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Cinnamon Benefits For Diabetics

Can Cinnamon Have Benefits For Diabetics And Dieters?

Can Cinnamon Have Benefits For Diabetics And Dieters?

Can eating cinnamon help the diabetic control their blood sugar levels or the obese lose weight? The straight answer: one study suggests eating cinnamon can reduce blood sugar levels but there is no evidence it can help with weight loss. The facts: advocates make some powerful claims for the healing powers of the spice cinnamon. It is said to increase sensitivity to insulin and decrease blood sugar levels. Cinnamon is supposed to take more energy to process than other foods, thus boosting the metabolism, and is full of fibre, which helps give a feeling of satiety, signalling to the body that one has eaten enough. The claims seem counter-intuitive – the spice is a component of five-spice powder, which is a common ingredient in Chinese cooking. The International Diabetes Federation says 10 per cent of Hong Kong adults have the condition. According to government statistics, 20.8 per cent of the population are obese. Cinnamon is grown in large quantities across south India and used liberally by chefs in that region, earning it the label of “diabetes capital of the world”. One survey suggests that more than 40 per cent of urban south Indians are obese. Cinnamon is no magic bullet then against diabetes and obesity. Accredited dietitian Samson Lee Kit-yue says a recent systematic review collected from clinical trials has found that eating one to six grams of cinnamon a day can have a beneficial effect in controlling blood sugar for type 2 diabetics. “Research suggests cinnamon increases the uptake of glucose from adipose tissues and skeletal muscles,” she says. Though the clinical trials suggest that cinnamon can decrease mean average blood sugar levels (HbA1c), they do not suggest that eating the spice can help prevent spikes or dips in blood sugar levels over the c Continue reading >>

Does Cinnamon Help Diabetes?

Does Cinnamon Help Diabetes?

It’s fine to sprinkle cinnamon on your oatmeal or use it in baking. Go ahead and enjoy it if you like its taste. But if you hope that it will help you manage your diabetes, you might want to pause before you head to your spice rack. It's not yet clear if cinnamon is good for diabetes. Research findings have been mixed, and the American Diabetes Association dismisses cinnamon’s use in diabetes treatment. Several small studies have linked cinnamon to better blood sugar levels. Some of this work shows it may curb blood sugar by lowering insulin resistance. In one study, volunteers ate from 1 to 6 grams of cinnamon for 40 days. (One gram of ground cinnamon is about half a teaspoon.) The researchers found that cinnamon cut cholesterol by about 18% and blood sugar levels by 24%. But in other studies, the spice did not lower blood sugar or cholesterol levels. Unless you have liver damage, it should be OK for you to enjoy it in food. If you do have liver problems, be careful, because large amounts of cinnamon may make them worse. you might like If you are considering cinnamon supplements, talk with your doctor first, especially if you take any medication. Also, look for brands labeled with a quality seal. These include the NSF International, US Pharmacopeia, or Consumerlab seal. This helps assure that the supplement actually has the ingredients stated on the label and doesn't have any contaminants or potentially harmful ingredients. Unlike medications, supplement makers don't have to prove their products are safe or effective. But the FDA can order a supplement off the market if it proves it's unsafe. Use caution if you also take other supplements that lower blood sugar levels, including: Bitter melon Devil's claw Fenugreek Garlic Horse chestnut Panax Siberian ginseng The s Continue reading >>

Cinnamon Can Help Lower Blood Sugar, But One Variety May Be Best

Cinnamon Can Help Lower Blood Sugar, But One Variety May Be Best

If I say cinnamon, you say ... sugar? It's a popular combination, of course. But if you're interested in the health-promoting effects of cinnamon, you may want to think anew about the spice. For instance, says John Critchley, executive chef at Bourbon Steak Restaurant in Washington, D.C., why not add it to savory dishes? He uses cinnamon to create a spice and herb rub for lamb loin. He also whips up a great spinach salad with raisins, pine nuts and cinnamon. Critchley is a fan of the intense aromatics in cinnamon, especially in Saigon — a cousin of the cassia varieties of cinnamon most commonly used in the U.S. and Europe. And he says adding cinnamon to spice blends is a great way to layer flavors when you're cooking. And when you start to look at the potential health-promoting effects of the spice, there's even more incentive to experiment with it in the kitchen. Cinnamon comes from the bark of trees. It has long been considered a medicinal plant. There are several varieties, harvested from southern China to Southeast Asia. For years, there have been hints that adding cinnamon to your diet can help control blood sugar. And a recent spate of studies adds to the evidence that the effect is real. "Yes, it does work," says Paul Davis, a research nutritionist with the University of California, Davis. He authored a recent meta-analysis published in the Journal of Medicinal Food that concluded that cinnamon lowers fasting blood glucose. "According to our results, it's a modest effect of about 3 to 5 percent," Davis says. This is about the level of reduction found in the older generation of diabetes drugs, he says. That makes the findings of interest not just to the 25 million Americans who already have diabetes, but also to the 80 million other people — nearly 1 in 4 of u Continue reading >>

How To Use Cinnamon To Help With Diabetes

How To Use Cinnamon To Help With Diabetes

Reader Approved Three Methods:Incorporating Cinnamon Into Your DietAdding a Cinnamon Supplement to Your Treatment RegimenUnderstanding Why Cinnamon Helps with DiabetesCommunity Q&A Cinnamon is not only a spice packed with healthful antioxidants. It can also be used to help diabetics control their blood glucose levels. While it should not completely replace other treatments, consult your physician about adding to your treatment regimen. 1 Use cinnamon to replace sugar. Because cinnamon is so flavorful, it can often replace small amounts of sugar in stove-top recipes, sauces, meat, and vegetable dishes. Replacing a sweetener with this spice can help reduce the amount of sugar you consume and improve your blood glucose levels. Cinnamon is considered safe when used in the amounts normally found as foods-- this works out to roughly ½ to 1 teaspoon or about 1000 mg per day. 2 Add cinnamon to your breakfast. For instance, stir cinnamon and a small amount of agave nectar into oatmeal in the morning, adding berries and nuts to make it an even more nutritious breakfast. Or top off buttered whole grain toast with a dash of cinnamon and a sprinkle of a crystallized sweetener like Stevia or Splenda. Cinnamon also goes well with peanut butter or sugar-free jam on toast. 3 Use cinnamon in meat sauces. Cinnamon pairs well with poultry, pork, and beef spice rubs as well as Asian-themed dishes, marinades, and salad dressings. Mixing to taste, replace some of the sugar or brown sugar with cinnamon for homemade barbecue sauces, pulled pork marinade, berry compotes, and even marinara sauces. 4 Replace sugar in vegetable dishes. Use cinnamon in place of brown sugar or regular sugar in candied vegetable dishes, such as candied yams, baby carrots, or sweet stir fry. Cinnamon lends a complex, Continue reading >>

Is Cinnamon Good For Diabetes?

Is Cinnamon Good For Diabetes?

Chances are you have a bottle of cinnamon in your spice cupboard. And chances are you never thought of cinnamon as medicine. However, cinnamon has been used medicinally since ancient times. This popular spice was used in ancient Egypt, China, and India for culinary and medicinal purposes, and its use has also been documented in the Bible. There are two types of cinnamon: Ceylon and cassia, both derived from the bark of evergreen trees. Ceylon cinnamon is grown in South America, Southeast Asia, and the West Indies, while cassia cinnamon is grown in Central America, China, and Indonesia. Ceylon cinnamon bark looks like tightly rolled scrolls, while cassia cinnamon is more loosely rolled. Cassia is the variety most commonly sold in the United States. Most people think of cinnamon as a flavoring for desserts or as a warm, robust scent for candles and potpourri. But this spice may do more than make your house smell good. Cinnamon has been shown to help lower blood glucose levels in people with Type 2 diabetes. A study published in the journal Diabetes Care in 2003 looked at 60 men and women with Type 2 diabetes who were taking diabetes pills. The participants took either 1, 3, or 6 grams of cassia cinnamon or a placebo, in capsule form, for 40 days. After this time, blood glucose levels dropped between 18% and 29% in all three groups that received cinnamon. However, only the participants who had taken the smallest amount of cinnamon (1 gram) continued to have improved blood glucose levels 20 days after they stopped taking it, for reasons the researchers didn’t quite understand. In the study, cinnamon also helped lower triglycerides (a blood lipid) and LDL (or “bad”) cholesterol levels. The benefits continued after 60 days, 20 days after participants had stopped taking Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment: Can Cinnamon Lower Blood Sugar?

Diabetes Treatment: Can Cinnamon Lower Blood Sugar?

Is it true that cinnamon can lower blood sugar in people who have diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. Whether cinnamon can lower blood sugar is a topic of debate — but some research suggests that cinnamon may be helpful as a supplement to regular diabetes treatment in people with type 2 diabetes. A 2012 review of several recent studies concluded that the use of cinnamon had a potentially beneficial effect on glycemic control. One study published in 2009 found that a 500 mg capsule of cinnamon taken twice a day for 90 days improved hemoglobin A1C levels — a reflection of average blood sugar level for the past two to three months — in people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (hemoglobin A1C levels greater than 7 percent). More research is needed to confirm these findings and determine how cinnamon supplementation could lead to these benefits. One theory is that cinnamon increases insulin action. If you have diabetes, remember that treatment is a lifelong commitment of blood sugar monitoring, healthy eating, regular exercise and, sometimes, diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Consult your doctor if you have questions or concerns about your diabetes treatment plan. Continue reading >>

Fact From Fiction: Is Cinnamon Good For Diabetes?

Fact From Fiction: Is Cinnamon Good For Diabetes?

Cinnamon bark is usually derived from the bark of the cinnamon tree, Cinnamomum zeylanicum. The most common species of cinnamon available is cassia or Chinese cinnamon, but other varieties include Indonesian cinnamon (Padang cassia or Korintje), Vietnamese cinnamon (Vietnamese cassia) or Sri Lanka (Ceylon) cinnamon. Cassia cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia) is often a combination of these forms of cinnamon, and is the most common type found, at least in North America. Cassia cinnamon has Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) status in the US and is considered safe in the amount commonly found in food and beverages.[1] The volatile oils (those that give cinnamon its distinctive odor) in cinnamon consist mainly of a substance known as cinnamaldehyde. Other substances found in cinnamon include coumarin and polyphenols such as hydroxychalcone. Cinnamaldehyde has antibacterial properties, antitumor properties and some immune system effects. The polyphenol hydroxychalcone appears to be responsible for the reported antidiabetic effects of cassia cinnamon and to a lesser degree, other forms of cinnamon. The Anti-Diabetes Actions of Cinnamon Research in a number of animal models of diabetes indicate that cassia cinnamon can increase insulin secretion, though its effects on blood sugar levels does not seem to be very significant. In clinical trials, the evidence that cassia cinnamon can effectively lower blood sugar levels and lower A1c percentage has been inconsistent. Some clinical studies have indicated that cassia cinnamon can lower the fasting blood sugar, HbA1C percentages, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure when compared to placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes while others have not demonstrated any effect. The doses Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Diabetes: Effect On Blood Sugar And Overall Health

Cinnamon And Diabetes: Effect On Blood Sugar And Overall Health

People with diabetes often face dietary restrictions to control their blood sugar and prevent complications. Although research is in a preliminary stage, cinnamon may help fight some symptoms of diabetes. It is also unlikely to cause blood pressure spikes, or disrupt blood sugar. So, people with diabetes who miss a sweet pop of flavor may find that cinnamon is a good replacement for sugar. Can cinnamon affect blood sugar? Cinnamon has shown promise in the treatment of blood sugar, as well as some other diabetes symptoms. Research on the effects of cinnamon on blood sugar in diabetes is mixed and in the early stages. Most studies have been very small, so more research is necessary. People with diabetes who are interested in herbal remedies, however, may be surprised to learn that doctors are serious about the potential for cinnamon to address some diabetes symptoms. A 2003 study published in Diabetes Care, compared the effects of a daily intake of 1, 3, and 6 grams (g) of cinnamon with a group that received a placebo for 40 days. All three levels of cinnamon intake reduced blood sugar levels and cholesterol. The effects were seen even 20 days after participants were no longer taking cinnamon. A small 2016 study of 25 people, published in the Journal of Intercultural Ethnopharmacology, found that cinnamon may be beneficial for people with poorly controlled diabetes. Participants consumed 1 g of cinnamon for 12 weeks. The result was a reduction in fasting blood sugar levels. However, a 2013 study published in the Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine had a different result. The study, which used a more reliable method, had slightly more participants, at 70. The researchers found that 1 g of cinnamon per day for 30 days and 60 days offered no improvements in blo Continue reading >>

Does Cinnamon Conflict With Metformin?

Does Cinnamon Conflict With Metformin?

I've heard that cinnamon helps control blood sugar. How much truth is there to this, and would it in any way conflict with me taking metformin? Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Diabetes: An Update

Cinnamon And Diabetes: An Update

About nine years ago (way back in 2006), I wrote about cinnamon and diabetes. To this date, people still ask questions and post comments about this topic. Since then, more research is available that (hopefully) sheds more light on whether cinnamon lowers blood sugars and HbA1c (a measure of blood sugar control over the previous 2–3 months) — or not. Let’s take a look at where things stand in 2015. Back then A study that I cited in 2006 was one published in the journal Diabetes Care back in 2003 by Khan et al. The researchers gave different doses (1, 3, or 6 grams) of cassia cinnamon to subjects with Type 2 diabetes for 40 days. All three groups of subjects had an improvement in their fasting blood sugar levels, as well as their lipid (blood fat) levels. As a result of this study, many people have jumped on the cinnamon bandwagon, so to speak, taking cinnamon supplements, adding cinnamon sticks to tea, and sprinkling cinnamon on their foods. In addition, much debate has occurred regarding the type of cinnamon that’s best to use for diabetes: cassia or ceylon. Where we are now Khan’s study certainly created a firestorm and has led to more research on the use of cinnamon for diabetes management. The tricky issues around studying cinnamon are that: • There are different types of cinnamon, primarily cassia and ceylon. • It’s difficult to assess the potency of any particular “batch” of cinnamon, no matter the type. • The active ingredient or ingredients in cinnamon that might have a glucose-lowering effect have yet to be identified. Without definitive answers to these issues, it’s hard to be certain of the role of cinnamon on glucose control. Much of the “evidence” is anecdotal: Someone reports that taking cinnamon helped to lower his blood sugar, Continue reading >>

Cinnamon Improves Glucose And Lipids Of People With Type 2 Diabetes

Cinnamon Improves Glucose And Lipids Of People With Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract OBJECTIVE—The objective of this study was to determine whether cinnamon improves blood glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A total of 60 people with type 2 diabetes, 30 men and 30 women aged 52.2 ± 6.32 years, were divided randomly into six groups. Groups 1, 2, and 3 consumed 1, 3, or 6 g of cinnamon daily, respectively, and groups 4, 5, and 6 were given placebo capsules corresponding to the number of capsules consumed for the three levels of cinnamon. The cinnamon was consumed for 40 days followed by a 20-day washout period. RESULTS—After 40 days, all three levels of cinnamon reduced the mean fasting serum glucose (18–29%), triglyceride (23–30%), LDL cholesterol (7–27%), and total cholesterol (12–26%) levels; no significant changes were noted in the placebo groups. Changes in HDL cholesterol were not significant. CONCLUSIONS—The results of this study demonstrate that intake of 1, 3, or 6 g of cinnamon per day reduces serum glucose, triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol in people with type 2 diabetes and suggest that the inclusion of cinnamon in the diet of people with type 2 diabetes will reduce risk factors associated with diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The incidence of cardiovascular diseases is increased two- to fourfold in people with type 2 diabetes (1). Although the causes of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases are multifactorial, diet definitely plays a role in the incidence and severity of these diseases. The dietary components beneficial in the prevention and treatment of these diseases have not been clearly defined, but it is postulated that spices may play a role. Spices such as cinnamon, cloves Continue reading >>

Can Taking Cinnamon Supplements Lower Your Blood Sugar?

Can Taking Cinnamon Supplements Lower Your Blood Sugar?

A slew of supplements on the market claim to help reduce blood sugar levels and cut the risk of heart attack for people with diabetes . Garlic, magnesium and coenzyme Q10 are among the most common that people try. But it may surprise you to know that an old favorite — cinnamon — is getting more attention. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy While results are still unclear, there have been some small studies about cinnamon and blood sugar that show promising results. However, to date, there isn’t strong enough evidence to recommend cinnamon to people with diabetes for medicinal purposes. Cinnamon, a spice made from tree bark, is often touted for its potential medicinal properties. People have tried cinnamon to reduce inflammation, lower cholesterol and fight bacteria. For more than a decade, researchers have been working to understand if it can help people with diabetes. Numerous studies have looked at this issue, and some have found no benefit at all from cinnamon. Other small studies have found that cinnamon can lower  levels of glucose , cholesterol and triglycerides (fat in the blood). Here’s a sampling of small studies that show a potential benefit for taking cinnamon: In a small study in Diabetes Care, 30 people with type 2 diabetes were split into three groups taking 1 gram, 3 grams or 6 grams of cinnamon supplements daily. Thirty other people took a placebo. After 40 days, everyone taking cinnamon had lower glucose, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL or “bad”) cholesterol and total cholesterol levels. The placebo group saw no change. A more recent study in Nutrition Research analyzed 69 patients Continue reading >>

The Cinnamon And Diabetes Connection

The Cinnamon And Diabetes Connection

Cinnamon is a spice that comes from the inner bark of trees belonging to the genus Cinnamomum. Reports suggest that this spice has been in use since the time of the Egyptians, as early as 2000 years ago. Cinnamon has been used for medicinal purposes since ancient times, apart from its use as a spice and as an embalming and anointing oil. There has been research that indicates that there is a cinnamon and diabetes connection and that type 2 diabetics certainly benefit from consuming cinnamon. It has been shown to lower blood sugar levels in diabetics. Cinnamon has been found effective in medical conditions such as: Muscle spasms Vomiting Diarrhea Infections Common cold Loss of appetite Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease Erectile dysfunction (ED) HIV Multiple sclerosis and Chronic wounds Research into Cinnamon and Diabetes A paper published in Diabetes Care concluded that low levels of cinnamon (1 to 6 grams per day) reduced glucose, triglycerides, LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and total cholesterol levels in type 2 diabetic subjects. This study also stated that cinnamon could be used by the healthy population to protect themselves from, and prevent, elevated glucose levels and blood lipid levels. Another study that underlined the connection between cinnamon and diabetes was published in Nutrition Research. It found that cinnamon extract improved fasting blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in 66 Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. There have been lab-level studies which show that cinnamon extracts may have potent anti-cancer properties. How Does Cinnamon Act? Phytochemical analysis of cinnamon reveals that it has many chemicals which have potent bioactivity. The chemicals contain antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anti-cancer and an Continue reading >>

Ways To Use Dalchini To Reduce Blood Sugar Levels

Ways To Use Dalchini To Reduce Blood Sugar Levels

Home Magazine Ways To Use Dalchini To Reduce Blood Sugar Levels Ways To Use Dalchini To Reduce Blood Sugar Levels Expert-reviewed byAshwini S.Kanade, Registered Dietician and Certified Diabetes Educator with 17 years of experience Fact-checked byAditya Nar, B.Pharm, MSc. Public Health and Health Economics Dalchini or cinnamon is a spice thats commonly found in most Indian kitchens. Traditionally, it has been used as a flavouring agent and a digestive. It was only in 1990 that a study, for the first time, indicated that this spice may have benefits in diabetes because of an insulin potentiating activity which is the ability to increase insulins efficiency in moving glucose from the blood into the cells. (1) Cassia or Ceylon which is the better cinnamon for controlling diabetes? If you decide to try dalchinior cinnamonfor your diabetes, do make sure you get the more expensive Ceylon cinnamon rather than the low-priced Cassia cinnamon. Cassia cinnamon, which is more easily and commonly found in Indian spice stores, has much higher coumarin content when compared to Ceylon or true cinnamon.This is significant because studies have shown coumarin to cause liver damage in some sensitive individuals. (2), (3) Considering that its impossible to make out which variety youre being sold when it is a powder, it would be best to purchase the sticks and then powder them at home. Ceylon cinnamon is made up of thin bark layers rolled into a stick; Cassia cinnamon is an entire layer of rolled thick bark. (2) Cassia cinnamon (left) and Ceylon or true cinnamon (right) How to use dalchinior cinnamonfor diabetes A dose of between half a teaspoon to 3 teaspoons of the ground dalchini powder can be used. (3) Depending on how you like your cinnamon, you could add the powder to your tea or coffe Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Diabetes

Cinnamon And Diabetes

Tweet Cinnamon is a sweet but pungent spice that is derived from the inner bark of the branches of wild cinnamon trees, which grow in tropical areas across Southeast Asia, South America and the Caribbean. The use of cinnamon dates back thousands of years and was highly prized among many ancient civilisations. Cinnamon, often used in cooking and baking, is increasingly being linked to improvements in the treatment of conditions such as diabetes mellitus. Research has suggested that cinnamon can help to improve blood glucose levels and increase insulin sensitivity. How does cinnamon affect diabetes? Results from a clinical study published in the Diabetes Care journal in 2003 suggest that cassia cinnamon (cinnamon bark) improves blood glucose and cholesterol levels in people with type 2 diabetes, and may reduce risk factors associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. [71] A daily intake of just 1, 3, or 6 grams was shown to reduce serum glucose, triglyceride, LDL or bad cholesterol and total cholesterol after 40 days among 60 middle-aged diabetics. Another study reported in the July 2000 edition of Agricultural Research Magazine found that consuming just 1g of cinnamon per day can increase insulin sensitivity and help manage or reverse type 2 diabetes. [72] In addition, more recent analysis published in 2007 in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that 6g of cinnamon slows stomach emptying and significantly reduces hyperglycemia after meals (postprandial blood glucose) without affecting satiety. As a result of the scientific evidence available, many health experts claim that cinnamon contains properties that are beneficial for blood sugar regulation and treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, bear in mind that like many natural compounds cinnamon is ye Continue reading >>

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