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Chronic Sinusitis And Diabetes

Miserable Symptoms Mark Chronic Sinusitis

Miserable Symptoms Mark Chronic Sinusitis

Miserable symptoms mark chronic sinusitis Chronic sinusitis, an illness that can feel as symptomatically miserable as congestive heart failure or rheumatoid arthritis, is often misdiagnosed or underdiagnosed. But distinctive clues can lead internists to deliver the right treatment. Chronic sinusitis, an illness that can feel as symptomatically miserable as congestive heart failure or rheumatoid arthritis, is often misdiagnosed or underdiagnosed. I recently saw a patient who had been diagnosed with allergic rhinitis for the past 14 months. You just had to look at her to know that she was miserable. She had bags under her eyes, she hadn't been sleeping well, and she had been waking up three and four times a night because her nose was so blocked up. She had seen an allergist and two internists in that time who never considered that it could be chronic sinusitis, said Neil Bhattacharyya, MD, associate professor of otology and laryngology at Harvard Medical School. Alexander C. Chester, FACP, simulates examining a patient for nasal/sinus disease using a rhinoscope. Photo courtesy of Dr. Chester Not picking up on the distinctive clues that point to chronic sinusitis can lead to misdiagnosis. An internist may label a condition allergic rhinitis because allergies are more common, but the treatment and the outcomes are completely different. The problem that confronts internists is understanding how to determine which subset of patients with sinonasal symptoms truly have chronic sinusitis or have that in conjunction with other conditions, Dr. Bhattacharyya said. There is no one objective measure of chronic sinusitis, or chronic rhinosinusitis, the term many now prefer. Even though it is one of the most common illnesses in the United States, afflicting approximately one in seven Continue reading >>

Sinusitis Understood

Sinusitis Understood

Link to Journal of Sinus Diseases and International Journal of Otorhinolaryngology. Sinusitis in the Immunocompromised, Diabetic, Cystic fibrosis, and HIV Infected Patients Bacterial and fungal sinusitis occurs in a wide range of immunocompromised hosts, including those with neutropenia,diabetesmellitus, patients in critical care units (intubation, nasogastric tubes), cystic fibrosis, and patients infected with HIV , and may be acute or chronic. Although each group possesses a different risk attributed to their acquired immunodeficiency, early recognition, diagnosis, and treatment are paramount. Sinusitis continues to be a potentially lethal and dreaded infectious complication of chemotherapy or bone marrow transplant-induced neutropenia. Recovery of the immune system is still the major prognostic factor in patients with this infection. Absolute neutrophil counts (ANC) below 500 cells/mm3strongly correlate with the development of invasive fungal disease in neutropenic patients.In bone marrow transplant patients, the critical time period for the development of fungal rhinosinusitis is approximately 3 weeks after transplantation.Secondary risk factors include 2 weeks or more of any of the following: systemic steroid use, ANC < 500 cells/ml,and exposure to multiple broad-spectrum antibiotics. A number of factors may predispose the HIV-infected patient to sinonasal disease. Qualitative and quantitative humoral immunity defects likely predispose HIV-infected patients to sinusitis. As in bone marrow transplant patients, mucociliary clearance abnormalities have been demonstrated in patients infected with HIV, particularly with CD4 counts < 300 cells/mm3. Ig-E mediated allergic disease is more prevalent in HIV-infected patients than in non-infected individuals and can cause mu Continue reading >>

Do You Have Chronic Sinusitis? Here Are 8 Natural Remedies

Do You Have Chronic Sinusitis? Here Are 8 Natural Remedies

Do you have chronic sinusitis? Here are 8 natural remedies Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS This is the first part of a two-part series on chronic conditions that Christine has and what shes learning and implementing. In Episode 91 of the Real World Wellness Podcast, Christine talks about chronic sinusitis, what causes it and and the important fact that less than 2 percent of sinus infections are bacterial. Christine explains eight natural remedies from nasal flushes to allergy-proofing your home and when you should see a doctor. Next Episode: Christine will talk about her journey with osteopenia/osteoporosis including her recent bone density tests and results, supplements shes taking, and the best types of movement/exercise. I'm Christine Lehmann, the Reverse Diabetes Coach and certified nutritional therapist. I'm dedicated to helping women prevent or reverse diabetes naturally. While doctors usually prescribe medications to control your blood sugar, I use a holistic, natural approach that is highly effective for lowering blood sugar, losing weight and regaining energy. When I see clients commit to my program, lose up to 100 pounds, and their lab tests come back normal, I know my approach works. My programs offer customized solutions to fit your lifestyle. I've helped numerous clients transform their health through a healthy diet, supplements, exercise, and stress management. Continue reading >>

Sinusitis And Diabetes: Sinusitis And Sinus Ear Problems

Sinusitis And Diabetes: Sinusitis And Sinus Ear Problems

Sinusitis And Diabetes: Sinusitis and Sinus Ear Problems Cold, breathing problems, sneezing and allergic reactions can just about all end up being causes of sinusitis. Nonetheless, the fact that these kinds of can be the cause of a sinus ear problem is often unknown. The reason between the relationship of sinusitis and nose ear problems is that the sinuses are connected to the ear through a tube which is known as the Eustachian pipe. We have a very simple business model that keeps you as the center." Having the industry's the majority of elaborate and exclusive Patient Care and also Scientific Coordination squads stationed at each and every companion clinic, we supply you the smoothest and smooth treatment actually imagined. With a ratio of one Affected person Care Manager to 5 patients our patient care specifications are unmatched throughout the sub continent. Endoscopic sinus surgery is a relatively new method designed to increase the amount of air flowing through the sinuses and allow mucous to drain correctly out of the nose. Are you one of the millions of people trying to find solutions for sinus infection? Do you know how to deal with a sinus infection, although not know how to truly get rid of it? If you are ready to handle the nose problems head on, it is time to stop by sinusinfectionproblems.com and find out what you can do to help yourself. Today is a great day to start breathing openly. Endoscopic sinus surgical treatment - also called endoscopy or sinoscopy - is actually a procedure used to take out blockades in the sinuses (the spaces full of air in a number of the bones of the skull). These obstruction cause sinusitis, a condition in which the sinuses get bigger and become clogged, causing pain and impaired breathing. The Most Common Cause of Sinus Infec Continue reading >>

Diabetics And Sinus Infections. Are They Synonymous?

Diabetics And Sinus Infections. Are They Synonymous?

Diabetics and sinus Infections. Are They Synonymous? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Diabetics and sinus Infections. Are They Synonymous? Since I've been talking (on line) with other diabetics, I've noticed that many of us seem to have problems with our sinuses. This leads me to ask if any of you have noticed a similar trend? I have chronic sinusitis, and have had sinus surgery...but it is a direct relation to my cystic fibrosis (just like my diabetes is, so take my response with a grain of salt I tend to get a lot of sinus infections, but I did so before diabetes, too. I was using that Neti Pot for awhile until all the bad PR came out last year about it. Definitely not synonymous, that means interchangeable or the exact same thing. But do you mean, do sinus problems always come along with diabetes? I don't think so, but errant blood sugars can definitely lead to a susceptibility of any infection, so if you are prone to sinusitus, you may get it worse or more often. I still use a neti pot. That's the only thing keeping me from going back to several sinus infections a year. However, I don't think my sinus issues are related to diabetes. I had the issues for 20 years before being diagnosed with diabetes and, thanks to the neti pot, had the sinus mostly under control by the time I was diagnosed. When my sugars run high, my nose gets stuffy and or runny. My eyes get watery too. Until about 5 years ago I'd get about 4 sinus infections per year. This was before diagnosis. Anytime I'd get a runny nose whether from a cold or allergies, I'd get an infection. Just diagnosed with diabetes (but probably T2 for years before) a year and Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Diabetes Mellitus On Chronic Rhinosinusitis And Sinus Surgeryoutcome.

The Effect Of Diabetes Mellitus On Chronic Rhinosinusitis And Sinus Surgeryoutcome.

1. Int Forum Allergy Rhinol. 2014 Apr;4(4):315-20. doi: 10.1002/alr.21269. Epub 2014Jan 10. The effect of diabetes mellitus on chronic rhinosinusitis and sinus surgeryoutcome. Zhang Z(1), Adappa ND, Lautenbach E, Chiu AG, Doghramji L, Howland TJ, Cohen NA, Palmer JN. (1)Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. BACKGROUND: Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are known to be prone toinfection. However, the association between diabetes and chronic rhinosinusitis(CRS) has not been well studied. We sought to determine the effects of DM on CRS culture results and quality of life (QOL) after functional endoscopic sinussurgery (FESS).METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study. Adult CRS patients undergoingFESS were recruited from October 1, 2007 to December 31, 2011. Patientdemographics, comorbidities, medication use, and Lund-Mackay CT scores werecollected prior to FESS. Intraoperative culture was obtained. Preoperative and1-month, 3-month, and 6-month postoperative QOL was measured by scores on the22-item Sinonasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22). A mixed effects model was performed foranalysis.RESULTS: Among the 376 CRS patients included, 19 patients (5.05%) had DM.Compared to non-DM patients, DM patients were significantly more likely to havePseudomonas aeruginosa (26.32% vs 7.56%; p = 0.004) and Gram-negative rods(26.32% vs 8.96%; p = 0.013), but there was no significant difference in theprevalence of Staphylococcus aureus; DM patients were also significantly morelikely to have nasal polyps and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Additionally, DMpatients had significantly less improvement of postoperative SNOT-22 scores from baseline to 6-month Continue reading >>

Uncommon Sinus Infection Causes: Diabetes, Dry Eyes | Kaplan Sinus Relief

Uncommon Sinus Infection Causes: Diabetes, Dry Eyes | Kaplan Sinus Relief

Sinus infections are typically caused by bacterial or viral infections. There are other, less common causes of sinus infections, such as dry eyes, that develop in conjunction with other medical conditions.This often leads to further questions, such as, Can a sinus infection cause dry mouth? With certain preexisting health conditions, sinus infection causes can become complicated. For example, diabetes and sinus infections can be linked if conditions are not well managed. Did you know that diabetes and sinus infections can be related? High blood glucose levels from diabetes can also make you more susceptible to developing sinus infections. Some people, especially those who poorly manage their disease, can have higher risks of developing infections, including those of the skin, oral cavity, and sinuses. However, the right mixture of treatment and control can lower the potential for diabetes and sinus infections occurring together. Maintaining tight control over your blood sugar levels will help mitigate this risk, while helping to reduce the risk for diabetes-related complications, such as renal failure, heart attack, and stroke. Diabetics may be at a higher risk for developing yeast infections, such as oral candida, which can also spread to your nasal cavity, leading to a fungal sinus infection. Candidiasis favorswarm, moist environments such as the mouth and throat.Because diabetes can causehigh concentrations of glucose to accumulate in your mouth,fungi and yeast microorganisms flourish because they thrive on sugar. Once you have good control over your diabetes, your risk for oral yeast infections will decrease, as will your risk for sinus infections. Another way diabetics are more susceptible to sinus infections is that diabetes can suppress the immune system, raisin Continue reading >>

Sugar's Effects On The Sinuses

Sugar's Effects On The Sinuses

Christine Garvin is a certified nutrition educator and holds a Master of Arts in holistic health education. She is co-editor of Brave New Traveler and founder/editor of Living Holistically... with a sense of humor. When she is not out traveling the world, she is busy writing, doing yoga and performing hip-hop and bhangra. MRI Xray of human sinuses. Sinus issues may be stemming from excessive sugar intake.Photo Credit: Photoprofi30/iStock/Getty Images Sugar is found in a wide variety of foods ranging from breakfast cereals to salad dressings. In fact, the average American consumes over 30 tsps. of refined sugar daily, according to registered dietitian Sandra Woodruff in her book, "The Complete Diabetes Prevention Plan." This is on top of the large consumption of high carbohydrate foods such as white bread, rice and baked goods. The impact of sugar on the human body is still up for debate, but more and more health professionals believe it has a detrimental effect on the immune system, causing issues ranging from fatigue to long-term sinus issues. Sinusitis is one possible effect of sugar on the sinuses, according to Jacob Teitelbaum, M.D., in his book, "Beat Sugar Addiction Now!" Usually this has to do with the growth of fungal yeast that is fed by sugar, which in turn causes an inflammatory reaction in the sinuses. The inflammation then creates swelling, which blocks the drainage from the nose and sinuses. Sinusitis is often treated with antibiotics, but this makes the yeast overgrowth worse, which can lead to chronic sinusitis, maintains Teitelbaum. One way to fight against sinusitis is to cut down sugar intake tremendously or remove it altogether. Dr. Robert S. Ivker states in his book, "Sinus Survival," that sugar weakens the immune system, which leads to higher poss Continue reading >>

Chronic Sinusitis | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Chronic Sinusitis | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Have just spent the last 2 weeks battling ' off ' my 5th dose of sinussitus, am on my 2nd lot of antibiotics now for it.... My GP has sent me for both chest and facial xrays , plus given me 2 scripts of antibiotics. He is being helpful and supportive. Am back to see him this week for check up and feedback on how I am progressing. This last lot of it has wiped me out! Slept the hours of the days away. Off my food with the facial jaw pain.Plus out of it with the strong painrelief [which just knocked me out, and never really killed the pain ] Given up on the monititoring of my BG levels, as they shot up with both the virus,bacterial infection, and the strong antibiotics my GP gave me. Theyre going to shoot upwards anyway, so whats the point! [no point in stressing over them - when have to battle with the agony in my face and jaw and head!] Also for the last 5 days havent been able to cope with even doing my levemir/victoza my diabetes has had to really take a back seat whilst I fought the sinussitus off. Today is the first day where the pain is still there but at a much more copeable level. When I return to my GP am going to stress and push the importance of addressing my low immune system and reoccurring sinus infections. Have felt so frustrated with it all, cant even cope with my diabetes meds/therapy plus fighting away the sinussitus on top of that!!! Any others have had similar experiences like this?? I kept my head and face wrapped up in a warm fluffy towel it didnt take the pain away but it did soothe me! My hubby was wondering what an earth I was doing tho... :shock: Have to say I cant possibly endure this ever again , had BG levels of 27 whilst b Continue reading >>

Fungal Sinusitis: Current Trends In Diagnosis And Treatment

Fungal Sinusitis: Current Trends In Diagnosis And Treatment

Fungal Sinusitis: Current Trends in Diagnosis and Treatment Acute or fulminant fungal sinusitis usually affects diabetics and immunocompromised hosts. Patients at highest risk for acute invasive fungal sinusitis are poorly controlled diabetics and those with conditions that predispose to metabolic acidosis such as chronic renal failure or diarrhea. Immunosuppressive states secondary to chemotherapy, hematologic disorders, transplantation, and AIDS also place their hosts at risk for opportunistic infection. Blitzer and colleagues.[ 1 ] studied 179 patients with acute invasive fungal sinusitis and found the prevalence of diabetes to be 70% (n=126); only 4% (n=8) had no identifiable risk factors. The other patients (26%) had underlying diseases such as leukemia, renal disease, infant diarrhea, immunosuppresion after transplant, and pancreatitis. The offending fungi originate from the classes zygomycetes (Mucor spp) and Ascomycetes (Aspergillus spp). The species of Aspergillus, such as fumigatus, causes aspergillosis, and species of the various genera (such as Mucor and Absidia and Rhizopus) of the order Mucorales cause mucormycosis. Within the Mucoraceae family are the genera Rhizopus, Mucor, and Absidia with species of Rhizopus responsible for the more serious infections.[ 2 ]Aspergillus species include A fumigatus, A flavus, A niger, and A oryzae.[ 3 ] These saprophytic fungi reproduce and grow in soil, decaying food, grain, and plants. They thrive in any environment with an acidic pH and an abundance of glucose.[ 1 ] The disease process is usually aggressive and necessitates prompt diagnosis and treatment. After becoming airborne, Mucor spores settle onto the mucosa of a susceptible host. They penetrate into the tissue, allowing angioinvasion to occur. Mucor has a pred Continue reading >>

Sinus Infections With Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

Sinus Infections With Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

I have had a sinus infection on the right side of my head for two months. I am currently on my third antibiotic and in the care of an ENT. I am concerned that the doctors are not taking my T2 diabetes into account during my treatment. I was on Ceftin for 10 days which almost cleared the problem up, but a few days after the antibiotics ran out the headaches and pain/stuffiness came back. Then I was put on Avelox for 14 days and it did little or nothing to my symptoms. Now two weeks later I am on Omnicef for 10 days. It seems to be knocking out the symptoms, but I am afraid that in a couple weeks after the drugs run out I will be in the same situation with pain and terrible headaches. Anyone out there with similar experience or advice? glad your symptoms have improved. I hope something will knock it out soon. I know how you feel. I have chronic sinusitus my allergy doc said years ago. I suffered for many years with several sinus infections per year, started with one, then two then three each year, until I finally went to the ENT. I hope you don't go down that road. He put me on a regimen on a prescription nasal spray and Claritin, worked well for a few years, now he has me on Zyrtec in the morning, Singulair at night, works great for me, have not had an infection in about two years. Sorry about those headaches, I never had them too bad, sometimes I had them sometimes not, sometimes fever but usually no fever. My main thing was all the congestion, just a yucky sick feeling, did not want to do anything, and awful sore throat, sometimes coughing a lot. I hope they are taking your diabetes seriously. He asked me if I wanted a shot once, after I was diagnosed, told me it would raise my BS, I said no thanks. I had a sinus infection and bronhitis for almost 4 months. Antibiotic Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Diabetes Mellitus On Chronic Rhinosinusitis And Sinus Surgery Outcome

The Effect Of Diabetes Mellitus On Chronic Rhinosinusitis And Sinus Surgery Outcome

The effect of diabetes mellitus on chronic rhinosinusitis and sinus surgery outcome Zi Zhang , MD, MSCE,1 Nithin D. Adappa , MD,3 Ebbing Lautenbach , MD, MPH, MSCE,1,5 Alexander G. Chiu , MD,2 Laurel Doghramji , RN, BSN,3 Timothy J. Howland , BS,3 Noam A. Cohen , MD, PhD,3,4 and James N. Palmer , MD3 1Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 5Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 3Department of OtorhinolaryngologyHead and Neck Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 4Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2Department of Surgery, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 3Department of OtorhinolaryngologyHead and Neck Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 4Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 5Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Correspondence: Zi Zhang, MD, MSCE, Address: 8th Floor, Blockley Hall, 423 Guardian Drive, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6021, Telephone number: 215-573-6625; Fax number: 215-573 Continue reading >>

Chronic Sinus Infections

Chronic Sinus Infections

What causes chronic sinusitis, and how can it be treated? If chronic sinus problems are making you miserable, you're not alone. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over 29 million American adults have been diagnosed with sinusitis . Sinus problems usually start with a viral head cold . Congestion in your nose blocks the drainage of your sinuses, and that can lead to acute sinusitis. "Both your nose and your sinuses are lined by moisturizing mucous membranes," explains Toribio Flores, MD, an ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialist at the Cleveland Clinic. "When mucus can't get out of the sinuses, bacteria start to grow, and that causes a sinus infection." Sinusitis symptoms that last for more than 12 weeks could be chronic sinusitis. In addition to frequent head colds, your risk for chronic sinusitis also goes up if you have allergies. "Chronic sinusitis can be caused by an allergy , virus, fungus, or bacteria and can go on for months or even years," says Dr. Flores. Symptoms of chronic sinusitis are not very different from acute sinusitis symptoms they just last longer. Whether sinusitis symptoms are the result of infection or allergy, the actual cause of the symptoms is the blocked drainage of mucus from the sinuses into the nose. Sinusitis symptoms you might experience include: Nasal congestion with thick nasal discharge "Acute bacterial sinusitis that occurs after a head cold usually responds to antibiotics , but chronic sinusitis may require anti-inflammatory medications, irrigation, and sometimes surgery to 'open up traffic' between the sinuses and the nasal passages," Flores says. Options for treating chronic sinusitis include: Steroid nasal sprays to fight nasal and sinus inflammation Antihistamines or allergy shots for allergic sin Continue reading >>

Chronic Sinusitis. Symptoms And Causes Of Chronic Sinusitis | Patient

Chronic Sinusitis. Symptoms And Causes Of Chronic Sinusitis | Patient

The sinuses are small, air-filled spaces inside the cheekbones and forehead. They make some mucus which drains into the nose through small channels. Sinusitis means inflammation of a sinus. Most bouts of sinusitis are caused by an infection. The cheekbone (maxillary) sinuses are the most commonly affected. Acute sinusitis means that the infection develops quickly (over a few days) and lasts a short time. Many cases of acute sinusitis last a week or so but it is not unusual for it to last 2-3 weeks (that is, longer than most colds). Sometimes it lasts longer. Sinusitis is said to be acute if it lasts from 4-30 days and subacute if it lasts from 4-12 weeks. A mild bout of acute sinusitis is common and many people will have some degree of sinusitis with a cold. Severe acute sinusitis is uncommon. Most people only ever have one or two bouts of acute sinusitis in their life. However, some people have repeated (recurring) bouts of acute sinusitis. See separate leaflet called Acute Sinusitisfor more details . Chronic sinusitis means that a sinusitis becomes persistent and lasts for longer than 12 weeks. Chronic sinusitis is uncommon. The rest of this leaflet is just about chronic sinusitis. Most cases of chronic sinusitis develop following an acute sinusitis infection. Most cases of acute sinusitis go away within 2-3 weeks, often much sooner. In some cases the symptoms do not go and become persistent (chronic). The following are causes of acute sinusitis that may progress into a chronic sinusitis: Cold or flu-like illnesses - in most cases, acute sinusitis develops from a cold or flu-like illness . Colds and flu are caused by germs called viruses which may spread to the sinuses. The infection may remain viral before clearing, causing a viral sinus infection. In a small number Continue reading >>

13 Sneaky Causes Of Sinus Trouble

13 Sneaky Causes Of Sinus Trouble

Sinus infection relief Sinus infections, the cause of untold misery, strike about 37 million people in the U.S. each year. On the surface of things, the cause of sinus trouble is clear. Teeny holes that connect your nasal passages to your sinuses (basically a collection of hollow, moist cavities that lurk beneath your nose, eyes, and cheeks) get blocked. Then gunk builds up in your sinuses, germs may grow, and you feel, well, hideous. But the cause of the blockage is sometimes trickier to figure out. Here are 13 things that can cause an acute sinus infection (the most common type) and, in some cases, lead to a chronic sinus infection. Viruses Most sinus infections start with a cold. Colds are caused by a virus, which can make nasal tissue swell, blocking the holes that normally drain sinuses. If your sinus infection is caused by a virus, antibiotics won’t help since these drugs kill only bacteria. Your symptoms will probably get better after about a week or so. A decongestant can help, but don’t use it for more than four or five days to avoid becoming dependent. The best defenses against these sinus infections are the same things that protect against colds and the flu. In other words, get a flu shot, wash your hands, and don’t chill with the visibly ill. Allergies Because inflammation can block the nasal passages and prevent draining, allergies are often associated with sinus infections. In fact, studies have shown that people with sinus infections who have allergies tend to have more extensive sinusitis, says Sonia Bains, MD, assistant professor in the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy, and Sleep Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina. If you’re prone to allergies or hay fever, avoid things that trigger allergic reactions, such as dust Continue reading >>

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