diabetestalk.net

Chromium Tablets For Diabetes

Role Of Chromium In Human Health And In Diabetes

Role Of Chromium In Human Health And In Diabetes

Despite widespread use by patients with diabetes and anecdotal reports in the past regarding its efficacy, until recently, data in humans concerning chromium’s effects on insulin action in vivo or on cellular aspects of insulin action were scarce. Consequently, significant controversy still exists regarding the effect of chromium supplementation on parameters assessing human health. Furthermore, elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which chromium supplements affect carbohydrate metabolism in vivo is necessary before specific recommendations can be made regarding its routine use in the management of diabetes. This review focuses on providing current information about this trace mineral’s specific mechanisms of action and clinical trials in patients with diabetes. Chromium, one of the most common elements in the earth’s crust and seawater, exists in our environment in several oxidation states, principally as metallic (Cr0), trivalent (+3), and hexavalent (+6) chromium. The latter is largely synthesized by the oxidation of the more common and naturally occurring trivalent chromium and is highly toxic. Trivalent chromium, found in most foods and nutrient supplements, is an essential nutrient with very low toxicity. The interest in chromium as a nutritional enhancement to glucose metabolism can be traced back to the 1950s, when it was suggested that brewer’s yeast contained a glucose tolerance factor (GTF) that prevented diabetes in experimental animals (1). This factor was eventually suggested to be a biologically active form of trivalent chromium that could substantially lower plasma glucose levels in diabetic mice (2). Interest regarding chromium administration in patients with diabetes was kindled by the observation in the 1970s that it truly was Continue reading >>

Can Chromium Help With Diabetes?

Can Chromium Help With Diabetes?

Chromium is an essential mineral—just to clarify, chrome metal is made by electroplating a very thin layer of the mineral chromium onto metal or plastic—and while chrome may be useful for your car’s bumper, it is not useful for your overall health! Chromium appears to be necessary for the optimal function of insulin. There is a relationship between being low in chromium and an increased risk for diabetes and high blood sugar—and an increased risk for high triglyceride levels, heart disease, and high cholesterol levels.[1] Many people are low in this essential mineral—particularly the elderly, those who are physically very active, pregnant women AND those people who consume high levels of sugar and sugar-filled foods. Chromium: The Basics Chromium (Cr) in the body is generally in its trivalent form, or Cr3+. Cr3+ is thought to act as a cofactor for a protein known as chromodulin. Chromodulin is believed to enhance the signaling activity of insulin after insulin binds to the cells of the body. The enhanced signaling activity of insulin would result in increased uptake of blood sugar by cells, thus decreasing the level of sugar in the blood.[2] There are a lot of “unknowns” regarding chromium, but it is believed that men over the age of 14 are adequately supplied (Adequate Intake) with about 35 mcg/day while women over the age of 14 are adequately supplied with a bit less—about 24 mcg/day. Higher amounts of chromium are needed in pregnancy (29 mcg/day) and breastfeeding (44 mcg/day), but it is not known if gestational diabetes is related to low chromium levels during pregnancy. Adults over the age of 50 require about 30mcg/day while children require lower amounts based on their age. There is another form of chromium—the hexavalent form, or Cr6+. This form Continue reading >>

Chromium Picolinate For The Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes

Chromium Picolinate For The Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes

Chromium Picolinate for the Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes 1Assistant Director, Integrative Medicine, Prevention Research Center, Yale University School of Medicine 2Assistant Director, Vascular Research Lab, Prevention Research Center, Yale University School of Medicine 3Data Analyst, Prevention Research Center, Yale University School of Medicine 4Professor of Toxicology and Molecular Epidemiology, University of Southern Maine 5Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology), Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine 6Director, Prevention Research Center, Yale University School of Medicine The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Treat Strategies Diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), and metabolic syndrome are considered precursors to type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus. 1 Endothelial dysfunction is also associated with increased risk for diabetes and is directly linked to insulin resistance 2 and hyperglycemia. While pharmacotherapy with such drugs as metformin, acarbose, orlistat, and thiazolidinediones can reduce risk of T2D, 3 their cost and potential adverse effects can be objectionable to patients who do not yet have an actual disease. 4 Intensive diet and lifestyle change can play an important role in diabetes prevention 5 though adherence to these regimens is often difficult. 6 The micronutrient chromium (Cr) is of interest in this regard as a potential means of improving glucose tolerance 7 , 8 by reducing insulin resistance. 9 Chromium picolinate is widely marketed to the public with diverse health claims pertaining to glucose metabolism, insulin action, muscle mass, weight control, and diabetes prevention. 10 In 2002, estimated sales of chromium-based supplements was $85 million (USD Continue reading >>

Chromium For Diabetes Type 2 - Usage, Benefits And Effects

Chromium For Diabetes Type 2 - Usage, Benefits And Effects

Dietary supplements have been recognized as an important weapon to counteract the symptoms as well as causes of type 2 diabetes ; not only by practitioners of alternative medicine but also by mainstream medical physicians. Functional medicine practitioners have also been using supplements to reduce the stress of side effects of prescription anti-diabetic drugs that cause both short-term and long-term health complications due to removal of vital nutrients from the body. Chromium has garnered a lot of interest, in recent times, with people with diabetes type 2 as it has been reported that chromium picolinate has been found to lower blood glucose levels. Chromium is an essential mineral that helps insulin regulate blood sugar level in our body. All metabolic reactions of chromium are insulin dependent. Adequate chromium consumption decreases our requirement of insulin and improves our blood lipid profile. Chromium is used by the body to make Glucose Tolerance Factor, a biologically-active compound that enhances activity of insulin by as much as three times. This activity has led to studies that show the importance of chromium for diabetes type 2. What Does Research Say About Chromium and Diabetes? The earliest study that showed the effect of chromium supplementation in decreasing symptoms of diabetes was done in the 1970s, when a patient was given supplemental chromium . Within two weeks, the patient showed distinct improvement in signs and symptoms, blood sugar levels improved and insulin requirements were greatly reduced. These and many other studies implicated chromium as a critical cofactor in insulin action. In a study with Chinese subjects with Type 2 Diabetes, patients that received a chromium picolinate diabetes dosage of 500 micrograms (g) twice per day of chromi Continue reading >>

Chromium: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, And Warning

Chromium: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, And Warning

Chromium is a mineral. It is called an "essential trace element" because very small amounts of chromium are necessary for human health. There are two forms of chromium: trivalent chromium and hexavalent chromium. The first is found in foods and supplements and is safe for humans. The second is a known toxin that can cause skin problems and lung cancer . Some people try chromium for body conditioning including weight loss , increasing muscle, and decreasing body fat. Chromium is also used to improve athletic performance, to increase energy, and to prevent age-related mental decline. Chromium is used intravenously (by IV) as a supplement in nutritional IV drips. Chromium deficiency. Taking chromium by mouth is effective for preventing chromium deficiency. Diabetes. Some evidence shows that taking chromium picolinate (a chemical compound that contains chromium) by mouth, either alone or along with biotin, can lower fasting blood sugar, lower insulin levels, and help insulin work in people with type 2 diabetes . Also, chromium picolinate might decrease weight gain and fat accumulation in people with type 2 diabetes who are taking a class of antidiabetes medications called sulfonylureas. Higher chromium doses might be more effective and work more quickly. Higher doses might also lower the level of certain blood fats (cholesterol and triglycerides) in some people. Early research suggests that chromium picolinate might have the same benefits in people with type 1 diabetes, people who have diabetes as a result of steroid treatment, and people with diabetes the develops during pregnancy. However, researchers are looking carefully at the results that show chromium might be effective for treating diabetes. It might not help everyone. Some researchers think that chromium supplemen Continue reading >>

Chromium Picolinate: What Are The Benefits?

Chromium Picolinate: What Are The Benefits?

Chromium Picolinate: What Are the Benefits? Chromium picolinate is a form of the mineral chromium that can be found in supplements. Many of these products claim to improve nutrient metabolism and produce weight loss. However, many people wonder about the safety and effectiveness. This article will discuss several possible benefits of chromium picolinate and help you decide whether or not it is worth trying. Chromium is a mineral that exists in several forms. Although one dangerous form can be found in industrial pollution, a safe form is found naturally in many foods ( 1 ). This safe form, trivalent chromium, is typically considered essential, meaning that it must be obtained from the diet. Although some researchers question whether this mineral is truly essential, it does serve several important functions in the body ( 2 ). For example, it is part of a molecule called chromodulin, which helps the hormone insulin perform its actions in the body ( 3 , 4 ). Insulin , a molecule released by the pancreas, is important in your bodys processing of carbs, fat and protein ( 5 ). Interestingly, the absorption of chromium in the intestines is very low, with less than 2.5% of ingested chromium being absorbed ( 1 ). However, chromium picolinate is an alternate form of chromium that is absorbed better. For this reason, this type is commonly found in dietary supplements ( 3 , 6 ). Chromium picolinate is the mineral chromium attached to three molecules of picolinic acid ( 3 ). Summary Chromium is a mineral found in low doses in many foods. It plays a role in the metabolism of nutrients through its impact on the hormone insulin. Chromium picolinate is the form often found in dietary supplements. In healthy people, the hormone insulin has an important role in signaling the body to brin Continue reading >>

Chromium

Chromium

What is chromium and what are some chromium benefits? Chromium is a metallic element that humans require in very small amounts. It is an essential part of metabolic processes that regulate blood sugar, and helps insulin transport glucose into cells, where it can be used for energy. Chromium also appears to be involved in the metabolism of carbohydrate, fat, and protein. Two forms are commonly available as supplements: glucose-tolerance factor (GTF) chromium and chromium picolinate. Why is chromium necessary? Chromium enhances the actions of insulin and is necessary for maintaining normal metabolism and storage of fats, proteins and carbohydrates. Inadequate intake of chromium has been linked to the development of glucose intolerance, a condition seen in type 2 diabetes. Chromium can also help raise HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels, and may play a role in preventing heart disease. What are the signs of a chromium deficiency? An estimated 25-50% of the U.S. population is mildly deficient in chromium, a greater incidence of deficiency than is found in almost any other developed country. The industrialization of the American food supply chain, reflected in very low soil levels of chromium and the loss of chromium from refined foods, especially sugar and flours, probably contributes to this. Dietary chromium has a low absorption rate, which becomes even lower with age, so the elderly are especially at risk. Life threatening clinical deficiency may be rare, but deficiency is common. Because adequate dietary chromium helps to maintain insulin sensitivity, chromium deficiency can contribute to the development of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Even mild deficiencies of chromium can produce problems in blood sugar metabolism, and contribute to other symptoms such as anxiety Continue reading >>

Chromium Picolinate Side Effects

Chromium Picolinate Side Effects

What Is Chromium Picolinate? Chromium picolinate is a chemical compound that's sometimes used as an alternative therapy or as a nutritional supplement. However, no studies or medical research have proven any significant benefit from using chromium picolinate. Some people use chromium picolinate in an attempt to treat chromium deficiency, control blood sugar, improve depression in people with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), lower cholesterol, or to aid in weight loss. But any alleged benefit from using chromium picolinate is largely anecdotal and not supported by scientific data. Chromium picolinate is available over-the-counter (OTC) without a prescription; it's also found in many multivitamin supplements. Chromium is a mineral that's known as an "essential trace element" because only very small amounts of it are necessary for human health. Many foods have small amounts of chromium. Meat, whole grains, and some fruits and vegetables are the best sources. Chromium picolinate works with insulin in the body to metabolize carbohydrates. It's made by combining chromium with picolinic acid. The acid helps the body absorb chromium. Chromium Picolinate Warnings You should not use chromium picolinate as a substitute for any treatment prescribed by your doctor. While the supplement is used by some people to manage different conditions, there's little or no evidence for its effectiveness. For example, a 2011 study published in the journal Endocrine Practice found that chromium picolinate use had no effect on glucose or insulin concentrations, insulin sensitivity, or cholesterol levels among people at risk of type 2 diabetes. Similarly, an analysis of several medical studies (published in the journal Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition) reviewing the use of chromium pi Continue reading >>

Supplementation With Chromium Picolinate: Therapeutic For Diabetes And Pre-diabetes

Supplementation With Chromium Picolinate: Therapeutic For Diabetes And Pre-diabetes

Supplementation with a form of the trace mineral chromium called chromium picolinate is prudent nutritional therapy for your patients with diabetes and pre-diabetes. To give you an overview of why I say this, most of the studies involving supplemental chromium for type II diabetes have shown positive results of one type or another. However, when chromium picolinate, which is the most bioavailable form, has been used, all of the studies have yielded positive results (in blood sugar, blood insulin and/or blood lipid [cholesterol and triglyceride] readings).[i] One of these studies, a 1997 study involving 180 type II diabetes patients in China, is a classic: it documented “spectacular” results in diabetes patients who took 500 mcg chromium picolinate twice daily. After four months, nearly all of the diabetes patients no longer had traditional signs of diabetes. Their blood sugar and insulin levels dropped to near normal—something that medications could not achieve. Even more importantly, the “gold standard” diagnostic measure of diabetes—blood levels of hemoglobin A1c (sugar-damaged proteins that age cells)—also dropped to normal.[ii] A follow-up study by some of the same researchers monitored 833 type II diabetes patients who took 500 mcg chromium picolinate twice daily: a significant reduction in fasting blood sugar levels and in post-meal blood sugar levels was found during the ten months of the study. No negative side effects were shown from taking the supplements. In addition, more than 85 percent of the patients reported improvements in the common diabetic symptoms of excessive thirst, frequent urination and fatigue.[iii] Although the incidence of type II diabetes is increasing in record numbers, many people don’t yet have diabetes but are at high ris Continue reading >>

Should I Try Chromium Tablets?

Should I Try Chromium Tablets?

I take metformin twice a day and, after breakfast, six or seven supplements I've seen mentioned on TV. Now I've ordered chromium GTF because it's reported to help with blood glucose control. Would you recommend these tablets, especially for those who have heart disease, as I do? John T. Foster, Jr., Jacksonville, Florida Chromium is an essential trace element that is associated with carbohydrate and lipid (fat) metabolism. Chromium is sometimes referred to as "glucose tolerance factor" (GTF), but GTF is actually a complex of various compounds, of which chromium is thought to be the active component. Some evidence shows that taking chromium picolinate can decrease blood glucose, insulin levels, and A1C and increase insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes . But not all the evidence is positive, and some studies have been inconclusive because of their small size or other factors. There is wide interest among people with diabetes about the role of various dietary supplements, herbs, and other "natural" products that may influence blood glucose levels and diabetic control. However, use of such products is largely a case of "buyer beware." This is primarily a result of a law enacted in 1994 called the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA). David Kessler, a former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), has said that DSHEA "does not require that dietary supplements be shown [by manufacturers] to be safe or effective before they are marketed. The FDA does not scrutinize a dietary supplement before it enters the marketplace." In other words, the law lets manufacturers market herbal products without having proved their safety and efficacy. The FDA can only remove such products from the market later if problems happen to be detected. Contr Continue reading >>

Cinnamon & Chromium For Diabetes

Cinnamon & Chromium For Diabetes

Cinnamon, a spice derived from the bark of several trees of the genus Cinnamomum, has garnered attention for its purported ability to lower blood sugar. Chromium, a mineral used by the body in minute quantities known as micrograms, is also widely used as a natural method to regulate blood sugar levels and to help with diabetes management. Consult your doctor before using cinnamon or chromium to treat diabetes. Video of the Day Cinnamon lowers blood sugar in ways that are unrelated to insulin, according to a study published in the 2010 issue of the journal "Bioscience Biotechnology and Biochemistry." In this study on laboratory animals with Type 1 diabetes, 30 mg per kg body weight of cinnamon per day for 22 days reduced blood sugar levels and kidney stress. The researchers observed that cinnamon worked by increasing glucose transporter molecules on muscle and fat cells and by increasing energy expenditure in cells. The results of this preliminary animal study may be prove helpful, along with further research to confirm the results on humans, in distinguishing how cinnamon can best be used in the treatment of diabetes in humans. Antioxidant Effects Antioxidant compounds known as procyanidin oligomers are responsible for the blood sugar-regulating effects of cinnamon, according to a study published in the February 2011 issue of the journal "Phytomedicine." In the study on laboratory animals, doses of 200 mg and 300 mg of cinnamon per kg body weight significantly improved the ability of insulin-resistant liver cells to absorb and utilize glucose. The researchers concluded that the results of their preliminary animal study indicate that cinnamon may be able to improve insulin sensitivity and decrease blood sugar levels in humans with Type 2 diabetes. Further research on the Continue reading >>

Chromium Picolinate Rating Summary

Chromium Picolinate Rating Summary

Did you? Yes No | Report inappropriate "I had type 2 diabetes. I started taking 500mcg of chromium picolinate and 500mg of cinnamon after my last A1c 5 months ago which was at 6.0 just had my last A1c done July 7 and my A1c was 5.5. My doctor was amazed and took me off my diabetes medication (Januvia). " Pinbuster71 (taken for 1 to 6 months) July 16, 2012 Did you? Yes No | Report inappropriate "I tried adding this supplement to my daily insulin injection therapy, and was able to cut my insulin usage in half. I now have an A1C of 7.2, down from 10.4 only 2 months ago. I take 600 mcg. before meals 3 times a day and I feel great. I think this supplement needs to be studied and utilized way more often than it is." Did you? Yes No | Report inappropriate "I used to weigh 463 pounds, my weight as of today is 211. I have been taking chromium picolinate for over 6 years now, watching my carbs, drinking water and sugar free kool aid. I started with 1 x 200 mcgs before each meal. Now I take 1 x 1000 mcg twice a day 1 before breakfast and 1 before dinner." "I found that if I take 400 mg of chromium picolante and do cardio-exercise for 20 minutes, I can reduce my blood sugar up to 100 points. " Continue reading >>

What Is Chromium Beneficial For? Blood Sugar, High Cholesterol & More

What Is Chromium Beneficial For? Blood Sugar, High Cholesterol & More

Chromium, a type of chemical element that’s actually a hard and brittle metal, is a trace mineral needed by the body in small amounts for healthy functioning. What is chromium most well-researched for in regard to promoting health? Blood sugar and diabetes control, heart health, weight management and brain health are all known benefits of chromium. Chromium plays a role in the insulin-signaling pathways that allow our bodies to control the amount of sugar we take in, helping balance blood glucose levels and giving us stable energy. Research also shows that chromium can help protect DNA chromosomes from damage, which means chromium may be able to halt cell mutations that can lead to various chronic diseases. In addition, chromium is associated with longevity and improved cardiovascular health due to its role in metabolizing fats, in addition to proteins, carbs and other nutrients. According to the National Institute of Health, there are two types of chromium: 1) trivalent (chromium 3+), which is considered “biologically active” and can be found in foods, and 2) hexavalent (chromium 6+), which is considered toxic and unsafe for humans, so it’s used in industrial applications and isn’t meant to be acquired from foods. (1) What is chromium found in? Chromium is naturally present in many whole foods, including brewer’s yeast, certain kinds of meats, vegetables, potatoes and whole grains. Chromium enters the body mostly through diet since it’s stored in soil and rocks that penetrate the crops we wind up eating, plus in smaller amounts in the water that we drink. Drinking tap water supplies some of our chromium, as does cooking in stainless-steel cookware. What Is Chromium Beneficial For and How Do We Get Enough? According to the USDA, chromium deficiency isn’t Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Chromium

Diabetes And Chromium

Chromium is of interest to people with diabetes as it has been suggested that Chromium Picolinate could be particularly suitable for lowering blood sugar levels . Supplements are increasingly becoming recognised as having a place in the management and treatment of diabetes. However, each separate naturally occurring or manufactured supplement will affect different people in different ways. Chromium is an essential mineral. Chromium may potentate insulin, and is usually lost in processed foods . What does Chromium have to do with diabetes? According to some studies, Chromium Picolinate can have a significant effect on diabetes. According to an Associate Professor of Medicine at University of Vermont: Prior human studies have suggested that chromium picolinate decreases insulin levels and improves blood sugar metabolism in both obese people and people with type 2 diabetes . Richard Anderson, of the US Department of Agriculture, seconded the positive assessment of Chromium: Essentially all the studies using chromium picolinate supplementation for impaired glucose intolerance and diabetes showed a positive effect. Is there an upper limit for Chromium Supplementation? According to the American IOM (Institute of Medicine), following an extensive review of scientific literature about chromium picolinate, there is no reason to set an upper limit (UL) for Chromium. In theory, this means that there are no substantive safety concerns about chromium. So, as a diabetic, should I be taking chromium? This remains uncertain, although medical research lends support to the idea that chromium can be useful. Dr. Byron Hoogwerf of the Cleveland Clinic Heart Centre, said: Routine use of chromium supplementation in diabetic patients who have overall adequate nutrition has not consistently sh Continue reading >>

Chromium And Diabetes

Chromium And Diabetes

I last wrote about chromium in 2006. Although more than 10 years have passed, the topic still remains relevant and controversial. If youve been taking chromium and youre convinced that its helped your diabetes control (apart from medication , healthy eating , physical activity , weight loss , and potentially any other supplements that you take yes, you need to consider their effects on your blood sugars, too), then it may make sense to continue taking it as long as youre taking a safe amount. But all these years later, is there anything new to add about chromium? Is it really helpful in managing blood sugars? Or are the chromium claims mostly hype? If youre a newbie to diabetes or diabetes supplements, you may not be familiar with chromium. At first glance, chromium sounds vaguely like it might be related to a chrome bumper or bathroom sink fixture. Close, but not quite. Chrome is a thin layer of a certain form of chromium (hexavalent) thats applied to a metal object. Hexavalent chromium is toxic and a carcinogen. The form of chromium that is biologically active and found in food is called trivalent chromium. According to the National Institutes of Health, chromium is known to enhance the action of insulin. Way back in 1957, a study done with rats showed that a compound in brewers yeast prevented an age-related decline in the rats ability to keep their blood sugars at a normal level. A couple of years later, chromium was identified as being the ingredient in the yeast, and was subsequently termed a glucose tolerance factor. How does chromium work to lower blood sugars? Chromium is a trace element, meaning that the body requires extremely small amounts. Thanks to the rats and the brewers yeast, researchers discovered that chromium helps the body to maintain a safe blood Continue reading >>

More in diabetes