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Chocolate Drink For Diabetics

Cocoa Could Be A Healthy Treat For Diabetic Patients

Cocoa Could Be A Healthy Treat For Diabetic Patients

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Cocoa Could Be A Healthy Treat For Diabetic Patients For people with diabetes, sipping a mug of steaming, flavorful cocoa may seem a guilty pleasure. But new research suggests that indulging a craving for cocoa can actually help blood vessels to function better and might soon be considered part of a healthy diet for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. For people with diabetes, sipping a mug of steaming, flavorful cocoa may seem a guilty pleasure. But new research suggests that indulging a craving for cocoa can actually help blood vessels to function better and might soon be considered part of a healthy diet for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Flavanols, natural plant compounds also found in tea, red wine, and certain fruits and vegetables, are responsible for cocoa's healthful benefits. In fact, according to new research published in the June 3 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC), after diabetic patients drank specially formulated high-flavanol cocoa for one month, blood vessel function went from severely impaired to normal. The improvement was as large as has been observed with exercise and many common diabetic medications, the researchers noted. These findings suggest that it may be time to think not just outside the box, but inside the cup, for innovative ways to ward off cardiovascular disease--the number one cause of death in diabetic patients. "Medical treatments alone often do not prevent complications of diabetes that are associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease," said Malte Kelm, M.D., a professor and chairman of cardiology, pulmonology and vascular medicine at the University Hospital Aachen and the Technical University Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Chocolate?

Can Diabetics Eat Chocolate?

If you have diabetes, you can eat anything -- although possibly not in the quantities you'd like. That includes chocolate. Some types of chocolate, such as dark chocolate, might even have health benefits, in moderation. Portion control is the key to enjoying foods like chocolate if you have diabetes, the American Diabetes Association reports. Dark chocolate is rich in polyphenols, plant substances that act as antioxidants and that might also help prevent heart disease and lower blood glucose levels. Types of Chocolate All chocolate is not created equal in terms of health benefits. When it comes to foods high in simple sugars, less is better if you have diabetes. Dark chocolate contains more cocoa and less sugar than milk chocolate, so you can eat a little more of it if you're controlling your calories or sugar intake. With dark chocolate, the higher the cocoa percentage, the better it is for you. Look for dark chocolate with at least 70 percent cocoa, registered dietitian Mitzi Dulan recommends. White chocolate contains no cocoa and is higher in calories and saturated fat than dark or milk chocolate. Potential Benefits According to a study that appeared in the January, 2015 issue of ARYA Atherosclerosis, high-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate lowers blood pressure and insulin resistance in patients with diabetes and high blood pressure. Insulin resistance restricts the uptake of glucose into cells, which causes blood glucose levels to rise. People who ate white chocolate did not experience a decrease in blood pressure or insulin resistance. In a British study published in the November 2010 issue of Diabetic Medicine, diabetics who consumed chocolate high in cocoa for 16 weeks experienced a decrease in total cholesterol and an increase in high-density lipoprotein, the so-c Continue reading >>

Does Hot Chocolate Affect Diabetics?

Does Hot Chocolate Affect Diabetics?

Kristin Mortensen began writing newspaper articles in 1992 for The Sierra Vista Herald. She has also been a registered dietitian since 1991, and has worked for hospitals, clinics and Women, Infants and Children (WIC) programs. Mortensen has a bachelor of science in dietetics from Brigham Young University. A mug of hot chocolate with marshmallows.Photo Credit: Yulia_Davidovich/iStock/Getty Images When the weather cools with that frosty nip in the air, curling up with a good book and steamy cup of hot chocolate can be just the thing to make you feel cozy and warm. If you have diabetes, however, you might wonder if that tempting mug of chocolaty goodness is the best thing for your blood sugar or your overall health. Rest assured, you can enjoy your hot chocolate. You might even be surprised by its health benefits. Ask your dietitian or health care provider how to include hot cocoa in your meal plan. Researcher Lee Hooper and associates analyzed 42 different studies on the effect of cocoa and chocolate on insulin. Their findings were published in the March 2012 edition of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The studies found that chocolate and cocoa reduced serum insulin, thus improving insulin resistance. Improving insulin resistance helps you have better blood sugar control, which is critical for people with diabetes. Not all hot chocolate beverages are created equal. Some can be very high in sugar and carbohydrates, leading to spikes in your blood sugar, so use caution when choosing your cocoa. The beneficial part of chocolate comes from the cocoa bean. The more processed, including the addition of fat and sugar, the less beneficial your cup of hot cocoa and the more risk of raising your blood sugar. To avoid this, choose sugar-free types. If you use milk to mak Continue reading >>

Dark Hot Chocolate For Diabetics

Dark Hot Chocolate For Diabetics

Dark chocolate makes this hot chocolate extra special. Ingredients 1 Tablespoon unsweetened Dutch-process cocoa powder (like Hershey's) 1 Tablespoon + 2 teaspoons Splenda 2 Tablespoons hot water 1 cup 1% milk Directions Place the cocoa powder and Splenda into a microwaveable mug. Add the hot water and stir until smooth. Pour in the milk and stir again. Microwave on high for 1 1/2 minutes or until hot. (Do not boil) Dark chocolate makes this hot chocolate extra special. Ingredients 1 Tablespoon unsweetened Dutch-process cocoa powder (like Hershey's) 1 Tablespoon + 2 teaspoons Splenda 2 Tablespoons hot water 1 cup 1% milk Directions Place the cocoa powder and Splenda into a microwaveable mug. Add the hot water and stir until smooth. Pour in the milk and stir again. Microwave on high for 1 1/2 minutes or until hot. (Do not boil) Continue reading >>

Enjoy Your Hot Chocolate But Drink It Healthy

Enjoy Your Hot Chocolate But Drink It Healthy

Who doesn’t love to sit next to the fire with a mug of hot chocolate on a chilly night? Well, what we would consider a tempting treat, may be better for your health than you think! The health benefits of cocoa include relief from high blood pressure, cholesterol, constipation, chronic fatigue syndrome and various other illnesses. Cocoa can quicken wound healing, and help to improve cardiovascular function and brain health. It also possesses mood-enhancing properties and is rich in minerals such as iron, magnesium, calcium, zinc, and potassium. Cocoa has also been shown to improve insulin resistance and help the body metabolize glucose. The antioxidant component of cocoa has been found to battle free radicals, reducing cell and tissue damage. Research has suggested that cocoa’s flavanols (phytonutrients with antioxidant properties) may contribute to maintaining a healthy brain. These protective benefits could also positively affect learning and memory functions. Findings have also found that cocoa-based products enhance the flow of blood to the brain and have been shown to help improve the effects of cardiovascular disorders. With all of these benefits, could chocolate soon be considered a health supplement? A study by Harvard Medical School said the benefits of the compound, Epicatechin, a compound which occurs naturally in cocoa beans, could prove “as important to medicine as penicillin or anesthesia.” Professor Hollenberg, director of the study, said the health benefits of the chemical, which is also found in tea, wine, some fruit and vegetables, could be enormous. He added: “If these observations predict the future, then we can say without blushing that they are among the most important observations in the history of medicine.” Are you ready to drink your Continue reading >>

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

No doubt: Water is the perfect drink. It doesn't have calories, sugar, or carbs, and it's as close as a tap. If you're after something tastier, though, you've got options. Some tempting or seemingly healthy drinks aren't great for you, but you can make swaps or easy homemade versions of many of them. These tasty treats can fit into your diabetes diet and still satisfy your cravings. 1. Chocolate Milk This treat may remind you of the school lunchroom, but it’s a good calcium-rich choice for grown-ups as well. Low-fat chocolate milk can be a good post-workout recovery drink. The bad news: Ready-made brands come packed with sugar. Try this at home: Mix 1% milk, 3 teaspoons of cocoa powder, and 2 tablespoons of the zero-calorie sweetener of your choice. It saves you 70 calories, 16 grams of carbs, and 2 grams of fat compared to 1 cup of store-bought, reduced-fat chocolate milk. 2. Sweet Tea A 16-ounce fast-food version might have up to 36 grams of carbs. That’s a lot of sugar, especially when there are carb-free choices, like sugar-free iced tea or iced tea crystals, that are just as satisfying. But you can also easily make your own: Steep tea with your favorite crushed fruit (raspberries are a good choice). Strain, chill, and then sweeten with your choice of no-calorie sugar substitute. That’s a tall glass of refreshment. 6. Hot Chocolate It’s the ultimate in decadent drinks. Coffeehouse-style versions of this classic are packed with carbs. A typical medium hot chocolate made with low-fat milk has 60 grams. Good news: You can make your own satisfying mug for less than half that. Mix 1 cup of low-fat milk with 2 squares of 70% dark chocolate, 1 teaspoon of vanilla, and a little cinnamon. Melt in a saucepan, and enjoy it for only 23 grams of carbs. It seems like a he Continue reading >>

13 Hot Diabetic Drinks To Enjoy All Year Round

13 Hot Diabetic Drinks To Enjoy All Year Round

If you're trying to control blood sugar levels it may seem as though there are limited diabetic drinks available. But in truth there are a wide range of safe options you can thoroughly enjoy. Recently we covered 11+ cold diabetic drink options. And today we're delving into some warming drinks that are low in sugar, and some that are rich in healthy fats and proteins to help stabilize your blood sugar levels. #1: Coffee There's something about the rich aroma of freshly made coffee that you either love or you don't. But if you do, you'll be pleased to learn that you can still enjoy your favorite blend. But just be aware that some people can be more sensitive to coffee, whereby their glucose levels increase. If that's you, then coffee is obviously not the best choice for you. I love drinking my coffee strong and black. But if you want a coffee creamer, use cream, milk, coconut milk or unsweetened almond or soy milk. #2: Coconutty Mocha If you are a coffee lover, adding a twist of coconutty chocolate for a deliciously warming mocha, may be just what you need on a fresh, crispy morning. Ingredients: Half a cup of brewed coffee 2/3 cup unsweetened almond or coconut milk 2 teaspoons cacao or cocoa powder (unsweetened) 1 tablespoon coconut butter or 1/8 teaspoon coconut extract Your choice of sweetener (sweeten to taste) Combine all the ingredients in a pan and heat over medium heat until you reach your desired temperature. Serve in mugs and sip away! Just be wary not to let it boil rapidly or you'll ruin your mix. #3: Classic Hot Chocolate I don't know about you but the thought of hot chocolate always brings back childhood memories – it's a warming drink that's sweet, creamy, and oh-so-satisfying! This simple recipe proves that you don’t have to ditch all your favorite dri Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Chocolate Milk For Diabetes And A1c Imperfection

Chocolate Milk For Diabetes And A1c Imperfection

The event had two opening speakers, a lunch keynote and four concurrent sessions both in the morning and afternoon. Obviously, with four sessions going on at the same time, it's nearly impossible to be at them all (my clones stayed at home this time). The JDRF organizers said they didn't record the sessions, but that was an idea they were considering for the future to allow more people access (hint, hint). Dr. Irl Hirsch , professor of Medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle Diagnosed with diabetes at age 6 in 1964, this guy's really, really smart and is a worldwide ambassador on diabetes, a leading voice in analyzing the real meaning of the HbA1c test since it became the standard in 1993. Hirsch says we've started seeing a trend in "geriatric type 1," something he sees as good news because it means more type 1s are living longer thanks to new technologies and treatments. But our D-Community has been misinformed in thinking that the A1C is an infallible test showing our average glucose levels during the past 90 days. Actually, he says it has a lot of problems, including that it can be weighted in the past 30 days so that someone with higher or lower blood sugar readings can skew the results. "This is a test you can study for," Hirsch says, and about 14% of A1C measurements may be off. That information from a study will be released at the upcoming American Diabetes Association's 72nd Scientific Sessions in June. Research is also showing that PWDs with new heart valves have a lower A1C because the red blood cells are being destroyed with each beat, and the same is being found for those PWDs with larger spleens. Yet, those with higher testosterone levels which increases red blood cell counts have higher A1Cs. Generally, the older a PWD gets, Continue reading >>

Chocolate As Diabetes Medicine

Chocolate As Diabetes Medicine

I used to say chocolate tasted great, but if you thought it was a health food, you were kidding yourself. But research shows that chocolate helps manage diabetes, prevents heart disease, and improves mood. Is this too good to be true? Next week, I’ll get back to toxic chemicals. This week, I felt like something tastier. According to nutritionist Amy Campbell, chocolate is made from cacao (cocoa) beans. The insides of the roasted beans, or the “nibs,” are crushed into a paste. So right there is a good start. We’ve written before about the diabetes benefits of beans, so chocolate has a good pedigree for health. Most of chocolate’s healing power seems to come from “flavonoids,” biological chemicals that Campbell says “are thought to help lower cholesterol and lower the risk of blood clots.” Other studies show chocolate can relax blood vessels; lower blood pressure, LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and blood glucose; and improve insulin function. Unfortunately, pure chocolate is bitter. You have to add sugar to make it taste good. And pure chocolate is powdery and dry. You have to add an emulsifier, like fat, to give it an enjoyable texture. So authorities have long called chocolate harmful and told people, especially people with diabetes, to avoid it. Is there a way to get the benefits, minimize the harmful sugars and fats, and still have something you want to eat? The healing flavonoids and flavonols are in the dark part of the chocolate. About.com guide Elizabeth LaBau defines “dark chocolate” as “chocolate without milk solids added…The cocoa content of commercial dark chocolate bars can range from 30%… to 70%… or even above 80% for extremely dark bars. Common terms used to distinguish the cocoa content of dark chocolate bars [from bitterest to Continue reading >>

Chocolate And Diabetes

Chocolate And Diabetes

Easter is a time for family, friends, new beginnings and, of course, chocolate… If you – or a child in the family – has diabetes, you might be wondering if it’s OK to eat chocolate and other sweet treats. How could eating chocolate affect your diabetes? Is ‘diabetic’ chocolate a good choice? We’re here to answer all your chocolate questions, plus there are eight top tips on how to eat chocolate in moderation and and some chocolate recipes. Can you eat chocolate if you have diabetes? When you have diabetes it’s important to eat a healthy, balanced diet and only include sugary, high-fat foods occasionally as a treat. That said, Easter only comes once a year, so don’t worry about the odd one or two indulgences as these will not affect your long-term blood diabetes management. It’s a myth that you can’t eat chocolate if you have diabetes, just eat it in moderation, rather than using it to satisfy hunger, and don’t eat a lot in one go as it affects your blood sugar levels. Should I buy ‘diabetic’ chocolate? In a word, no! Here’s why: Chocolate labelled ‘diabetic’contains a type of sweetener, such as fructose or sorbitol, which can affect blood sugar levels. It also tends to contain just as much fat as ordinary chocolate – and is often high in the really bad type of fats – saturated and trans fat. It usually has as many calories, if not more, than normal chocolate. It can a laxative effect and make you need the loo more often. It is also more expensive. Children and chocolate Easter is a fun time for children. There are Easter eggs to be eaten and Easter egg hunts they’ll want to be part of, so it’s important that they don’t feel that their diabetes excludes them from any of this. They’ll also want to enjoy a chocolate treat like Continue reading >>

Can Cocoa Help In The Treatment Of Diabetes

Can Cocoa Help In The Treatment Of Diabetes

Can Cocoa help in the treatment of diabetes Can Cocoa help in the treatment of diabetes? Controlling your carbohydrate intake is one of the ways by which you can manage diabetes, sugary foods, starch, some starchy vegetables, dairy foods and some cereals account for most the sources of carbohydrates we ingest into the body. To keep your blood sugar at the recommended levels of 70 to 180mg/DL you need to consume not more than 60g of carbs per meal. Chocolate is a product of cocoa that can be incorporated into your diabetics management meal because it contains little amount of sugar. Unsweetened cocoa powder is one of the cocoa meals you can add to your diabetic management plan; it comes with less than 50g of carbs and sugar. Cocoa powder contains 0.g, 1.6g and 3.2g of sugar, fiber and carbohydrates respectively. Your available carbohydrate tracking will help you detect how much you are consuming rather than tracking the total carbohydrate you consume a day. A tablespoon of unsweetened cocoa powder contains 1.6g of carbs; you can add this with some fresh milk and warm water. Instead of adding sugar to your unsweetened cocoa powder, add some sucrose- it doesnt add any carbohydrates to your diet. Cocoa brown and dark chocolates have also been found to be useful in the fight against diabetes. Dark chocolate contains at least 70% cocoa, it also contains less carbs and sugar when compared to milk chocolate. A serving of dark chocolate will supply not more170g of calories to your diet, you will also get approximately 13. 8g and 3.3g of carbs and fiber respectively. Resent researches on mice fed with liquid diets contain polyphenols revealed that polyphenols can actually help in controlling sugar levels. Mice fed with liquid polyphenol supplements were found to have steady bloo Continue reading >>

The Benefits Of Chocolate For Diabetes

The Benefits Of Chocolate For Diabetes

Ohhhhhhhhhh….Chocolate! Chocolate! How many times have you just had that sometimes nearly overwhelming urge to have some chocolate—in any form! You can have a chocolate bar, chocolate milk, chocolate cake, brownies, a chocolate ice cream sundae or a cup of hot cocoa just to list a few forms of chocolate. Oh wait—you can have dark chocolate, milk chocolate, orange, mint or raspberry-flavored chocolate or white chocolate….so much to choose from! But….should you? And if you should, just how much is enough and how much is overdoing it? Are there “healthier” forms of chocolate? Many of us sure as shootin’ hope there is! The “Dark” History of Chocolate Chocolate comes from the fruit and seeds of the cacao tree and is native to the Amazon forest. Botanically, the cacao tree is known as Theobroma cacao – this tree has three major varieties; the Forastero, the Trinitario and the Criollo. The Forastero is the most commonly used variety while the rarest and most prized for its aroma and its delicate taste is the Criollo variety. Christopher Columbus is credited with being the first European to come in contact with the cacao bean—he and his crew found—and stole, apparently—a canoe filled with various food items, including baskets of cacao beans. The cacao beans were actually used as local currency, but their chocolate quality was missed for another twenty years until Hernando Cortez brought 3 chests of cacao beans, this time stolen from the Aztecs, back to the court of the Spanish king—and the popularity of cacao and chocolate took off![1] The history of chocolate though, actually appears to be much older, going back to at least the Mayan civilization and possibly the Olmec civilization that predates the Mayan civilization. The traditional chocolate be Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Chocolate

Diabetes And Chocolate

Tweet A diabetic eating chocolate may raise eyebrows amongst some people but within reason, chocolate needn’t be completely cut out of your diet. In most cases, chocolate will cause blood sugar levels to rise and in light of this it’s best to limit chocolate consumption to small amounts and to avoid eating when blood sugars are already higher than the recommended blood glucose levels. Is eating chocolate good or bad for you? Chocolate contains a number of beneficial nutrients, some of which called flavonoids are thought to guard against heart disease. However, it should be noted that larger quantities of chocolate can be disadvantageous to health in other ways. If a larger amount of chocolate is consumed, it will raise blood sugars which increases the risk of complications, of which cardiovascular problems is one. Secondly, the calorific content of chocolate is relatively high and therefore overconsumption of chocolate could lead to weight gain which also raises the risk of heart problems. How much chocolate should I eat? For most people with diabetes, chocolate is best restricted to a few squares to prevent too much of an increase in sugar levels. For people with diabetes without weight problems, chocolate can be appropriate to have before exercising. For more strenuous activity, however, even shorter acting carbohydrate may be required. Which chocolate is best for me? Chocolate with higher amounts of cocoa solids are best, as the sugar and fat content will often be lower as a result. For high cocoa solids content, dark chocolate is usually a good pick. Is diabetic chocolate better for my sugar levels? Generally speaking, diabetic chocolate is made by replacing some or all of the sugar content with an alternative source of sweetener, such as the polyols (sugar alco Continue reading >>

8 Drinks That Help Fight Diabetes

8 Drinks That Help Fight Diabetes

So one great addition to a healthier lifestyle for people who are living with diabetes is to include more water in your diet. The problem here? Plain water every day can taste kind of boring, and people with diabetes may already feel that their diets are restricted. So what are some good ways to up your water intake while not completely boring your palate? One simple solution is to incorporate spa water into your diet. With a name like that, it sounds indulgent, and fortunately, it can taste that way, too, while still being very good for you. Spa water is a delicious combination of fresh fruits, and sometimes herbs, that you can infuse into cold water. It's great to keep a pitcher in your fridge running, and you can mix up a variety of different combinations with whatever ingredients you like so that you don't get tired of the same tastes every day. We recommend a combination of diabetes-fighting lemon and lime wheels with some anti-oxidant-packed fresh berries. You can slice up just one or two strawberries and they'll infuse a whole pitcher of water with their bright, berry sweetness. Peppermint, which is thought to potentially help both nerve and digestive disorders associated with diabetes, can be added to spa water as well, for a fresh, invigorating, and healthful taste. Eating and drinking well is something everyone should enjoy, and having diabetes should never prevent you from doing that. But learning how to make healthy (and tasty) drink choices when you have diabetes may take some getting used to. Take a look at our suggestions to find out more about healthful drink options you should feel great about enjoying. Chamomile Tea No calories, big flavor, and a boatload of antioxidants have made chamomile tea trendy for health reasons, especially for diabetics. Resea Continue reading >>

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