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Chinese Medicine For Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes

Diabetes

Are you one of the +9 million Canadians living with Diabetes, Pre-Diabetes, high blood sugar and frustrated with therapies which don’t work? Try Dr. Zhao’s All Natural Acupuncture and Chinese Herbs therapy. You will happy with the result! What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic condition in which there is a high level of sugar (Glucose) in the bloodstream. When we eat foods, it is broken down into Glucose by our liver which is absorbed by our fat and muscle's cells and stored as energy. Diabetes develops when the Pancreas does not produce enough Insulin, a hormone that allows the body to absorb Glucose. Type 1 Diabetes is when the body makes little or no Insulin requiring daily injections of Insulin. It typically occurs during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 Diabetes is where the body makes Insulin but cannot use it properly. It typically develops in adulthood but is becoming more prevalent in children because of high obesity rates. Type 2 Diabetes accounts for over 90% of Diabetes cases. Diabetes if not adequately treated and controlled can result in heart disease and stroke, nerve damage, kidney failure, blindness and limb amputations. There is no cure for Diabetes. What are the Trends of Diabetes in Canada? Formerly considered a disease of adults and the elderly, Diabetes is now common in children as young as 10 years old. The percentage of Canadians suffering from Diabetes increased 70% in the last 10 years due to our increasing sedentary lifestyle, high obesity rates and rich diet of processed foods. Western drugs such as Metformin and Thiazolidinedione (TZDs) are commonly used to treat Diabetes; however, patients taking these drugs may experience mild side effects such as diarrhea, nausea, gas, water retention to more serious side effects such as hepatitis an Continue reading >>

Traditional Chinese Medicine In The Treatment Of Diabetes

Traditional Chinese Medicine In The Treatment Of Diabetes

In Brief Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a system of healing that is thousands of years old. It has long been utilized in the Chinese culture to treat the complex of symptoms that Western medicine terms diabetes mellitus. This article will outline the key concepts and therapies of TCM that play a role in the evaluation and treatment of diabetic patients. Traditional Chinese Medicine TCM is a system of healing that originated thousands of years ago. It has evolved into a well-developed, coherent system of medicine that uses several modalities to treat and prevent illness. The most commonly employed therapeutic methods in TCM include acupuncture/moxibustion, Chinese herbal medicine, diet therapy, mind/body exercises (Qigong and Tai Chi), and Tui Na (Chinese massage).3 TCM views the human body and its functioning in a holistic way. From this perspective, no single body part or symptom can be understood apart from its relation to the whole. Unlike Western medicine, which seeks to uncover a distinct entity or causative factor for a particular illness, TCM looks at patterns of disharmony, which include all presenting signs and symptoms as well as patients’ emotional and psychological responses. Humans are viewed both as a reflection of and as an integral part of nature, and health results from maintaining harmony and balance within the body and between the body and nature.3 Two basic TCM theories explain and describe phenomena in nature, including human beings: Yin-Yang Theory and the Five Phases Theory or Five Element Theory. Yin and Yang are complementary opposites used to describe how things function in relation to each other and to the universe. They are interdependent—one cannot exist without the other, and they have the ability to transform into each other.3 T Continue reading >>

Chinese Herbal And Acupuncture Treatment Protocols For Diabetes Type I - Formulas, Protocols, Tcm Diagnoses | Chinese Medicine Theory - Yin Yang House

Chinese Herbal And Acupuncture Treatment Protocols For Diabetes Type I - Formulas, Protocols, Tcm Diagnoses | Chinese Medicine Theory - Yin Yang House

Clinical Information For the Treatment Of Diabetes Type I Diabetes is a condition characterized by high levels of glucose in the blood due to a limited production of or ineffective performance of insulin in the body. After a person eats, glucose (sugar) from the food enters the bloodstream. Insulin, a chemical produced by the pancreas, then absorbs glucose from the blood and deposits it into various cells to use for energy. If the body's insulin levels are too low or the insulin does not function properly, glucose collects in the blood, causing diabetes. Type I diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, and is caused by the body's destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Signs that an individual may have diabetes include frequent urination, abnormal thirst, slow healing of wounds, unexplained weight loss, dry or itchy skin, abnormal hunger or fatigue, and numbness in the feet. Below you will find alternative and natural treatment options including those from a Chinese Medicine perspective for Diabetes Type I. Blog Posts Where Diabetes Type I Is Discussed Which Acupuncture Point Protocols May Be Applied For Diabetes Type I? The treatment of conditions with acupuncture can be a complicated endeavor that should only be undertaken by individuals with a deep understanding of the underlying Chinese Medicine theory (and/or whatever system being used for treatment). There are many approaches, but generally speaking few viable approaches are involved on a point to condition basis. Rather using proper diagnostic procedures the patients diagnostic pattern is ascertained and that is what is treated. The protocols listed here exemplify some of these clinical approaches. The following acupuncture treatment protocols may be used with diabetes type Continue reading >>

Syndrome Differentiation Of Diabetes By The Traditional Chinese Medicine According To Evidence-based Medicine And Expert Consensus Opinion

Syndrome Differentiation Of Diabetes By The Traditional Chinese Medicine According To Evidence-based Medicine And Expert Consensus Opinion

Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 492193, 7 pages Guang’anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053, China Academic Editor: Zhao-Xiang Bian Copyright © 2014 Jing Guo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract In Chinese medicine, diabetes belongs to the category of “Xiaoke disease (disease with symptoms of frequent drinking and urination)”; in the traditional sense, its pathogenesis is “Yin deficiency and dryness-heat.” However, over time, changes in the social environment and lifestyle have also changed the use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in diabetes. In this study, we performed diabetes syndrome differentiation using TCM according to evidence-based medicine and expert consensus opinion. 1. Introduction Diabetes mellitus (DM) is often caused by the consumption of a high fat and calorie diet. It has a high prevalence and can often lead to complications that seriously affect the quality of life of sufferers. In 2013, according to the latest statistics of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the global prevalence of diabetes among adults aged 20–79 was 8.3%. The total number of patients with diabetes worldwide was estimated to be 382 million, which was predicted to rise to nearly 592 million by 2035. Therefore, research on the prevention and treatment of diabetes is critical and represents a great challenge for the medical profession. In recent years, Chinese medicine has made great progress toward the prevention and the treatment of diabetes, and its curative effects have b Continue reading >>

Insulin Combined With Chinese Medicine Improves Glycemic Outcome Through Multiple Pathways In Patients With Type2 Diabetes Mellitus

Insulin Combined With Chinese Medicine Improves Glycemic Outcome Through Multiple Pathways In Patients With Type2 Diabetes Mellitus

Insulin combined with Chinese medicine improves glycemic outcome through multiple pathways in patients with type2 diabetes mellitus 2Department of Clinical Laboratory, Teaching Hospital of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China 1Department of Endocrinology, Teaching Hospital of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China 2Department of Clinical Laboratory, Teaching Hospital of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China * Correspondence Chunguang Xie, Tel.: +86-13882258778, Fax: +86-13882258778, E-mail address: [email protected] Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer Received 2014 Dec 15; Revised 2015 Feb 9; Accepted 2015 Feb 16. Copyright 2015 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association of the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Insufficient insulin secretion or inefficient insulin response are responsible for the clinical outcome of type2 diabetes mellitus. Administration of insulin alone is prone to cause secondary effects, resulting in an unsatisfactory outcome. Shen-Qi-Formula (SQF), a well-known Chinese medicinal formula, has been used for diabetic treatment for a long time. The present study was designed to investigate whether SQF in combination with insulin improved the clinical outcome of type2 diabetes mellitus, and what mechani Continue reading >>

Modern Medicine And Traditional Chinese Medicine: Diabetes Mellitus (part 1)

Modern Medicine And Traditional Chinese Medicine: Diabetes Mellitus (part 1)

Home The Journal JCM Article Archive Modern Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine: Diabetes Mellitus (part 1) 1. Background There is nothing new about diabetes; it has been a medical problem since antiquity. The name which was originated by Aretaeus (30-90 CE) came from the Greek words meaning 'siphon' and 'to run through', signifying the chronic excretion of an excessive volume of urine. Diabetes mellitus, because of its frequency, is probably the single most important metabolic disease and is widely recognized as one of the leading causes of death and disability in the United States. It affects every cell in the body and the essential biochemical processes that go on there. Diabetes has been linked to the western lifestyle, as it is uncommon in cultures consuming a more primitive diet. As cultures switch from their native diets to more commercial foods, their rate of diabetes increases, eventually reaching the same proportions seen in western societies. A great deal of research has been conducted into the possible aetiology of diabetes. Most of the prevalent ideas can be classified under one of the following categories: heredity, endocrine imbalance, dietary indiscretion and obesity, sequelae of infection, and severe and continued psychic stress. Although genetic factors appear important in determining susceptibility to diabetes, environmental and dietary factors are also important in its development and many have been identified. A diet high in refined fibre-depleted carbohydrate is believed to be the causative factor in many individuals, while a high intake of high-fibre complex carbohydrate foods is protective against diabetes. Obesity appears to be a significant factor, particularly considering the fact that 90% of Type 2 (see below) sufferers are obese. Even Continue reading >>

Traditional Chinese Medicine In The Treatment Of Diabetes.

Traditional Chinese Medicine In The Treatment Of Diabetes.

Abstract This review focuses on the efficacy and safety of Chinese medicine in the treatment of type-2 diabetes. Included were 84 controlled clinical studies of type-2 diabetes treated with Chinese medicine for at least 1 month. Reported outcomes were: symptom relief; improvement in glycemia, insulin resistance and secondary failure, and adverse events. Symptom relief was achieved in most (>80%) of the patients receiving Chinese medicine. Compared with orthodox drugs, Chinese medicine had a 1.2-fold (95% CI 1.2-1.3) increase in symptom relief. The relative risk of achieving a fasting blood glucose of <7.3 mmol/l or a postprandial blood glucose of <8.2 mmol/l was: 3.0 (95% CI 1.4-6.5) for Chinese medicine plus diet versus diet; 2.0 (95% CI 1.4-3.0) for Chinese medicine versus placebo; 1.8 (95% CI 1.4-2.3) for combined Chinese medicine and orthodox drugs versus Yuquan Wan (a classic Chinese herbal formula for diabetes), 1.5 (95% CI 1.4-1.7) for combined Chinese medicine and orthodox drugs vs. orthodox drugs, and 1.3 (95% CI 1.2-1.5) for Chinese medicine versus orthodox drugs. A fasting blood glucose of <8.2 mmol/l plus symptom relief was observed in 71-100% of the patients with secondary failure to oral anti-diabetic drugs. Serious adverse events including hypoglycemic coma and death were caused by adulteration with orthodox drugs, erroneous substitution, self-meditation, overdoses, and improper preparation. Chinese herbal medicine should be used cautiously with doctors' prescription and follow-up. Long-term clinical studies may disclose the effectiveness of Chinese medicine in reducing the mortality and morbidity of diabetic complications. Continue reading >>

Diabetes / Metabolic Syndrome

Diabetes / Metabolic Syndrome

Insulin-dependent Diabetes Type 1 - IDDM One form of diabetes, Type 1, eventually results in pancreatic beta cell damage and cell death, probably due to autoimmune disorder, but also now shown to be due to heavy metal toxins in the environment, such as arsenic and mercury from coal fired power plants, and other heavy industries (see links to scientific studies in Additional Information). As studies continue to elucidate the poorly understood etiopathology of Type 1 Diabetes, though, we see that the array of factors destroying the insulin producing beta cells of the pancreas represent a larger cycle of dysfunction. In 2016, experts at the Kumamoto University in Japan showed that the protein hormone oxytocin, linked to dysmetabolic syndromes, obesity and diabetes in recent years, protects the pancreatic beta cells from cytotoxic stress-induced cell death (PMID: 27143105). Oxytocin is a neuropeptide largely produced in the hypothalamus and distributed in circulation by the pituitary, and just a few years ago most scientists just assumed that its hormonal role was largely limited to childbirth mechanisms. Today, we see that oxytocin is highly involved in mood, memory, social instinct, addiction, and inflammatory regulation. We see from such study that the failure to acknowledge the more holistic nature of diabetic cause and pathology, and the stubborn insistence on treating it only be supplying deficient insulin, as well as calling other types of Metabolic Syndrome by the same name, has led to a great failure to prevent and treat this prevalent disease. This pancreatic beta cell damage caused by a number of factors results in the inability to produce enough insulin hormone with true diabetes. Synthetic insulin is usually injected daily by these patients with careful monitor Continue reading >>

Chinese Medicine For Diabetes Sufferers

Chinese Medicine For Diabetes Sufferers

The invention of insulin has had a profound and destiny-changing impact on people with IDDM (Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, also known as Type 1 diabetes). Proper use of insulin can significantly prolong life expectancy for patients with IDDM. However, insulin use does not guarantee that the patient will avoid diabetes complications. Today, even with modern developments in science that have improved the administration and absorption of insulin, as well as management of the disease, living with IDDM is very difficult for patients and their families. To date, Western Medicine does not fully understand IDDM, because its causes are multi-faceted and extremely complex. Modern medicine believes that diabetes can’t be cured, because it does not fully understand its causes. Aside from administering insulin injections for life, the world has no cure for Type 1 diabetes. Modern medicine thinks that Type 1 diabetes develops in stages, beginning with a genetic predisposition, causing an autoimmune stage, followed by a breakdown of the immune system, then a progressive deterioration of insulin cell function, and finally, the diabetes stage. In fact, no matter the type of diabetes, it is caused by an imbalanced metabolism and the loss or partial loss of function in various organs. It is a disease that has many causes and involves many organs and systems. EASTERN MEDICINE APPROACH Traditional Chinese Medicine offers an alternative explanation and treatment for most diabetic patients. Traditional Chinese remedies can be used, in tandem with insulin, to treat the pancreas and other damaged internal organ functions gradually, control blood sugar, and reduce insulin dosage over time. This treatment aims to slowly reduce insulin intake while recovering the pancreatic functions unti Continue reading >>

Acupuncture And Type 1 Diabetes

Acupuncture And Type 1 Diabetes

Acupuncture can be a very helpful tool in the management of Type 1 diabetes. Acupuncture is a form of Traditional Chinese Medicine in which tiny needles are placed at various points on the body to treat and prevent illness. In TCM, the body is viewed in a holistic way, and treatments are individualized to each patients presenting symptoms. Several research studies have shown that acupuncture can be helpful in the maintenance of Type 1 diabetes by: lowering blood glucose and regulating endocrine function [1] alleviating painful peripheral neuropathy and preserving nerve function [3] [4] increasing gastric emptying time (gastropareisis) [5] increasing circulation and range of motion in musculoskeletal conditions like frozen shoulder and trigger finger [6] In addition, acupuncture also works in a preventative capacity by supporting the bodys immune system to fight off colds and viruses. And as we T1Ds know, getting sick can cause major fluctuations in blood sugar control. The exact mechanisms of acupuncture arent fully understood, but scientific research has proven that acupuncture triggers the bodys regulatory systems to release chemicals that reduce pain and inflammation, stimulate the secretion of neurohormones and neurotransmitters to help the body restore homeostasis. The blood sugar lowering effects of acupuncture are believed to be due to the down-regulation of corstisol, a stress hormone that encourages the liver to create glucose, and by decreasing free-fatty acid concentration in the blood, which is believed to increase insulin sensitivity. A typical acupuncture treatment will include a consultation in which the practitioner will ask a variety of questions about all the systems of the body. This is a holistic medicine, meaning that everything going on in the bod Continue reading >>

Can Traditional Chinese Medicine Help People With Type I Diabetes? | Scrapbookpages Blog

Can Traditional Chinese Medicine Help People With Type I Diabetes? | Scrapbookpages Blog

Can Traditional Chinese Medicine help people with Type Idiabetes? Filed under: Health Tags: kidney deficiency , Traditional Chinese Medicine , Type II diabetes furtherglory @ 9:19 am Yesterday, I went to my TCM doctor to have acupuncture and get a refill on herb pills for the kidneys. I was very pleased to learn that my kidney pulse is now very strong and all the damage done by a stroke that I had just over a year ago has now been reversed. The doctor told me that the window of opportunity for reversing stroke damage is 6 months; thank God I made use of that 6-month window of opportunity. I took my daughter, who is 30 years younger, along with me for her first acupuncture treatment and a diagnosis of the condition of her heart and kidneys. She was shocked to hear that I have a better heart and better kidneys than she does. This time I questioned my doctor on the effectiveness of Traditional Chinese Medicine. I asked him if TCM could do anything for a 23-year-old friend of mine who has had Type I diabetes since she was 3 years old and has now been told by her Western doctor that she has failing kidneys. The first thing that my TCM doctor said was Is she on dialysis yet? When I told him that she was not that far gone yet, the doctor said that acupuncture and Chinese herbs can positively help kidney deficiency in Type I diabetes patients. My TCM doctor explained that Western doctors say that diabetes destroys the kidneys, but TCM teaches that kidney deficiency comes first and that Type I diabetes is caused by a pre-natal kidney deficiency. This is why Type I diabetes typically comes on in early childhood: The kidney damage started in the womb. TCM doctors determine the condition of the kidneys by taking the kidney pulse; they check the patients pulse at three different po Continue reading >>

Complementary Therapy Of Traditional Chinese Medicine For Blood Sugar Control In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes - Sciencedirect

Complementary Therapy Of Traditional Chinese Medicine For Blood Sugar Control In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes - Sciencedirect

Complementary therapy of traditional Chinese medicine for blood sugar control in a patient with type 1 diabetes Author links open overlay panel Ming-HueiChengd Ching-LiangHsiehb Chih-YuWange Chin-ChuanTsaif Che-ChangKuoDr.ac Using a case study to discuss the effects of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatments on Type 1 diabetes mellitus. A 4-year-old girl with sudden polyuria and nocturia (fasting plasma glucose level: 270mg/dL) was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Although multiple daily insulin injections were applied, her plasma glucose levels were still unstable. Therefore, she received a complementary TCM therapy by taking modified Liu-Wei-Di-Huang-Wan (3.0g/day; three times daily) for 3 months. After the treatments, her plasma glucose levels appeared to be more stable. HbA1c 6.5% and insulin injections were reduced to only once a day. The results suggest that complementary TCM therapy has the ability to assist some patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus in controlling their plasma glucose levels. Continue reading >>

Acupuncture, Chinese Medicine And Diabetes

Acupuncture, Chinese Medicine And Diabetes

What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic disease wherein the body is unable to properly metabolize sugar. More than 9 million Canadians are living with diabetes or prediabetes. Diabetes can be fatal condition and often leads to disability and damage to organs, blood vessels, and nerves. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) is the main symptom of the disease. The percentage of people with diabetes is rising rapidly as obesity increases. Complications of diabetes include blindness, heart disease, circulation problems, kidney disease, eye disease, and erectile dysfunction. Types and Symptoms of Diabetes There are three primary types of diabetes. Type 2 or “adult-onset” diabetes comprises 90% of diabetes cases. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body is unable to utilize insulin or produce enough insulin to control blood sugar levels. This leads to unbalanced blood sugar levels and symptoms including excessive thirst and urination, fatigue, and strong hunger, among other symptoms. Type 2 diabetes is associated with obesity and a high fat, high sugar diet. 90% of diabetics are overweight and older than 40. Insulin injections, dietary changes, exercise, and stress management are the primary forms of treatment. Diabetes drugs are used to treat complications. There can be side effects of diabetic drugs and they are often not effective at minimizing complications. Metformin and the TZD group of drugs are commonly used drugs. Many patients cannot use metformin or TZDs due to side effects. In type 1 diabetes the insulin producing cells in the pancreas have been damaged by the body’s immune system. Type 1 diabetics are unable to produce insulin and require insul in injections or else they will die. Approximately 10% of diabetes cases are type 1. Type 1 diabetes is usually considered Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes With Chinese Herbs

Treatment Of Diabetes With Chinese Herbs

by Subhuti Dharmananda, Ph.D., Director, Institute for Traditional Medicine, Portland, Oregon Diabetes has been described repeatedly in the ancient Chinese medical literature, and the disease has been treated with Chinese herbs for at least 2,000 years. In the Huang Di Nei Jing (1), the condition known as xiao ke is mentioned, and this is translated today as diabetes or diabetic exhaustion (the literal translation is emaciation-thirst). According to this ancient text, the syndrome arises from consuming too much fatty, sweet, or rich foods; it is said that it typically occurs among wealthy people: "you ask them to refrain from a rich diet, which they may resist." The description fits that of type 2, or insulin-independent diabetes mellitus, the most common form of diabetes that exists today. Two of the traditional formulas most frequently used in modern China and Japan for the treatment of diabetes were described in the Jin Gui Yao Lue (2), about 200 A.D. One is Rehmannia Eight Formula (Ba Wei Di Huang Tang), originally indicated for persons who showed weakness, fatigue, and copious urine excreted soon after drinking water; in some cases, this may have been diabetes as we know it today. The other is Ginseng and Gypsum Combination (Bai Hu Jia Ren Shen Tang), used more in modern Japan than China; it was indicated originally for severe thirst and fatigue and is considered ideal for diabetes of recent onset. In 752 A.D., the distinguished physician Wang Tao published the famous book Wai Tai Mi Yao, which was a comprehensive guide to medicine (3). In it, he mentioned that diabetes was indicated by sweet urine and he recommended the consumption of pork pancreas as a treatment, implying a conclusion that the pancreas was the organ involved in the disease (he also recommended an Continue reading >>

Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture And Diabetes

Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture And Diabetes

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is an ancient form of treatment that aims to maintain harmony and balance within the body. A number of therapeutic methods may be combined to produce a holistic effect. Whilst some aspects of TCM may result in benefits, there is little in the way of scientific proof to show that the theory behind TCM is valid. How does Chinese medicine work? Chinese medicine works to benefit the mind and body overall. Techniques used in Chinese medicine include: Chinese herbal medicine Acupuncture Diet therapy Mind body exercises such as qigong and t’ai chi Chinese massage (tui na) Chinese herbal medicine Chinese herbal medicine is centred on the use of plants, but also some minerals and animal products. These herbs are often combined in formulas and administered as capsules, powders or teas. Different herbs are chosen based on the person’s symptoms. These may be single herbs or a combination, with the different herbs playing different roles. Different herbs are chosen based on the person’s symptoms. These may be single herbs or a combination, with the different herbs playing different roles. [304] Acupuncture Acupuncture is the practise of inserting needles (4-25mm long) into specific areas of the body to stimulate sensory nerves. The stimulation of nerves can result in the release of chemicals in the body including endorphins. Research studies have demonstrated that acupuncture therapy may benefit peripheral diabetic neuropathy and reduce nerve pain. [305] [306] Evidence showing a positive effect of acupuncture on blood glucose levels are limited to animal studies. Diet therapy Diet therapy in Chinese medicine is based around eating natural whole foods. Chinese diet therapy puts forward the idea that diabetes is down to excess internal heat. Th Continue reading >>

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