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Children With Diabetes

Diabetes In Children And Teens

Diabetes In Children And Teens

Until recently, the common type of diabetes in children and teens was type 1. It was called juvenile diabetes. With Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose,or sugar, get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much sugar stays in the blood. Now younger people are also getting type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes used to be called adult-onset diabetes. But now it is becoming more common in children and teens, due to more obesity. With Type 2 diabetes, the body does not make or use insulin well. Children have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if they are overweight or have obesity, have a family history of diabetes, or are not active. Children who are African American, Hispanic, Native American/Alaska Native, Asian American, or Pacific Islander also have a higher risk. To lower the risk of type 2 diabetes in children Have them maintain a healthy weight Be sure they are physically active Have them eat smaller portions of healthy foods Limit time with the TV, computer, and video Children and teens with type 1 diabetes may need to take insulin. Type 2 diabetes may be controlled with diet and exercise. If not, patients will need to take oral diabetes medicines or insulin. A blood test called the A1C can check on how you are managing your diabetes. Continue reading >>

Welcome! - Children With Diabetes

Welcome! - Children With Diabetes

Share your experiences in the CWD Forums. The College Diabetes Network isdedicated to helping young adults with type 1 diabetestake ownership of their health and live a life without compromise. The Diabetes Patient Advocacy Coalition (DPAC) works on policy matters that impact families living with diabetes. The National Diabetes Volunteer Leadership Council is committed to improving the safety and quality of life for all children, adults and their families who are living with diabetes. Life for a Child provides insulin and diabetes supplies to those in need.Make a difference. Insulin for Life provides insulin and diabetes supplies to those in need.Make a difference. Diabetes-kids is a free forum and the largest virtual German-speaking self-help group for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their parents. This internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a physician or other health care professional. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Be Prevented?

Can Diabetes Be Prevented?

en espaolSe puede prevenir la diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose , the main type of sugar in the blood. Glucose, which comes from the foods we eat, is the major source of energy needed to fuel the body. To use glucose, the body needs the hormone insulin . But in people withdiabetes, the body either can't make insulin or the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should. Type 1 diabetes, in which the immune system attacks the pancreas and destroys the cells that make insulin. Type 2 diabetes, in which the pancreas can still make insulin, but the body doesn't respond to it properly. In both types of diabetes, glucose can't get into the cells normally. This causes a rise in blood sugar levels , which can make someone sick if not treated. Type 1 diabetes can't be prevented. Doctors can't even tell who will get it and who won't. No one knows for sure what causes type 1 diabetes, but scientists think it has something to do with genes . But just getting the genes for diabetes isn't usually enough. In most cases, a child has to be exposed to something else like a virus to get type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes isn't contagious, so kids and teens can't catch it from another person or pass it along to friends or family members. And eating too much sugar doesn't cause type 1 diabetes, either. There's no reliable way to predict who will get type 1 diabetes, but blood tests can find early signs of it. These tests aren't done routinely, however, because doctors don't have any way to stop a child from developing the disease, even if the tests are positive. Unlike type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes can sometimes be prevented. Excessive weight gain, obesity , and a sedentary lifestyle are all things that put a person at risk for type 2 diabetes. In the Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children

Diabetes In Children

Diabetes mellitus is a very serious metabolic disorder that prevents the normal breakdown and use of food, especially sugars (carbohydrates) by the body. It can damage the heart, blood vessels, kidneys, and neurological system and can cause a progressive loss of vision over many years. Forms of Diabetes There are multiple forms of diabetes but the two most common forms are called type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Both forms can occur at any age, but a child is more likely to be diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. About type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is caused by inadequate production of the hormone insulin by the pancreas. When that happens, the body is unable to properly metabolize sugars, which build up in the bloodstream; these sugars (also called glucose) cannot be used by the body and are excreted in the urine. This leads to the major symptoms of diabetes: Increased urination Thirst Increased appetite Weight loss While type 1 diabetes can begin at any age, there are peak periods at about ages five to six and then again at ages eleven to thirteen. The first sign is often an increase in the frequency and amount of urination. This is often most notable at night, including recurrence of bedwetting in children who are potty-trained. However, the other cardinal symptoms must be present as well for the diagnosis of diabetes: Your child will complain of being thirsty and tired, will begin to lose weight, and will have an increase in appetite. It is important to identify these symptoms early, since children that are diagnosed late may become ill, because of the high blood sugars and dehydration, requiring intravenous insulin and fluids in a pediatric emergency room or critical care unit to stabilize their condition. Controlling and Managing Diabetes Although there is no cure for dia Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose , the main type of sugar in the blood. Our bodies break down the foods we eat into glucose and other nutrients we need, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream from the gastrointestinal tract. The glucose level in the blood rises after a meal and triggers the pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the bloodstream. But in people with diabetes, the body either can't make or can't respond to insulin properly. Insulin works like a key that opens the doors to cells and lets the glucose in. Without insulin, glucose can't get into the cells (the doors are "locked" and there is no key) and so it stays in the bloodstream. As a result, the level of sugar in the blood remains higher than normal. High blood sugar levels are a problem because they can cause a number of health problems. The two types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. Both make blood sugar levels higher than normal but they do so in different ways. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas loses its ability to make insulin because the body's  immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin. No one knows exactly why this happens, but scientists think it has something to do with genes. But just getting the genes for diabetes isn't usually enough. A person probably would then have to be exposed to something else — like a virus — to get type 1 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes , the pancreas still makes insulin but the body doesn't respond to it normally. Glucose is less able to enter the cells and do its job of supplying energy (a problem called insulin resistance ). This raises the blood sugar level, so the pancreas works hard to make even more insulin. Eventually, this strain can make the pancreas unable to produce enough ins Continue reading >>

Young Children With Type 1 Diabetes: Challenges, Research, And Future Directions

Young Children With Type 1 Diabetes: Challenges, Research, And Future Directions

Go to: The incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in young children (age <6 years) is rising. Diabetes management guidelines offered by the American Diabetes Association and health care teams understandably place a high burden of responsibility on caregivers to check young children's blood glucose levels, administer insulin, and monitor diet and physical activity with the ultimate goal of maintaining tight glycemic control. Unfortunately, this tight control is needed during a vulnerable developmental period when behavior is unpredictable, T1D can be physiologically difficult to control, parenting stress can be elevated, and caregivers are strained by normal child caretaking routines. Despite the potentially different management needs, specific education and clinical services for managing diabetes in young children are rarely offered, and behavioral research with this young child age group has been limited in scope and quantity. Research findings pertinent to young children with T1D are reviewed, and potential clinical implications, as well as areas for future research, are discussed. Go to: Introduction Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is one of the most prevalent chronic illnesses diagnosed in childhood and occurs in 1:400-600 American children [1]. An increasing number of young children are impacted by T1D [2, 3], with 15-20% of new diagnoses occurring in children under age 5 [4]. This is an alarming figure and the reason for the increased incidence in this youngest age group is unknown. Diabetes management in young children can be challenging for a variety of reasons, including physiological factors such as increased insulin sensitivity and a potentially shortened honeymoon period. Daily T1D management is further complicated by young children's cognitive, behavioral, and social-emo Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Children

Type 2 Diabetes In Children

For decades, type 2 diabetes was considered an adults-only condition. In fact, type 2 diabetes was once called adult-onset diabetes. But what was once a disease mainly faced by adults is becoming more common in children. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects how the body metabolizes sugar (glucose). Over 5,000 people under the age of 20 were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 2008 and 2009. Until 10 years ago, type 2 diabetes accounted for less than 3% of all newly diagnosed diabetes cases in adolescents; it now comprises 45% of all such cases. It’s more common in those aged 10-19 and in non-Caucasian populations, including African Americans, Native Americans, Asian/Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics. Being overweight is closely tied to the development of type 2 diabetes. Overweight children have an increased likelihood of insulin resistance. As the body struggles to regulate insulin, high blood sugar leads to a number of potentially serious health problems. In the past 30 years, obesity in children has doubled and obesity in adolescents has quadrupled, according to the CDC. Genetics may also play a role. For instance, the risk of type 2 diabetes increases if one parent or both parents has the condition. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes are not always easy to spot. In most cases, the disease develops gradually, making the symptoms hard to detect. Many people do not feel any symptoms. In other cases, children may not show any obvious signs. If you believe your child has diabetes, keep an eye out for these signs: Excessive fatigue: If your child seems extraordinarily tired or sleepy, their body may not have enough sugar to properly fuel their normal body functions. Excessive thirst: Children who have excessive thirst may have high blood sugar levels. Frequent Continue reading >>

Help For Families Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

Help For Families Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

Help for Families Newly Diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes Finding out your child has type 1 diabetes can be scary. Most people will have many questions and concerns. It's only natural. We're here to help guide you, to care for your child and help you and your entire family move forward with confidence. A type 1 diabetes diagnosis can be challenging because it requires constant attention and care. But, so does childhood! You have a bond with your child that drives your natural instincts, so with a little help and knowledge, you, your child and your entire family can thrive and live well with diabetes. Coping with a Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis Video Finding out your child has type 1 diabetes can be scary. Many people have had similar feelings after the diagnosis. See how 6 families coped with the diagnosis and learned to manage their kids diabetes. Children who require inpatient care (a hospital stay) for diabetes will work with a team specially trained to support children with diabetes and their families. This diabetes team is here to encourage and guide you as you learn to care for your child with diabetes. For three days, the Diabetes Center team will provide you with the information and skills you need to safely take care of your child at home. The aim of the DCC is to help you continue doing all the things you used to do before your child was diagnosed. Your child will be able to play sports, go trick-or-treating and attend birthday parties, just like any other child. All you need is a plan. Your family will be assigned a team. Meet the team at the Diabetes Center. CHOP taught me everything I needed to know. I am no longer frightened and am ready to tackle any obstacles that stand in my way! Liam embraces his Type 1 diabetes. He is very open about his condition and share Continue reading >>

Care Of Children With Diabetes In The School And Day Care Setting

Care Of Children With Diabetes In The School And Day Care Setting

Federal laws that protect children with diabetes include Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1991 (originally the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975), and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Under these laws, diabetes has been considered to be a disability, and it is illegal for schools and/or day care centers to discriminate against children with disabilities. In addition, any school that receives federal funding or any facility considered open to the public must reasonably accommodate the special needs of children with diabetes. Indeed, federal law requires an individualized assessment of any child with diabetes. The required accommodations should be provided within the child’s usual school setting with as little disruption to the school’s and the child’s routine as possible and allowing the child full participation in all school activities. Despite these protections, children in the school and day care setting still face discrimination. For example, some day care centers may refuse admission to children with diabetes, and children in the classroom may not be provided the assistance necessary to monitor blood glucose and may be prohibited from eating needed snacks. The American Diabetes Association works to ensure the safe and fair treatment of children with diabetes in the school and day care setting (13–15). Diabetes care in schools Appropriate diabetes care in the school and day care setting is necessary for the child’s immediate safety, long-term well being, and optimal academic performance. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial showed a significant link between blood glucose control and the later development of diabetes complications, with improved glycemic control dec Continue reading >>

Children's Medical Services - Diabetes Program

Children's Medical Services - Diabetes Program

Learning your child has diabetes may be quite a shock. When your child is diagnosed with diabetes, it is easy to feel frightened and overwhelmed by all the information you're given. Diabetes is one of the most common medical conditions in children. It is a chronic medical condition in which the body does not make or properly use insulin, a hormone that is needed to change glucose (sugar) and other food to energy. When diabetes occurs in children, it is called juvenile-onset diabetes. This type of diabetes is caused when the body's immune system destroys the cells that make insulin. People with juvenile-onset diabetes must have daily shots of insulin to be healthy. Children and their families can work together to help manage diabetes. Kids with diabetes can have very normal childhoods with training and awareness about their unique condition. The Children's Medical Services (CMS) Diabetes program provides coordinated, family-centered care by a team of medical professionals with experience in treating children with diabetes. This health care team will teach you and your child about the importance of diabetes management, healthy eating habits, diabetes education, and how to incorporate physical activity into your child's daily routine. All these components are important strategies to help children with diabetes live long and healthy lives. CMS referral centers are located in Jacksonville, Tampa/St. Petersburg, Gainesville, and Miami. Infants, children and adolescents under age 21 who are enrolled in the CMS network and have been diagnosed with diabetes, are eligible for services provided by this program. To find out if your child is eligible to receive services by the CMS Diabetes program, contact your child's primary care provider, or your local CMS office. Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children And Teens: Signs And Symptoms

Diabetes In Children And Teens: Signs And Symptoms

With more than a third of diabetes cases in the United States occurring in people over the age of 65, diabetes is often referred to as an age-related condition. But around 208,000 children and adolescents are estimated to have diabetes, and this number is increasing. Type 1 diabetes is the most common form of the condition among children and adolescents. A 2009 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that type 1 diabetes prevalence stands at 1.93 in every 1,000 children and adolescents, while type 2 diabetes affects 0.24 in every 1,000. In 2014, Medical News Today reported that, based on a study published in JAMA, rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have increased significantly among American children and teenagers. The study found that incidence of type 1 diabetes in children aged up to 9 years increased by 21 percent between 2001 and 2009, while incidence of type 2 diabetes among youths aged 10-19 years rose by 30.5 percent. The researchers note: "The increases in prevalence reported herein are important because such youth with diabetes will enter adulthood with several years of disease duration, difficulty in treatment, an increased risk of early complications and increased frequency of diabetes during reproductive years, which may further increase diabetes in the next generation." Contents of this article: Here are some key points about diabetes in children. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Type 1 and 2 diabetes are both increasing in the youth of America Often, the symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children develop over just a few weeks If type 1 diabetes is not spotted, the child can develop diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) What is diabetes in children? Type 1 diabetes in children, previously called juve Continue reading >>

How To Tell If Your Child Has Type 1 Diabetes

How To Tell If Your Child Has Type 1 Diabetes

Every parent knows babies and small children sleep and drink a lot. But if your child is suddenly much drowsier or thirstier than usual, it could be a symptom of type 1 diabetes . It used to be called juvenile diabetes because most of the people who got it were young children. Your child could get type 1 diabetes as an infant , or later, as a toddler or a teen. Most often, it appears after age 5. But some people dont get it until their late 30s. Know the symptoms of type 1 diabetes so you can help keep your child healthy. Its not the same as classic or type 2 diabetes , which is often linked to obesity and seen in adults (but it can occur in children too, usually after age 10). If your child has type 1 diabetes, it means her pancreas -- an organ in the upper-right side of the belly -- makes little or no insulin . The condition is an autoimmune disorder , which means it happens when the bodys defense system attacks and destroys cells that make insulin . Symptoms of type 1 diabetes in infants and children can start very suddenly. Keep an eye out for these signs in your baby or child: Breath that smells fruity, sweet, or like wine Peeing more often (infants and toddlers may have more wet diapers than usual) Type 1 diabetes may cause sudden, extreme swings in blood sugar that can be dangerous. If you notice any of the symptoms of diabetes in your child, its important to get her a physical exam as soon as possible, so her doctor can begin treatment right away. The doctor will do a simple urine test to check for glucose (sugar) in the urine. A more involved test, called an oral glucose tolerance test , can tell for certain if its type 1 diabetes. Your child will need to follow a special diet before this procedure. If your child has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes Continue reading >>

Colorado Kids With Diabetes | Just Another Wordpress Site

Colorado Kids With Diabetes | Just Another Wordpress Site

Editors: Leah Wyckoff, MS, BSN, RN, NCSN & Kathy Patrick,MA, RN, NCSN, FNASN In Colorado, it is estimated that there are over 2,200 students who have been diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Research has shown that intensive management of diabetes helps decrease the long-term complication of the disease. Students with diabetes require special management of their health care needs at school to allow them to access the same educational opportunities as their peers and to keep them safe at school. In August 2005, the American Diabetes Association, Colorado Association of School Nurses, Colorado Department of Education and the Colorado Department of Health and Environment in conjunction with other stakeholders such as healthcare providers, parents and other community partners launched theDiabetes Care in Colorado Schools Collaborative renamedColorado Kids with Diabetes Care and Prevention Collaborative. The vision of the collaborative is to assure quality care and safety for Colorados children with diabetes within the school community. The collaborative accomplishments include developing: Statewide standards and guidelines for the safe management of children with diabetes in schools Standardized health and medical forms to be utilized by school nurses, parents and healthcare providers Parent School Toolkit to assist families in educating school personnel Innovative Diabetes Resource Nurse Consultant Program that connects nurses with expert training in diabetes with school nurses Continue reading >>

What Life Is Like For A Kid With Diabetes

What Life Is Like For A Kid With Diabetes

What Life is Like for a Kid with Diabetes If your child has been recently diagnosed with diabetes, you may have some concerns about how it will affect his or her childhood. What may surprise you to learn is that kids with diabetes can do everything regular kids do, and live a normal, active life they just have to be more careful about planning their daily activities. According to Debbie Butler, L.I.C.S.W., C.D.E. , Clinical Social Worker in Pediatrics and Behavioral and Mental Health , Joslin Diabetes Center, Children with diabetes should be able to do all of the activities that they would have done if they were not diagnosed with diabetes. It is our job as healthcare providers to adjust your childs diabetes management plan around your childs daily routine. A common misconception is that kids with diabetes cant eat anything with sugar, including things like birthday cake, cookies, and ice cream. The truth is that kids can eat these foods in moderation; they just need to carefully plan what else they eat that day, and adjust insulin doses accordingly. A healthy meal plan for a child with diabetes is actually the same for a child without diabetes. Kids can also play sports and take part in physical activities just like other children. Once again, you just need to plan first talking with their doctor, and then learning the routine of glucose testing, planned eating, and insulin, that works best for them. Of course children, cant, and shouldnt, be dealing with their diabetes alone. Diabetes affects the whole family, and its very important that all members of the family take an active role in your childs diabetes. One of the most important things parents can do to help their child with their diabetes is to continue to stay involved with day to day management tasks and find Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Children Living With The Disease

Type 1 Diabetes: Children Living With The Disease

Type 1 Diabetes: Children Living With the Disease This topic covers type 1 diabetes in children. For information about type 1 diabetes in adults and about preventing complications from type 1 diabetes, see the topic Type 1 Diabetes . Type 1 diabetes develops when the pancreas stops making insulin . Your body needs insulin to let sugar (glucose) move from the blood into the body's cells, where it can be used for energy or stored for later use. Without insulin, the sugar cannot get into the cells to do its work. It stays in the blood instead. This can cause high blood sugar levels. A person has diabetes when the blood sugar is too high. What will it be like for your child to live with type 1 diabetes? Your child can live a long, healthy life by learning to manage his or her diabetes. It will become a big part of your and your child's life. You play a major role in helping your child take charge of his or her diabetes care. Let your child do as much of the care as possible. At the same time, give your child the support and guidance he or she needs. The key to managing diabetes is to keep blood sugar levels in a target range. To do this, your child needs to take insulin, eat about the same amount of carbohydrate at each meal, and exercise. Part of your child's daily routine also includes checking his or her blood sugar levels at certain times, as advised by your doctor. The longer a person has diabetes, the more likely he or she is to have problems, such as diseases of the eyes, heart, blood vessels, nerves, and kidneys. For some reason, children seem protected from these problems during childhood. But if your child can control his or her blood sugar levels every day, it may help prevent problems later on. Even when you are careful and do all the right things, your child c Continue reading >>

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