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Chia Seeds Gestational Diabetes

Anyone Not Doing A Bedtime Snack? Help With Fasting!

Anyone Not Doing A Bedtime Snack? Help With Fasting!

Anyone NOT doing a bedtime snack? Help with fasting! My life/work schedule doesn't permit a bedtime snack, as I eat dinner around 730pm, go to bed around 930pm, and get up for work at 5am. I also have a toddler to deal with so not super flexible in this. My numbers post meals are always quite low, so I'm not concerned about that, but morning fasting is a bit high (5.5/5.7 which is equivalent to about 100). Anyone on a prohibitive schedule and have issues with fasting? Last night I tried a nocturnal snack and had milk and chia seeds at midnight (set alarm). This seemed to work when I had GD with my daughter, but this morning it was the same. I've tried a bed time snack twice, both times I had worse fasting numbers. Once was cheese and pita crackers (15g carbs) and last night I tried full fat vanilla ice cream, 125ml serving. Tonight I'm going to try boiled eggs at midnight. If that doesnt work, I will probably just go back to no snack before bed. It's so frustrating. My numbers barely go up after meals, even eating carbs (i.e. Steak, half baked potato and broccoli and my numbers before and 1hr post dinner were exactly the same the other day (5.2 / 90). I've not been over range for any meals other than one super greasy burger that I ate for dinner somewhat late. Different than when I had GD with my first, which I was able to diet control pretty easily but numbers definitely weren't this low, and I had to be somewhat cautious with what I ate. I'm starting to think maybe I'm not eating enough at night? When I had the one high number 8.9/160 (greasy dinner burger) it was the only day that week where my fasting the next morning was in range. Ugh, so frustrating! The schedule definitely is the hardest! Tried ice cream last night about 1.5hrs post dinner, and still slightly hi Continue reading >>

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Note From Mommypotamus: When I wrote about natural alternatives to the glucola test, many of you asked what to do if gestational diabetes is diagnosed and confirmed. Today I am so excited to welcome Lily Nichols, RDN, CDE, CLT, a registered nutritionist and gestational diabetes educator, who will be filling us in on how to take a real food approach to GD. Lily is the author of Real Food for Gestational Diabetes, a thoroughly researched guide filled with practical guidance and easy-to-follow instructions. It is, hands down, the best resource on the subject that I have found so far. If you or someone you know is looking for information on managing GD with real food, I highly recommend it! Gestational diabetes is never part of any mom’s plan . . . But it is the most common complication of pregnancy, affecting up to 18% of pregnant women. Yet there are many misconceptions about this diagnosis, both in conventional health care and the integrative medicine world. As a registered dietician/nutritionist and certified diabetes educator who specializes in gestational diabetes, I’m going to clear up some of the confusion for you today. Whether or not you have gestational diabetes, this post will help you understand how it develops and why it’s important to maintain normal blood sugar (for all pregnant women, really). I’ll also be sharing why the typical gestational diabetes diet fails and why a real food, nutrient-dense, lower carbohydrate approach is ideal for managing gestational diabetes. What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is usually defined as diabetes that develops or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. However, it can also be defined as “insulin resistance” or “carbohydrate intolerance” during pregnancy. I prefer to rely on the latter descrip Continue reading >>

Nikki Hopp Talks To Gestational Diabetes Recipes

Nikki Hopp Talks To Gestational Diabetes Recipes

Nikki Hopp talks to Gestational Diabetes Recipes I met Nikki on our Facebook page . She had responded to another mum who was having a tough time dealing with gestational diabetes which I thought was pretty awesome of her. Then Nikki posted about chia seeds, low glycemic substitutions and eating raw food and I thought I have to talk with this mama. At the time of this interview Nikki was 40 weeks and ready! Sointroducing Nikki! GDRecipes: Nikki can you tell us about where you live and what a day in your life is like? Nikki: I live in Wisconsin in the U.S. I am mom to two boys (ages 3.5 years and 23 months) and am currently 40+ weeks pregnant. Our day always starts with juice! Our juice is: bananas, spinach, cucumber, honeydew, mango, nut mix, wheat germ, and water blended in a Vitamix blender. My kids love it and I always tolerated it well with GD. Food is a big part of our lives; my husband and I love to cook healthy meals with quality ingredients (local organic vegetables, grass-fed beef, herbs, etc). When were not cooking (or cleaning up the kitchen =) ), we like to be outside playing or geocaching!* I like to be fairly active, even at 40+ weeks pregnant. I am also a full-time pharmacist and my husband is a stay-at-home dad and dog-walker. GDRecipes: You were diagnosed with gestational diabetes in your third pregnancy. Was this the first time and how did you take the diagnosis? Nikki: I had no problems with blood sugars in the other pregnancies, and even though I have a strong family history of diabetes, I really never thought I was at risk because I feel I live a very healthy, active lifestyle. With this pregnancy, I even opted not to do the traditional glucose challenge (drink the disgusting orange syrup). I did, however, agree to eat a high carb meal and then test Continue reading >>

Managing Gestational Diabetes Naturally

Managing Gestational Diabetes Naturally

Once you have learned that you have gestational diabetes, it is up to you to handle your blood sugar levels. The American Diabetes Association states that there is no known cure for gestational diabetes, but that treating the condition is done in two ways: Diet and Exercise. Even if you are required to monitor your glucose levels daily and administer insulin shots, you will still be asked to change your diet and increase your exercise level. (Always ask to alter your lifestyle and retest before accepting insulin shots.) As a chiropractor, I have had the opportunity to discuss this topic in length with many clients. Im going to break down my gestational diabetes diet and exercise recommendations into easy to manage ideas that you can incorporate into your daily life without feeling deprived, and at the same time lower your chances of having a c-section. Remember to consult your midwife or doctor before altering your lifestyle drastically. The Standard American Diet (SAD) does not meet our nutritional needs. 6-11 servings of breads and grains per day? Are you kidding? Thats a diabetics nightmare. Its easy to see just why so many people are experiencing conditions such as gestational diabetes. We are addicted to sugar and other foods that break down into sugar. We cannot let go of dairy or pesticide-sprayed gluten and wheat. We cant put down the GMO-filled, processed products. But we are suffering. Not only are we suffering, but our children are too even in utero. You do not have to wait until the diagnosis has been handed to you before you change your diet. Ideally, you should alter and follow a healthier diet and lifestyle before you are pregnant, or at least once pregnancy is confirmed. But, if you are now wondering how to help manage your condition, then it is definit Continue reading >>

My Gestational Diabetes Experience

My Gestational Diabetes Experience

By Florencia Tagliavini, The Nutramilk Nutritionist I had just gotten through a beautiful 2nd trimester, watching my belly grow, feeling my babymove and just in awe of this miracle growing inside me. I had been really taking care of myself,carefully watching what I was eating and getting my daily exercise.I tend to eat pretty healthy anyway but now I was feeding my little growing baby and so I reallytook on that responsibility. As a dietitian, I studied nutrition in all stages of life, includingpregnancy so I knew exactly what I needed to eat to have a healthy baby and make sure mybody did not get depleted of nutrients as well. Third trimester came around and it was time for the dreaded glucose test. My first test resultscame out bad but I just thought it was a false positive as I knew that could happen.Unfortunately, it was not a false positive. What I most wanted to avoid during pregnancy,happened!Gestational Diabetes! Yup! I was pretty shocked, I felt I had done a pretty good job at takingcare of myself and my baby and I definitely had the correct knowledge to know that I had donethe right things.In my case, I was not upset because I would not be able to enjoy certain foods such as cake, ice cream or a lot of high carb foods for the remainder of my pregnancy, since I mostly stayed awayfrom those foods anyway. It was like a slap to my ego, I guess. Thinking I could control everything especially since I knewwhat I was doing. I did understand the physiology behind gestational diabetes and how hormonal changes in thethird trimester can cause this condition but still, why did I have to get it? I knew so many peoplethat didnt get it and they didnt even take care of themselves. It was hard to accept andfrustrating. Feelings of guilt clouded me; did I really do a good job e Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Chia Seeds During Pregnancy, Plus Recipes!

Benefits Of Chia Seeds During Pregnancy, Plus Recipes!

You are here: Gestational Diabetes Gestational Diabetes Tips Benefits of Chia Seeds during Pregnancy, Plus Recipes! Benefits of Chia Seeds during Pregnancy, Plus Recipes! Posted by Admin on July 17th, 2015 09:05 AM Chia seeds have actually been taken into consideration a dietary supplement by Native Americans for centuries, however its simply been just recently that they have actually come to be more mainstream. And for great reason! Find out much more concerning them, as well as exactly how consuming them can profit both you and your baby. Well additionally be sharing some recipes that will certainly help you easily integrate these effective little seeds right into your diet. Edible seeds of the mint family members, chia seeds are extremely low in calories, yet very high in nutrients. These seeds are so abundant in anti-oxidants that they can be kept for up to 4 years before shedding their nutritional worth. They can be included to a variety of foods, consisting of soups, smoothie mixes, and covered dishes. They expand when contributed to liquid. As formerly stated, chia seeds are extremely high in nutrients, consisting of omega-3, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, protein, copper, zinc, iron, niacin, fiber, boron, and also calcium. Lets take a better look at just what that implies for you and also baby. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for mind health and also property development not just for you, yet also for your infant. You can get this vital nutrient in fish, fish oil supplements, or in nuts, but fish consists of mercury, as well as many nuts have a quite high body fat material. On the other hand, chia consists of no mercury, has a reduced fat content, and also can be saved for up to four years. Your calcium intake is important to the skeletal property developm Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetesif You Have It Once Will You Have It Again?

Gestational Diabetesif You Have It Once Will You Have It Again?

July 11, 2013 by Mary Earhart: Pregnancy, Childbirth Leave a Comment If you are in a high-risk category for gestational diabetes, test your blood glucose frequently. Image by michaelaw It is a common belief that women who have high blood sugar, or gestational diabetes mellitus, during one pregnancy will most likely have the disease in all future pregnancies and that each subsequent baby will grow larger than the last one. But this is not always the case. Decoded Pregnancy interviewed Camille Johnson, a 32 year old mother of two who is expecting her third baby soon. Camilles first baby was born by cesarean section 4 years ago and her second child delivered vaginally just two years later. Camille and her husband moved from Oregon to southern California about the time they learned she was pregnant again. I wanted another vaginal birth but the doctors and hospitals in this area were not eager to facilitate that. I found a midwife about an hour from my home that would work with me in a birth center setting, which is how I delivered naturally last time. I do carry a few extra pounds, my weight before pregnancy was 289 and I am only 5 ft 4 inches tall. The doctor I saw for my early prenatal care warned that obesity could impact my babys health. I knew that was true because I had gestational diabetes with my last pregnancy. This time I was determined to eat right and control my weight. So far I have been successful. Camille Started Checking her Blood Sugar With a Glucometer Before She Reached 20 Weeks Gestation Like most women with gestational diabetes, her blood glucose before breakfast, or fasting blood sugar, was normal. A reading two hours after meals might be elevated and would change depending on the foods Camille ate and whether or not she had gone for a brisk 20-minute Continue reading >>

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

While most women need to be careful about their diets, others have to be especially careful not to develop gestational diabetes. I’m on the crusade to fight diabetes in all of us, but I’m especially concerned about women with gestational diabetes because their babies are automatically at risk for developing diabetes related issues down the line. And we don’t want that! So let’s discuss a plan to keep moms as healthy as possible during this magical time known as pregnancy. How Did I Get Gestational Diabetes? Insulin is the hormone responsible for getting sugar out of the blood and inside the cells. Our bodies can typically regulate the amount of insulin it needs to produce to get sugar out of the bloodstream and into the cells. But during gestational diabetes, the hormones in the placenta that help the baby develop properly also block insulin from working in mommy’s body – causing insulin resistance. So instead of getting moved into the cells, all this sugar becomes stuck outside the cells, creating high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycemia. How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect Babies? Diabetic women who become pregnant are at higher risk of developing birth defects. But since gestational diabetes only affects the baby after it’s been formed, but is still growing, the risk becomes macrosomia, or “fat” baby. During gestational diabetes, mom’s pancreas has to work harder to produce more insulin to get rid of all the sugar in the blood that the cells are not absorbing. The placenta doesn’t absorb insulin, but it does let sugar pass through. This extra sugar goes right to the baby. When the baby develops high blood sugar levels, the baby’s pancreas starts to produce additional insulin to eliminate all the extra sugar in the blood, just like mom’s do Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Chia Seeds During Pregnancy, Plus Recipes!

Benefits Of Chia Seeds During Pregnancy, Plus Recipes!

Benefits of Chia Seeds during Pregnancy, Plus Recipes! Chia seeds have been considered a dietary supplement by Native Americans for centuries, but its only been recently that theyve become more mainstream. And for very good reason! Learn more about them, and how consuming them can benefit both you and your baby. Well also be sharing some recipes that will help you easily incorporate these powerful little seeds into your diet. Edible seeds of the mint family, chia seeds are very low in calories, but very high in nutrients. In fact, these seeds are so rich in antioxidants that they can be stored for up to four years before losing their nutritional value. They can be added to a number of foods, including soups, smoothies, and casseroles. They expand when added to liquid. As previously mentioned, chia seeds are extremely high in nutrients, including omega-3, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, protein, copper, zinc, iron, niacin, fiber, boron, and calcium. Lets take a closer look at what that means for you and baby. Omega-3 fatty acids are important for brain health and developmentnot just for you, but also for your baby. You can get this vital nutrient in fish, fish oil supplements, or in nuts, but fish contains mercury, and most nuts have a very high fat content. In contrast, chia contains no mercury, has a low fat content, and can be stored for up to four years. Your calcium intake is vital to the skeletal development of your baby, especially in the last trimester. Chia seeds contain five times as much calcium as milk, and they contain boron, another important critical nutrient for healthy bones. Iron is needed to develop red blood cells that transport oxygen throughout the body. An increase in this nutrient is essential during pregnancy to accommodate the increase in blo Continue reading >>

Dealing With Gestational Diabetes Naturally

Dealing With Gestational Diabetes Naturally

Dealing with Gestational Diabetes Naturally by kerryfarriss | Feb 15, 2017 | Mama Health , Pregnancy | 0 comments If youve been diagnosed with gestational diabetes it may throw you into a state of shock and confusion, especially if youve been eating a nutritious diet during your pregnancy. Pregnancy is time of constantly changing hormones so try to be gentle on yourself and calm yourself with the knowledge that there are a few natural steps you can take to ensure the health of you and your growing bub. Symptoms of gestational diabetes are usually mild but complications to mum and bub can occur so its important to take advice from you doctor. A doctor may prescribe insulin therapy if required. As the chance of both mother and baby developing Type II diabetes is increased after gestational diabetes, these steps could be important in the prevention of future problems. Like many health issues in our modern world, a lack of nutrients combined with the over-consumption of highly processed non-foods with no nutritional value will be a major contributing factor. After consulting with your healthcare professional, follow these guidelines and listen to your body. Eat regularly. Consume nutritious food every 2-3 hours. A major cause of all types of diabetes is irregular eating when the body learns to expect a hit of sugar and calories but is then subjected to long periods with no nutrients. This can negatively affect insulin receptors and mess with your metabolism. Eliminate sugar and refined grains. Get rid of the white stuff like biscuits, lollies, cakes, ice cream, white bread, flour and rice. A well-balanced diet of wholefoods will be of great benefit to you and your growing baby. Consume carbohydrates with protein and good fats. Carbs are what affect your blood sugar so if y Continue reading >>

Chia Seed Pudding Archives Gestational Diabetes Uk

Chia Seed Pudding Archives Gestational Diabetes Uk

Gestational Diabetes Easter Happy Easter ladies, time to start planning your Gestational Diabetes Easter! To help you with Read More Gestational diabetes risk factors and future diagnosis of diabetes Gestational diabetes risk factors and future diagnosis of diabetes in both the mother and child We felt it Read More Happy Chinese New Year! Kung Hei Fat Choi! For 2018 Chinese New Year we are celebrating the year Read More Pancake Day or Shrove Tuesday Pancake Day is almost upon us (Tuesday 13th February 2018) and many ladies Read More Gestational diabetes Party food Gestational diabetes party food can be hard to try to figure out and Read More Gestational diabetes Christmas Survival Guide! Here's your ultimate survival guide to a gestational diabetes Christmas. Dedicated to all Read More Dreading Halloween with GD? Is the thought of Trick or Treating filling you with dread and turning into Read More Happy 3rd Birthday Gestational Diabetes UK Mums Facebook group! To celebrate 3 years since the launch of the Read More Happy Mother's Day! With Mother's Day coming up soon in the UK (Sunday 26th March), I thought it Read More Soup It's cold outside and you want something warm and filling. You know a salad just isn't going Read More Continue reading >>

Eating To Control Blood Sugar + The Gestational Diabetes Vegan Diet

Eating To Control Blood Sugar + The Gestational Diabetes Vegan Diet

Last night, after dinner, after I checked my post-dinner blood sugar (I have to poke myself 4 times a day to do this), I cried. It was 147, & according to my guidelines, it needs to be under 140 post-meals. I miscalculated the carbohydrates in “refried” beans & had nearly a cup, rather than 2/3 cups I should have had, which is just a slight difference, but enough to put me over the edge. It’s an overwhelming feeling to feel like your health is in your control, yet at the same time you feel a little out of control. It’s also a depressing thought to think about having a long term health issue that affects every aspect of your life. Believe me, I realize gestational diabetes (which is temporary), is nothing like a lifelong type-1 diabetic, or some other much more all-encompassing long-term disease or health issue. But, it’s giving me a glimpse of that life, & I have a greater empathy, though still limited understanding, of what those individuals might be going through. Fortunately, as I mentioned in Tuesday’s post (which thank you, by the way, for so many great comments!), I’m feeling so much better since I’ve made some tweeks in my diet. Here are some truths I’ve always known about myself, some even from a young age: 1) Sugar, especially too much sugar, makes me wacky. I love sweet things, as you well know, but I absolutely have to keep my sugar consumption (even unrefined sugars) in check. 2) My body is sensitive to foods. And like the princess & the pea, I’m overly-aware of any & all feelings/discomforts/issues going on with my body. At times it’s annoying, but overall, I’m glad my body speaks to me, & I try to listen & act accordingly, as best I can. Here are some things I’ve realized recently: 1) The importance of exercise for controlling blo Continue reading >>

Bad Numbers & Chia Seeds

Bad Numbers & Chia Seeds

A few weeks ago, I returned from my doctor, where he exclaimed, "What happened? Your sugars are through the roof!" I was stunned, but I don't know why I should have been. Since Thanksgiving, I haven't been eating healthy and, soon after Christmas, I took a 3-week vacation and ate my way from Florida to Maine! I had gained 8 pounds. I looked my doctor in the eye and told the truth. I didn't make excuses, admitted I'd been off my food plan for several months and hadn't been testing regularly, so I had no clue what my BG trends had been. He gave me three months to get my A1C below 7 again, or he highly recommends that I go back on insulin. I was devastated. I went home, felt sorry for myself for having this horrible disease for the 100th+ time and, yes, I cried. Then I made a confession to myself: Perfectionist though I am, I am only human and, just like everyone else that struggles with diabetes, I make mistakes. It took me a few days, but I have forgiven myself, I've begun to eat healthy consistently and have even begun to regain some enthusiasm for vegetables again. My progress is slow, but I'm on track with my food plan again and some weight has been lost. I hope my BG numbers will begin to go down but, so far, they remain high. Now, what are Chia Seeds? They are the tiny, edible "Chia Pet" seeds that are incredibly high in fiber, low in carbs, a good source of Omega 3 fatty acids, high in calcium and protein and help me to feel full longer and may aid in my weight loss! I learned about them from a program I watched on Netflix called, "Hungry for Change." (BTW, if you can watch this highly motivational documentary yourself, please do! Try Netflix or check out the DVD from your local library.) Since learning about this product, I purchased some Chia Seeds from Whole Foo Continue reading >>

The Relation Between Chia Seeds And Pregnancy

The Relation Between Chia Seeds And Pregnancy

There are specific health conditions out there that make people always keen about knowing whether what they are eating is good for their health or otherwise might negatively affect it; such as being pregnant for example. Pregnancy and breastfeeding phase are both important and will require the women to make sure that chia seeds will be helpful or will keep her the way she is without bringing any side effects to her or her infant. Chia seeds have different benefits but some people consider them risky when it comes to pregnancy and breastfeeding. To know whether you are allowed to consume chia seeds when you are pregnant or else stay away from it, you should keep reading this article. Chia seeds are also given the name Salvia Hispanica and they are a species of a flowering plant in the mint family known as Lamiaceae. Chia is found in Southern Mexico and Guatemala, and it is still used in both its ground and whole forms in those countries as well as Paraguay, Bolivia, and Argentina. Chia seeds were cultivated by the Aztecs who used to consider it one of the energy sources that they could depend on and even their famous Tarahumara tribe was famous for their runners who used to drink chia Iskiate in order to run longer without getting easily tired. The chia Iskiate is now known as the chia Fresca, which is a combination of chia seeds, water, and lemon, and which is considered one of the recipes that people use when they are trying to get off some pounds and lose weight. There are other several benefits for chia seeds other than being used for weight loss or as a source of energy; they are a good source for omega-3 fatty acids , B vitamins, calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus and zinc and each one of these could help the body in a specific way. When it comes to c Continue reading >>

***gosh Darn Gestational Diabetes Support Thread***

***gosh Darn Gestational Diabetes Support Thread***

***Gosh darn Gestational Diabetes Support Thread*** Chat with other moms of children born in 2013. Welcome to the JustMommies Message Boards. We pride ourselves on having the friendliest and most welcoming forums for moms and moms to be! Please take a moment and register for free so you can be a part of our growing community of mothers. If you have any problems registering please drop an email to [emailprotected] . Our community is moderated by our moderation team so you won't see spam or offensive messages posted on our forums. Each of our message boards is hosted by JustMommies hosts, whose names are listed at the top each board. We hope you find our message boards friendly, helpful, and fun to be on! First off, I am sorry that you have to go thru this! I have no experience with it, so I can only imagine how hard it is for you! I hope this thread offers you a place to vent, share ideas, give support, etc! You CAN do this!!! BlessednHighlyFavored , shana1979 and Myopia like this. Again, thanks for making the thread, Kris. I'm actually a bit aggrevated right now. I can't get into the dietician until next Wednesday. So, I don't have the stuff to monitor my sugars yet, which means I have no clue if what I've already adjusted is working at all. I feel kind of woozy, though, since I cut the sugars and am trying to not go over a certain amount of carbs each meal and snack. I'm eating protein with every one, aiming for max 45 carbs for big meals (including aiming for low glycemic stuff in most instances) and 15-20 for snacks. Trying to space out eating to every 2 1/2-3 hours. I don't think my body likes this! And I of course get hungry at times in between. I just wanted to get the first dietician appt over with and get the sugar monitoring stuff so I can adjust as needed! Al Continue reading >>

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