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Chia Seeds For Diabetes

9 Chia Seeds Benefits + Side Effects

9 Chia Seeds Benefits + Side Effects

Chia seeds (salvia hispanica) have become one of the most popular superfoods in the health community. They’re easy to digest when prepared properly and a very versatile ingredient that adds easily to recipes. Plus, chia seeds benefits are plentiful. Chia seeds are the best-kept secret of the nutrition industry! Download our simple guide to learn how they can improve your health and wellness routine. Originally grown in Mexico, the seeds were highly valued for their medicinal properties and nutritional value. In fact, they were even used as currency. The chia seed is nutrient-dense and packs a punch of energy-boosting power. Aztec warriors ate chia seeds to give them high energy and endurance. They said just one spoonful of chia could sustain them for 24 hours. Chia means “strength” in the Mayan language, and chia seeds were known as “runners’ food” because runners and warriors would use them as fuel while running long distances or during battle. Not only that, but recent research has found that the chia seeds benefits are even greater than we realized. Chia seeds benefits include promoting healthy skin, reducing signs of aging, supporting the heart and digestive system, building stronger bones and muscles, and more. They’ve even been linked to helping reverse diabetes. Continue reading for possible side effects, preparation instructions and a complete list of chia seeds benefits and nutrients. Chia Seed Nutrition Profile The reason chia seeds are so beneficial is due to them being rich in fiber, omega-3 fats, protein, vitamins and minerals. For example, one ounce (28 grams) of chia seeds contain about: (1) 137 calories 12.3 grams carbohydrates 4.4 grams protein 8.6 grams fat 10.6 grams fiber 0.6 milligram manganese (30 percent DV) 265 milligrams phosphorus Continue reading >>

Worried About Type 2 Diabetes? Learn How Fiber Can Help You!

Worried About Type 2 Diabetes? Learn How Fiber Can Help You!

The news will tell you that type 2 Diabetes is on the rise in the USA, and around the world, There are many studies, theories & articles going around trying to explain the rise. 3. More artificial flavors instead of health-benefit packed real herbs, spices & seasonings into sugars as you’re digesting (this is good for blood sugar levels.) 2. When fats are removed from foods, they’ll taste bland and no-one will want to buy them...so sugar is usually added for flavor instead. and 3. Real-food herbs & spices like cinnamon can have positive effects on natural insulin use. Obviously, removing fiber, adding sugar, and If you don’t have diabetes, it’s not too late to take steps to prevent it. And if you already have it, there’s a new way to help manage it. Studies have proven that the earlier you tackle any blood sugar problems, the better your chances are for success. It has also been made clear that losing excess weight can help ward off diabetes. If you could lose weight without being hungry, if you could add back precious fiber to foods, and if you could eat something You don’t have to turn all your habits upside-down or start taking expensive pills. All you need is the power of easy-to-eat fiber. The Chia Seed, while not well known, is actually a Superfood. It was lost for centuries, ever since the ancient Aztecs used its super-nutrition for their armies. With the ability to keep people feeling full, and being 23% complete protein by weight, it isn’t any wonder they were able to conquer so many lands. Every tiny seed was a powerhouse of nutrition, vitamins and essential omega-3 oils. They were light enough to carry, and Chia Seeds are actually one of the easiest things you can possibly add to your diet. It’s as simple as sprinkling them onto anything you a Continue reading >>

Eating To Control Blood Sugar + The Gestational Diabetes Vegan Diet

Eating To Control Blood Sugar + The Gestational Diabetes Vegan Diet

Last night, after dinner, after I checked my post-dinner blood sugar (I have to poke myself 4 times a day to do this), I cried. It was 147, & according to my guidelines, it needs to be under 140 post-meals. I miscalculated the carbohydrates in “refried” beans & had nearly a cup, rather than 2/3 cups I should have had, which is just a slight difference, but enough to put me over the edge. It’s an overwhelming feeling to feel like your health is in your control, yet at the same time you feel a little out of control. It’s also a depressing thought to think about having a long term health issue that affects every aspect of your life. Believe me, I realize gestational diabetes (which is temporary), is nothing like a lifelong type-1 diabetic, or some other much more all-encompassing long-term disease or health issue. But, it’s giving me a glimpse of that life, & I have a greater empathy, though still limited understanding, of what those individuals might be going through. Fortunately, as I mentioned in Tuesday’s post (which thank you, by the way, for so many great comments!), I’m feeling so much better since I’ve made some tweeks in my diet. Here are some truths I’ve always known about myself, some even from a young age: 1) Sugar, especially too much sugar, makes me wacky. I love sweet things, as you well know, but I absolutely have to keep my sugar consumption (even unrefined sugars) in check. 2) My body is sensitive to foods. And like the princess & the pea, I’m overly-aware of any & all feelings/discomforts/issues going on with my body. At times it’s annoying, but overall, I’m glad my body speaks to me, & I try to listen & act accordingly, as best I can. Here are some things I’ve realized recently: 1) The importance of exercise for controlling blo Continue reading >>

Chia Seeds And Diabetes

Chia Seeds And Diabetes

Chia seeds are one of those foods that's been proclaimed to be a ‘superfood'. And the topic of chia seeds and diabetes seems to come up frequently with questions such as: Can people with diabetes eat chia seeds? Are there any benefits of chia seeds for diabetes? Is chia harmful for diabetes? Is chia good for diabetics? These are all similar questions so in this post we're going to explore the ins and outs of chia. What Is Chia? According to Wikipedia: “Salvia hispanica, commonly known as chia, is a species of flowering plant in the mint family, Lamiaceae, native to central and southern Mexico and Guatemala”. It's an ancient seed that dates back to the 16th Century and is thought to be used by the Aztecs. The seeds themselves are harvested from the flowers and can be used for multiple purposes, which we'll cover in more detail soon. Chia Seed Nutrition As can be seen by this nutrition table, chia seeds are full of fiber, healthy fats such as omega 3, protein, and loads of vitamins and minerals. In fact, as far as seeds go, they really are a ‘complete' food source so we can see why it's been eaten for centuries. Please pin, share, or tweet this post Please pin, share, or tweet this post Data calculated from USDA Nutrient Database Can People With Diabetes Eat Chia Seeds? The short and small answer to this question is YES. Chia is a healthy food for diabetics to eat. Are There Any Benefits Of Chia For Diabetes? As a matter of fact there are quite a number of benefits. Improves glucose and insulin tolerance In a recent study in rats, one group of rats were fed a high fat, high fructose (sugar) diet (HFF), and the other group were fed a high fat, high fructose (sugar) diet along with chia seeds and chia oil (HFFC). The rats fed the HFF diet developed glucose intoleran Continue reading >>

11 Proven Health Benefits Of Chia Seeds

11 Proven Health Benefits Of Chia Seeds

Chia seeds are among the healthiest foods on the planet. They are loaded with nutrients that can have important benefits for your body and brain. Here are 11 health benefits of chia seeds that are supported by human studies. Chia seeds are tiny black seeds from the plant Salvia Hispanica, which is related to the mint. This plant grows natively in South America. Chia seeds were an important food for the Aztecs and Mayans back in the day. They prized them for their ability to provide sustainable energy... in fact, "chia" is the ancient Mayan word for "strength." Despite their ancient history as a dietary staple, only recently did chia seeds become recognized as a modern day superfood. In the past few years, they have exploded in popularity and are now consumed by health conscious people all over the world. Don't be fooled by the size... these tiny seeds pack a powerful nutritional punch. A 1 ounce (28 grams) serving of chia seeds contains (1, 2): Fiber: 11 grams. Protein: 4 grams. Fat: 9 grams (5 of which are Omega-3s). Calcium: 18% of the RDA. Manganese: 30% of the RDA. Magnesium: 30% of the RDA. Phosphorus: 27% of the RDA. They also contain a decent amount of Zinc, Vitamin B3 (Niacin), Potassium, Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) and Vitamin B2. This is particularly impressive when you consider that this is just a single ounce, which supplies only 137 calories and one gram of digestible carbohydrate! Just so that we're all on the same page, 1 ounce equals 28 grams, or about 2 tablespoons. Interestingly... if you subtract the fiber, which may not end up as usable calories for the body, chia seeds only contain 101 calories per ounce. This makes them one of the world's best sources of several important nutrients, calorie for calorie. To top things off, chia seeds are a "whole grain" f Continue reading >>

6 Science Backed Benefits Of Chia Seeds In Diabetes

6 Science Backed Benefits Of Chia Seeds In Diabetes

Diabetes is a health condition that includes Diabetes Insipidus(DI) and Diabetes Mellitus(DM). Diabetes insipidus is caused due to the kidney’s inability to respond to Anti Diuretic Hormone (ADH). ADH is a hormone secreted by the hypothalamus; it is responsible for regulating and balancing the amount of water in the blood. Diabetes mellitus can be further categorized as Type 1 and Type2. Diabetes mellitus is characterized by high blood glucose levels, insulin resistance and lack of production of insulin. Insulin is secreted by the β cells in the pancreas. Insulin regulates the glucose levels in the blood by sending out signals to liver, fat and muscle cells to take in the glucose thus reducing the blood glucose levels. A defect in this blood glucose regulation mechanism leads to Diabetes mellitus. The cause of Diabetes can be genetic or can be a result of an unhealthy lifestyle. Diabetes is a chronic disease. People diagnosed with Diabetes need to take care of their diet and health overall in order to not spike the levels of glucose in the blood. If the disease is not kept under check it may lead to further complications like cardiovascular defects, gangrene and retinopathy. The best way to avoid any further complications is to have good food and a healthy lifestyle. Chia seed is one such super food which helps manage diabetes. What are Chia Seeds? Salvia hispanica, the plant species whose seed is categorized under the umbrella of Super Foods, is native to the central and southern regions of Mexico and Gautemala. Chia as the plant is popularly known was a major commodity in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica. Historic and economic studies have made it evident that Salvia hispanica or Chia was as the staple food of that region and was given even more importance than maize. The Continue reading >>

U Of T Study Finds Chia Pet Seed Relative, Salba Seed, Has Big Health Benefits For Diabetes Patients

U Of T Study Finds Chia Pet Seed Relative, Salba Seed, Has Big Health Benefits For Diabetes Patients

The Globe and Mail reports that U of T researchers will publish a study in the U.S. journal "Diabetes Care" showing that eating the Salba seed, a cousin of the popular Chia pet seed, will have a remarkable impact on diabetes and high blood pressure. The Salba seed grown in Central and South America and used extensively by the ancient Aztecs has long been thought to have exceptional nutritional properties. The Salba seed is a variation on the popular Chia pet seed often seen growing out of the heads of pottery frogs and turtles in gift shops. Please be aware that eating your Chia pet seed will not have the same impact on your health as eating Salba seed. Dr.Vuksan, the lead researcher on the study, and Associate Director of the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre at St. Michaels' Hospital in Toronto reports that, "You simply don't see many other ingredients that can do what Salba seed can. You add this to any food, even bad food, and it will improve your health." Researchers found that the nutritional impact of the Salba seed was more consistent and significant that its relative Chia pet seed. High blood pressure is a significant problem for diabetes sufferers. The U of T study indicates when type-2 diabetes patients ate up to four teaspoons of Salba or Chia seed a day it had a major impact on high blood pressure readings. Another effect was an increase in EPA, a beneficial omega-3 fatty acid most often found in fish. These results are good news for diabetes sufferers. Salba seeds are small and almost tasteless. They can be sprinkled on cereal or salads and included in baking with no impact on the taste of the food. Working a daily dose of Salba seeds into your diet can have a real impact on improving your health. Food manufacturers have been quick to Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

1 / 8 Embrace Superfood Diversity You probably know that salmon is a good choice if you have diabetes because it’s rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which may improve your body’s ability to respond to insulin. Broccoli is another good choice because it’s high in fiber and may help to reverse the heart damage diabetes can cause. But salmon and broccoli aren’t the only superfoods for a healthy diabetes diet. "Eating a variety of different types of nutrient-dense foods creates the healthiest diet since there is no one food that provides all of the essential nutrients our body needs for optimum health," says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a health, food, and fitness coach in Arizona and dietitian with the Mayo Clinic Diet online program. Liven up your meal plan and enhance your health by adding these seven good-for-diabetes foods to your shopping list. Continue reading >>

4 Ways To Prevent Prediabetes And Completely Reverse Type 2 Diabetes (with Video)

4 Ways To Prevent Prediabetes And Completely Reverse Type 2 Diabetes (with Video)

According to the CDC more than 29 million Americans now have diabetes. That’s over 9% of the total population! It’s astonishing to think that this is just one health condition that the American population suffers from and it’s about one out of ten people that suffer from it. Not only that but 79 million Americans are prediabetic, which means they have higher blood glucose levels than normal and are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Diabetes is a big problem and if you suffer from it, are prediabetic of already have signs of blood sugar imbalances in general then these tips will help you. First things first though, there is a lot of misinformation on diabetes online and in the general public that needs to be cleared up. The first big lie perpetuated is that diabetes may run in your family and that it is not reversible. Type 2 diabetes is completely reversible with the proper nutrition and understanding insulin sensitivity properly. In fact, there’s a great movie called ‘ Simply Raw: Reversing Diabetes in 30 Days‘ and multiple people in that film reverse their diabetes on an organic raw food diet. I don’t think you need to eat 100% raw and only stick to the foods in that film to reverse or prevent diabetes, but it will open your eyes. Here’s the trailer for this film: Understanding insulin and leptin sensitivity and resistance and how these work in your body will help you understand how diabetes works and how to work for the support of your body in creating balance and reversing it. Insulin resistance for example occurs when the pancreas produces insulin to support the liver because the liver has been overloaded with sugar. The pancreas works overtime to produce this hormone (insulin) to support the liver. As this continues Continue reading >>

Bad Numbers & Chia Seeds

Bad Numbers & Chia Seeds

A few weeks ago, I returned from my doctor, where he exclaimed, "What happened? Your sugars are through the roof!" I was stunned, but I don't know why I should have been. Since Thanksgiving, I haven't been eating healthy and, soon after Christmas, I took a 3-week vacation and ate my way from Florida to Maine! I had gained 8 pounds. I looked my doctor in the eye and told the truth. I didn't make excuses, admitted I'd been off my food plan for several months and hadn't been testing regularly, so I had no clue what my BG trends had been. He gave me three months to get my A1C below 7 again, or he highly recommends that I go back on insulin. I was devastated. I went home, felt sorry for myself for having this horrible disease for the 100th+ time and, yes, I cried. Then I made a confession to myself: Perfectionist though I am, I am only human and, just like everyone else that struggles with diabetes, I make mistakes. It took me a few days, but I have forgiven myself, I've begun to eat healthy consistently and have even begun to regain some enthusiasm for vegetables again. My progress is slow, but I'm on track with my food plan again and some weight has been lost. I hope my BG numbers will begin to go down but, so far, they remain high. Now, what are Chia Seeds? They are the tiny, edible "Chia Pet" seeds that are incredibly high in fiber, low in carbs, a good source of Omega 3 fatty acids, high in calcium and protein and help me to feel full longer and may aid in my weight loss! I learned about them from a program I watched on Netflix called, "Hungry for Change." (BTW, if you can watch this highly motivational documentary yourself, please do! Try Netflix or check out the DVD from your local library.) Since learning about this product, I purchased some Chia Seeds from Whole Foo Continue reading >>

Flax Seed, Pumpkin Seed, Chia Seed & Diabetes

Flax Seed, Pumpkin Seed, Chia Seed & Diabetes

Seeds and nuts are often referred to as the ultimate “super foods” because they contain nutrients, protein and “good” fat. Seeds are also antioxidant-rich and satisfy your appetite. People with diabetes should add seeds in small amounts to their daily diet because they are delicious, nutritious and conveniently portable. Seeds are an easy way to add protein, fat and nutrients to your diet. They are a leading source of energy to keep you going all day without the highs and lows people get from sugary snacks. Seeds are also portable so you can carry them as a quick snack on-the-go. Flavorful flax seeds help combat high cholesterol and coronary artery disease, two common concerns for people with diabetes. They can be used to reduce inflammation and minimize the symptoms of many gastrointestinal conditions. There is evidence that adding flax seeds can help people shed pounds and improve a kidney infection. These seeds may also protect against cancer and arthritis because of the way the body breaks them down. Flaxseed oil is used externally for inflammation, eczema and boils. Flax seeds are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, dietary fiber and protein. Flaxseed meal is easier to digest and absorb than the seeds themselves. Use flaxseed meal in breads and muffins for a nutty taste. Flax seeds can be ground in a coffee grinder to make fresh meal, which should be stored in the refrigerator or freezer. Grinding it as you need it keeps the oils more fresh and potent. Sprinkle flaxseed meal over any finished dish for a slightly nutty flavor and use it to thicken stew or soup or sprinkle on a salad. Pumpkin seeds have heart-healthy fat along with plenty of vitamins and minerals such as vitamin K and zinc. They also make you feel fuller longer so they are a great sna Continue reading >>

A Three-minute Diabetes Breakfast That Changes Lives?

A Three-minute Diabetes Breakfast That Changes Lives?

A video preview of chia seed pudding from the Food Chapter of Bright Spots & Landmines! Mark your calendar for May 9, when Bright Spots & Landmines: The Diabetes Guide I Wish Someone Had Handed Me will launch at diaTribe.org/brightspots! The video on chia seed pudding below summarizes just one of the 43 Bright Spots discussed in the book. For those who prefer reading, the written details on how to make chia pudding are below the video. I’ve now made this recipe about 200 times, and after sharing some of the advantages last fall – little impact on blood glucose, very filling and tasty, three minutes to make without cooking, inexpensive, and stocked with Omega 3s and fiber – I’ve been shocked at the positive response. Said one diaTribe reader, “Adam, thank you so much. I’ve been looking for a breakfast like this for 25 years! It has changed my life.” How to Make Chia Seed Pudding To make chia seed pudding, I mix 1/4 cup of chia seeds, 1/2 cup of water, a hearty amount of cinnamon, 1-2 tbsp of coconut oil, and some combination of toppings like frozen raspberries, shelled sunflower seeds, and nuts. After about a minute of stirring with a spoon and about a minute sitting, it turns into a pudding-like gel. It can also be made in a batch ahead of time by quadrupling the recipe. The water can be hot or cold, depending on your preferences, and the pudding can be made thicker by using less water. Chocolate or vanilla protein powder or pure vanilla extract can be added for additional flavor. Parents have even emailed me with enthusiasm for this recipe – “My son loves this!” – meaning this isn’t just a weird concoction for health nuts like me. There is nothing “exact” about this recipe, so you can experiment with the components and toppings to fit your t Continue reading >>

We're Nuts About Nuts, Seeds, Peanut Butter & Nut Butters!

We're Nuts About Nuts, Seeds, Peanut Butter & Nut Butters!

Nuts, seeds, peanut butter and nut butters are a great source of protein and natural fats. This means that they make for a great 'GD food pairing tool' to eat with carbohydrates to slow down the absorption of glucose into the bloodstream. But with so many different products available to buy, which ones should you choose and are any better than others? Here we share with you all our hints and tips for choosing the best nuts, seeds, peanut butter and nut butters... Nuts Nuts are a great source of protein and natural fat but they do still contain carbohydrates, meaning that some nuts are better than others. The best choice for nuts are nuts which are not salted or flavoured. Looking at this chart we can see that cashew nuts and pistachio nuts contain the highest amounts of carbohydrates, making them the nuts which aren't so good for pairing if eaten in larger amounts. Another nut that is high in carbohydrates, which isn't listed on this chart is the chestnut, so be wary of these carby nuts at Christmas! Highest in protein are the peanut and almonds. With macademia, walnuts and pecans being the highest in fats. That makes these nuts better for food pairing. Flavoured or coated nuts Salted, dry roasted, sweet chilli, BBQ, salt & vinegar, yoghurt coated, crispy shells, chocolate coated, you name it they seem make nuts covered or coated in so many different things. Savoury nuts included salted, dry roasted and flavoured contain high amounts of salt, so bear this in mind when eating them. Choosing nuts which are yoghurt or chocolate coated means that you are significantly increasing the carb amount, making these type of nuts possibly suitable for a treat, but would not be advisable as such good 'food pairing tools'. What about snickers, peanut M&Ms & Reese's peanut butter cups? Continue reading >>

A Chia Pet For Diabetes?

A Chia Pet For Diabetes?

Like swallows returning to San Juan Capistrano in the spring, Chia Pets begin appearing every December on late-night television and in the gift aisles of many stores. (Full disclaimer: I bought one for the Yankee Swap at Harvard Health Publication’s annual Christmas party.) Water these ceramic figures and they sprout a green “fur” from seeds embedded on the surface. Silly? Sure, that’s why they are such a hit. What you might not know is that the seeds may someday be a real gift for people with diabetes. Chia seeds come from a plant formally known as Salvia hispanica, which is a member of the mint family. It gets its common name from the Aztec word “chian,” meaning oily, because the herb’s small, black seeds are rich in oils. It was a staple food for the Aztecs, and legend has it that their runners relied on chia seeds for fuel as they carried messages one hundred or more miles in a day. Chia seeds contain more healthy omega-3 fats and fiber than flax or other grain seeds. They are also a good source of protein and antioxidants. Some preliminary research indicates that chia seeds could—I stress the “could”—help people with diabetes control their blood sugar and protect their hearts. Studies in animals show that a chia-rich diet lowers harmful LDL cholesterol and triglycerides while increasing beneficial HDL cholesterol. And a white-seeded variant of chia, called Salba, helped diabetic volunteers control their blood sugar, as well as their blood pressure and new markers of cardiac risk, such as C-reactive protein. The results were published in the journal Diabetes Care. Before you rush out to buy Salba, which is sold online and in health food stores, keep in mind that it worked only slightly better than wheat bran (which is less expensive and easier Continue reading >>

Ways Chia Seed Benefits Diabetics

Ways Chia Seed Benefits Diabetics

Learn How Chia Seed Benefits Diabetics by Helping to Control Blood Sugar Naturally! There are a several reports that suggest that Chia seed benefits diabetics, but wow does it really work? We are going to examine chia seeds benefits for diabetes in this post today! So keep reading…! If you are diabetic or have a loved one who is diagnosed with diabetes, you must have heard a lot about the importance of diet and exercise to diabetics. A lot of people have been able to control type 11 diabetes naturally by eating the right foods and exercise! Even though some people may not be able to successfully control their diabetes by eating the right foods, one cannot deny the fact that nutrition plays a vital role in improving the health of diabetics. My dad and mom were diabetics, so we were always looking for ways to improve their health. Doctors recommended fiber-rich diet for them. My dad was able to control his type 2 diabetes by eating the right types of foods. Although my mum’s case wasn’t as successful as my dad’s, healthy diet helped to improve her quality of life before she finally passed on to GLORY. There are a lot of fiber rich foods that diabetic can take advantage of and Chia seed is one of them. What is Chia Seed? It is one of a few complete protein plants. Chia belongs to the mint and sage family. It is also known as salvia hispanic, with salvia meaning sage in Spanish. Chia is rich in minerals, vitamins and proteins, omega 3 fats, antioxidants and fiber. This is why it is considered a superfood. The term superfood refers to a nutrient-rich food that is considered to have health benefits. There is currently a revival of chia seed consumption as more people become aware of its nutritional value. The Diabetes Epidemic and the Need for a Solution! Diabetes is Continue reading >>

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