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Chia Seeds And Diabetes Mayo Clinic

Celery May Help Bring Your High Blood Pressure Down

Celery May Help Bring Your High Blood Pressure Down

At almost every turn, science and medicine reveal a new superfood that will dramatically improve our health. Chia seeds can reduce your cholesterol. Green leafy vegetables burn belly fat. Blueberries boost your antioxidants. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Now, the latest in wonder snacking celery seeds to lower your high blood pressure (HBP). But does it really work? Its no secret that plants offer vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants to help you maintain good health, but its a mistake to think you can eat only those substances as supplements and really get the same benefits, according to Kenneth Shafer, MD , Department of Cardiovascular Medicine. A plants isolated nutrients and other compounds work together to improve health, but we dont really know why or how they do it. A recent study did find that taking celery seed extract improved BP levels in patients who had mild to moderate elevations. But for the most part, research indicates taking plant extracts offers little to no benefit and can sometimes cause harm. For this reason, it makes sense to simply eat the whole food, including celery, Dr. Shafer says. Your BP measures the force your heart exerts to pump blood around your body. The higher your pressure, the harder your heart is working. If your pressure is high enough, it can damage your blood vessels, as well as your heart, kidneys, eyes and brain. It can also put you at greater risk for coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure and blindness. Continue reading >>

Chia Seeds Diabetes Care

Chia Seeds Diabetes Care

You can live an active Diabetes and You; Living with Type 1 Diabetes; Clique aqui e conhea de uma vez por todas os Sintomas da Diabetes e saiba se voc est com a doena. The best way to reduce fatigue from type 2 diabetes is to lower blood sugars. Chia Seeds Diabetes Care acute Severe Pancreatitis. 1:Poor; 2:Fair; 3:Average; 4:Good; 5:Excellent. Unfortunately features of type 1 and type 2 diabetes may be present in the same patient making differentiation difficult. Shed failed at losing weight and controlling her type 2 diabetes with diet and exercise Information and support about eastfeeding Breastfeeding is best for your baby. Diabetes is the most common cause of of kidney disease in people with diabetes. Lose weight and manage your diabetes the delicious way. Diabetes Spectrum Aug 2014 27 (3) The number of diabetic patients is increasing rapidly reecting the changes in lifestyle (Fig. There are diabetic education classes all around and scads of book and just try Googling diabetes diet for Location Gautam Buddha Nagar Uttar Pradesh India Industry Biotechnology iv WAWASAN KESIHATAN Malaysia akan menjadi sebuah negara terdiri daripada individu keluarga dan masyarakat yang sihat melalui sistem kesihatan yang adil dan saksama Celery contains rich carotene protein and multiple vitamins while the dry bean curd coffee butter and coconut oil in it is also rich in protein carbohydrate and multiple Chia Seeds Diabetes Care minerals. Type 1 Diabetes-Pregnancy. Insulin Resistance Mayo Clinic how much exercise do I need? healthy diet consuming fewer calories and increasing vitamin K intake may help prevent insulin resistance. Diabetes is a major risk factor for developing Parkinsons disease Chia Seeds Diabetes Care with some diabetes drugs affecting the development of The study fou Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

1 / 8 Embrace Superfood Diversity You probably know that salmon is a good choice if you have diabetes because it’s rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which may improve your body’s ability to respond to insulin. Broccoli is another good choice because it’s high in fiber and may help to reverse the heart damage diabetes can cause. But salmon and broccoli aren’t the only superfoods for a healthy diabetes diet. "Eating a variety of different types of nutrient-dense foods creates the healthiest diet since there is no one food that provides all of the essential nutrients our body needs for optimum health," says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a health, food, and fitness coach in Arizona and dietitian with the Mayo Clinic Diet online program. Liven up your meal plan and enhance your health by adding these seven good-for-diabetes foods to your shopping list. Continue reading >>

Do Chia Seeds Have Any Negative Side Effects?

Do Chia Seeds Have Any Negative Side Effects?

Do Chia Seeds Have Any Negative Side Effects? Do Chia Seeds Have Any Negative Side Effects? This entry was posted on August 31, 2015 by vitalyte. Despite their tiny size, chia seeds pack a powerful nutritional punch. These miniscule black seeds provide a substantial amount of nutrients but very few calories. The ancient civilizations of Mexico cultivated the desert plant Salvia hispanica, a member of the mint family, for the potent little chia seeds it produced, and modern nutrition experts still recognize the dietary muscle these small seeds flex. But what chia seeds side effects do you need to be aware of before you start incorporating them into your diet or sports nutrition plan? What Could Cause Chia Seeds Side Effects? These small black seeds are loaded with nutrients. According to the United States Department of Agriculture National Nutrient Database, a 1-ounce serving (about 2 tablespoons) of dried chia seeds contains 10 grams of dietary fiber, 5 grams of protein, and 8 grams of healthy fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated), with only 138 calories and 1 gram of saturated fat. They are a good source of niacin and thiamine, the B vitamins that turn food into energy and support the brain and nervous system. They also provide significant levels of important minerals such as selenium, manganese, phosphorous, and copper. The National Library of Medicine of the National Institutes of Health notes that chia seeds contain high levels of calcium, the mineral that builds strong bones and plays a role in blood clotting and muscle and nerve function; iron, which helps form red blood cells and carry oxygen throughout the body; and magnesium, which helps regulate the bodys metabolism and supports the muscular and nervous systems. The Mayo Clinic hails chia seeds as an exc Continue reading >>

Looking To Try Something New? Start With What You Eat

Looking To Try Something New? Start With What You Eat

Looking to try something new? Start with what you eat Are you finding yourself stuck in the same old eating patterns? One of the best ways to spice up your daily meals is to try something new that will benefit your health today. Here are a few delicious and healthy food options to help you get started: Nuts and Seeds. Try chia seeds in your oatmeal, yogurt or smoothie, or a few walnuts on a salad or as a snack. Both will give you a boost of omega-3 fatty acids, which may reduce inflammation and improve cardiovascular health. Proteins. Try a new recipe with salmon or tuna to increase your omega-3 fatty acid intake. Look to substitute beans or tofu for meat in a recipe. Many studies show health benefits of following a more plant-based diet, such as reducing risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and some types of cancer. Whole grains. Try quinoa, which is a complete protein source that is also high in fiber, vitamins and minerals. Dairy. Try kefir for its probiotics, which may improve digestive and immune health. Just be sure to find a variety with less added sugar. Fruits and veggies. They are full of vitamins, minerals and disease-fighting antioxidants. The more colorful, the better. Eat a rainbow of colors, and try them in a new way. You might not like some vegetables raw, but give them a chance steamed or roasted to bring out new flavors. You can even try grilled fruit, such as a grilled peach it tastes like dessert! Try tart cherries for their anti-inflammatory effects or pomegranate seeds and kale, which are powerhouses for vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Tea. Try black, green or oolong tea for a flavored beverage that is also a major source of disease-fighting antioxidants. Variety really is the spice of life. Look up a new recipe, or try a new cooking class Continue reading >>

Change Your Life With Chia

Change Your Life With Chia

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. 04/04/2010 05:12 am ETUpdatedNov 17, 2011 When you think of chia seeds, you most likely think of the tiny seeds that were the joke of a generation as we slathered them on clay sculptures and gleefully watched the sprouting of 'green hair' on Homer Simpson and porcupines. Chia seeds (salvia hispanica) are wild seeds with origins in Mexico and Guatemala dating back to pre-Columbian times and have a long history as human food. Domesticated by ancient Mexicans in 2600 BC, these tiny seeds were a staple food of both Native American and Mexican cultures. Known to those cultures as 'the running food,' chia seeds and water were the main ingredients that fueled Aztec warriors in their conquests. Along with corn, beans and amaranth, chia seeds were a cornerstone in both the Mayan and Aztec diets. Tributes and taxes were paid to Aztec priests and nobility in chia seeds. And what, you may be thinking, has this to do with you and changing your life? Last time you looked around, there weren't any Aztec nobles roaming the streets of your neighborhood, right? Well, they didn't know the science, but the ancient peoples who thrived on these tiny seeds were definitely on to something. Extremely high in the essential fatty acid, omega-3, chia seeds are loaded with antioxidants (more than blueberries), vitamins, minerals (including more calcium than milk), fiber (more than most bran products) and protein. Christopher McDougall, author of Born to Run, the true story of the astoundingly fit and healthy Tarahumara barefoot runners in Mexico, (who take off on 50-100-mile running jaunts as if they were evening strolls) likened the nutritional value of chia to making a 'smoothie of wild salmon, spinach and human grow Continue reading >>

Chia Seeds And Weight Loss: What You Need To Know

Chia Seeds And Weight Loss: What You Need To Know

Remember those ch-ch-ch-chia commercials? Well, chia seeds have come a long way since the days of terracotta Chia pets. Youve probably seen delicious-looking puddings and smoothies made with chia seeds popping up on your Instagram feed a lot recently. Chia seeds have even been called a superfood in recent years. Claims abound about the health benefits, including that they may help you lose weight. But can they really help shrink your waistline? Read on to find out. Chia is actually a member of the mint family and native to Mexico. Chia seeds are consumed like whole grains, but theyre a pseudo grain. That means theyre the carbohydrate-rich seeds of a nongrass plant. When chia seeds encounter liquid, they expand and form a thick gel. Chia seeds were said to be a staple of Aztec and Mayan diets, but were later banned because of their ritualistic religious use. Over the last century or so, theyve enjoyed a minor following, but recently made a comeback on the market as a potential superfood. There are many assertions on the internet that chia seeds curb your appetite and promote weight loss. The running theory is that since chia seeds are filling and high in fiber, they keep you fuller longer. They may therefore help prevent overeating. Two tablespoons of chia seeds have almost 10 grams of fiber. Thats around 40 percent of the recommended daily intake. Diets high in fiber have been linked to weight loss. According to 2015 research , eating 30 grams of fiber daily may help you lose as much weight as if you followed a more complicated diet. Heres the catch, though. Research doesnt back the hype. There are few human studies on chia seeds and weight loss. A 2009 study reviewed the effects of chia seeds on weight loss and disease risk factors. For the study, 90 overweight or obe Continue reading >>

Chia Seeds, Diabetes

Chia Seeds, Diabetes

Health-food fans have been talking up chia seeds for years. Now some studies show benefit for these seeds in diabetes. Possibly, chia seeds could help you. Chia is an herb in the Lamiaceae plant family, related to mint and sage. It grows in Mexico and Central America. It is the same plant that became a fad a few years ago as a “Chia Pet.” When you water a Chia Pet, it grows a “fur” and becomes kind of cute. But we’re talking here about eating the seeds and their health benefits. Why is chia getting so much media buzz now? Writing on Diabetic Connect, Jewels Doskicz, RN, explained: “Chia seeds are a total protein” (which not many plants are). “They are high in fiber, rich in healthy omega-3s (actually higher than salmon), and are also high in calcium and antioxidants.” A report in Harvard Health Blog highlights studies of animals in which a high-chia diet led to lower LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, and higher HDL, the good cholesterol. Eating a lot of chia also lowered triglycerides (blood fat levels). In a study of 20 humans with diabetes, one variety of seed called Salba helped participants control blood glucose, reduce blood pressure, and lower C-reactive protein, a major marker of heart disease risk. The study was published in the journal Diabetes Care. The omega-3 oils and antioxidants in chia are healthy, but the fiber content may be a bigger benefit. Chia seeds seem to slow glucose passage into the blood. They fill you up and so reduce appetite. The oils are a good energy source — Aztecs used to carry bags of them to keep going on long walks at high altitude. If you want to try chia seeds, how do you take them? A reader on the American Diabetes Association online support group asked that question and received many answers from fans of chia. One Continue reading >>

Top 10 Health Benefits Of Chia Seeds

Top 10 Health Benefits Of Chia Seeds

Large pile of chia seeds and a wooden spoon.Photo Credit: GregaErzen/iStock/Getty Images The main benefits of chia seeds come from the high concentration of nutrients they contain. A 1-ounce serving has 136 calories, 4.6 grams of protein, 11.8 grams of carbohydrates, and 8.6 grams of fat, almost all of which is healthy unsaturated fat. Mix a tablespoon of chia seeds with water to serve as a replacement for an egg in baked goods, or add the seeds to yogurt, cereal or a smoothie to give yourself a nutrient boost. Chia seeds are high in fiber, with each 2-tablespoon serving providing 9.6 grams, or 38 percent of the daily value, or DV. Eating the recommended amount of dietary fiber may help lower your risk for constipation, high cholesterol, heart disease and obesity, as well as help control your blood sugar levels. In a study published in April 2010 in the "European Journal of Clinical Nutrition," participants who ate bread containing chia seeds experienced lower after-meal blood sugar levels and decreases in appetite. These little seeds are also a source of omega-3 fatty acids, which are essential for keeping your heart and brain healthy. A study published in "Plant Foods for Human Nutrition" in June 2012 looked at the effects of consuming chia seeds on omega-3s. Researchers found that participants ingesting 25 grams of chia seeds per day for seven days experienced a 138-percent increase in alpha-linolenic acid and a 30-percent increase in eicosapentaenoic acid, both of which are omega-3 fatty acids. Each 2-tablespoon serving of chia seeds provides 12 percent of the DV for niacin and thiamine. These B vitamins are important for turning the food you eat into energy and keeping your brain and nervous system functioning properly. The mineral selenium acts as an antioxidant Continue reading >>

5 Reasons You Need To Add Chia To Your Diet

5 Reasons You Need To Add Chia To Your Diet

5 Reasons You Need To Add Chia To Your Diet Since posting the recipe for chocolate pinole , Ive received a bunch of questions about chia seed. Perhaps not surprisingly, it seems most people still havent heard of the ancient superfood known as chia. Although, in reality, youre probably more familiar with it than you think Loveable oaf... or source of ancient power? Chia (salvia hispanica) is a plant in the mint family that is common to much of Mexico and Guatemala. Chia has a history as a food source that reportedly dates back as far as 3500 BCE . Chia was one of the major food sources for much of ancient Mexico. The Mexican state of Chiapas even derives its name from the crop. However, terra-cottanotwithstanding, chia really hasnt had a prominent place in the modern world. In recent years, there has been a resurgence in the use of chia as a food source. Here are a few reasons you should consider jumping on the chia bandwagon. Chia seeds are a great source of Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids. In fact, a 1oz serving of chia seed contains almost two-and-a-half times as much Omega-3 as a 6oz serving of salmon, and 160 times as much Omega-6. To put that into perspective, consider that to get as much Omega-6 as is in a single ounce of chia seed, youd have to eat almost 1,000 ounces of salmon. Thats a heck of a lot of fish. Chia seeds are a good source of all essential amino acids. Out of the twenty-two amino acids required by the human body for enzyme production and protein synthesis , eight are regarded as essential. That is, we have the ability to naturally synthesize all but eight of the amino acids we require. Those that cant be synthesized must be supplied by the foods we eat. If you dont get enough of the essential amino acids through your diet, bad things can start to Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Chia Seeds Side Effects

What You Need To Know About Chia Seeds Side Effects

Womens Health Articles What you Need to Know about Chia Seeds Side Effects What you Need to Know about Chia Seeds Side Effects If you not familiar with Chia seeds, you might consider adding them to your diet but be aware there are some Chia seeds side effects for some people. Chia seeds are another example of a superfood not unlike single celled algae and kelp. All are high in fiber, vitamins, minerals, lipids and amino acids. Lets take a look at what they are and their many health benefits as well as Chia seeds side effects. Chia seeds have been used for hundreds of years by the Aztecs and were certainly a part of the Native American Indians. The seeds come from a plant in the mint family and are grown throughout South and North America as well as Mexico. The seeds are an important food source and are also used to make tea. Chia seeds, just like oily fishes, some algae and krill, are known to contain high concentrations of omega 3 fatty acids that are so important for promoting cell membrane health for every cell in the body. They are also a great source of protein, energy and magnesium. In fact, these seeds have 2 times the amount of protein found in other seeds and grains. The antioxidant content happens to be 3 times that of blueberries. The mineral content is high in calcium and boron and over 3 times the amount of iron as spinach and yet very low in sodium. Many individuals eat the seeds raw, mix them with water to make a gelatin-like base which anything can be added to like Jello or simply add the seeds into a number of foods/salads. They have a mild flavor and are easy to digest that makes them so versatile, they can be put into almost anything. It is said that Chia seeds help the gut to absorb nutrients better from other foods. These seeds are also known to gi Continue reading >>

3 Seeds That Pack A Nutritional Punch

3 Seeds That Pack A Nutritional Punch

03/08/2017 01:37 EST | Updated 03/08/2017 01:37 EST Lifetime Daily Health articles and wellness tips for active adults If you watched last year's Summer Olympics you may have witnessed a spectacular display of explosive power from Simone Biles, the US's four-foot-eight star gymnast. Super seeds are kind of like Biles. They pack an exceptional nutritional punch into a tiny package. The term super seeds refers to nutrient-dense, edible seeds. They contain levels of vitamins and minerals disproportionate to their diminutive size. One tablespoon of a super seed contains about 50 calories, yet it provides a balanced mix of two grams each of protein, fat, and fiber. Indeed, these tiny kernels might just be nature's perfect food. Although they're currently enjoying a renaissance as a trendy health food, they've been consumed worldwide for thousands of years. For example, flax was cultivated in Mesopotamia 10,000 years ago, where it was used both as a food and a medicine. Used by the ancient Egyptians for sustenance and medicine, these little brown seeds come from an annual plant. Due to their high fiber content, flax seeds are a well-known remedy for constipation. Just one tablespoon satisfies 11% of our daily fiber needs. They're also an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids and anemia-preventing iron. Research shows flax seeds can help prevent breast cancer , ease menopausal symptoms and may be beneficial in lowering cholesterol and treating high blood pressure . Sprinkle flax seeds on cereal or yogurt. To obtain their full nutritional benefit, grind flax seeds in a coffee grinder. Ground seeds can be used to replace eggs in pancakes and baked goods. Use 2 tablespoons of ground seeds and 3 tablespoons of water in place of one egg. Chia seeds are the magic behind Chia Pet, Continue reading >>

Are Chia Seeds Good Foryou?

Are Chia Seeds Good Foryou?

One Regular Guy Writing about Food, Exercise and Living Past 100 Some people have heard of them from Dr. Ozs book, YOU Staying Young. I, on the other hand, happened upon Chia seeds at Costco of all places. Considered rare, Chia seeds are now available at your local big box store. I got a huge 2 pound bag for $6.79. They dont have to be refrigerated and last several years. How good is that? Im sure you are dying to know if these have anything to do with the seeds you bought as a kid for Chia Pets. Yes and no. Chia Pets use Chia seeds, but these edible ones wont grow hair on clay planters. This is part of the Chia Pet Presidential set which also includes Washington, Lincoln and Lady Liberty Chia seeds are nutritional dynamite. Self NutritionData says that one ounce (28 grams) yields 137 calories, 9 grams total fat, 1 gram saturated fat, no cholesterol, 5 mg of sodium, 12 grams carbohydrates, 11 grams of fiber and 4 grams of protein. If you are interested in Omega-3, there are 4915 mg in an ounce and 1620 mg of Omega-6. The package I bought calls Chia seeds SUPERFOOD OF THE AZTECS. This member of the mint family has been cultivated by humans for thousands of years. It was a staple in the diets of the Aztecs and Mayans in Central America. Chia is the Mayan word for strength. Chia seeds contain significantly more antioxidants than flax seeds and are easier to digest as they dont have to be ground to release their nutritional benefits. They appeal to Mr. Lazy Cook because they are a no-muss, no-fuss, easy-to-fix treat. He recommends the following simple ways to include them in your diet: Add one or two tablespoons of Chia seeds to : * Top your salad or blend into your salad dressing * Sprinkle on oatmeal or atop any breakfast cereal * Blend into your favorite muffin or panca Continue reading >>

The Health Benefits Of Popular Seeds

The Health Benefits Of Popular Seeds

Convince me you have a seed there, Henry David Thoreau wrote, and I am prepared to expect wonders. The famed naturalist of Walden Pond was referring to the power of a seed to build a forest. Little did he know that his thoughts apply to the outsize talent of seeds for nourishing humans, too. Inside a seeds hard coating is an entire embryonic plant, surrounded by all the food that it needs to thrive once it gets dispersed into the soil. Incorporate seeds into your diet, not occasionally but consistently, and youll reap the benefits of all those nutrients, making seeds well worth the calories. The seeds here are among the healthiest. Most will stay fresh for up to a year when stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Consider them worthy alternatives to the nuts that are commonly enjoyed. (Nuts, in fact, are shelled fruits that contain seeds.) All contain omega-3 fatty acids, which are associated with everything from a healthy brain and heart to supple skin. Each also boasts its own distinctive dietary offerings, along with unique flavors that transform everyday eats into food that feels special. Calories per serving: 75 in 2 tablespoons (ground). Notable nutrients: Fiber and alpha linoleic acid (ALA). Diabetes prevention: A 2011 study in Nutrition Journal reported that prediabetic subjects who daily ate flaxseed (which is rich in sugar-regulating fiber) raised their insulin sensitivity slightly after 12 weeks. And a 2012 paper in Nutrition & Metabolism suggested that flaxseed may be better at lowering LDL cholesterol (yep, the bad kind) when its stirred into viscous foods, like yogurt, rather than sprinkled onto solids. Omega-3 boost: One ounce has more than twice the omega-3s (in the form of ALA) in 4 ounces of salmon. Try them on oatmeal: Sprinkle ground fl Continue reading >>

20 Foods That Are Good For High Blood Pressure

20 Foods That Are Good For High Blood Pressure

With many factors influencing heart health and blood pressure, is there a diet for those with high blood pressure? Health experts suggest that consuming a nutritious, balanced diet may be the best bet to lower blood pressure and achieve good health. Try adding these 20 foods into your diet to help reduce blood pressure. Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is when the heart forcefully pumps blood into the arteries, consequently increasing the pressure against the blood vessels. Uncontrolled hypertension may lead to atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), kidney disease, stroke and heart failure. But with numerous causes, many factors contributing to high blood pressure are modifiable and include smoking, being overweight and obese, staying sedentary, drinking too much alcohol and eating too much salt. With a healthy lifestyle encompassing most of the influences, is there a high blood pressure diet? Health experts suggest that consuming a nutritious, balanced diet may be your ticket to lower blood pressure and achieving good health. 20 Foods That Are Good for High Blood Pressure When it comes to food that lowers blood pressure, one single nutrient or food cannot do the entire job. Instead, the DASH (dietary approaches to stop hypertension) diet focuses on a lifelong approach. The DASH diet further emphasizes portion sizes and encourages a variety of nutritious foods by incorporating fresh produce and low-fat dairy with moderating intake of whole grains, fish, poultry and nuts. Additionally, nutrients such as fiber, potassium, magnesium and calcium have been shown to have a healthy effect on blood pressure. Fresh Produce: 8 to 10 servings of fruits and vegetables a day 1. All Green, Leafy Vegetables Romaine lettuce, spinach and kale are all prime examples and provid Continue reading >>

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