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Chf And Diabetes Foods To Avoid

Adjusting Your Diet: Diabetic Diet

Adjusting Your Diet: Diabetic Diet

Heart failure and diabetes are frequent companions. Up to one-third of people with heart failure may have some degree of diabetes that may be controlled by diet, medicines or insulin. It’s important that people with heart failure maintain good control of blood sugar. Elevated levels will also have direct and indirect harmful effects on heart function. It’s especially important for people with both diabetes and heart failure to carefully follow the advice of their doctor, nurse and dietician. Continue reading >>

Proper Diet For Congestive Heart Failure Patients

Proper Diet For Congestive Heart Failure Patients

Having congestive heart failure can lead to serious health complications such as having fluid in the lungs or heart related problems. Diet along with medication compliance is an important part of the management of congestive heart failure. Monitoring fluid and sodium intake helps to prevent overloading the heart. Video of the Day Congestive heart failure, also known as CHF is a condition in which the heart is unable to pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs according to the Mayo Clinic. High blood pressure or other heart or kidney conditions can lead to congestive heart failure. The inability of the heart to pump blood efficiently enough can lead to fluid in the lungs or extremities, fatigue, or irregular heart rhythm. If congestive heart failure is not treated, it can cause kidney, heart or liver damage, or even sudden death. It is important to limit sodium in your diet when you have congestive heart failure because sodium can lead to fluid or water retention. This, in turn, can put more pressure on the heart to work harder. Sodium is a component of salt, and is used to season many different foods. Read food labels for sodium content, avoid added salt, and discuss sodium content in menu items when you are going out to eat. Instead of using salt or sodium filled seasoning to flavor food, try lemon or fresh herbs. It is important to discuss with your doctor daily fluid limitations for your condition if you have CHF. Some patients may have a specific fluid restriction that their doctor recommends. Measuring fluid intake is not as easy as it seems. It is important to remember that fluid is contained in soups, some desserts, such as gelatins, and other prepared food items. The best way to keep track of fluid intake, if you are on fluid restriction, is to keep a dietar Continue reading >>

Tips For Managing Congestive Heart Failure

Tips For Managing Congestive Heart Failure

Tips for Managing Congestive Heart Failure Congestive heart failure, or CHF, is a condition in which the heart is unable to pump enough blood to meet the bodys needs. Sometimes called just heart failure, the term is a little misleading. Heart failure doesnt mean that the heart has failed or that it no longer works; rather, it means that the heart is struggling to pump enough blood throughout the body. There are many causes of CHF, and these include: Cardiomyopathy, or weakened heart muscle Toxic amounts of certain drugs, such as alcohol and cocaine High blood lipids (cholesterol and triglycerides) While maybe not a direct cause, certain lifestyle factors can contribute to or worsen CHF, such as being overweight or obese, smoking, drinking excessive amounts of alcohol, a high sodium intake, and lack of physical activity. You may be surprised to learn that having diabetes puts you at risk for CHF. Heart failure is one of the most common complications of diabetes, and while many factors play a role, the two main culprits are hyperglycemia (high blood sugars) and insulin resistance (strongly linked with Type 2 diabetes ). Data from the well-known Framingham Heart Study showed that the frequency of heart failure is twice as high in men with diabetes and five times as high in women with diabetes compared to a control population. How do you know if you have CHF? Symptoms that may indicate congestive heart failure are: Swelling in your ankles, feet, or legs (called edema) Sudden weight gain (due to fluid retention) Of course, these symptoms can be due to other medical issues, so its important to get them checked out by your doctor. The Heart Failure Society of America suggests this easy way to remember symptoms of CHF: Think of the acronym FACES, which stands for Fatigue, Acti Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid With Congestive Heart Failure

Foods To Avoid With Congestive Heart Failure

With congestive heart failure, or CHF, the heart has to work harder and is less efficient at delivering oxygen to the body. Blood can build up in different parts of the body, causing fluid accumulation in the lungs, arms, legs and gastrointestinal tract. Foods that you eat may worsen symptoms of CHF, such as swollen feet, fatigue, shortness of breath and weight gain. It’s important to avoid foods that are high in sodium and saturated fat. Video of the Day It is important to control and limit your sodium intake because it makes your heart work harder. You should limit your salt intake to 1,500 to 2,000 milligrams per day. Sodium is found in salt and is added to most processed foods, including fast food. Avoid using the salt shaker and replace it with spices, herbs and other seasonings. Check food labels to determine how much salt is in your food. If a serving has 140 milligrams of sodium or less, it is considered low in sodium. Avoid processed foods that come in cans or boxes, such as canned soup, canned vegetables and boxed mac and cheese. Salty snacks such as chips, nuts and pretzels should be avoided as well. These foods are high in sodium, which makes the body hold extra water. One cup of canned soup can have anywhere from 600 to 1,300 milligrams of sodium. Canned and frozen main dishes can have between 500 and 2,570 milligrams of sodium per 8-ounce serving. These food items can provide one-half to an entire day's worth of sodium. Make homemade soup with low-sodium broth and purchase fresh or frozen vegetables to lower your sodium intake. Tomato juice, salad dressings, seasoning mixes and ramen noodle soups should also be avoided. Meats and Milk High in Saturated Fat Limit your intake of meats and whole milk that are high in saturated fat. Diets high in saturated f Continue reading >>

Your Diet If You Have Congestive Heart Failure

Your Diet If You Have Congestive Heart Failure

Congestive heart failure (CHF) occurs when the heart does not pump efficiently and is not able to deliver enough oxygen to the body. It can be caused by high blood pressure or other heart problems. When you eat too much sodium (and salt) or drink too many fluids, your heart has to work even harder to pump the extra blood volume through your blood vessels. The heart does not have to work quite as hard when you make changes to your diet. All heart-healthy guidelines are important for people with CHF, but it is extra important to follow a low-sodium diet-1,500 milligrams-to prevent fluid retention in the body. Sodium makes you thirsty and makes your body hold onto fluids rather than urinating them out. In addition, it is important to limit the amount of fluids you drink. The amount can vary and your doctor will let you know how much you should be drinking in a day. The extra fluid may make it very hard to breathe and it may be life-threatening and require hospitalization. So, following low-sodium and fluid guidelines are a vital part of the treatment for CHF. Here are some ways to help manage congestive heart failure with your eating plan: 1. Slash Sodium. Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, which are naturally low in sodium. Choose fresh foods, including lean meats, fish, poultry, dry and fresh legumes (or rinsed canned beans), eggs, milk, yogurt, plain rice, pasta and oatmeal. Choose lower-sodium sensible snacks. Avoid using the salt shaker. Or replace it with a sodium-free blend of herbs, such as Mrs. Dash. Cut the sodium completely, or at least reduce it by half in recipes. Be a creative cook-use herbs, onion, garlic, citrus and other fruit juices, and vinegars to add flavor. Be careful of condiments-ketchup, mayonnaise, mustard, pickles, olives, marinades, tenderizer Continue reading >>

Healthy Foods To Eat On A Daily Basis

Healthy Foods To Eat On A Daily Basis

Eating healthy foods on a daily basis can enhance your energy, wellness and brain function while reducing your risk of serious conditions, such as heart disease. Because each healthy food provides unique nutrients and benefits, aim for a variety from each good group. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggests a diet based on nutrient-rich whole foods, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and fewer processed foods. Video of the Day Fruits and vegetables provide a broad assortment of vitamins, minerals and anti-oxidants, which enhance your immune system and help reduce the severity and frequency of viruses, infections and disease. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggest that most people eat at least 2 cups of fruit and 2 1/2 cups of vegetables per day. For added benefits, consume a variety of colors and types of vegetables. Fruits particularly rich in nutrients include berries, citrus fruits, apples, pears, bananas, papaya, cantaloupe, guava, tomatoes, spinach, kale, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, string beans, artichokes, sweet potatoes and bell peppers. Though fresh produce tends to provide the densest nutrients, frozen and canned varieties stored in water or natural juices are options. Whole grains are complex carbohydrates, meaning they are digested more slowly than simple carbohydrates, such as sugar, and contain rich amounts of fiber and nutrients. A diet rich in whole grains may reduce your risk of heart attack and stroke while enhancing digestive wellness and weight management. The American Heart Association suggests at least six servings of grains daily, three of which should be whole grains. One serving is equal to a slice of 100 percent whole-grain bread, 1/2 cup brown rice, wild rice or oat Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes, Congestive Heart Failure, And Weight Loss

Type 2 Diabetes, Congestive Heart Failure, And Weight Loss

My husband has type 2 diabetes as well as congestive heart failure. He is 67.5 years old , is 5'7" and weighs 313 lbs. Is there a place where I can get recipes that deal with all three issues? Dr. Gourmet Says... It is well established that a Mediterranean style diet can help control diabetes. Likewise, this can help lower cholesterol, raise HDL (good) cholesterol, lower LDL (bad) cholesterol and lower blood pressure. For our patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) we generally want them to be on a low sodium diet as well, which limits the patient to 1,500 milligrams per day of sodium. Check with your husband's physician regarding the number of calories he should be eating along with the amount of sodium. You can then use this link to understand what a healthy diet is and how to make this part of your lives: Thanks for writing, Timothy S. Harlan, MD, FACP Dr. Gourmet Continue reading >>

Cardiac And Diabetic Meal Plans

Cardiac And Diabetic Meal Plans

If you have diabetes, you are twice as likely to have a heart attack or stroke than someone who does not, according to the American Diabetes Association. Eating right not only helps you manage your blood sugar but also helps lower cholesterol and blood pressure. A cardiac and diabetic diet encourages you to eat more fresh, whole foods and less saturated fat and sodium. Consult a doctor before making any dietary changes. Video of the Day A cardiac and diabetic meal plan incorporates the diet basics for both diabetes and heart health. That means continuing to control your carb intake by eating the same amount of carbs at each meal as determined by your dietitian or doctor to manage blood sugar. If you don't know your meal carb needs, the ADA suggests starting at 45 to 60 grams. In addition, to improve heart health, eat more nutrient-rich foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, poultry, fish and nuts, while limiting foods high in calories and sodium that offer very little nutrition, such as soda, cake and fast food. Limit sodium to less than 2,300 milligrams a day, or 1,500 milligrams if you have high blood pressure. What to Eat for Breakfast Make whole grains a priority at breakfast. Whole grains, as well as fruits and vegetables, are a good source of fiber, and getting more fiber in your diet helps with blood sugar control and lowers your risk of heart disease. A heart-healthy diabetic breakfast might include 1/2 cup of cooked oatmeal topped with a small banana and served with a 6-ounce container of sugar-free yogurt. Or try a toasted whole-wheat English muffin topped with 2 teaspoons of peanut butter and an apple. Keeping It Heart-Healthy at Lunch The American Heart Association recommends you eat at least two servings of fish a week. The omega-3 f Continue reading >>

Congestive Heart Failure

Congestive Heart Failure

Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a condition where the heart is unable to properly pump blood to the rest of the body, causing fluid to back up in the vessels, leading to swelling and inadequate blood flow to the organs. There are two types of CHF: systolic and diastolic. Systolic heart failure (now referred to as “heart failure with reduced ejection fraction”) occurs when the heart muscle is weak and unable to contract with as much force. Diastolic heart failure (now referred to as “heart failure with preserved ejection fraction”) occurs when the heart muscle is stiff and unable to relax, inhibiting the heart chambers from filling with blood properly. Both of these can result in significant disability. Overview The key is prevention of congestive heart failure with a Nutritarian diet and active lifestyle; however, once CHF has developed, a Nutritarian diet can significantly improve symptoms and quality of life and, in some cases, reverse impaired heart function. From 2007 to 2010, an estimated 5.1 million Americans older than age 20 had heart failure. This is projected to increase by 46% to 8 million Americans older than age 18 by the year 2030. In 2010, the cost of heart failure in the U.S. was $30.7 billion and will likely increase to $69.7 billion by the year 2030.1 Because of impaired pumping of the heart, blood will back up into the lungs and lower extremities causing difficulty breathing and swelling. Patients with CHF often have to sleep with the heads elevated on several pillows because of shortness of breath. They can have trouble breathing while exerting themselves, as well as palpitations or chest pain. Swelling can occur in the feet, ankles or whole leg and even into the back. Patients often complain of dizziness or fatigue. CHF can significantly a Continue reading >>

Heart Failure And Nutrition

Heart Failure And Nutrition

When you have CHF (congestive heart failure), what you eat and drink is important in helping you get better. A diet low in sodium and fluid will help keep your heart working its best. You already may be on a special diet for health problems such as coronary artery disease, diabetes, or obesity. You will need to continue following that diet in addition to limiting your sodium and fluids. It is important to meet with a registered dietitian to develop your own meal plan. He or she can teach you what you need to know about your diet. The more sodium and fluid you consume, the more fluid you will hold, or retain, in your body. When your body holds fluid, this is called edema (eh-DEE-muh). This can worsen your condition and make it more difficult for your heart to work. If you are overweight, you may be given a diet to help you lose weight. Losing weight can lessen the work load for your heart. Limiting Sodium Limit your sodium to 2,000 mg (milligrams), or 2 grams, per day. How do you know how many milligrams you are getting? One good way is to read food labels carefully. Look at the serving size first on the food label. Then look at how many milligrams of sodium each serving has. If you eat 2 servings, you are eating double the amount of sodium on the label. Tips for Limiting Sodium If there is 250 mg of sodium or more in a serving of any food, that’s a lot. Avoid it unless you can work it into your daily allowance of 2,000 mg per day. Avoid salt. It has the most sodium of any food. One teaspoon of salt has 2,360 mg of sodium. That is more than you should get in a whole day! Even 1/4 tsp. of salt has 590 mg. • Do not add salt to your food while cooking or at the table. Try using fresh or dried herbs or spices to season your food. Do not use a salt substitute, unless your Continue reading >>

Sample Diet For Managing Congestive Heart Failure

Sample Diet For Managing Congestive Heart Failure

Congestive heart failure effects about 5 million people in the United States and is responsible for more than 300,000 deaths annually, according to the website MedlinePlus. When you have congestive heart failure, your heart can no longer efficiently pump enough blood throughout your body, leading to a build up of blood and fluid around your heart, lungs and extremities. Following a healthy diet can help you manage your symptoms and improve your quality of life. Video of the Day The goal of diet therapy for congestive heart failure is to lessen the work load of your heart, reduce fluid build up and make it easier for you to breath. The diet for congestive heart failure limits your intake of sodium to 2,000 to 3,000 mg a day and encourages you to choose more fresh, unprocessed foods that are naturally lower in sodium. Some people with congestive heart failure also need to limit their fluid intake. Talk to your doctor about your daily fluid needs. A low-sodium lunch meal for congestive heart failure may include 3 oz. of low-sodium tuna mixed with 1 tbsp. of low-fat mayonnaise on two slices of whole wheat bread, served with 1 cup of mixed greens topped with 1 tsp. of olive oil and balsamic vinegar, 1 cup of nonfat fruit yogurt and a small orange. This meal contains 620 calories and 700 mg of sodium. You can also help limit your sodium intake by preparing foods at home. This way you know exactly how much sodium you are eating. A low-sodium dinner meal may include 3 oz of baked chicken breast seasoned with fresh rosemary and served with 1 cup of rosemary roasted new potatoes drizzled with 1 tsp. of olive oil, 1 cup of roasted carrots with 1 tsp. of olive oil, and 1 cup of nonfat milk. This sample dinner meal contains 580 calories and 360 mg of sodium. Eliminating salt from yo Continue reading >>

Diet And Congestive Heart Failure

Diet And Congestive Heart Failure

Congestive heart failure (CHF) occurs when the heart does not pump efficiently and does not deliver enough oxygen to your body. Many diseases lead to CHF, such as high blood pressure and diseases of the heart and kidney. Treatment for CHF helps to prevent its complications and relieve its symptoms. The heart does not have to work as hard when you make some changes in your diet. If you eat too much salt or drink too much fluid, your body's water content may increase and make your heart work harder. This can worsen your CHF. The following diet will help decrease some of your symptoms. Reduce the Salt in Your Diet Enjoying what you eat is important. Even if you crave salt you can learn to like foods that are lower in salt. Your taste buds will change soon, and you will not miss the salt. Removing salt can bring out flavors that may have been hidden by the salt. Reduce the salt content in your diet by trying the following suggestions: Choose plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables. They contain only small amounts of salt. Choose foods that are low in salt, such as fresh meats, poultry, fish, dry and fresh legumes, eggs, milk and yogurt. Plain rice, pasta and oatmeal are good low-sodium choices. However, the sodium content can increase if salt or other high-sodium ingredients are added during their preparation. Season with herbs, spices, herbed vinegar and fruit juices. Avoid herb or spice mixtures that contain salt or sodium. Use lemon juice or fresh ground pepper to accent natural flavors. Try orange or pineapple juice as a base for meat marinades. See "Salt-Free Herb Blends," below, for other ideas. Read food labels before you buy packaged foods. Check the nutrition facts on the label for sodium content per serving. Find out the number of servings in the package. How does t Continue reading >>

The New Heart Failure Diet: Less Salt Restriction, More Micronutrients

The New Heart Failure Diet: Less Salt Restriction, More Micronutrients

The Western diet has been implicated in a number of chronic diseases, including heart disease, diabetes and cancer. Patients have eagerly sought medical guidance on the proper diet, and although certain food elements appear to increase the risk of certain diseases, offering up specific dietary advice can be a treacherous endeavor. For one thing, diet is notoriously difficult to study. The effects of diet may take years to develop, few volunteers are willing to engage in randomized trials of diet for long periods of time, and protective factors identified in cohort studies rarely stand up to randomized trials. Not surprisingly, diet advice predicated on observational studies or pathophysiological mechanisms rather than randomized trial evidence may turn out to be ineffective (e.g. avoiding eggs)1 or even harmful (e.g. replacing the saturated fat in butter with margarine rich in trans-fats).2 Admitting that our past advice was wrong is uncomfortable and may also make patients less inclined to trust medical recommendations in the future. This may explain why the American Heart Association (AHA) was slow to rescind the recommendation to limit dietary fat due to its effects on total blood cholesterol levels. This recommendation has stood at the heart of public policy for decades3 but now appears to have been misguided.4 In fact, the vilification of fat may have encouraged increased consumption of sugar, which the AHA now recognizes as a possible cause of obesity, diabetes and heart disease.5 The notion that the lives of 6 million Americans living with heart failure might be improved by prudent dietary choices is appealing. Despite advancements in pharmacological therapy, heart failure remains the most common cause for both hospital admission and readmission among Medicare pa Continue reading >>

Foods To Eat With Congestive Heart Problems & Diabetes

Foods To Eat With Congestive Heart Problems & Diabetes

Congestive heart problems and diabetes both require a healthy, balanced diet of protein, carbohydrates, vitamins and nutrients found in vegetables, whole-wheat products and lean meats. Saturated fat and trans fat should be eliminated from the diet as they can raise cholesterol, which leads plaque build-up in the arteries and can cause heart disease. Avoid consuming high levels of sodium, as it can lead to high blood pressure and heart disease. Diabetics are prone to heart disease, and should follow the same dietary guidelines as those with heart problems, according to the American Diabetes Association. Meats Red meat is a good source of protein, but the level of saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium makes it an unhealthy choice for your daily meat requirement. Skinless chicken, turkey and fish are healthy alternatives that are also high in protein, but should be consumed in limited amounts due to cholesterol. Fish provides your body omega-3 fatty acids, which helps in reducing blood pressure, according to the American Heart Association. When preparing your meat you should broil, bake or grill them rather than frying or sauteing, as the oils used to fry and saute can add saturated fat and trans fat. Fruit and Vegetables Fruits and vegetables are low in calories and carbohydrates and high in vitamins and nutrients. To manage your blood glucose level you should limit your consumption of starchy vegetables including corn, potatoes, beans, lentils peas and squash. Your daily requirement of fruit should be between 2 to 4 servings and 3 to 5 servings of vegetables, according to the American Diabetes Association. Each meal should consist of mostly non-starchy vegetables, with small portions of meat and starchy foods such as grains, cereals, or pasta. Grains Whole-wheat grains a Continue reading >>

Diet And Heart Failure

Diet And Heart Failure

Eating a healthy diet may reduce your symptoms of heart failure. A registered dietitian can provide in-depth, personalized nutrition info and help you start an action plan. Here are some basic tips to get you started: Control the salt in your diet. Lowering the amount of sodium you eat to no more than 1,500 milligrams per day is one of the most important ways to manage heart failure. Learn to read food labels. Use the information on food packages to help you to make the best low-sodium selections. Eat a variety of foods. This will help make sure you get all the nutrients you need. Include high-fiber foods in your diet. Fiber helps move food along your digestive tract, controls blood sugar levels, and may reduce the level of cholesterol in your blood. Vegetables, beans, whole-grain foods, bran, and fresh fruit are high in fiber. You should have 25 to 35 grams of fiber each day. Keep track of how much you’re drinking. Have less (including soup) if you have shortness of breath or notice swelling. Talk to your doctor about how much fluid you should be drinking each day. Maintain a healthy weight . Lose weight if you’re overweight. Limit the number of calories you have each day. Exercise regularly to get to or keep your ideal weight. Cut back on alcohol. It can affect your heart rate and worsen your heart failure. Your doctor may tell you to avoid or limit alcoholic beverages. Alcohol may also interact with the medications you are taking. Questions? Ask your doctor for guidelines. Nutrition labels and an ingredient list are required on most foods so you can make the best choice for a healthy lifestyle. If you have trouble reading the food label, meet with a registered dietitian. He can review the label with you and clear up any confusion. Continue reading >>

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