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Chemo And Low Blood Sugar Levels

10 Nutrition Tips For Managing Cancer And Diabetes

10 Nutrition Tips For Managing Cancer And Diabetes

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month, and of the more than 13 million Americans who have or have had cancer, eight to 18 percent also have diabetes. It’s an eye-opening statistic and a reminder about why it’s important to be proactive about our overall health and well-being during and after cancer treatment. “Because of the huge link between insulin resistance and cancer, it is critically important for people who have diabetes to manage their blood glucose during cancer treatment,” adds Brooke McIntyre, a clinical oncology dietitian and diabetes program coordinator at CTCA in Tulsa. McIntyre recommends the following tips to help manage cancer and diabetes: Never eat a “naked” carbohydrate. Funny statement, but people remember it! Rather than eating only an apple, eat a handful of nuts or one to two tablespoons of nut butter too. This helps decrease the rise in blood sugar and makes you feel more satisfied. Eat fewer carbohydrates. Decreasing carbohydrate intake not only lowers blood sugar, but can also help lower blood pressure. Eat more veggies, fruits and whole grains. Eating cancer-fighting foods high in fiber can help regulate blood sugar. Foods to add to your diet include: Asian pears, raspberries, blackberries, bananas, blueberries, beans, broccoli, spinach, lentils, peas, corn, flax seeds and whole-grain breads or crackers. Exercise regularly. The American Institute for Cancer Research and the American Diabetes Association recommend 30 minutes of physical activity five days a week to lower risk of cancer recurrence. Add healthy fats to your diet. Say “no” to doughnuts and fried chicken and “hello” to healthy fats such as avocado, salmon and walnuts. Good fats contain antioxidants, help you maintain a steady blood sugar level and feel Continue reading >>

Can Chemotherapy Cause Elevated Blood Sugar?

Can Chemotherapy Cause Elevated Blood Sugar?

One of three common treatments for cancer, chemotherapy uses drugs to kill or slow down the progression of cancer cells. Different chemotherapy drugs are used for different types of cancers and can be combined with other treatments, like radiation therapy or surgery. Chemotherapy often causes side effects, such as fatigue, nausea and mouth sores. Most side effects subside after treatment ends; however, some side effects can develop late in treatment and cause long-lasting issues, such as heart and kidney problems, or damage to nerve and lung tissue. Make sure to talk to your oncologist early about these potential side effects. To prepare for chemotherapy, ask your doctor for tests to check your heart and liver functions to make sure you are healthy enough to undergo treatment. Once you're ready for treatment, you may receive the drugs intravenously through a port in your chest, orally by taking a pill or through an injection into a muscle. Continue reading >>

How To Balance Diabetes And Cancer Treatment

How To Balance Diabetes And Cancer Treatment

How to Balance Diabetes and Cancer Treatment Managing your type 2 diabetes during cancer treatment can be challenging but it can be done. Being treated for cancer when you have type 2 diabetes requires working with a multidisciplinary team of caregivers. Type 2 diabetes can raise your risk for several types of cancer, and it can also affect your cancer treatment if you are diagnosed with cancer. The critical issue is to treat the cancer with whatever works best for the patient and not to avoid any treatment just because of the diabetes, says Derek LeRoith, MD , director of research in the division of endocrinology, diabetes and bone disease at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. It is vital, though, to take the diabetes into consideration as part of the treatment, says Marilou Terpenning, MD , a physician at Santa Monica Hematology-Oncology Consultants in Santa Monica, California. And that means assembling a multidisciplinary team of caregivers that may include an endocrinologist , internist, surgeon, medical oncologist , and radiation therapist, and a dietitian for nutritional education and counseling,Dr. Terpenning says. Treatment for cancer can affect glucose metabolism and affect the need for monitoring blood sugar and adjustment of medications, she says. The cancer treatment team needs to prepare the joint cancer treatment plan and work with the endocrinologist or internist overseeing diabetes management. The good news is that experts can generally predict how certain treatments such as surgery and chemotherapy will affect diabetes management and advise accordingly, Terpenning says. Many people with diabetes have a form of nerve damage known as diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy can cause tingling, burning, pain, or num Continue reading >>

Chemo Is Raising Blood Sugar Level

Chemo Is Raising Blood Sugar Level

Chemo seems to dramatically raise my mom's blood sugar level. Example: right before the chemo her blood sugar level was 70, and right after the chemo, it had shot up to 130! Is this a common phenomenon? This is frustrating, because we've been trying to keep her blood sugar level low, as there is a theory that cancer cells primarily feed on glucose (sugar). My mom is not diabetic, but I can imagine for diabetics who are also undergoing chemotherapy, this must be very challenging. They gave my husband a prescription for pills- he took one the day before chemo, one the day of and then the 2 days after. They actually caused more side effects for him that the chemo (ansomnia, constipation, bad moods!) He did folfox -not sure if they also prescribe it with Folfiri. I checked. She is not taking decadron. Neither are the chemo drugs (Avastin, Irinotecan, 5-FU) being diluted with solutions containing sugar (instead, they are being diluted withsodium chloride and water). Perhaps the drugs themselves are having an effect. I guess, we will just need to ask her oncologist about it. I seem to remember that saline with dextrose is used with oxaliplatin, but it could be one of the steroids. Whatever it is, I've not used it in a long time. If that's the case, it could be the reason for the rise in blood sugar. Traci culprit is caught. indeed, she has been taking steroid called dexamethasone! and i also found a scientific study which investigates dexamethasone's effect on blood sugar level and which finds that it significantly elevates glucose, even in nondiabetic patients. now the question is, whether there is a way out without taking dexamethasone, because it is supposed reduce the side effects of chemo. any suggestions about nonsteroid drugs that alleviate chemo sideeffects (especial Continue reading >>

Fasting During Chemotherapy May Offset Some Side Effects Of Cancer-fighting Drugs

Fasting During Chemotherapy May Offset Some Side Effects Of Cancer-fighting Drugs

Fasting during chemotherapy may offset some side effects of cancer-fighting drugs A short-term diet change may counteract increases in blood sugar and possibly protect healthy cells A fasting-like diet may benefit some chemotherapy patients, according to USC researcher Valter Longo. (Photo/Shutterstock) A short-term fast appears to counteract increases in blood sugar caused by common cancer drugs, protecting healthy cells in mice from becoming too vulnerable to chemotherapy, according to a new study from USC researchers. Valter Longo , director of the USC Longevity Institute at the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, examined the effects of short-term fasting on mice being treated with the drug doxorubicin. Mice received the doxorubicin alone or in combination with either dexamethasone or rapamycin, which are both commonly administered during chemotherapy to manage side effects but are also known to increase blood glucose levels. The mice who received a drug combination showed worse side effects from the chemotherapy, including greater damage to cells in the heart, than the mice who received doxorubicin alone, said Longo, a professor of biological sciences at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences. This combination [doxorubicin with dexamethasone or rapamycin] could be very dangerous; it made the mice much more sensitive to chemotherapy and it could also make patients more sensitive to chemotherapy, he said. What is concerning is that drugs such as dexamethasone could be toxic even though they are often given to patients to reduce minor side effects of chemotherapy treatment. He added that he and his team suspected that healthy cells increased vulnerability was caused by increased blood sugar. A previous study led by Longo described how yeast cells Continue reading >>

My Life With Cancer & Diabetes

My Life With Cancer & Diabetes

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. This upcoming Sunday is National Cancer Survivors Day , a worldwide observance the first Sunday in June, dedicated to "showing the world that life after a cancer diagnosis can be meaningful and productive." We almost hate to mention it, but there is some question about a possible link between cancer and diabetes and there are many people out there dealing with both. There's no real proof that one causes the other, yet there are a lot of studies linking the two . Results suggest that anywhere from 8 to 18% of people with cancer also have diabetes. One recent study published in Diabetes Care showed that 16 out of every 100 men with diabetes and 17 out of every 100 women with diabetes said they had cancer, compared to just 7 out of 100 men and 10 out of 100 women without diabetes. So maybe there is some connection...? We're not pointing this out to scare anybody, but rather to pay homage to the folks who are dealing with both illnesses. Despite the stats cited, there's hardly any available literature on treating this combination. One of the few things we found was a 2006 Diabetes Spectrum article by Helen Psarakis, a diabetes nurse practitioner at Yale New Haven Hospital. She states that cancer patients who are on glucocorticoids a steroid used in short term, high-dose chemo treatments often suffer with high blood sugar. In fact, patients at risk for diabetes who begin taking glucocorticoids during cancer treatment are often quickly diagnosed with diabetes too. Insulin is recommended to treat steroid-induced blood sugar, as patients "may require two to three times their usual dose(s) of insulin." Woah. Helen points out a f Continue reading >>

Overcoming Treatment-induced Diabetes

Overcoming Treatment-induced Diabetes

Good nutrition is key Betty Overfelt's oncologist back home in Missouri informed her that she had stage IV small-cell lung cancer. His prognosis was grim — "I think I can get you three months if you'll take treatment," he said. Jerry, her husband of 45 years, decided immediately to seek a second opinion, which led them to Cancer Treatment Centers of America© (CTCA). There, Jerry remembered, doctors told Betty that they couldn't promise a cure but thought they might be able to control the cancer. Subsequent blood tests at CTCA delivered unexpected news — Betty had developed treatment-induced diabetes, in a big way. "We had just visited the pulmonologist and were waiting at the scheduler's desk when my cell phone rang," Jerry recalled. It was Sue, [the pulmonologist's nurse], who said, "Don't move; stay right there." Sue came to their location and told them Betty needed an immediate infusion of insulin. Her initial lab screening indicated a blood sugar of 863. Normal range is from 80 to 110, with above 500 signaling a critical situation. The diagnosis for diabetes was confusing because Betty never had diabetes, nor did it run in her family. The Overfelts were not alone — 8 to 18 percent of all cancer patients also have diabetes, according to CTCA. Type 1 diabetes is linked to cervical cancer and stomach cancer, and type 2 diabetes is linked to breast, endometrial, pancreatic, liver, kidney and colon cancers. Treatmentinduced diabetes can be triggered by chemotherapy and steroid use. "It is very overwhelming to a patient to be diagnosed with cancer, and then be told that they have diabetes as well," said Andrea Reser, RD, LD, nutrition supervisor/diabetes program coordinator at CTCA. "People need to know how to regulate their blood sugar while on a cancer-fighting d Continue reading >>

How Does Having Diabetes Affect My Cancer Treatment?

How Does Having Diabetes Affect My Cancer Treatment?

More than 25 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among people 65 and older, nearly 27 percent have diabetes. The vast majority of diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes, which is associated largely with older age and being overweight as well as family history. Older age and obesity also are risk factors for developing cancer, which means that people with type 2 diabetes are diagnosed with cancer more often than those in the general population. Having diabetes can complicate cancer treatment due to a number of factors. At the same time, some treatments for cancer, including certain newer targeted therapy drugs, can spur the development of diabetes, especially in patients who already had a propensity toward developing the disease, although this effect is usually reversible. Azeez Farooki is a Memorial Sloan Kettering endocrinologist who specializes in treating cancer patients who also have diabetes. We spoke with Dr. Farooki about what special considerations are taken into account when treating this group of patients. A Disease of Blood Sugar “Diabetes is a disease in which a person has increased levels of glucose, or sugar, in the blood,” Dr. Farooki explains. “It can occur because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin — the hormone that allows glucose to be absorbed — or because cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. Cells should normally take in sugar from the blood; if they don’t, then high blood sugar or ‘hyperglycemia’ results.” The majority of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, which often causes the body to become resistant to the effects of insulin. Type 2 disease may be treated with insulin injections, other hormonal inject Continue reading >>

Chemotherapy Induced Side Effects, Understanding What They Are

Chemotherapy Induced Side Effects, Understanding What They Are

Visit our Health Index for More Subjects, Conditions and Answers Chemotherapy Side Effects- Understanding what they are The side effects of chemo generally depend on the type of therapy being offered and amount of drugs being used. Some chemotherapy side effects cease after treatment. Some treatments produce long-term effects. Chemotherapy acts by killing cells that divide rapidly, (fast growing cells). This is one of the main properties of cancer cells. This means that it also harms cells that divide rapidly under normal circumstances: cells in the bone marrow, digestive tract and hair follicles; this results in the most common side-effects of chemotherapydecreased production of blood cells, inflammation of the lining of the digestive tract) and hair loss. One of the most debilitating of these side effects is neuropathy, or nerve damage. For more information on neuropathy, see Chemo Induced Neuropathy For treatments for other side effects see Treatments A bdominal Pain- this can be a dull ache, cramping, or sharp pain. Chemo can cause both increased (rapid) and decreased (slow) motility of the intestines resulting in the digestion process moving too quickly or too slowly through the intestines. Going too quickly can result in cramps and diarrhea. Going too slowly can result in the backup, putrefaction with resultant toxicity and gas (flatulence). Chemo can destroy the normal bacteria and flora necessary for proper digestion. The food is not properly broken down for digestion Ataxia - the drug affects nerve cells. Nerve cells are very sensitive as they are the communication line of the body which relays messages including feeling. The nerve cells are actually more sensitive to the chemo drug then the cancer cells. When the nerve damaged is a nerve connected to a motor Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Chemotherapy

Diabetes And Chemotherapy

If you have diabetes, your blood sugar may need closer monitoring while you are having treatment. Chemotherapy can make you feel sick or be sick. You might not want to eat and this can be a problem. If you can't eat, your blood sugar could drop too low causing: faintness sweating coma This is called a hypoglycaemic attack. You and your doctor might need to plan chemotherapy a bit more carefully than would be necessary if you weren’t diabetic. Some chemotherapy combinations include steroids and these might upset your sugar balance. It might be a good idea for you and your cancer doctor to talk to your diabetes specialist. Types of diabetes There are 2 different types of diabetes. How you manage it depends on the type you have: type 1 – you need to have regular insulin injections or an insulin pump type 2 – you may be able to control it with either diet or with a combination of diet and tablets. There are some people with type 2 diabetes who also need to have insulin injections Type 1 diabetes If you are dependent on insulin, your doctor may suggest that you have the first course of chemotherapy in hospital so that the nurses can keep an eye on you. Then, if you need sugar quickly, you can have it through a drip rather than by mouth. It's possible for you to have insulin and a sugar solution (dextrose) given together through a drip in hospital. The insulin dose is based on hourly or 2 hourly blood sugar tests. But most people don't need this. If you are unable to eat your normal diet when you are at home, you may find you need to check your blood sugar a bit more often than you usually would. Type 2 diabetes If you control your diabetes with diet or tablets it should be possible to manage it during chemotherapy without too many problems. Discuss the options with you Continue reading >>

A Simple Rule For Treating Low Blood Sugar

A Simple Rule For Treating Low Blood Sugar

This information explains how to quickly treat low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Signs of Low Blood sugar Feeling faint Problems seeing A headache Shakiness Too much sweating A fast, forceful heartbeat If you faint or become unconscious, someone must call 911 for an ambulance. Please tell your family and friends about low blood sugar and what to do if you feel faint. If your blood sugar is below 70 milligrams/deciliter (mg/dL) and you’re awake and alert, follow the rule of 15/15: Take 15 grams of sugar. Wait 15 minutes, then retest your blood sugar. Take 15 grams of sugar Choose 1 of these options: Drink 4 ounces of fruit juice or regular soda (not diet soda) Drink 8 ounces of milk Eat 4 large marshmallows Chew 6 to 8 Life Savers® (not mints) Chew 3 to 4 large glucose tabs Do not eat chocolate or cookies when your blood sugar is below 70 mg/dL. Wait 15 minutes then retest your blood sugar Retest your blood sugar 15 minutes after eating 15 grams of sugar. If your blood sugar is still less than 70 mg/dL when you retest, take another 15 grams of sugar. Retest 15 minutes later. Keep doing this until your blood sugar rises to 70 mg/dL or more. When your blood sugar rises to 70 mg/dL or more, eat half of a sandwich and drink 4 ounces of milk or have your meal. When you feel better, call your healthcare provider. They may need to change your insulin or medication. Try to figure out why your blood sugar was low. Ask yourself: Did I have too little food? Did I take too much insulin? Did I take my diabetes medication without eating? Did I get too much physical activity without eating enough? One way to prevent low blood sugar is to avoid skipping meals. Speak with your healthcare provider about your diabetes management plan. Continue reading >>

How Does Chemo And Radiation Affect Glucose Levels In A Diabetic?

How Does Chemo And Radiation Affect Glucose Levels In A Diabetic?

How does chemo and radiation affect glucose levels in a diabetic? I have an Endo that handles my diabetes and my Primary handles everything else except diabetes. My Endi is always fearful of low blood sugars and has read more Then it's probably a good idea to keep your Endo in the loop. yes it does but it only does for a short time for me Working for a Dr's office I do know steroids raise your blood sugar levels so you should keep record of your #'s am noon , & pm & your PCP might read more I am already onnthe max dose of metformin. So Inwould have to add a new drug. Many of them have Cancer warnings. I will talk to my oncologist when I read more lots of good advice here. chemo can increase bs especially steroids. but nausea and fatigue lower bs dangerously if you can't eat. check often and keep read more My blood sugars are very weird, when I don't eat they usually go up not down. In almost 10 years I have never had a hypo. My liver seems to be read more mine go up to when I don't eat I don't understand why but it does I think I have an overactive liver. I have to take my metformin right before bed to keep my bgs stable over night. Usually if my bgs are high, eating a read more I've been type 2 for six years, now, but so far I've never been on meds for it. When I was on Afinitor , though, it raised my blood sugar and nothing I read more MyBCTeam is a social network and online support group for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. MyBCTeam is a social network and online support group for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. MyBCTeam gives you the easiest way to find the best team of breast cancer providers and peers who are living with orhave survived breast cancer. Share with others like you, and learn from their experience. Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

A A A Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar) Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is a commonly perceived problem. In actuality, while some or many of the symptoms may be present, it is rarely confirmed or documented. The presence of true, documented hypoglycemia in the absence of diabetes treatment must be evaluated comprehensively by an endocrinologist. Hypoglycemia most often affects those at the extremes of age, such as infants and the elderly, but may happen at any age. Generally, hypoglycemia is defined as a serum glucose level (the amount of sugar or glucose in your blood) below 70 mg/dL. As a medical problem, hypoglycemia is diagnosed by the presence of three key features (known as Whipple's triad). Whipple's triad is: symptoms consistent with hypoglycemia, a low plasma glucose concentration, and relief of symptoms after the plasma glucose level is raised. Symptoms of hypoglycemia typically appear at levels below 60 mg/dL. Some people may feel symptoms above this level. Levels below 50 mg/dL affect brain function. The body regulates its glucose level—the primary source of energy for the brain, muscles, and other essential cells - by the actions of different hormones. These hormones include insulin (which lowers the blood sugar level) and other chemicals which raise blood sugar (such as glucagon, growth hormone, and epinephrine). Both insulin and glucagon are manufactured in the pancreas, an organ near the stomach which assists the digestive tract. Special cells in the pancreas, called beta cells, make insulin. Alpha cells in the pancreas make glucagon. The role of insulin is to help in the absorption of glucose from the blood by causing it to be stored in the liver or be transported into other tissues of the body (for metabolism or storage). Glucagon increases the amount of Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

What Is Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia may be described as low levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. This is commonly seen in people who are diabetic, and their blood sugar levels fall too low - either because they took their medications and did not eat properly, or the dosage of medication is too high for them. Normal blood Glucose (sugar) levels are 60-110 mg/dL. Normal values may vary from laboratory to laboratory. Levels much lower than these can indicate hypoglycemia. Causes of Hypoglycemia: Causes of hypoglycemia may include: Excessive exercise, or lack of food intake Certain forms of alcohol may cause low blood sugar levels Certain kinds of tumors, affecting the pancreas (insulinomas) After stomach surgery People with kidney failure, who are on dialysis, may experience hypoglycemia. If you have liver disease, you may be at risk for hypoglycemia. You may have problems with your thyroid, adrenal, or pituitary glands. You may not be absorbing food that you eat very well, thus resulting in hypoglycemia. Symptoms of Hypoglycemia: You may feel sweaty, shaky or hungry. You may feel faint. Extremely low blood sugar levels may cause you to be confused, or disoriented. Severely low levels of blood sugar may cause coma. You may have a fast heartbeat, or feel palpitations. Things You Can Do About Hypoglycemia: If you are experiencing low blood sugar levels as a result of your treatment of diabetes, your healthcare provider may instruct you on the use of close blood sugar monitoring during this time. Follow all of your healthcare provider's instructions. Try to exercise. Low blood sugar levels are often temporary. If you are diabetic, you will have high blood sugars as well. Make a daily walk either alone, or with a friend or family member a part of your routine. Even light wal Continue reading >>

How Chemotherapy Can Affect Your Diabetes

How Chemotherapy Can Affect Your Diabetes

If you're struggling to find what you need, call our Support line on 0808 808 0000 (Monday to Friday, 9am-8pm) How chemotherapy can affect your diabetes How chemotherapy can affect your diabetes Need to talk? Call us free* 0808 808 00 00 Monday to Friday, 9am-8pm Chemotherapy is often used to treat cancer. When you have chemotherapy treatment, your blood sugar level may go too high or drop too low. This can happen because of the side effects of treatment. Side effects may include sickness, diarrhoea and loss of appetite. Some chemotherapy drugs can also affect your blood sugar level. Your cancer doctor can let you know if the drugs you are taking are likely to affect you. Some chemotherapy drugs can damage the nerves in your body. This can cause pain and changes in sensation. These effects can be worse if you already have nerve damage caused by diabetes. You will need to monitor your blood sugar more often during chemotherapy treatment. You may have to adjust the way you manage your diabetes. Your diabetes team can give you advice. It is important to let your doctors know how well you are managing to control your blood sugar level when you are having chemotherapy. They may be able to change the drug you are taking. Chemotherapy uses anti-cancer (cytotoxic) drugs to destroy cancer cells. Cytotoxic means toxic to cells. Cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs disrupt the way cancer cells grow and divide, but they also affect normal cells. These healthy cells can usually repair damage caused by chemotherapy but cancer cells cant and eventually die. Chemotherapy is often used to treat cancer. It is sometimes used on its own, but is commonly used in combination with other cancer treatments. This video provides a brief overview of chemotherapy treatment, how it can be given, how it wor Continue reading >>

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