diabetestalk.net

Cheap Glucometer

New Glucometer - Treatment - Tudiabetes Forum

New Glucometer - Treatment - Tudiabetes Forum

Need Recs for a new glucometer. Small blood drop and inexpensive strips desired. Type two, diagnosed four years ago, age 70, weight normal to low, required to test three times a week, On Metformin and occasional glipizide with big meals such as Thanksgiving.I am now testing more than three times a week as I am going through a period of extreme stress and not eating often enough. Thanks in advance. There will likely be a number of comments on your question, but I think it would help if you could clarify a few points. Apparently you have a meter now. Is it not meeting your needs or costs too much for the appropriate strips, or both? You say you need to test 3X per week, so perhaps a dozen times a month? There may be a few outliers, but I think most strips fall in a range between twenty cents and a dollar. If thats the case, we would be looking at a monthly cost of between $2.40 and $12. And while there are variations in the required blood drop size, I dont think its that large and I would consider most of them small. From what youve told us, Id be much more concerned about dealing with the stress and getting your eating plan under control. and the strips that I like retail for $1.44 each! a 100 count box of Contour Next strips are $144. thankfully, Ive got Medicare coverage so my cost is zero. Cheap strips are the store brands such as Walmarts Relion. We recently switched to the Contour Next strips. There are a few meters which use these strips. The strip requires a very small amount of blood and has a very highly rated level of accuracy. Amazon has the Contour Next strips at 26 cents per strip when buying 100 at a time. Or 21 or 22 cents per strip when buying 300 at a time. wow, thats a lot cheaper than at Walgreens! I was shocked when I saw the $144 sign in front of th Continue reading >>

Erasing Diabetes - Winning Without Meds

Erasing Diabetes - Winning Without Meds

Inexpensive, accurate glucometer and test strips at CVS You are probably paying more than a dollar per glucometer test strip. If that's the case, keep reading. Your local CVS has their own store brand of glucometer and glucometer strips. You can buy the CVS Advanced Glucose Meter for $17.99 and 100 strips for only $22.99. That's 23 cents per strip. Compare that to $1.78 for Free Style InsuLinx strips. But is it accurate? All glucometers and strips must comply with the same accuracy guidelines: 95% of measured blood glucose values be within 15% of the actual blood glucose level and 99% of the values be within 20% of the actual blood glucose level. Get the best deal. Ask your doctor for a prescription for the CVS Advanced Glucose Meter and CVS Advanced Meter Test Strips and bring it to your CVS pharamacy. CVS will check whether or not the glucometer and strips are covered by your insurance. Even if they are not covered by your insurance, the supplies will probably cost far less than your usual purchase of test strips. These supplies are also available online at cvs.com. Continue reading >>

Abbott Introduces Affordable Otc Glucometer Amid Reimbursement Pressures

Abbott Introduces Affordable Otc Glucometer Amid Reimbursement Pressures

Abbott Introduces Affordable OTC Glucometer Amid Reimbursement Pressures Abbott recently received FDA clearance for a new over-the-counter glucose monitor that is a more affordable alternative to expensive branded glucometers and test strips. Patients can purchase the device without related insurance paperwork or copays. The FreeStyle Precision Neo Blood Glucose Monitoring System is available in pharmacies and retailers in the United States for $14 to $17 for 25 strips and a one-time fee for the meter, which ranges from $22 to $28, according to a press release from Abbott. Citing the American Diabetes Association, the company said that diabetics pay approximately 2.3 times more for their medical care than people who do not have the chronic condition. Direct medical expenditures for a person with diabetes can reach up to $7,900 annually. The prices of branded meters and strips are out of reach for many diabetics, but Abbott's new device offers a cheaper alternative without sacrificing diagnostic quality. "People with diabetes depend every single day on trusted, high-quality tools to monitor their glucose levels," said Robert Ford, senior VP, Diabetes Care, Abbott, in the press release. "This dependence makes it even more important to ensure people have affordable access to accurate, fast, and easy-to-use systems such as FreeStyle Precision Neo system. Today, more than ever, consumers have more influence on their healthcare decisions, and Abbott is focused on offering products that provide the highest standard of accuracy, and are also affordable and easily accessible over the counter." The slim FreeStyle Precision Neo System device features a large touchscreen, e-ink display with simple icons and can produce a blood sugar reading within 5 seconds. Its onboard memory can Continue reading >>

Cheap Diabetes Tests Can Now Be Printed With An Ink-jet Printer

Cheap Diabetes Tests Can Now Be Printed With An Ink-jet Printer

Glucose strips that diabetics use to measure their blood sugar levels can be pretty pricey - but students have now come up with a way for people in poorer regions to simply print them out at home. Bioengineering students in the US have developed technology that lets people in the developing world use a hacked printer to print out glucose strips for just five cents each. They're also providing them with cheap parts to make their own device to measure their blood sugar levels. Glucose strips are part of blood glucose level tests diabetics need to perform around five or more times a day to work out how much insulin or food they need to inject to manage their diabetes and avoid complications such as blindness and cardiovascular disease. These strips are then inserted into machines called glucometers, which give them a reading of their levels. But right now, glucometer machines are hard to access and expensive. And if someone in a developing region can get their hands on one, it will only work with a specific brand of store-bought glucose strips, which can cost around $1 each. For a quarter of the people in Tanzania, where the students started their project, that adds up to around 10 times their average monthly salary. Now students from Clemson University in South Carolina have developed technology that lets people in developing countries build their own simple glucose testing systems at home for a fraction of the cost, and using easy-to-access parts. Called GlucoSense, the glucometer is made entirely from off-the-shelf parts that can be bought in electronics stores or easily shipped to remote regions in bulk. And the glucose strips required for each test are even easier to make - they’re simply printed with a hacked ink-jet printer. To create the glucose strips, you just Continue reading >>

5 Best Glucometers - Mar. 2018 - Bestreviews

5 Best Glucometers - Mar. 2018 - Bestreviews

Zero products received from manufacturers. We purchase every product we review with our own funds we never accept anything from product manufacturers. If you are one of the more than 29 million people in the U.S. living with diabetes, a glucometer is your best friend. This small device is used to test your blood glucose (BG) levels at any given time, providing an indication of whether those levels are high, low, or on target. Diabetics test their blood as often as 10 times per day, depending on circumstances. They select the proper remedy based on the reading, whether its taking insulin for high blood sugar or ingesting a glucose tablet, sugar-based soft drink, or orange juice for low blood sugar. No matter the size, shape, or advanced features of a glucometer, the process of using the device is almost always the same. It begins with placing a test strip in the glucometer and then drawing a small amount of blood from a finger or other designated area with a specially designed lancing device. The blood is placed on the test strip, and the glucometer springs into action. Within seconds, a digital readout of your blood glucose level appears. Get exclusive content, advice, and tips from BestReviews delivered to your inbox. Dr. Schreiber earned a bachelor of science in dietetics with a minor in biology from the University of Delaware, then continued at the University of Bridgeport in Bridgeport, CT, earning his doctorate of chiropractic and masters degree in human nutrition.He is double board certified in rehabilitation and clinical nutrition. He has been featured in prominent publications such as the Huffington Post, livestrong.com, and WebMD.com. Dr. Schreiber | Chiropractic Physician, Acupuncturist, Nutritionist The American Diabetes Association considers readings betwee Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter Buying Guide

Blood Glucose Meter Buying Guide

Controlling your blood sugar, or blood glucose, level is key to managing diabetes. Accurate test results help people with diabetes adjust their diet, exercise routine, and treatment plan—which might help prevent complications and reduce the risk of seizures, kidney disease, nerve damage, and blindness. Anyone with diabetes can benefit from testing. Blood glucose monitoring can be important for those taking insulin or other diabetes medications, women with gestational diabetes (diagnosed during pregnancy), and those having difficulty controlling their diabetes. Today's blood glucose meters are smaller, faster, more accurate than older models, and come with more features. We tested dozens of models priced between $10 and $75. Use our guide to help you find the best monitor for your needs. All glucose monitors work in a similar way, but some have features and options that might better suit your specific needs. Talk with your doctor or diabetes educator about which monitor matches monitoring requirements lifestyle, and budget. Cost Don't just look at the retail price of the meters alone. What makes blood glucose monitoring expensive is the test strips, which you might use many times a day. At $18 to $184 per 100 test strips, the cost can add up to about $265 to $2,685 a year for people who test four times a day. Replacement lancets are another expense to consider. Insurance Medicare covers some diabetes-related supplies, and private insurance might cover some of the cost. See if there are certain brands of meters and test strips that insurance covers. Find out how many test strips, if any, are covered per month. Your strip coverage may depend, for example, on whether you use insulin. Automatic Coding Blood glucose meters need to be calibrated to each batch of test strips. Continue reading >>

Affordable Glucometer: Cheap Glucometer Found At Walmart

Affordable Glucometer: Cheap Glucometer Found At Walmart

It sure has costed me a ton of money! How many of you pray for a cheaper glucometer and solution? How many of you have gone without testing? You only had a few test strips left and you could not afford another batch of them till pay day. I remember getting sick from not testing my blood sugars at least 2-4 times a day. Diabetes is nothing to mess around with. Let us take a look at the ReliOn Glucometer! Well a couple years ago I was looking online for some answers and I happened to stumble across Walmart ReliOn glucometer testing kit. The kit itself costed me 9$, I thought to myself this cannot be that accurate if the kit costed me 9$. Also the test strips for a 100 pack only costed me 19$, I was in pure disbelief. Walmart has inexpensive diabetic supplies. Yay for my diabetes. When I got the glucometer kit home I immediately tried this new kit out. I put the ReliOn glucometer against my amazing and expensive Freestyle glucometer. Amazingly they were only off by 5 points, one read 150 and the other 145. I felt like I hit the loto not having to pay 50$ anymore for a month supply. I had insurance so I could not imagine what others were paying. For once I had hope about testing my diabetes and could afford testing myself. ReliOnhas different products as well. Glucose tablets, which actually taste really good. They have finger pokers with refillable lancets and also a1c testing kits. The a1c testing kit was actually close to the one my doctor gave me a week later. Walmart had saved me in a pinch when I was low on money and I needed to pay my bills. I will leave a link down below to help you check the glucometer out. Well hope this helps someone get the help they need to afford testing themselves. Continue reading >>

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

These 10 meters varied in age and wear.Some were old, some were new one wasmy own personalmeter that I used to calibrate my CGM and make mission-criticaldecisions each day.All of them passed their respective control solution tests, so its safe to assume that they werein good working order. I tried to match the testing method employed by Chris (author of the original post ) as closely as possible. Eightrounds of testing were performed over the course of 24 hours according to the following procedure: Order of meters was randomized for each round. Tests were performed only when CGM readings were stable (i.e. no insulin on board and CGM showing a slope of ~0 mg/dL/min). I didnt do anything special to stabilize my blood glucose just tested as I went about a normal day. The test strips used for each meter all came from their own unique vials. Before and after completing the eight testing rounds, the meters were checked using their respective control solutions. They all passed the control solution tests. Unlike Chris, I didnt have an alarming spread in my results for any round. The overallbetween-meter variability (% Error, or %CV for you stats folks) was only 6%. In plain English:My treatment decisions wouldnt have varied much at all, regardless of the meter I was using. One unit of rapid-acting insulin brings my BG down by ~80 mg/dL, and I correct whenever Im over 100 mg/dL. Ill usually correct down to 70-110 mg/dL, depending on my plans for the next couplehours (big meal = correct to 70; workout = correct to 110). Iwasrelieved to see that even if I tooka correction bolus for the maximum BG of each round, I still would have been brought down to a desirableblood glucose level. For example, take Round 1. The highest reading I saw was 182 md/dL, and Id take 1 unit for that. Ev Continue reading >>

The Best Glucometers Of 2018

The Best Glucometers Of 2018

Our Process We spent over 80 hours researching the best 30 glucometers on the market. We considered the specifications, features, user reviews, medical studies, availability and cost. After eliminating models that used old technology, like coding, or were too difficult to find in stores, we purchased the best 12 blood glucose meters so we could perform hands-on evaluations of each device. Before diving into our recommendations for the best glucometers, it’s important to note that Top Ten Reviews is not a substitute for your primary care physician. Our recommendations are made based on common scenarios, hands-on experience, market cost evaluations and a comparison of important features, but they’re not a replacement for advice from your doctor. We are not medical experts. $19.99 The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from its main feature – Bluetooth that connects it to a mobile app on your smartphone. This provides excellent data management of your readings so you can spot patterns and better treat your diabetes. In addition, the device's interface is one of the easiest to navigate. It has multiple buttons so you can get to the features you need quickly, and the display is high-contrast with big numbers. Another reason why the Aviva Connect is the best glucometer is the availability of its test strips – they are everywhere. We couldn't find a pharmacy or online store that didn't stock them. Of course, the one significant downside to the test strips is their cost. At $1.39 per strip in a pack of 100 and $1.52 per strip in a pack of 50, they’re more expensive than most test strips on the market. Best Glucometer for Value & Availability $13.95 The CONTOUR NEXT is our pick for the best glucometer if your primary concerns are overall value and the availability o Continue reading >>

Glucose Meter

Glucose Meter

Four generations of blood glucose meter, c. 1993–2005. Sample sizes vary from 30 to 0.3 μl. Test times vary from 5 seconds to 2 minutes (modern meters typically provide results in 5 seconds). A glucose meter is a medical device for determining the approximate concentration of glucose in the blood. It can also be a strip of glucose paper dipped into a substance and measured to the glucose chart. It is a key element of home blood glucose monitoring (HBGM) by people with diabetes mellitus or hypoglycemia. A small drop of blood, obtained by pricking the skin with a lancet, is placed on a disposable test strip that the meter reads and uses to calculate the blood glucose level. The meter then displays the level in units of mg/dl or mmol/l. Since approximately 1980, a primary goal of the management of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus has been achieving closer-to-normal levels of glucose in the blood for as much of the time as possible, guided by HBGM several times a day. The benefits include a reduction in the occurrence rate and severity of long-term complications from hyperglycemia as well as a reduction in the short-term, potentially life-threatening complications of hypoglycemia. History[edit] Leland Clark presented his first paper about the oxygen electrode, later named the Clark electrode, on 15 April 1956, at a meeting of the American Society for Artificial Organs during the annual meetings of the Federated Societies for Experimental Biology.[1][2] In 1962, Clark and Ann Lyons from the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital developed the first glucose enzyme electrode. This biosensor was based on a thin layer of glucose oxidase (GOx) on an oxygen electrode. Thus, the readout was the amount of oxygen consumed by GOx during the enzymatic reaction with the substra Continue reading >>

Trend Report: High-tech Glucose Monitoring

Trend Report: High-tech Glucose Monitoring

If you got a free glucometer from your doctor, you may not have thought to check out your other options. But these days, you have a lot of exciting new choices -- not just glucometers, but other devices, apps, and web sites. These make glucose monitoring simpler, more effective, and a lot more convenient. Just like every other piece of tech in your life these days -- your TV, computer, DVD player, e-book reader, and fitness tracker -- glucose meters are going wireless, or at least syncing data with web sites and apps. That can have a big benefit for your health. Here are some of the new things you can do with a glucometer. Share data with your doctor or anyone else you choose, like your spouse. You can give real-time updates on how your treatment is working. Since managing diabetes is all about tight control of your blood sugar, that's crucial. See a more complete picture of your health. When you're just looking at today's glucose readings, you're missing how it's trending overall. These devices and apps let you see glucose trends over weeks and months. Seeing your records in colorful graphs and charts makes it easier to understand -- and to figure out if you need to make changes. For instance, a graph can quickly show if your blood sugar tends to be high in the mornings. Then you can easily share that with your doctor to see if you need to change your treatment. Track food and more. Most devices and apps let you log the food you eat. In that same tracker, you can see how your carbs add up, and you can add notes about exercise, or insulin if you take it. With this kind of info, you can get a clearer sense of how your breakfast or afternoon run affect your blood sugar levels. Sync with an app, web site, or the cloud. Several new cutting-edge glucose monitors or other dev Continue reading >>

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

With countless blood glucose meters on the market, how do you know which one to choose? Do you choose the most expensive one; it must work the best if it costs the most, right? Or are you a techie looking for a Bluetooth meter that syncs to your smartphone? Perhaps, you’re concerned with the cost and you’re looking for the most affordable meter. Top 10 Glucose Meters We’ve taken the time to test the ten most popular blood glucose meters. Take a look to find the meter that’s the best fit for you. Winner and our favorite meter is One Touch Ultra 2. OneTouch Ultra 2 Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Walmart ReliON Confirm OneTouch Verio Abbott FreeStyle Lite Walgreens True2Go Contour Next EZ Livongo Health In Touch Meter Nova Max Plus Sanofi iBGStar Our Pick After a careful review of the top glucose meters on the market, our #1 recommendation is the One Touch Ultra 2. It’s simply one of the best in terms of functionality and price. Click here to learn more. (Helpful Tip: Although you can get one from your local pharmacy, you’ll find it cheaper on Amazon. Click here to get yours.) Accu-Chek Aviva Connect The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from the Bluetooth connection that syncs to the user’s smartphone. The Connect utilizes an app to keep track of both short-term and long-term readings on a person’s smartphone. The user can also view their trends via bar graphs and maps on the app. The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect will cost you $29.99 and $1.75 for a single test strip. One con to this meter is that the test strips are one of the highest priced strips on the market. However, they are readily available in almost all drug stores and pharmacies. Accu-Chek also offers a supplemental program called Preferred Savings which can reduce most test-strip co-pays to $15-$45. Ot Continue reading >>

Why Do Test Strips Cost So Much? (part 2)

Why Do Test Strips Cost So Much? (part 2)

Last week I was busy being blown away by the amazing technology of glucose test strips. But back to reality. Why do these things cost so much? Why do prices vary by 600% or more? From what I can tell on Consumer Reports, customer reviews, articles like this one in Diabetes Forecast, and comments on diabetes blogs, it seems like most meters and strips have pretty similar quality. So how do you choose? Meters have a variety of features. Some have backlights, which is nice in the dark. Some speak to you, which helps people with poor vision. Some can store more results in memory. Some hook to your computer or smart phone with a cable to upload results; others connect with wireless; others don’t have that function. Some create graphs for you of various types. Meters are temperature sensitive. Some can function at higher temperatures; others can work at lower temperatures. Some burn through batteries faster than others. Some seem to need a little more blood than others to get a reading. Diabetes Forecast says meters are so similar that some people just buy the cheapest one, and it works for them. But most meters are cheap. The cost comes in the strips. So the best meter might be the one with the most affordable strips. When it comes to strip cost, the mega-retailers like Walmart, Walgreens, and Kroger have an advantage. And the quality seems comparable. One user commented that Strips for [Walmart Prime] run $9.00 per fifty, a $60 cost reduction from my Accu-Chek strips which are $69 at Costco. On a typical reading of 180 the meters will be maybe two points different. Pretty darn close. But that cost advantage only holds if you don’t have insurance. A lot of insurers will pay for Accu-Chek, OneTouch, or some more expensive strips, but won’t pay for a Walmart Prime or Wal Continue reading >>

Best Cheap Blood Glucose Meters

Best Cheap Blood Glucose Meters

Cheap blood glucose meters are still accurate and consistent It may be tempting to judge a blood glucose meter solely by its initial cost. But given that someone testing their glucose levels four times a day can blow through more than 100 test strips in a month, a glucose meter's true cost is best measured by how much you spend on test strips over time. In fact, some major manufacturers give away their meters for free because they recoup their losses on sales of test strips. Still, the meters with the lowest yearly operating cost also tend to cost very little themselves. Take our best-reviewed cheap glucose meter, the Bayer Contour Next (Est. $15). It's one of the few truly inexpensive meters that not only makes it into clinical trials but also excels: In a study published in 2014 in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, researchers found that the Bayer Contour Next outperformed a professional glucose monitor designed for point-of-care testing. This small, inexpensive glucose meter also receives Excellent scores for accuracy from a leading consumer research organization, alongside Very Good scores for repeatability and convenience. User reviews on the Bayer Contour Next tend to be very short and to the point; at this price, users just want a blood glucose meter that does its job. But they also love not having to code the meter when they open a new vial of test strips, being able to collect blood from almost any angle, and having the option to add more blood to the test strip if there wasn't enough the first time. The Bayer Contour Next requires a 0.6 microliter blood sample and allows you to use your palm as an alternate testing site. Other popular features -- and unusual finds on a glucose meter in this price range -- include the ability to add notes to store Continue reading >>

Checking Blood Sugar: Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy

Checking Blood Sugar: Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy

If handheld blood glucose meters were always as accurate checking blood sugar levels as the much bigger (25 pounds), much more expensive ($10,000) analyzers that hospitals and labs use, then hospitals and labs would use the small, personal blood sugar meters. Find out more about how meters get to market, what to look for when choosing your next meter, and how to calculate the performance results of the meter you have now. How meters get to market To get clearance to market a new meter, a manufacturer needs to submit data to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that shows the new blood glucose monitoring system (meter plus test strips) is as safe to use and effective as other devices on the market that have FDA clearance. Many meter companies cite criteria published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), a network of the national standards institutes of 162 countries, based in Switzerland. The standard for blood glucose meters is ISO 15197, published in 2003. It is an FDA-recognized standard. It includes instructions for manufacturers on how tests of accuracy are to be run and what counts as a passing grade. Companies don't have to go by the ISO standard. According to the FDA, "Conformance with recognized consensus standards is strictly voluntary for a medical device manufacturer. A manufacturer may choose to conform to applicable recognized standards or may choose to address relevant issues in another manner." So if a manufacturer isn't using the ISO standard, it still has to make a case to the FDA that the device and strips are as safe to use and effective as others on the market. How is accuracy tested? Accuracy means how close the meter's results are to the results from a big, expensive, carefully calibrated lab analyzer. ISO requires man Continue reading >>

More in diabetes