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Changing From Apidra To Humalog

Test Driving Insulin

Test Driving Insulin

How many insulins have you tried? If you're like most people, you only switch to something new when a better generation comes out, such as when Regular upgraded to Humalog or when NPH upgraded to Lantus. But when it comes to comparing insulin in the same family, say Humalog versus Novolog or Lantus versus Levemir, most of us only try something new when something goes very wrong, such as burning at the injection site. Yech... But what really differentiates them anyway? On the outside, there aren't many distinct differences between Humalog, Novolog and Apidra. They are all rapid-acting insulin designed to enhance upon the classic Regular. They have a quick onset (between 10 and 15 minutes) and are generally are out of your system in a couple of hours. But if you ask an individual, "Which insulin do you use?" you'll get a variety of answers and a variety of reasons. When Apidra came to market in 2004, it claimed the title of speed champion. While Humalog was fast, and Novolog was faster, Apidra was the fastest, according to manufacturer Sanofi-Aventis. Actually, there is no scientific evidence that there are any major difference between the different brands of rapid-acting insulin. "I have seen zero reliable research (ie, not conducted by an insulin company) showing any difference in action times," says expert John Walsh, PA, CDE, and author of Pumping Insulin. But many people — including many Apidra users like myself! — still claim otherwise. We surveyed the folks at TuDiabetes to get their impressions of how the different insulins have affected their blood sugar, and several people responded with interesting feedback about the new kid on the block, Apidra. Linzie, a type 1, switched to Apidra when she went on her insulin pump. "Apidra works really quick compared to t Continue reading >>

Similarities And Differences Between Apidra Insuin Vs Humalog

Similarities And Differences Between Apidra Insuin Vs Humalog

Apidra and Humalog are both injectable insulins that are used to treat people with diabetes. These drugs help to reduce high blood sugar levels in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Both insulin medications are fast-acting insulin analogs, meaning that they start to work quickly compared to other insulin analogs. However, there are differences between them, hence they cannot be used interchangeably. If your doctor prescribes either Apidra or Humalog, you may need to take them together with long-acting insulin. What is Apidra? Apidra is a fast-acting insulin that has insulin glulisine. Insulin glulisine starts to work after 15 minutes and peaks after 1 hour. As a fast-acting insulin, it is recommended you take this medication 15 minutes before you eat, or 20 minutes after you eat. This medicine is only part of a treatment program which includes a diet plan, an exercise program, weight control and blood sugar testing. Your blood sugar will be affected in case you change any of these factors. It is used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes and type 1 diabetes in adults and children above the age of 4. However, the drug should not be taken by children younger than the age of 4. What is Humalog? Humalog refers to another fast-acting insulin which is taken by people with diabetes to lower blood sugar levels. When injected under the skin, the medication starts to work after 15 minutes to lower your blood sugar levels. If you take this insulin drug with a meal, you should take it within 15 minutes before you eat or just after you take a meal. This medication should be used as it is prescribed by your doctor. Make sure you carefully follow the instructions on the prescription label. It should not be used to treat children of any age with type 2 diabetes. Similarities and di Continue reading >>

The Switch: How I Accidentally Found The Right Insulin

The Switch: How I Accidentally Found The Right Insulin

WRITTEN BY: Chris Wiggins Note: This article is a part of our library of resources in Tools & How to. Check out more helpful product reviews and run downs on different diabetes management devices here. One of the unfortunate realities of being a Type 1 diabetic in the American healthcare system is that we don’t always have control of the medications we receive. I’ve changed insulin back and forth from Novolog to Humalog over my time with the pump due merely to the preference of my insurance company at the time. While those two insulins were nearly identical based on my blood sugar levels, I recently was put on a new insulin for the reason that it is the only insulin my new insurance covered. That insulin is Apidra, an insulin I had never even heard mentioned by my doctors despite it being on the market since 2004. At first I didn’t know much about the new insulin, except that it was similar to Humalog, the insulin I had previously been prescribed. I was told it was slightly faster acting, but my dosages for carbohydrates and lowering my blood sugar shouldn’t change by much. While fairly skeptical about the new insulin I chose my first few meals carefully (low carbs, high fiber) and monitored my blood sugar closely. Everything seemed fine and similar to Humalog, so I figured it was just the same medicine with a new name/logo. Then after a few days I tested the insulin against a high carbohydrate sandwich from one of my favorite sandwich places. These sandwiches are not what I would call “diabetic friendly” as the bread rolls are massive, clocking in an estimated 100-120 grams of carbohydrates for my preferred roll, Dutch Crunch. What happened next was surprising. In my experience eating anything over 100 grams of carbohydrates in a single meal, I would always Continue reading >>

Insurance Forcing Me To Switch To Humalog

Insurance Forcing Me To Switch To Humalog

Insurance forcing me to switch to Humalog My health insurance has classified my current insulin Novolog as a drug that requires their step therapy, a.k.a., - use generic or their preferred brand-named drug. Otherwise I pay unless I get my doctor to submit a pre-authorization. Many reasons why this is in the wrong direction- this will absolutely not save ME money! My insurances only claim for change. it is so unreasonable to have me the patient & insurer to interrupt, bother and harass my doctors to call & answer questions to insurance personal instead of being doctors to me (and others). if a pre-authorization is approved, it may be for a short length of time (in my case 1 year). So I have to ask my doctor to repeat the process all over again! Ive been on Novolog for 13 years and after many pump parameter adjustments my A1C is finally under 7%. I dont want to be forced to change my insulin nor feel pressured to bother my Endocrinologist to call my health insurance when my diabetes is in control and I am in a state of being healthy! This doesnt make sense to me. Thoughts from others? Novolog and Humalog tend to work very similarly. You may find that its not as much of an interruption as youre expecting. Have you had a bad reaction to Humalog in the past? If youve been able to go 13 years on one insulin without having been forced to change by your insurance previously, consider yourself indeed fortunate. In my first five years Ive been forced to change three times. Most people seem to find Novolog and Humalog very similar, though there are exceptions. In my case, Novolog went a little further than Humalog, i.e. 1:8 versus 1:7 I:C ratio. In rare cases someone might be allergic to one or the other. I agree, it is a pain in the derriere to have insurance calling the shots i Continue reading >>

Can Insulin Go Back In The Fridge?

Can Insulin Go Back In The Fridge?

After removing insulin glargine (Lantus) from the refrigerator for use, can it be refrigerated over and over again after having warmed to room temperature, or does this degrade it? Continue reading >>

Apidra To Humalog Advice

Apidra To Humalog Advice

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have been advised to change from Apidra to Humalog, has anyone found Humalog better? Seem to be having alot of highs! Last week was upto 33, felt pretty rough, last 5 days, had a high every day, today, was ok to start with, had lunch out, Shephers pie, gave 4.5 units for it, then had banana milkshake, 2.5 units for that, felt fine, coulpe of hours later, got home, bm was 7(thought that was ok) then went out & about, got back again & bm was 33!!Just really struggling to make sense of these highs Also have got the implant in, has stopped working(as have had periods) going to ring surgery in week to get another one done or maybe just go back on the pill, wondering if this is playing a part in my sugars so high?! It's a long time since I've swapped from one insulin to another... Apidra as about the same lick in time, peaks about the same time, but burns out the system a lot quicker than humalog, and it sounds what you say you have two things going on in the main. Firstly are your insulin/carb ratio correct? Secondly it sounds like some of the problem is your Apidra is burning out the system too quickly.. But I think you should first do some basal checking to ensure that your background is set correctly so you know that this isn't impacting on your levels. Then once your basal is correct, you need to double check your insulin/carb ratio's As you are Apridra I would take several test from 1/2 hour through to the four hour mark... By doing this you should be able to see the pattern your Apridra is working and when it's burning out.. So if your BG's remains pretty stable for the first hour or so, with a small raise then start shooting up, this would indicat Continue reading >>

Humalog Vs. Novolog.

Humalog Vs. Novolog.

It wasn't until recently that I started thinking about building up a tolerance to insulin. Do you build up a chemical familiarity, a resistance of sorts, to a drug after taking it for ... oh, say a few decades? Do PWD eventually become the Dread Pirate Roberts, building up a tolerance to iocane powder? "I realize this is probably ridiculous, and I'm sure there aren't any studies on this," I said to my doctor the other week. "But it has prompted me to want to try a different kind of fast acting insulin, to see if I have better results. Is that something I'm able to do, to have a script written for a one-off in order to assess how the insulin might work for me?" "We can do that." And I left the appointment, expecting my pharmacy to auto-dial me when my order was complete. Instead, a three-month supply of Novolog ended up on my doorstep, having been accidentally shuttled through my mail order pharmacy and eating up my insurance order that was intended for my normal course of Humalog. Which is why I'm experimenting with Novolog for the next few months, as a result of a shipping error. I've been taking Humalog for over ten years, after switching from Regular insulin before starting on my insulin pump, so I feel like I'm familiar with how Humalog acts in my pump and on my blood sugars. Switching to a different, but similar, rapid-acting analog should hopefully be a seamless transition. Last night was my first pump-load of Novolog, despite the last unopened bottle of Humalog in my stash. (I didn't want to use up the Humalog entirely, then switch to Novolog, because if I absolutely hated the new insulin, I'd be stuck with it.) So far, last night was entirely uneventful, and the biggest change I've noticed (in less than 24 hours of use) is that the bottle of Novolog plays host t Continue reading >>

Difference Between Apidra & Humalog

Difference Between Apidra & Humalog

Apidra and Humalog are both types of fast-acting insulin that are used by diabetics as a bolus dose to cover the carbohydrates eaten during a meal or snack. They can both also be used in an insulin pump. While both types of insulin work to lower blood sugar quickly, certain individuals respond better to one than the other. Time Frame Ohio State University Medical Center suggests that you take Humalog insulin no more than 15 minutes after eating, but extends the amount of time you can wait to inject Apidra after a meal to 20 minutes. Onset Apidra starts working to bring down blood sugar levels 20 minutes after injection. Humalog begins lowering blood sugar 5 to 10 minutes after injection. Duration Apidra peaks (or works the hardest) between 34 and 90 minutes after injection. Humalog takes between one and two hours after injection to peak. Effectiveness Since Apidra peaks faster than Humalog, it can lower high blood sugar levels faster, meaning you spend less time with high glucose levels. This can positively impact (as in, lower) A1c test results, which measure the average blood glucose level for the past three months. Usage in Insulin Pumps Some insulin pump users have experienced fewer clogged tubing/reservoir incidents with Apidra than with Humalog. Continue reading >>

Rapid-acting Analogues

Rapid-acting Analogues

Rapid-Acting Analogues Short-Acting Insulins Intermediate-Acting Insulins Long-Acting Insulins Combination Insulins Onset: 12 - 18 min Peak: 1-3 hours Duration: 3-5 hours Solution: Clear Comments: NovoLog should generally be given immediately before a meal (start of meal within 5-10 minutes after injection) because of its fast onset of action. NovoLog is homologous with regular human insulin with the exception of a single substitution of the amino acid proline by aspartic acid in position B28 (beta chain). Insulin lispro (Humalog) and insulin aspart (Novolog), when administered intravenously, show pharmacodynamic parameters similar to regular insulin. Mixing NPH: If NovoLog is mixed with NPH human insulin, NovoLog should be drawn into the syringe first. The injection should be made immediately after mixing. Regular insulin: Compatible - but NO support clinically for such a mixture. Draw up Novolog first before drawing up Regular Insulin. Mixtures should not be administered intravenously. When used in external subcutaneous infusion pumps for insulin, NovoLog should not be mixed with any other insulins or diluent. When rapid-acting insulin is mixed with either an intermediate- or long-acting insulin, the mixture should be injected within 15 min before a meal. INDICATIONS AND USAGE Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus NovoLog is an insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Dosing NovoLog is an insulin analog with an earlier onset of action than regular human insulin. The dosage of NovoLog must be individualized. NovoLog given by subcutaneous injection should generally be used in regimens with an intermediate or long-acting insulin [see package insert for Warnings and Precautions (5), How Supplied Continue reading >>

Information Regarding Insulin Storage And Switching Between Products In An Emergency

Information Regarding Insulin Storage And Switching Between Products In An Emergency

en Español Insulin Storage and Effectiveness Insulin for Injection Insulin from various manufacturers is often made available to patients in an emergency and may be different from a patient's usual insulin. After a disaster, patients in the affected area may not have access to refrigeration. According to the product labels from all three U.S. insulin manufacturers, it is recommended that insulin be stored in a refrigerator at approximately 36°F to 46°F. Unopened and stored in this manner, these products maintain potency until the expiration date on the package. Insulin products contained in vials or cartridges supplied by the manufacturers (opened or unopened) may be left unrefrigerated at a temperature between 59°F and 86°F for up to 28 days and continue to work. However, an insulin product that has been altered for the purpose of dilution or by removal from the manufacturer’s original vial should be discarded within two weeks. Note: Insulin loses some effectiveness when exposed to extreme temperatures. The longer the exposure to extreme temperatures, the less effective the insulin becomes. This can result in loss of blood glucose control over time. Under emergency conditions, you might still need to use insulin that has been stored above 86°F. You should try to keep insulin as cool as possible. If you are using ice, avoid freezing the insulin. Do not use insulin that has been frozen. Keep insulin away from direct heat and out of direct sunlight. When properly stored insulin becomes available again, the insulin vials that have been exposed to these extreme conditions should be discarded and replaced as soon as possible. If patients or healthcare providers have specific questions about the suitability of their insulin, they may call the respective manufacturer a Continue reading >>

Comparable Efficacy And Safety Of Insulin Glulisine And Insulin Lispro When Given As Part Of A Basalbolus Insulin Regimen In A 26-week Trial In Pediatric Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

Comparable Efficacy And Safety Of Insulin Glulisine And Insulin Lispro When Given As Part Of A Basalbolus Insulin Regimen In A 26-week Trial In Pediatric Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

Comparable Efficacy and Safety of Insulin Glulisine and Insulin Lispro When Given as Part of a BasalBolus Insulin Regimen in a 26-Week Trial in Pediatric Patients with Type 1 Diabetes We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Comparable Efficacy and Safety of Insulin Glulisine and Insulin Lispro When Given as Part of a BasalBolus Insulin Regimen in a 26-Week Trial in Pediatric Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Areti Philotheou, M.B., Ch.B., Silva Arslanian, M.D., [...], and Thomas Danne, M.D. We compared the efficacy and safety of insulin glulisine with insulin lispro as part of a basalbolus regimen in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Overall, 572 children and adolescents (417 years old) using insulin glargine or neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin as basal insulin were enrolled in a 26-week, multicenter, open, centrally randomized, parallel-group, noninferiority study. Subjects were randomized to receive glulisine (n = 277) or lispro (n = 295) 015 min premeal. Baseline-to-endpoint hemoglobin A1c changes were similar between the two insulins: adjusted mean change (glulisine vs. lispro), 0.10% versus 0.16%; between-treatment difference (glulisinelispro), &minsu;0.06, 95% confidence interval (0.24; 0.12); and prespecified noninferiority margin, 0.4%. Overall, for all age groups together, the percentage of patients achieving American Diabetes Association age-specific A1c targets at endpoint was significantly higher ( Continue reading >>

Compare Humalog Vs. Apidra

Compare Humalog Vs. Apidra

Apidra (insulin glulisine) is an insulin that controls blood sugar during your meals, but you'll still have to follow your doctor's diet and exercise plan. Humalog (insulin lispro) is the most effective medication for lowering your blood sugar. Dose can be easily adjusted to create a regimen that's tailored to your body's needs. Humalog (insulin lispro) can be used even if you have liver or kidney problems, unlike other anti-diabetic medications. Apidra (insulin glulisine) starts working in as soon as 15 minutes. Programs are available to lower your copay. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist. Can be used in people over 65 and children 4 years of age and older. 280 reviews so far Have you used Humalog (insulin lispro)? Leave a review Not enough review data. Continue reading >>

Indications And Usage For Apidra® (insulin Glulisine [rdna Origin] Injection)

Indications And Usage For Apidra® (insulin Glulisine [rdna Origin] Injection)

Prescription Apidra® is for adults with type 2 diabetes or adults and children (4 years and older) with type 1 diabetes to improve blood sugar control. Apidra® given by subcutaneous injection is usually used with a longer-acting insulin. When used as a mealtime insulin, Apidra® should be given within 15 minutes before or within 20 minutes after starting a meal. Apidra® may be infused subcutaneously by external insulin infusion pumps. Do not use Apidra® during a low blood sugar reaction (hypoglycemia) or if you are allergic to any of the ingredients in Apidra®. Do not share needles, insulin pens or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. You must test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Apidra®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Apidra® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Apidra®, when given by injection under the skin, should not be mixed with insulins other than NPH. Do not mix Apidra® with any insulin when used in the pump or for intravenous administration. The most common side effect of insulin, including Apidra®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious. Some people may experience symptoms such as shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision. Severe hypoglycemia may be serious and life threatening. It may cause harm to your heart or brain. Other possible side effects may include low blood potassium, injection site reactions, such as changes in fat tissue at the injection site, and allergic reactions, such as itching and rash. Less common, but potentially more serious or life-threatening, is generalized allergy to in Continue reading >>

Switching From Humalog To Apidra

Switching From Humalog To Apidra

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I was taken off Avandia for insulin resistance, and given Actos instead. I have used Actos for 2 months, and it is not as good as Avandia. I have gained 3 pounds, I am using almost 20% more insulin, and I am having higher blood sugar one hour after meals. My doctor refuses to let me go back to Avandia, and refuses to let me use Metformin. The only thing he agreed to change is my insulin. I am replacing Humalog by Apidra in my pump. If you pump with Apidra, does it act faster and then is it used up in about 3 hours? I am hoping it works this way, since I have been having numbers like 160-180 one hour after eating. I had 130-160 one hour after eating with Humalog. I hope Apidra will help me avoid the higher spikes at those times. Humalog did not give me this problem with Avandia, but it does with Actos. Anything you can tell me about using Apidra will be appreciated. I have not filled the Apidra prescription yet, I just received the prescription today (3-10-11). I assume I will use the same dosages, ratios, basal rates, sensitivities, etc on my pump as I did with Humalog. I imagine some basal rates may change eventually once I get started. I've used Humalog, Novolog, and Apidra in my pump. For me at least, each seems to work faster than the other (in the order listed). I eventually settled on Apidra since it helped better match timing with my food intake. I find to last about 3.5-4 hours, but we're all different of course. I haven't really had to adjust my basals due to the change. The past week or so, I seem to have hit on a really good site, because the Apidra is much more effective than it h Continue reading >>

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap "old-school" Insulin

Note: BootCamp for Betics is not a medical center. Anything you read on this site should not be considered medical advice, and is for educational purposes only. Always consult with a physician or a diabetes nurse educator before starting or changing insulin doses. Did you know that all type 1 diabetics and some type 2 diabetics need injectable insulin in order to live? Put another way, if a diabetic needs insulin in order to live, and the diabetic does not get insulin, the diabetic will die. Diabetic death from Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a grisly process, during which acid starts running through your bloodstream, searing your vessels and organs while your body shrivels up in dehydration as it tries to push the acid out of your body through your urine and lungs, and, left untreated, the condition shuts down your organs one by one until you are dead. If you're lucky, your brain will be the first thing to swell itself into a coma and you'll be unconscious for the remainder of the organ failures. In some cases, this grisly diabetic death can take a few days or weeks to complete its process. Or, if you're one of the luckier less-resistant insulin-dependent type 2 diabetics, you may actually get away with staying alive for quite a few years and suffer only some heart disease, stroke, kidney damage/failure, neuropathy, limb amputations and blindness. (my intent in describing how lack of insulin leads to death is not to cause fear in people with diabetes or their loved ones; rather, my intent is to make clear the reality that injectable insulin is absolutely vital to diabetics who depend on injectable insulin to live) While I'd love to go off on a political rant about how insulin should be a basic human right for all insulin-dependent diabetics (and why the hell isn't it?), that' Continue reading >>

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