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Ceylon Cinnamon Diabetes

Does Cinnamon Help Diabetes?

Does Cinnamon Help Diabetes?

It’s fine to sprinkle cinnamon on your oatmeal or use it in baking. Go ahead and enjoy it if you like its taste. But if you hope that it will help you manage your diabetes, you might want to pause before you head to your spice rack. It's not yet clear if cinnamon is good for diabetes. Research findings have been mixed, and the American Diabetes Association dismisses cinnamon’s use in diabetes treatment. Several small studies have linked cinnamon to better blood sugar levels. Some of this work shows it may curb blood sugar by lowering insulin resistance. In one study, volunteers ate from 1 to 6 grams of cinnamon for 40 days. (One gram of ground cinnamon is about half a teaspoon.) The researchers found that cinnamon cut cholesterol by about 18% and blood sugar levels by 24%. But in other studies, the spice did not lower blood sugar or cholesterol levels. Unless you have liver damage, it should be OK for you to enjoy it in food. If you do have liver problems, be careful, because large amounts of cinnamon may make them worse. you might like If you are considering cinnamon supplements, talk with your doctor first, especially if you take any medication. Also, look for brands labeled with a quality seal. These include the NSF International, US Pharmacopeia, or Consumerlab seal. This helps assure that the supplement actually has the ingredients stated on the label and doesn't have any contaminants or potentially harmful ingredients. Unlike medications, supplement makers don't have to prove their products are safe or effective. But the FDA can order a supplement off the market if it proves it's unsafe. Use caution if you also take other supplements that lower blood sugar levels, including: Bitter melon Devil's claw Fenugreek Garlic Horse chestnut Panax Siberian ginseng The s Continue reading >>

Cinnamon For Diabetes

Cinnamon For Diabetes

The use of cinnamon to help treat diabetes remains controversial. We know that cinnamon is so good at controlling one’s blood sugar that you can cheat on a diabetes test by consuming two teaspoons of cinnamon the night before your glucose tolerance test. That’s where they make you drink some sugar water to see how well your body can keep your blood sugar levels under control, and if you eat those two teaspoons right when the test starts or 12 hours before you can significantly blunt the spike. Even a teaspoon a day appears to make a significant difference. A review of the best studies done to date found that the intake of cinnamon by type 2 diabetics or prediabetics does lower their blood glucose significantly. So what’s the controversy? Well, as I described in my video The Safer Cinnamon, cassia cinnamon, also known as Chinese cinnamon (probably what you’re getting at the store if it just says “cinnamon”) contains a compound called coumarin which may be toxic to the liver at high doses. Originally the concern was mainly for kids during Christmas-time where they might get an above average exposure, but more recently some researchers suggest that kids just sprinkling some cassia cinnamon on their oatmeal a few times a week might exceed the recommended safety limit. As you can see in my 5-min video Update on Cinnamon for Blood Sugar Control just a quarter teaspoon of cinnamon a few times a week may be too much for little kids, and if they’re eating that cinnamon-sprinkled oatmeal more like every day they can bump up against the limit for adults. So a teaspoon a day of cassia cinnamon might be too much for anyone, but can’t we just switch from cassia cinnamon to Ceylon cinnamon and get the benefits without the potential risks? Without the risks, yes, but we Continue reading >>

Which Cinnamon Is Better For Blood Sugar?

Which Cinnamon Is Better For Blood Sugar?

In type 2 diabetes, blood sugar and insulin tend to spike after meals. Insulin is often present, sometimes even plentiful, in type 2 diabetes, but it isn’t efficient. There is a bewildering array of prescription drugs designed to improve the action of insulin; there are also some non-drug approaches that may be helpful. You may have heard that cinnamon can help, but which cinnamon works best? Which Cinnamon Should You Choose? Q. I have read on your website that people with diabetes can take cinnamon to help control blood glucose levels. I understand that there are two kinds of cinnamon, cassia and Ceylon. Is there a difference in effectiveness? Which cinnamon is better? A. A number of studies have shown that cinnamon can lower fasting blood glucose and (in some studies) HbA1c, a measure of glucose control over several weeks (Clinical Nutrition, Oct., 2012; Nutrition Research, June, 2012; Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Sep. 12, 2012; International Journal of Preventive Medicine, Aug., 2012; Journal of Intercultural Ethnopharmacology, Feb. 21, 2016). Some studies found that cinnamon helped moderate blood sugar but did not improve insulin sensitivity (Journal of Dietary Supplements, July/Aug., 2016). Most of these studies did not specify which cinnamon they used. In many instances, it was probably cassia cinnamon, readily available in supermarkets. Is Ceylon Cinnamon More Helpful? It is possible that Ceylon cinnamon, also known as “true” cinnamon, might also be able to moderate blood sugar levels after meals and help control type 2 diabetes. It has been tested in in animal research (Nutrition Journal, online Oct. 16, 2015). French scientists have also found that Ceylon cinnamon extract can block an enzyme (alpha-amylase) that breaks starch down into its con Continue reading >>

Cinnamon Diabetes Recipes

Cinnamon Diabetes Recipes

Unfortunately because the US FDA heavily regulates anything that can be used like a medicine even a natural product like Cinnamon it will no longer allow us to display any material or cite any research studies however remote on the benefits of Cinnamon. While it's effects on diabetes is certainly debatable and certainly not proven beyond a shadow of doubt the FDA will not even allow us to even discuss it. This is an unfortunate tun of events but we must follow the law. But we do make the best Ceylon Cinnamon products in the World and hopefully you can get this valuable information from other sites. Admittedly they will not be as as comprehensive as ours but this is how Big Pharma controls your health. We can however give you some great diabetes friendly recipes with Cinnamon. Adding Ceylon Cinnamon adds flavor and flair to most recipes. Here are some of our diabetes friendly Cinnamon recipes. That means with little or no carbs. KETO DIET FOR DIABETES By far the best method to treat your diabetes is the Keto diet. Developed as a post cancer treatment, the Keto diet has been discovered as one of the best possible treatment options for diabetes. Because sugar and weight gain are all inter related. This is by no means the only solution but it is one of the best of many treatment options. Eating healthy. The Keto diet which involves a diet composed of 70% fat, 20% protein and 5% carbs. But remember in order to lose weight your sugar levels have to be zero. Here are some excellent videos you must watch The Myth about Blood Sugar and Diabetes How to burn the most Fat Home Cart Contact US Terms & Shipping Disclaimer Search Research Benefits Blog Client Login Tea Powder Sticks Leaf Oil Bark Oil Face Mask Toothipicks Candles Gifts & Other Continue reading >>

Ceylon Cinnamon: Health Benefits, Uses, And More

Ceylon Cinnamon: Health Benefits, Uses, And More

What is Ceylon cinnamon? Cinnamon is a spice used by many different cultures as seasoning for savory and sweet foods. There are different varieties of cinnamon. Ceylon cinnamon, also known as Cinnamon zeylanicum and cinnamon cassia are the most common. Cinnamon cassia is more common. It may already be in your spice cabinet. But Ceylon cinnamon is different from other varieties. It has a distinctive shape, lighter color, and delicate taste. It also has properties that contribute to many health benefits. Benefits of Ceylon cinnamon Potential for diabetes treatment Cinnamon is considered as an alternative treatment for diabetes mellitus. In one study, Ceylon cinnamon brought insulin levels in diabetic rats to close to normal levels. Other studies support the idea that Ceylon cinnamon is useful for diabetes treatment. Ceylon cinnamon stimulates insulin-like activity. It reduces insulin resistance in the body. This helps glucose metabolize in the liver, according to research. Ceylon cinnamon is a promising treatment for people looking for alternatives to synthetic insulin therapy. To use cinnamon as an insulin stabilizer, at least 120 milligrams (mg) per day are recommended. Contains cancer-fighting enzymes Ceylon cinnamon contains anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial effects. These properties mean Ceylon cinnamon supports your immune health. Ceylon cinnamon was part of a study that showed it enhanced antioxidant enzyme activity. This means it may prevent or treat certain types of cancer. This is good news for people who are looking for dietary supplements that can help prevent their cancer from growing. You shouldn't experiment with cinnamon to treat your cancer without speaking to your oncologist first. Helps manage blood pressure All varieties of cinnamon con Continue reading >>

Using Cinnamon For Blood Sugar: Does It Work, And Is It Safe?

Using Cinnamon For Blood Sugar: Does It Work, And Is It Safe?

Using cinnamon to treat diabetes is something you might have heard of in the last few years. Some diabetics may take cinnamon supplements, while others may just shake the stuff on everything. It’s important to remember that cinnamon is a spice, and all spices can be incredibly beneficial to our health. Not one can save us from anything as serious as diabetes, however adding cinnamon to our foods may offer some benefits to our blood sugar. But how? Why and How Cinnamon May Help During Meals When you eat, your blood glucose rises naturally. This is a normal process in the body, and not harmful … until that insulin doesn’t reach the cells efficiently and your blood glucose stays high all the time. Various reasons can cause this to happen, whether it be too much sugar intake, not enough fiber, too much or any animal protein, a high starchy meal with not enough other nutrients like magnesium and protein to slow down the response, or simply due to blood sugar problems you have currently have. Some other factors that are possible, include a high fat intake from animal or oil fat sources that prevents insulin from reaching the cells, or possibly a diet too low in calories. Skipping meals can also cause problems with blood sugar. Whatever the cause, the important solution is to eat a whole foods diet, lean plant-based proteins, sufficient (but modest) portions of healthy plant-based fats, and as much fiber as your body can tolerate comfortably. Cinnamon works its magic by lowering the insulin response in the body to a degree, and it also contains nutrients that assist in this process as well. Nutrients in Cinnamon That Provide Blood Sugar Support Adding cinnamon to some foods can benefit you for a few reasons. First, it tastes naturally sweet, so it may lower your cravings Continue reading >>

Effects Of Cinnamomum Zeylanicum (ceylon Cinnamon) On Blood Glucose And Lipids In A Diabetic And Healthy Rat Model

Effects Of Cinnamomum Zeylanicum (ceylon Cinnamon) On Blood Glucose And Lipids In A Diabetic And Healthy Rat Model

Go to: Diabetes mellitus is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with an estimated 80% of the world population with diabetes living in developing countries.[1] Most patients with the disease have type 2 diabetes to which the South Asians are known to have an increased predisposition.[2] The causes of type 2 diabetes are multi-factorial, and the diet plays an important role on its’ incidence, severity, and management.[3] Hence, studies have frequently focused on dietary components beneficial in the prevention and treatment of diabetes. Recent studies have demonstrated that herbal products have beneficial effects in patients with diabetes by improving glucose and lipid metabolism, antioxidant status, and capillary function.[4] Cinnamon is one such a dietary component that has shown to have biologically active substances with insulin-mimetic properties. In vitro[5,6] and in vivo[7,8] studies have shown that cinnamon enhances glucose uptake by activating the insulin receptor kinase activity, auto-phosphorylation of the insulin receptor, and glycogen synthase activity. Cinnamon, the inner bark of a tropical evergreen tree has two main types, Ceylon cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume) and Chinese Cassia (Cinnamomum aromaticum Ness) and which when dried, rolls into a tubular form known as a quill. Cinnamon is available in either its whole quill form (cinnamon sticks) or as ground powder. In native Ayurvedic medicine, cinnamon is considered a remedy for respiratory, digestive, and gynecological ailments. Recent studies emerging from western countries have shown many potentially beneficial health effects of cinnamon such as anti-inflammatory properties, anti-microbial activity, blood glucose control, reducing cardiovascular disease, boosting cognitive funct Continue reading >>

Fact From Fiction: Is Cinnamon Good For Diabetes?

Fact From Fiction: Is Cinnamon Good For Diabetes?

Cinnamon bark is usually derived from the bark of the cinnamon tree, Cinnamomum zeylanicum. The most common species of cinnamon available is cassia or Chinese cinnamon, but other varieties include Indonesian cinnamon (Padang cassia or Korintje), Vietnamese cinnamon (Vietnamese cassia) or Sri Lanka (Ceylon) cinnamon. Cassia cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia) is often a combination of these forms of cinnamon, and is the most common type found, at least in North America. Cassia cinnamon has Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) status in the US and is considered safe in the amount commonly found in food and beverages.[1] The volatile oils (those that give cinnamon its distinctive odor) in cinnamon consist mainly of a substance known as cinnamaldehyde. Other substances found in cinnamon include coumarin and polyphenols such as hydroxychalcone. Cinnamaldehyde has antibacterial properties, antitumor properties and some immune system effects. The polyphenol hydroxychalcone appears to be responsible for the reported antidiabetic effects of cassia cinnamon and to a lesser degree, other forms of cinnamon. The Anti-Diabetes Actions of Cinnamon Research in a number of animal models of diabetes indicate that cassia cinnamon can increase insulin secretion, though its effects on blood sugar levels does not seem to be very significant. In clinical trials, the evidence that cassia cinnamon can effectively lower blood sugar levels and lower A1c percentage has been inconsistent. Some clinical studies have indicated that cassia cinnamon can lower the fasting blood sugar, HbA1C percentages, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood pressure when compared to placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes while others have not demonstrated any effect. The doses Continue reading >>

More News On Blood Sugar: Ceylon Cinnamon Can Help

More News On Blood Sugar: Ceylon Cinnamon Can Help

Q: My doctor says I have pre-diabetes. I have read your columns about the advantages of Ceylon cinnamon for people with diabetes. Would this help me with my pre-diabetes? Ceylon cinnamon is hard to find. Would Saigon cinnamon work as well? Are there other natural herbs or spices I should consider taking? A: Cinnamon and other spices and herbs rich in plant polyphenols can help control blood sugar and insulin spikes after meals (Diabetologia, July 2015). One placebo-controlled trial found that a supplement containing cassia cinnamon, chromium and carnosine successfully lowered fasting blood sugar in people with pre-diabetes (PLOS One, Sept. 25, 2015). Most studies of cinnamon to lower blood sugar have used ordinary cassia cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia) rather than the more expensive Ceylon cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylonicum). Saigon cinnamon is closely related to cassia cinnamon. You shouldn’t need Ceylon cinnamon to get the blood-sugar benefits. If you take either cassia or Saigon cinnamon, though, we suggest a water extract rather than the powdered spice. Both cassia cinnamon and Saigon cinnamon contain coumarin, a natural compound that can harm the liver when taken in large amounts. Coumarin is not water-soluble, however. There are a number of other spices that can be helpful. They include caraway, cumin, ginger, fenugreek and turmeric. You can learn much more about these spices and their beneficial effects from our 200-page book “Spice Up Your Health.” It is available at www.PeoplesPharmacy.com. It is important to monitor your blood-sugar levels very carefully. Your doctor will want to monitor your progress, so a daily diary with glucose levels will enable her to make sure you are within normal limits. If natural products, exercise and a low-carb diet don’t work, Continue reading >>

Cinnamon Can Help Lower Blood Sugar, But One Variety May Be Best

Cinnamon Can Help Lower Blood Sugar, But One Variety May Be Best

If I say cinnamon, you say ... sugar? It's a popular combination, of course. But if you're interested in the health-promoting effects of cinnamon, you may want to think anew about the spice. For instance, says John Critchley, executive chef at Bourbon Steak Restaurant in Washington, D.C., why not add it to savory dishes? He uses cinnamon to create a spice and herb rub for lamb loin. He also whips up a great spinach salad with raisins, pine nuts and cinnamon. Critchley is a fan of the intense aromatics in cinnamon, especially in Saigon — a cousin of the cassia varieties of cinnamon most commonly used in the U.S. and Europe. And he says adding cinnamon to spice blends is a great way to layer flavors when you're cooking. And when you start to look at the potential health-promoting effects of the spice, there's even more incentive to experiment with it in the kitchen. Cinnamon comes from the bark of trees. It has long been considered a medicinal plant. There are several varieties, harvested from southern China to Southeast Asia. For years, there have been hints that adding cinnamon to your diet can help control blood sugar. And a recent spate of studies adds to the evidence that the effect is real. "Yes, it does work," says Paul Davis, a research nutritionist with the University of California, Davis. He authored a recent meta-analysis published in the Journal of Medicinal Food that concluded that cinnamon lowers fasting blood glucose. "According to our results, it's a modest effect of about 3 to 5 percent," Davis says. This is about the level of reduction found in the older generation of diabetes drugs, he says. That makes the findings of interest not just to the 25 million Americans who already have diabetes, but also to the 80 million other people — nearly 1 in 4 of u Continue reading >>

Surprisingly Little Discussion About Cinnamon?

Surprisingly Little Discussion About Cinnamon?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Surprisingly little discussion about cinnamon? I did a forum search here for cinnamon and only 14 results appeared, with most not focusing specifically on the apparent benefits of cinnamon which appear to be quite effective in aiding the control of blood sugar levels. The advice is to ensure you use Ceylon cinnamon and not the type that is more common in the USA (Cassia cinnamon) as benefits of Cassia are lower or non-existent and Cassia also has a higher component of a toxin called coumarin which some people can be especially susceptible to. It's quite difficult to distinguish one type from another when buying the powdered form of cinnamon but easier with cinnamon sticks as the Ceylon type is more delicate and much thinner and the sticks have many layers while Cassia is tougher and thicker so may only have one layer. Ceylon is easily broken into pieces while Cassia is more woody, as well as darker in hue. I'm still researching cinnamon but some human studies show it can reduce blood sugar levels by over a quarter although actual situations aren't clear (if the subjects had very poor management in the first place, for example). Anyway I have ordered some Ceylon cinnamon sticks and I love the taste; just need to work out how much I should be consuming per day. If anyone here has some experience or advice on this please do share. Hi. There was momentary fuss in the media a year or so back about the dangers of cassia cinnamon as you describe. I asked about it at my local Co-op but they didn't know what I was talking about. My Co-op cinnamon is labelled "from Sri Lanka" and packed in France, so your guess is as good as mine as to its provenance. I've just Continue reading >>

How Does Cinnamon Help Control Diabetes?

How Does Cinnamon Help Control Diabetes?

What comes to your mind when you think of cinnamon? Well, logically speaking, nothing should. Unless otherwise you are obsessed with its link with diabetes (like me) and want to know more. Coming to the point, there are numerous studies that support cinnamon’s efficacy in treating diabetes. But there is another side to it. And in this post, we look at both the sides. Keep your questions ready about the use of cinnamon for diabetes prevention. Because the answers are coming! Cinnamon And Diabetes – The Link We already know what cinnamon is, don’t we? It is a sweet and pungent spice derived from wild cinnamon trees. Grown in tropical areas in Southeast Asia, the Caribbean, and South America, cinnamon has been in use for thousands of years. What has been debatable for quite some time is its efficacy in treating diabetes. Is cinnamon good for diabetes treatment? Does it have any side effects? How should one use it? Oh yes, that’s where we are heading – to find the answers. Diabetes and Cinnamon – What Research Says There is a bunch of studies. One clinical study published in the 2003 edition of Diabetes Care journal supported the ability of cinnamon to improve the blood glucose and cholesterol levels in type 2 diabetes patients (1). Cinnamon for diabetes type 2 – Another study published in 2000 in Agricultural Research Magazine stated that consuming just 1 gram of cinnamon a day can increase insulin sensitivity and even help reverse type 2 diabetes (2). Though more research is required in this area, a few other studies have indicated the usefulness of cinnamon as a diabetes treatment supplement. A review of several related studies conducted back in 2012 states that cinnamon has a beneficial effect on glycemic control – which means cinnamon, when taken in the Continue reading >>

The Health Benefits Of Ceylon Vs. Cassia Cinnamon

The Health Benefits Of Ceylon Vs. Cassia Cinnamon

Most cinnamon sold in the United States is the cassia variety, which is often labeled as Chinese cinnamon. Its scientific name is Cinnamomom cassia, also known as Cinnamomom aromaticaum. Ceylon cinnamon, which is native to Sri Lanka, is more difficult to find and more expensive. Its scientific name is Cinnamomum zeylanicum, and it is also known as Cinnamomum verum -- "verum" means "true." You may have to go to a specialty gourmet store or upscale food market to find it. Video of the Day Both types of cinnamon have been studied for their health benefits. In a 2012 study published in the "International Journal of Preventive Medicine," diabetic patients were given 3 grams of an unspecified cinnamon supplement per week or a placebo. At the end of eight weeks, the test subjects experienced improvements in blood sugar and triglycerides, and they lost weight compared with the placebo group. A 2012 review article published in "Diabetic Medicine" examined 16 studies of Ceylon cinnamon specifically. The researchers uncovered beneficial effects on diabetic complications, with no toxicity to the liver and kidneys. Toxicity might, however, be an issue for cassia. Ceylon cinnamon has a sweeter, more delicate flavor than cassia does, which may make it preferable for flavoring desserts and lighter dishes. But the more important distinction may be the presence of a chemical called coumarin, a natural plant chemical that acts as a blood thinner. This chemical is present in much higher concentrations in cassia than in Ceylon cinnamon. It is contraindicated for anyone taking prescription blood thinners. Coumarin has also been shown to be toxic to the liver and kidneys, and it may also be carcinogenic, which can negate any health benefits of cinnamon. Other Benefits of Ceylon Cinnamon In ad Continue reading >>

Ceylon Cinnamon Lowers Blood Sugar Better Than Drugs: Study

Ceylon Cinnamon Lowers Blood Sugar Better Than Drugs: Study

(NaturalNews) Type 2 diabetes is definitely among the more frustrating diseases, in that the conventional treatment model requires constant needle pricks while providing no actual cure. But a growing body of research suggests that regular supplementation with cinnamon could help in thwarting the onset of diabetes, and potentially even provide better relief than mainstream therapies for already-diagnosed diabetics. Most Americans are familiar with cinnamon as a tasty spice used in oatmeal, pumpkin pie, egg nog and a variety of other often holiday dishes. But a recent meta-analysis published in the Journal of Medicinal Food found that cinnamon is also capable of lowering fasting blood glucose levels. Paul Davis, a research nutritionist at the University of California, Davis, (UCD) recently explained his work to NPR. "Yes, it does work," Davis stated to NPR about the blood sugar-regulating effects of common cinnamon. "According to our results, it's a modest effect of about 3 to 5 percent," he added, noting that cinnamon is on par with many older generation diabetes drugs in terms of efficacy. But where cinnamon has a real leg up on all those drugs prescribed for diabetes is its safety profile. Apart from isolated claims that the coumarin content in cinnamon could potentially be harmful to the liver -- one would have to consume ghastly amounts of cinnamon for it to ever become harmful, despite all the hype -- there are no harmful side effects associated with consuming therapeutic doses of cinnamon. "Cinnamon intake, either as whole cinnamon or as cinnamon extract, results in a statistically significant lowering in FBG [fasting blood glucose] and intake of cinnamon extract only also lowered FBG," wrote Davis and his colleagues about their findings. "Thus cinnamon extract and Continue reading >>

The Cinnamon And Diabetes Connection

The Cinnamon And Diabetes Connection

Cinnamon is a spice that comes from the inner bark of trees belonging to the genus Cinnamomum. Reports suggest that this spice has been in use since the time of the Egyptians, as early as 2000 years ago. Cinnamon has been used for medicinal purposes since ancient times, apart from its use as a spice and as an embalming and anointing oil. There has been research that indicates that there is a cinnamon and diabetes connection and that type 2 diabetics certainly benefit from consuming cinnamon. It has been shown to lower blood sugar levels in diabetics. Cinnamon has been found effective in medical conditions such as: Muscle spasms Vomiting Diarrhea Infections Common cold Loss of appetite Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease Erectile dysfunction (ED) HIV Multiple sclerosis and Chronic wounds Research into Cinnamon and Diabetes A paper published in Diabetes Care concluded that low levels of cinnamon (1 to 6 grams per day) reduced glucose, triglycerides, LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and total cholesterol levels in type 2 diabetic subjects. This study also stated that cinnamon could be used by the healthy population to protect themselves from, and prevent, elevated glucose levels and blood lipid levels. Another study that underlined the connection between cinnamon and diabetes was published in Nutrition Research. It found that cinnamon extract improved fasting blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in 66 Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. There have been lab-level studies which show that cinnamon extracts may have potent anti-cancer properties. How Does Cinnamon Act? Phytochemical analysis of cinnamon reveals that it has many chemicals which have potent bioactivity. The chemicals contain antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anti-cancer and an Continue reading >>

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