diabetestalk.net

Certified Diabetes Educator Requirements

How To Become A Certified Diabetes Educator

How To Become A Certified Diabetes Educator

There is no cure for diabetes, requiring patients to rely on medication, diet and lifestyle changes to manage the disease. People with diabetes look to experienced educators to teach them how to eat, how exercise affects their symptoms, and what complications to watch for while monitoring their conditions. A diabetes educator has an extensive background with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and earns a specific certification after accumulating experience and passing an exam. Preparing for Role of CDE A certified diabetes educator, or CDE, is a health professional who works directly with patients in a number of settings, ranging from outpatient counseling groups to inpatient hospital rooms and doctors’ offices. To earn the specialty certification, a CDE studies diet, exercise, lifestyle and other health issues and counsels patients in all aspects of the disease, from prevention to daily blood sugar monitoring. Your general healthcare education and direct-care background prepare you for the next step as a specialist in diabetes education. Medical Licensure Required To sit for the certified diabetes educator exam given by the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators, you first must prove you already hold medical or healthcare credentials. The exam is given to a host of professionals, including licensed nurses, physicians, clinical psychologists and nutritionists. You also may hold a master’s degree in social work to sit for the certification exam. Proven Experience In addition to holding a degree and healthcare credentials. You must be able to prove that you have been active in diabetes care for a minimum of 1,000 hours, with 400 of those hours having taken place within the year preceding your application for certification. You must have been in professional pract Continue reading >>

Guidance For Becoming A Diabetes Educator/cde

Guidance For Becoming A Diabetes Educator/cde

How do I become a diabetes educator? One must be a healthcare professional who has a defined role as a diabetes educator, not for those who may perform some diabetes related functions as part of or in the course of other usual and customary duties. Practice as a diabetes educator means actively employed for compensation, providing a direct or indirect professional contribution to the care and self-management education of people with diabetes. Diabetes education, also referred to as diabetes self-management education or diabetes self-management training, is performed by health care professionals who have appropriate credentials and experience consistent with the particular profession's scope of practice. Diabetes self-management education is defined as the interactive, collaborative, ongoing process involving the person with diabetes or pre-diabetes and/or the caregivers and the educator(s). The process includes: Assessment of the individual's specific education needs Identification of the individual's specific diabetes self-management goals Education and behavioral intervention directed toward helping the individual achieve identified self-management goals Evaluation(s) of the individual's attainment of identified self-management goals Proper documentation of all education encounters Diabetes educators can be found in a variety of settings: hospitals, physician offices, clinics, home health, wellness programs, to name a few. They most often work within accredited or recognized diabetes education programs. This means that the diabetes education program has met requirements set forth by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and can bill for diabetes self-management training through two different codes: G0108 and G0109, which are for individual and group diabetes ed Continue reading >>

Diabetes Educators: Referral And Reimbursement

Diabetes Educators: Referral And Reimbursement

Many primary care physicians, endocrinologists, and other physicians who care for people with diabetes depend on diabetes educators. A diabetes educator can help physicians manage the challenges and barriers of patient-centered care in today’s healthcare environment. Diabetes educators are knowledgeable and trained to recognize the needs of patients with diabetes ancillary capacity. When to Refer The patient has been diagnosed with diabetes Patient care has changed from no diabetes medications to taking medications to treat diabetes; or, from oral diabetes medication to insulin The patient with diabetes has recently become eligible for Medicare The patient is at risk for complications from diabetes* *The physician may consider the person with diabetes at increased risk if they have: Problems controlling blood glucose Been treated in an emergency room or stayed overnight in a hospital because of diabetes Been diagnosed with diabetes-related eye disease Lack of feeling in the feet or other foot problem, such as ulcers, deformity, had an amputation Been diagnosed with kidney disease related to diabetes About CDE and BC-ADM Specialists Certified Diabetes Educators (CDE) and/or diabetes educators who are Board Certified in Advanced Diabetes Management (BC-ADM) work in an interactive and collaborative manner to educate and empower patients with diabetes to apply self-management skills. Their services not only benefit patients, but the physicians who oversee their medical care. Insurance Reimbursement Many health insurance plans, including Medicare and Medicaid reimburse for diabetes self-management education. Patients who are not covered by Medicare should check medical insurance provider to verify coverage. Medicare offers two separate benefits for people with diabetes: Di Continue reading >>

Pardon Our Interruption...

Pardon Our Interruption...

As you were browsing something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: You're a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. You've disabled JavaScript in your web browser. A third-party browser plugin, such as Ghostery or NoScript, is preventing JavaScript from running. Additional information is available in this support article. After completing the CAPTCHA below, you will immediately regain access to Continue reading >>

Billing Medicare For Diabetes Self-management Training

Billing Medicare For Diabetes Self-management Training

Medicare now covers education for patients with diabetes, but be sure the right person is doing the educating. Fam Pract Manag. 1999 Apr;6(4):10. Last year, we told you that under the 1997 Balanced Budget Act (BBA), Medicare would soon be covering diabetes self-management education and training under certain conditions (see “An Ounce of Prevention,” April 1998). Now, Medicare has worked out the details of this provision, and here's what you need to know to bill for this service. The right trainer First, the physician managing the patient's diabetes must order the training sessions and certify that the patient needs them as part of a comprehensive plan of care related to the condition. Additionally, under BBA, the training must come from “a certified provider,” which Medicare defines as a physician, other individual or entity paid under Medicare's physician fee schedule who meets the National Diabetes Advisory Board (NDAB) standards. To demonstrate that you are a certified provider, you must send your Medicare carrier an Education Recognition Program (ERP) certificate from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) before submitting any claims for this service. If you're interested in earning an ERP certificate or obtaining a copy of the NDAB standards, contact the ADA at 888-232-0822. You may also be able to get a copy of the standards from your Medicare carrier. Certified diabetic educators and dietitians employed by physicians or entities that meet the ADA standards also may provide diabetes self-management training in out-patient settings. But since these individuals aren't paid according to the physician fee schedule and therefore aren't “certified providers” as defined by Medicare, carriers can only make payments to their employers under the “incident to Continue reading >>

Legislation For Diabetes Education Reimbursement

Legislation For Diabetes Education Reimbursement

Regarding “Access to Quality Diabetes Education Act of 2015” (H.R. 1726 and S. 1345): This legislation, if passed, will amend title XVIII (Medicare) of the Social Security Act to improve access to diabetes self-management training, also known as diabetes self-management education or diabetes education, by authorizing certified diabetes educators to provide diabetes self-management training services, including as part of telehealth services, under part B of the Medicare program. The mission of the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE) is to define, develop, maintain and protect the certification and credentialing process to promote ongoing quality diabetes education and support, which includes the protection of the Certified Diabetes Educator® (CDE®) credential. To obtain the CDE credential, health professionals must meet stringent eligibility requirements and pass an examination to verify knowledge related to diabetes and diabetes education. Individuals must also renew their certification on a regular basis. With a goal to expand access to diabetes education provided by CDEs, NCBDE has supported similar legislation in the past and also encouraged CDEs to support it. However, the language in the current bills includes two different definitions for a ‘certified diabetes educator’. It is NCBDE’s understanding that the development of state licensure for diabetes educators has been the reason for the different definitions in the bills. Whenever documentation or discussion includes more than one definition of a CDE, the number of stakeholders that are unclear about NCBDE’s certification program, and what it means to be a CDE, will increase. NCBDE believes that the provision of diabetes education should be vested in health professionals who Continue reading >>

Are You Interested In Becoming A Cde (certified Diabetes Educator) Or A Mentor?

Are You Interested In Becoming A Cde (certified Diabetes Educator) Or A Mentor?

Are YOU Interested in Becoming a Certified Diabetes Educator? Basic requirements for the examination are as follows: 1. The first requirement is that you are in the proper discipline and are current, active, licensed or registered: RD, RN, MD, DO, PA, pharmacist, OR have a master's degree in social work or other health care field. 2. Next, you must meet the professional practice experience of a minimum of 2 years working in your discipline AND a minimum of 1000 hours with at least 40% of those hours in the past year working in diabetes self-management education (DSME). 3. Finally, after meeting the discipline requirement and before applying for the exam, you must have 15 hours of continuing education in the past 2 years in diabetes education. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Mentor Eligibility Criteria The eligibility criteria for mentors are: (updated 4/2015) CDE®, in good standing, for 3 years Current practice as a Diabetes Educator, providing DSME services Other preceptor/mentoring experience Verify that DSME provided includes*: a process to coordinate educational activities the individual’s learning needs and goals a curriculum (appropriate diabetes content areas, learning objective, methods of instruction delivery and methods for learning evaluation) documentation of the educational activities communication to the individual’s primary care provider and/or the referring provider regular assessment of the needs of your community and changes made based upon those needs regular evaluation of the educational effectiveness and outcomes with results used to make changes in the educational activities Agree to complete and submit appropriate Mentor/Mentee monitoring documentation *Additional information may be requested for any application and is required if the application is Continue reading >>

Clinical Dietitian Earns Credentials As ‘certified Diabetes Educator’

Clinical Dietitian Earns Credentials As ‘certified Diabetes Educator’

Susan K. Ray is Second CAH Nutrition Team Member to Complete Extensive Requirements Carthage Area Hospital Clinical Dietitian Susan K. “Susie” Ray recently earned credentials as a Certified Diabetes Educator, completing more than a year of training and education that culminated with successful passage of a rigorous credentialing exam. A Certified Diabetes Educator is a health professional who possesses comprehensive knowledge of and experience in diabetes management, prediabetes, and diabetes prevention. A CDE educates and supports people affected by diabetes to understand and manage the condition while promoting self-management to achieve individualized behavioral and treatment goals that optimize health outcomes. Ray joins Carthage Area Hospital Nutrition Services Director Carly R. Draper, RD, CDN, CDE, as the second Certified Diabetes Educator on the hospital’s clinical staff. “We are proud of Susie’s latest professional success; she has worked tremendously hard on this goal,” Draper said. “An additional CDE enables our Nutrition Services team to expand its clinical care and outreach for those who face diabetes or who may be at risk for developing diabetes. The more people on staff who are qualified to help improve the lives of our patients, the better we can make a difference in the outcomes we hope to achieve.” A grant from the North Country Initiative helped Carthage Area Hospital cover training and related expenses for Ray to complete the requirements of CDE credentialing, which include 1,000 clinical practice hours, academic materials, continuing education and testing. The National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators administers the Certified Diabetes Educator credentialing exam, which Ray passed on Oct. 30. Hospital leadership applied for Continue reading >>

Raising The Debate On Wound Care And Diabetes Education

Raising The Debate On Wound Care And Diabetes Education

The No. 1 cause of non-traumatic lower limb amputations and the seventh-leading cause of death in the US,1 diabetes has a large presence in the majority of wound care clinics. This is where comprehensively educated, trained, and credentialed wound care staff members can prove invaluable to patients, especially in those centers where there is an established interdisciplinary team that includes a certified diabetes educator (CDE). While having a CDE is more likely a common trait of larger clinics, smaller centers are considered lucky to have access to a regular, devoted CDE. But what about those individual wound care providers who would like to earn their CDE certification in an effort to bolster their clinical acumen and improve patient care outcomes? Unfortunately, many may find it very challenging (or in some cases relatively impossible) to achieve these initials behind their name due to eligibility requirements.2 For patients, this often means making a separate appointment to a CDE at another location (and sometimes being charged another co-pay). For wound care providers, this often means relying on the services of another clinician outside their respective clinics to effectively collaborate with the patient’s wound care (and possibly having nothing more than hope that the patient will follow through with the necessary educational appointments). How should the wound care industry and individual wound care clinics best handle this conundrum? Apparently, there are no easy answers. According to the CDC, the number of people who have been diagnosed with diabetes in the US is almost 21 million (or approximately 8% of the total population).1,3 In my personal experience of managing diabetes and wound care, the average patient is seen in the clinic weekly for approximately Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Certified Diabetes Educators

Everything You Need To Know About Certified Diabetes Educators

In this article, we will explore what it takes to look for a Certified Diabetes Educator, where to look for one, and what questions to ask when you get there, among other things. We will also explore how to become a CDE, and what kind of degree, license, hours and examination that you will need to pass in order to become a Certified Diabetes Educator. Personal perspective on becoming a CDE My own story of becoming a Certified Diabetes Educator may help to illustrate the process of actually becoming a Certified Diabetes Educator. It is a process, and it is a challenge to get the 1,000 hours of diabetes education that is required. Many people with diabetes do enter careers in healthcare or related fields, and do become Certified Diabetes Educators. Their experience as a person with diabetes is very valuable to their client. I am a registered nurse, which is one of the licenses that you can hold in order to become a CDE. Degrees and licensure needed in order to become a CDE One must be in one of the following disciplines holding an active and current license which is unrestricted in the United States in order to become a Certified Diabetes Educator according to NCBDE (National Certification Board of Diabetes Educators): A clinical psychologist A registered nurse An occupational therapist An Optometrist A pharmacist A physical therapist A physician (M.D. or D.O.) A podiatrist A dietitian or dietitian nutritionist holding active registration with the Commission on Dietetic Registration A physician assistant holding active registration with the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants A clinical exercise professional holding active certification with American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) as a Certified Clinical Exercise Physiologist (ACSM CEP), previo Continue reading >>

Being A Cde

Being A Cde

The Credentialled Diabetes Educator® (CDE) is a registered trademark allowing the Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA) to define the conditions under which the term is used. The ADEA grants status as a Credentialled Diabetes Educator (CDE) in recognition of demonstrated experience and expertise in diabetes education and commitment to professional development and ongoing learning that meet the ADEA’s expected standards. Recognition as a CDE is ADEA’s assurance to people with or at risk of diabetes, their families, carers and health care providers that they can expect to receive quality diabetes education and advice when consulting a CDE. The ADEA recommends the CDE as the appropriately qualified provider of diabetes education. Credentialled Diabetes Educators are also the recognised by Medicare Australia and the Department of Veterans’ Affairs as well as by private health insurers as the providers of diabetes education. Credentialled Diabetes Educators already hold a professional health care qualification and have completed a post graduate certificate in diabetes education and care that has been accredited by the ADEA. Before gaining recognition as a CDE, they must complete a set minimum of clinical practice in diabetes education, participate in a mentoring partnership registered with the ADEA and have a referee report addressing the criteria of the National Core Competencies for Credentialled Diabetes Educators. Credentialled Diabetes Educators must demonstrate ongoing participation in professional development within the specialty of diabetes education in accordance with the ADEA Credentialling and Re-Credentialling Program to gain and maintain recognition as a CDE. All CDEs must apply to the ADEA to retain their CDE status every year. ADEA Credential Continue reading >>

Health Insurance Coverage Laws For Diabetes Self-management Education And Training

Health Insurance Coverage Laws For Diabetes Self-management Education And Training

More than 30 million U.S. adults have diabetes and about 84 million have prediabetes or are at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Teaching patients to monitor and manage their diabetes is an important method for controlling this disease. Many states require all public and private health insurance plans to cover diabetes self-management education and training (DSME/T). This map shows which states have laws that require such coverage for both private insurance plans and Medicaid, and provides information on legal requirements for, among other things, when DSME/T coverage is triggered, what specific activities are covered, and the standards that DSME/T must meet. Click any state below to view all data on that state's DSME/T laws. Click here to view D.C. specifically. Data collection for this map was conducted by the Policy Surveillance Program, ChangeLab Solutions and the National Health Law Program. Read more about DSME/T. Continue reading >>

Dimensions Of Dental Hygiene

Dimensions Of Dental Hygiene

GUEST EDITORIAL New Career Opportunity A recent change in eligibility requirements enables dental hygienists to become certified diabetes educators. By Cynthia Stegeman, EdD, RDH, RD, CDE, FAND Dental hygienists have long recognized the special oral health needs of patients with diabetes. Research demonstrates that patients with diabetes are at greater risk for prevalence, progression, and severity of periodontal diseases, depending on their level of blood glucose control.1 Periodontal infections may lead to insulin resistance and difficulty in maintaining appropriate blood glucose levels.1,2 Additionally, poor wound healing, decreased resistance to infections, recurrent infections, candidiasis, xerostomia, burning mouth, and dental caries are often experienced by individuals with diabetes. The dental literature, however, is inconclusive regarding the effects of periodontal treatment on blood glucose control. A recent landmark study, the Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial, which included 257 participants, determined that nonsurgical periodontal therapy did not improve blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes who experienced moderate to advanced chronic periodontitis.3 Chapple et al,1 however, reported that several randomized controlled trials consistently demonstrated that scaling and root planing reduced blood glucose levels at 3 months post-therapy. Additional studies, with larger subject groups and extended follow-up, are necessary to determine whether periodontal therapy improves blood glucose control. IMPORTANT ROLE OF ORAL HEALTH CLINICIANS Due to the relationship between diabetes and oral health, dental professionals have always played an important role in diabetes management. Dental examinations provided by oral health professionals uncover many Continue reading >>

How To Become A Certified Diabetic Educator

How To Become A Certified Diabetic Educator

1. Verify that you meet the career and education discipline requirements for exam eligibility. The National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators requires that you be licensed in one of several medical fields to qualify for the position. As of 2012, the qualifications require a field such as registered nurse, physician, physical therapist, podiatrist, registered dietician, psychiatrist or another healthcare professional with a master's degree in social work. These requirements can vary from year to year, so it is best to check the current field requirements on the NCBDE's web site when you are preparing for your exam. 3. Show proof of at least 1,000 hours spent providing diabetes education. At least 400 hours of your diabetes education work should be within the year before you apply for the exam. 4. Complete 15 hours of continuing education classes related to diabetes education in the 24 months before you submit your exam application. Your continuing education must be completed at an approved education provider according to the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators. The list is updated regularly and made available by the NCBDE. 5. Submit an application for the Certified Diabetes Education examination. Provide payment for the exam and your application with the submission. Exam fees can vary annually; as of 2012 the registration cost for a first-time certification is $350. The NCBDE offers exams twice each year, in the spring and winter months. Check the current exam listings to find out the exam dates and deadlines for application. Exams are offered at certified testing locations across the country, and you can access the current list of available testing locations from the NCBDE. 6. Contact the testing center for your scores if you elect to receive th Continue reading >>

Geoff Twigg From Apple Discount Drugs Achieves Certified Diabetes Educator Status

Geoff Twigg From Apple Discount Drugs Achieves Certified Diabetes Educator Status

Fruitland – The National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE) announced that Geoff Twigg, Board Certified Ambulatory Care Pharmacist at Apple Discount Drugs achieved Certified Diabetes Educator® (CDE®) status by successfully completing the Certification Examination for Diabetes Educators. Candidates must meet rigorous eligibility requirements to be able to take the Examination. Achieving certification status demonstrates to people with diabetes and employers that the health care professional possesses distinct and specialized knowledge, thereby promoting quality of care for people with diabetes. Currently, there are over 16,600 diabetes educators who hold NCBDE certification. “Geoff is a vital to the Apple Drugs team,” said Jeff Sherr, President, Apple Discount Drugs. “This certification adds credibility to his services and counseling to diabetes patients, while bringing additional knowledge to the Diabetes Resource Center from his certification as an Ambulatory Care Pharmacist.” Twigg was certified as an Ambulatory Care Pharmacist in December, 2011. Ambulatory Care Pharmacy practice addresses medication needs, the development of sustained partnerships with patients and the integration of pharmacy practice within the family and community. This is accomplished through direct patient care and medication management for ambulatory patients, coordination of care, patient advocacy, wellness and health promotion and patient education and self-management. “Too many times patients with diabetes don’t understand the drugs they are prescribed,” said Twigg. “In addition to John Motsko’s training and counseling, I will inform diabetics about the effects, side-effects or interactions they may have with their medications to offer a more comprehensiv Continue reading >>

More in diabetes