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Certified Diabetes Educator Daily Activities

A National Study Of The Certified Diabetes Educator: Report On A Job Analysis Conducted By The National Certification Board For Diabetes Educators

A National Study Of The Certified Diabetes Educator: Report On A Job Analysis Conducted By The National Certification Board For Diabetes Educators

Purpose. The job analysis described in this report was conducted by the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE) in order to 1) provide a basis for documenting the continuing validity of the Certification Examination for Diabetes Educators, 2) define new areas that should be assessed in future certification examinations, and 3) ensure that the content of certification examinations is job related. Methods. The study involved developing a diabetes educator job task list and survey, distributing 1,100 surveys, and analyzing survey responses from a multidisciplinary and geographically representative sample of certified diabetes educators. Results. Three hundred and thirty-nine surveys were suitable for analysis, with relevant demographic subgroups adequately represented. Based on survey data, an examination matrix and detailed content outline was constructed that will be used by NCBDE to assemble future test forms. Conclusions. Certification examination specifications were developed directly related to the important activities that diabetes educators perform. Future forms of the certification examination will continue to be matched to job-related, criterion-referenced test specifications and will have strong evidence of content validity. Future forms of the exam will contain 200 items at specified cognitive levels, with a representative sampling of tasks within three core areas from the detailed content outline. This study of the role of certified diabetes educators (CDEs) was conducted in 2004 for the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE) by its testing agency, Applied Measurement Professionals. The purpose of this study was to describe the CDE's job with enough detail to 1) provide a valid basis for a national, state-of-the-art, pr Continue reading >>

How To Become A Certified Diabetes Educator

How To Become A Certified Diabetes Educator

There is no cure for diabetes, requiring patients to rely on medication, diet and lifestyle changes to manage the disease. People with diabetes look to experienced educators to teach them how to eat, how exercise affects their symptoms, and what complications to watch for while monitoring their conditions. A diabetes educator has an extensive background with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and earns a specific certification after accumulating experience and passing an exam. Preparing for Role of CDE A certified diabetes educator, or CDE, is a health professional who works directly with patients in a number of settings, ranging from outpatient counseling groups to inpatient hospital rooms and doctors’ offices. To earn the specialty certification, a CDE studies diet, exercise, lifestyle and other health issues and counsels patients in all aspects of the disease, from prevention to daily blood sugar monitoring. Your general healthcare education and direct-care background prepare you for the next step as a specialist in diabetes education. Medical Licensure Required To sit for the certified diabetes educator exam given by the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators, you first must prove you already hold medical or healthcare credentials. The exam is given to a host of professionals, including licensed nurses, physicians, clinical psychologists and nutritionists. You also may hold a master’s degree in social work to sit for the certification exam. Proven Experience In addition to holding a degree and healthcare credentials. You must be able to prove that you have been active in diabetes care for a minimum of 1,000 hours, with 400 of those hours having taken place within the year preceding your application for certification. You must have been in professional pract Continue reading >>

Why You Need A Certified Diabetes Educator

Why You Need A Certified Diabetes Educator

By Gary Scheiner MS, CDE As we all know, there is no shortage of fancy gadgets for those of us with diabetes. We have pumps and pens for delivering insulin. Meters and continuous monitors for measuring blood sugar levels. Digital scales for counting carbs. Pedometers and accelerometers for tracking physical activity. Not to mention the growing number of cell phone apps and online programs for collecting and tracking data. With all this technology at our disposal, one would think that blood sugar control would be a snap. No such luck. Unfortunately, technology is only as good as those who use it. Without the skill to apply it properly, blood sugar control often remains suboptimal. That’s where Certified Diabetes Educators (CDEs) come in. CDEs to the Rescue! CDEs know that you want to manage your diabetes well. And who wouldn’t? Keeping blood sugar levels within an acceptable range most of the time allows you to feel and perform your best. It allows women to have healthy babies and makes it safe to work and drive. Not to mention the prevention of nasty long-term complications. Given the time, energy and resources that you put into managing your diabetes, you deserve positive results. CDEs are in a unique position to help you reach your diabetes management goals. Unlike physicians who usually have little time to spend with each patient (or may lack the expertise to effectively educate and motivate), CDEs’ sole focus is on helping you live more successfully with diabetes. CDEs are healthcare professionals themselves. Many are nurses or dietitians. Others have backgrounds in mental health, exercise science or pharmacy. There are also some physicians who take the initiative to become CDEs. To become a CDE, one must earn an advanced degree in a healthcare field, obtain e Continue reading >>

Daily Activities For A Diabetes Health Counselor

Daily Activities For A Diabetes Health Counselor

Diabetes health counselors play integral roles in helping individuals with diabetes to learn to manage their medical condition. Working in outpatient clinics or in acute care hospitals, the daily activities of these counselors include educating individuals with diabetes on medications, dietary intake, and stress management. Overall, diabetes health counselors provide front-line support to clients and families who are learning to manage diabetes. Counseling on Medication Management Diabetes health counselors must understand how medications affect the control of blood sugar by their clients. As such, many of the daily activities involve teaching clients how their medications impact their blood sugar and educating them on how much or how often to take these medications. It is important to remember, though, that not all all diabetes health counselors can prescribe diabetes medications. Nonetheless, they still need to understand how oral diabetes medications and insulin affect blood sugar control. Counseling on Dietary Intake An individual's diet can significantly impact their blood sugar control, thus diabetes health counselors often find themselves counseling individuals with diabetes on how to eat properly. These counselors may teach clients how to read nutrition labels, count carbohydrates or estimate diabetic exchanges. They may also find themselves teaching diabetes-friendly cooking classes or even creating healthy-eating education materials. Counseling on Stress Management Diabetic individuals with high stress levels often find themselves unable to control their blood sugar levels. In order to help these individuals manage their stressful lives, diabetes health counselors may provide psychological therapy or other stress-relieving techniques. In some cases, diabetes h Continue reading >>

Why Do I Need To See A Diabetes Educator?

Why Do I Need To See A Diabetes Educator?

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects more than 23 million people in the United States. If managed well, people with diabetes can live normal, healthy lives. However, the many devastating effects of uncontrolled or poorly controlled diabetes are fairly well known: Diabetes, which increases a person's chances of heart attack or stroke by 200% to 400%, respectively, is the seventh leading cause of death and the leading cause of adult blindness, kidney failure and lower-limb amputation. But with proper management and control through daily food, fitness, medication and lifestyle choices, people with diabetes can reduce their risk of diabetes related complications. That said, diabetes is largely a "self-care" disease, which means that most of the time, you are in charge of many day-to-day decisions that affect your condition. This responsibility puts an individual with diabetes in the driver’s seat of their personal care team—and that's a lot of pressure! So what's the most important tool you need to successfully manage diabetes? Knowledge. There is a lot of information available about diabetes. In the information age, there is certainly no shortage of diabetes related books, cookbooks, websites, and magazines. Unfortunately, information about diabetes is not always credible and some of the information out there is just flat-out incorrect or bad advice. How do you decide whether the information you read or hear about diabetes is safe and reliable? Fortunately, you don’t have to do this on your own. A diabetes educator can help! A Certified Diabetes Educator is a qualified professional—typically, a registered nurse, registered dietitian, or a pharmacist— that provides diabetes self-management education (DSME) or diabetes self-management training (DSMT). The Ame Continue reading >>

Certified Diabetes Educator (cde)

Certified Diabetes Educator (cde)

We’re seeking a passionate, skilled, and energetic Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) to work at our growth-phase NYC-based startup. Our team is a talented and diverse group developing innovative ways to empower people to use their data to lead healthier lives. Job Description We’re looking for someone who wants to be a leader in a new approach to diabetes education. You’ll be expected to use your expertise as a diabetes educator in new, exciting ways, using mobile technology and advanced analytics to provide education and support to people with diabetes when they need it most. Job Responsibilities Provide diabetes education and coaching entirely via text message within the One Drop mobile app Use our 12-lesson diabetes coaching curriculum to deliver a new paradigm of diabetes education Get to know One Drop users and learn about their motivations for managing diabetes and their barriers to getting there Answer users’ questions and provide them with resources to help them manage their diabetes effectively Encourage, support and empower users to make healthy behavioral changes Support users who are dealing with tough emotions and diabetes-related stress Give users real-time insights and feedback about their diabetes management behavior Help refine and develop the the optimal workflow for One Drop Experts Give feedback and suggestions about how to improve the One Drop Experts user experience Identify materials and resources we need and help develop these materials, based on your area of expertise Job Perks Get in on the ground-floor on a massively ambitious project Deeply impact the lives of hundreds of millions of people worldwide Modern, flexible, progressive workplace Convenient LES location Healthcare tech, yeah! Equity About One Drop One Drop is a digital healt Continue reading >>

Certified Diabetes Educators (cdes): What You Should Know

Certified Diabetes Educators (cdes): What You Should Know

We get a lot of questions about Certified Diabetes Educators (CDEs) – what they can offer patients, how to find one, and even how to become a diabetes educator yourself if interested. We’ve queried some top diabetes education experts in the country to compile this at-a-glance guide. Read on for practical information about the world of CDEs, along with lists of the Top Tips for Patients to Make the Most of Their CDE Appointments, and Top Things You Should Know About Becoming a CDE. A huge thank you to the following expert contributors: Deborah Greenwood, Diabetes Clinical Specialist and 2015 president of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) Jane K. Dickinson, RN, PhD, CDE, Coordinator of the Columbia University Master’s in Diabetes Education and Management program, and person with type 1 diabetes herself Jennifer Smith, CDE, Registered Dietitian & Director of Lifestyle and Nutrition at Integrated Diabetes Services, also living with type 1 diabetes herself Marissa Town, RN, CDE and a type 1 diabetes patient too, who was the inspiration for the Children With Diabetes (CWD) community Diabetes Educator Basics What is a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE)? CDEs are healthcare professionals trained specifically to coach patients with diabetes through their own self-care. This means coaching on glucose testing, medication dosing, insulin delivery, results logging and more. Some CDEs even have specialized training as insulin pump educators, focusing on helping patients get set up on those advanced devices. What Does a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) Do? CDEs work with patients and their families to teach diabetes self-management skills, and help with everyday challenges that doctors often don’t have time to address. They work in hospitals, clinics and sm Continue reading >>

The Scope Of Practice, Standards Of Practice, And Standards Of Professional Performance For Diabetes Educators

The Scope Of Practice, Standards Of Practice, And Standards Of Professional Performance For Diabetes Educators

Introduction The Scope of Practice, Standards of Practice, and Standards of Professional Performance for Diabetes Educators has been developed by the AADE to define the scope, role, and minimal level of quality performance of the diabetes educator; to differentiate diabetes education as a distinct healthcare specialty; to promote diabetes self-management education and training (DSME/T) as an integral part of diabetes care; and to facilitate excellence. Representing the expertise and experience of a multidisciplinary task force of health professionals representative of the AADE membership and an extensive review process embracing a broad spectrum of practice areas, this document supports the specialty by: • Stimulating the process of peer review, • Promoting documentation of the outcomes of DSME/T, • Encouraging research to validate practice and improve quality DSME/T and diabetes care, • Engaging in a process of critical examination of current diabetes educator practice and professional performance, and • Complementing other practice-related documents that address the delivery of DSME/T by diabetes educators and roles of other healthcare practitioners who are members of the diabetes care team. Diabetes education is unique in that its practitioners come from a variety of health disciplines. Diabetes educators remain individually accountable to the standards set by the discipline and by national, state, local, and institutional regulations that define and guide professional practice. This document serves to guide diabetes educators’ practice regardless of their professional discipline. Background Living well with diabetes requires active, diligent, effective self-management of the disease.1 Self- management is an important concept to e Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Educator (diabetes Educator)

The Diabetes Educator (diabetes Educator)

Journal description The Diabetes Educator is the official journal of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). It is a peer-reviewed journal intended to serve as a reference source for the science and art of diabetes management. The Diabetes Educator, an ISI-ranked journal, publishes original articles that relate to aspects of patient care and education, clinical practice and/or research, and the multidisciplinary profession of diabetes education as represented by nurses, dietitians, physicians, pharmacists, mental health professionals, podiatrists, and exercise physiologists. RG Journal Impact: 1.53 * RG Journal impact history 2017 RG Journal impact Available summer 2018 2015 / 2016 RG Journal impact 1.53 2011 RG Journal impact 3.11 2010 RG Journal impact 2.23 2009 RG Journal impact 1.73 2008 RG Journal impact 1.62 2007 RG Journal impact 1.64 2006 RG Journal impact 1.01 2005 RG Journal impact 0.87 2004 RG Journal impact 0.43 2003 RG Journal impact 0.58 2002 RG Journal impact 0.82 2001 RG Journal impact 0.97 2000 RG Journal impact 0.82 RG Journal impact over time Additional details Cited half-life 7.00 Immediacy index 0.24 Eigenfactor 0.00 Article influence 0.78 Website The Diabetes Educator website Other titles The Diabetes educator ISSN 0145-7217 OCLC 2776215 Material type Periodical Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper Continue reading >>

Pardon Our Interruption...

Pardon Our Interruption...

As you were browsing something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: You're a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. You've disabled JavaScript in your web browser. A third-party browser plugin, such as Ghostery or NoScript, is preventing JavaScript from running. Additional information is available in this support article. After completing the CAPTCHA below, you will immediately regain access to Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Educators And Coaches Can Help With Diabetes

How Diabetes Educators And Coaches Can Help With Diabetes

You don’t have to tackle a diabetes diagnosis alone. In fact, your condition can be a whole lot easier to manage if you work with the right person — or people. One such person is a certified diabetes educator (CDE). Like the name suggests, these professionals are credentialed and have met the standards set by the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators. CDEs can provide motivation, help, and support so much so that a joint statement from the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE), and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) recommended that people with diabetes see one at least once a year, if not more. Check with your health insurance plan to see how many CDE sessions are covered. A diabetes coach is another person that can help you manage your condition. They offer education and support, but don’t have the same training as a CDE and might not be covered by insurance. Look for someone who has been educated by an accredited organization; for instance, the AADE offers lifestyle coach training to medical personnel, such as nurses and dietitians. Whether you choose to work with either a coach or diabetes educator (or both), here’s how each can help you manage your diabetes. The Benefits of Diabetes Education “I tell my patients, I’m not here to judge you,” says Tami Ross, RD, LD, a Lexington, Kentucky-based certified diabetes educator, former AADE president, and author of What Do I Eat Now? A Step-by-Step Guide to Eating Right With Type 2 Diabetes. Instead, Ross helps identify opportunities for improvement in diabetes care. A CDE is a mentor and a trainer who can help you be your healthiest, adds Suzanne Catania, 49, of Alexandria, Virginia, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1983. In Continue reading >>

Nutrition & Health Topics

Nutrition & Health Topics

Diabetes educators are healthcare professionals –nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, exercise physiologists, podiatrists, among others – who focus on helping people with diabetes understand their disease and learn how to adjust their lifestyle and behavior so that they can develop the skills to successfully manage their diabetes at home, 24/7. Many diabetes educators have also earned the certified diabetes educator (CDE) credential. Diabetes education (also called diabetes self-management training) is a covered Medicare benefit and is covered by some private insurance plans. It requires a referral from a physician or qualified non-physician practitioner. Continue reading >>

Partnering With Diabetes Educators To Improve Patient Outcomes

Partnering With Diabetes Educators To Improve Patient Outcomes

Go to: One in every three Americans currently has or is at risk to develop diabetes mellitus.1 Worldwide, the number of individuals with diabetes is growing at an unprecedented rate and is expected to surpass 550 million by 2030.2 Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is actually a group of diseases characterized by high blood glucose levels that result from defects in the body’s ability to produce and/or use insulin. The hyperglycemia resulting from the excessive amounts of circulating glucose can be aggravated by exogenous factors, such as food consumption, physical activity, inflammation, medications, and stress. The chronic, progressive nature of diabetes necessitates ongoing medical care; it benefits from timely access to patient self-management education and support to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications.3 Adequately responding to and managing circulating glucose requires an assortment of elements, including an ongoing assessment of pharmacology, nutritional interventions, and monitoring. Historically, diabetes was depicted as a condition managed by diet, exercise, and medication. Seemingly straightforward, diabetes management has always been challenging. Changes in each of these treatment elements over the past 2 decades have increased the overall complexity of the disease’s management. Nutritional intake remains the foundation of diabetes management. However, the diabetes diet has shifted away from a physician-prescribed, calorie-restricted exchange diet toward an individualized meal plan that takes into account a patient’s cultural background and nutritional likes and dislikes. Exercise, which is still widely recognized as an anchor to diabetes management, is now carefully linked to the patient’s routine so as to maximiz Continue reading >>

Certified Diabetes Educator On Staff

Certified Diabetes Educator On Staff

The purpose of the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE) certification program is to conduct certification activities in a manner that upholds standards for competent practice in diabetes education. The Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE®) credential demonstrates that the certified health care professional possesses distinct and specialized knowledge, thereby promoting quality care for persons with diabetes. Certification is a voluntary testing program used to assess and validate qualified health care professionals’ knowledge in diabetes education. It is an evaluative process that demonstrates that rigorous eligibility requirements have been met (National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators). Diabetes self-management training, also called diabetes education, gives patients the knowledge and skills to be able to effectively manage their diabetes on a daily basis. Through a collaborative process, diabetes educators help their patients identify barriers, facilitate problem solving and develop coping strategies (American Association of Diabetes Educators). Continue reading >>

The Factors That Limit Activities Of Certified Diabetes Educators In Japan: A Questionnaire Survey

The Factors That Limit Activities Of Certified Diabetes Educators In Japan: A Questionnaire Survey

Abstract Background The certified diabetes educator (CDE) is a qualification awarded to health professionals with specialized knowledge, skills, and experiences in diabetes management and education. To clarify whether CDEs consider themselves to be working sufficiently, in other words, making sufficient use of their specialized skills or not, a questionnaire survey was conducted. The participants were persons involved in diabetes-related educational seminars and medical personnel engaged in diabetes care at the National Center for Global Health and Medicine. They were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding self -perception of CDE’s activities and to describe the reasons for their answers. Fewer than 40% of the responding CDEs in each of the professions surveyed were satisfied with the current state of their activities and contributions as a CDE. For CDEs, “lack of labor” is the most concerning issue that limits their satisfactory activities as CDEs, followed by “condition of facilities”. Other factors such as insufficient “interprofessional teamwork”, “limited personal ability”, “mismatched allocation”, and “low recognition for CDEs” also limited their activities. Many CDEs perceived they are not working sufficiently. Further efforts should be made to support CDEs to improve their working conditions. Introduction Globally, the number of patients with diabetes has been increasing rapidly and become a significant health care burden to each country. As a result of the complex nature of this disease process, patients with diabetes require comprehensive management and support. However, limited numbers of physicians alone cannot cope with the significant increase in the number of diabetic patients in recent years. Therefore, developing health ca Continue reading >>

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