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Certified Diabetes Educator Daily Activities

How Diabetes Educators And Coaches Can Help With Diabetes

How Diabetes Educators And Coaches Can Help With Diabetes

You don’t have to tackle a diabetes diagnosis alone. In fact, your condition can be a whole lot easier to manage if you work with the right person — or people. One such person is a certified diabetes educator (CDE). Like the name suggests, these professionals are credentialed and have met the standards set by the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators. CDEs can provide motivation, help, and support so much so that a joint statement from the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE), and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) recommended that people with diabetes see one at least once a year, if not more. Check with your health insurance plan to see how many CDE sessions are covered. A diabetes coach is another person that can help you manage your condition. They offer education and support, but don’t have the same training as a CDE and might not be covered by insurance. Look for someone who has been educated by an accredited organization; for instance, the AADE offers lifestyle coach training to medical personnel, such as nurses and dietitians. Whether you choose to work with either a coach or diabetes educator (or both), here’s how each can help you manage your diabetes. The Benefits of Diabetes Education “I tell my patients, I’m not here to judge you,” says Tami Ross, RD, LD, a Lexington, Kentucky-based certified diabetes educator, former AADE president, and author of What Do I Eat Now? A Step-by-Step Guide to Eating Right With Type 2 Diabetes. Instead, Ross helps identify opportunities for improvement in diabetes care. A CDE is a mentor and a trainer who can help you be your healthiest, adds Suzanne Catania, 49, of Alexandria, Virginia, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1983. In Continue reading >>

Certified Diabetes Educators (cdes): What You Should Know

Certified Diabetes Educators (cdes): What You Should Know

We get a lot of questions about Certified Diabetes Educators (CDEs) – what they can offer patients, how to find one, and even how to become a diabetes educator yourself if interested. We’ve queried some top diabetes education experts in the country to compile this at-a-glance guide. Read on for practical information about the world of CDEs, along with lists of the Top Tips for Patients to Make the Most of Their CDE Appointments, and Top Things You Should Know About Becoming a CDE. A huge thank you to the following expert contributors: Deborah Greenwood, Diabetes Clinical Specialist and 2015 president of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) Jane K. Dickinson, RN, PhD, CDE, Coordinator of the Columbia University Master’s in Diabetes Education and Management program, and person with type 1 diabetes herself Jennifer Smith, CDE, Registered Dietitian & Director of Lifestyle and Nutrition at Integrated Diabetes Services, also living with type 1 diabetes herself Marissa Town, RN, CDE and a type 1 diabetes patient too, who was the inspiration for the Children With Diabetes (CWD) community Diabetes Educator Basics What is a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE)? CDEs are healthcare professionals trained specifically to coach patients with diabetes through their own self-care. This means coaching on glucose testing, medication dosing, insulin delivery, results logging and more. Some CDEs even have specialized training as insulin pump educators, focusing on helping patients get set up on those advanced devices. What Does a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) Do? CDEs work with patients and their families to teach diabetes self-management skills, and help with everyday challenges that doctors often don’t have time to address. They work in hospitals, clinics and sm Continue reading >>

Partnering With Diabetes Educators To Improve Patient Outcomes

Partnering With Diabetes Educators To Improve Patient Outcomes

Go to: One in every three Americans currently has or is at risk to develop diabetes mellitus.1 Worldwide, the number of individuals with diabetes is growing at an unprecedented rate and is expected to surpass 550 million by 2030.2 Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is actually a group of diseases characterized by high blood glucose levels that result from defects in the body’s ability to produce and/or use insulin. The hyperglycemia resulting from the excessive amounts of circulating glucose can be aggravated by exogenous factors, such as food consumption, physical activity, inflammation, medications, and stress. The chronic, progressive nature of diabetes necessitates ongoing medical care; it benefits from timely access to patient self-management education and support to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications.3 Adequately responding to and managing circulating glucose requires an assortment of elements, including an ongoing assessment of pharmacology, nutritional interventions, and monitoring. Historically, diabetes was depicted as a condition managed by diet, exercise, and medication. Seemingly straightforward, diabetes management has always been challenging. Changes in each of these treatment elements over the past 2 decades have increased the overall complexity of the disease’s management. Nutritional intake remains the foundation of diabetes management. However, the diabetes diet has shifted away from a physician-prescribed, calorie-restricted exchange diet toward an individualized meal plan that takes into account a patient’s cultural background and nutritional likes and dislikes. Exercise, which is still widely recognized as an anchor to diabetes management, is now carefully linked to the patient’s routine so as to maximiz Continue reading >>

Pardon Our Interruption...

Pardon Our Interruption...

As you were browsing something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: You're a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. You've disabled JavaScript in your web browser. A third-party browser plugin, such as Ghostery or NoScript, is preventing JavaScript from running. Additional information is available in this support article. After completing the CAPTCHA below, you will immediately regain access to Continue reading >>

Why You Need A Certified Diabetes Educator

Why You Need A Certified Diabetes Educator

By Gary Scheiner MS, CDE As we all know, there is no shortage of fancy gadgets for those of us with diabetes. We have pumps and pens for delivering insulin. Meters and continuous monitors for measuring blood sugar levels. Digital scales for counting carbs. Pedometers and accelerometers for tracking physical activity. Not to mention the growing number of cell phone apps and online programs for collecting and tracking data. With all this technology at our disposal, one would think that blood sugar control would be a snap. No such luck. Unfortunately, technology is only as good as those who use it. Without the skill to apply it properly, blood sugar control often remains suboptimal. That’s where Certified Diabetes Educators (CDEs) come in. CDEs to the Rescue! CDEs know that you want to manage your diabetes well. And who wouldn’t? Keeping blood sugar levels within an acceptable range most of the time allows you to feel and perform your best. It allows women to have healthy babies and makes it safe to work and drive. Not to mention the prevention of nasty long-term complications. Given the time, energy and resources that you put into managing your diabetes, you deserve positive results. CDEs are in a unique position to help you reach your diabetes management goals. Unlike physicians who usually have little time to spend with each patient (or may lack the expertise to effectively educate and motivate), CDEs’ sole focus is on helping you live more successfully with diabetes. CDEs are healthcare professionals themselves. Many are nurses or dietitians. Others have backgrounds in mental health, exercise science or pharmacy. There are also some physicians who take the initiative to become CDEs. To become a CDE, one must earn an advanced degree in a healthcare field, obtain e Continue reading >>

The Factors That Limit Activities Of Certified Diabetes Educators In Japan: A Questionnaire Survey

The Factors That Limit Activities Of Certified Diabetes Educators In Japan: A Questionnaire Survey

Abstract Background The certified diabetes educator (CDE) is a qualification awarded to health professionals with specialized knowledge, skills, and experiences in diabetes management and education. To clarify whether CDEs consider themselves to be working sufficiently, in other words, making sufficient use of their specialized skills or not, a questionnaire survey was conducted. The participants were persons involved in diabetes-related educational seminars and medical personnel engaged in diabetes care at the National Center for Global Health and Medicine. They were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding self -perception of CDE’s activities and to describe the reasons for their answers. Fewer than 40% of the responding CDEs in each of the professions surveyed were satisfied with the current state of their activities and contributions as a CDE. For CDEs, “lack of labor” is the most concerning issue that limits their satisfactory activities as CDEs, followed by “condition of facilities”. Other factors such as insufficient “interprofessional teamwork”, “limited personal ability”, “mismatched allocation”, and “low recognition for CDEs” also limited their activities. Many CDEs perceived they are not working sufficiently. Further efforts should be made to support CDEs to improve their working conditions. Introduction Globally, the number of patients with diabetes has been increasing rapidly and become a significant health care burden to each country. As a result of the complex nature of this disease process, patients with diabetes require comprehensive management and support. However, limited numbers of physicians alone cannot cope with the significant increase in the number of diabetic patients in recent years. Therefore, developing health ca Continue reading >>

Nutrition & Health Topics

Nutrition & Health Topics

Diabetes educators are healthcare professionals –nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, exercise physiologists, podiatrists, among others – who focus on helping people with diabetes understand their disease and learn how to adjust their lifestyle and behavior so that they can develop the skills to successfully manage their diabetes at home, 24/7. Many diabetes educators have also earned the certified diabetes educator (CDE) credential. Diabetes education (also called diabetes self-management training) is a covered Medicare benefit and is covered by some private insurance plans. It requires a referral from a physician or qualified non-physician practitioner. Continue reading >>

Protect Your Body From Diabetes Complications

Protect Your Body From Diabetes Complications

Protect your body from diabetes complications The holidays are already upon us. Just as you are planning for holiday get-togethers, sharing, parties and gifts, don’t forget to plan ahead to take care of your diabetes. Planning and preparation are at least 50 percent of your diabetes management. As things get busier with more to do, be sure to stay on track with your diabetes management. Continuing your daily physical activity program is essential, and our weather is perfect for being outside and getting exercise. If you see your blood sugars increasing, increase your duration of activity by 5-10 minutes daily. Use your exercise time to mentally organize yourself for upcoming activities and to increase your energy level. Keeping blood sugars in control should be your #1 priority so you can thoroughly enjoy the holidays. Take all medications as prescribed. If taking mealtime medication, be sure to have it ready to go when you leave your house. If traveling during the holidays, be sure to have your medications refilled in time so you don’t run out. 1. Plan meals with protein and plenty of vegetables. 2. Bring vegetable/dip platter or deviled eggs to parties and get-togethers. 3. Limit alcohol so you aren’t tempted to overeat. 4. Have sparkling flavored waters with lime/lemon on hand for guests and if needing something quick to take to a party. 5. Have a plan in place to limit the amount of food you eat 6. Have a protein snack before going to an event or party to satiate you. Never go to an event hungry. 7. Protein shakes or protein bars are handy to have available. 8. What is your plan for physical activity during the holidays? Being physically active every day will help balance the blood sugars. 9. Check your blood sugar frequently, at least daily, to be sure it is Continue reading >>

Certified Diabetes Educator (cde)

Certified Diabetes Educator (cde)

We’re seeking a passionate, skilled, and energetic Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) to work at our growth-phase NYC-based startup. Our team is a talented and diverse group developing innovative ways to empower people to use their data to lead healthier lives. Job Description We’re looking for someone who wants to be a leader in a new approach to diabetes education. You’ll be expected to use your expertise as a diabetes educator in new, exciting ways, using mobile technology and advanced analytics to provide education and support to people with diabetes when they need it most. Job Responsibilities Provide diabetes education and coaching entirely via text message within the One Drop mobile app Use our 12-lesson diabetes coaching curriculum to deliver a new paradigm of diabetes education Get to know One Drop users and learn about their motivations for managing diabetes and their barriers to getting there Answer users’ questions and provide them with resources to help them manage their diabetes effectively Encourage, support and empower users to make healthy behavioral changes Support users who are dealing with tough emotions and diabetes-related stress Give users real-time insights and feedback about their diabetes management behavior Help refine and develop the the optimal workflow for One Drop Experts Give feedback and suggestions about how to improve the One Drop Experts user experience Identify materials and resources we need and help develop these materials, based on your area of expertise Job Perks Get in on the ground-floor on a massively ambitious project Deeply impact the lives of hundreds of millions of people worldwide Modern, flexible, progressive workplace Convenient LES location Healthcare tech, yeah! Equity About One Drop One Drop is a digital healt Continue reading >>

A National Study Of The Certified Diabetes Educator: Report On A Job Analysis Conducted By The National Certification Board For Diabetes Educators

A National Study Of The Certified Diabetes Educator: Report On A Job Analysis Conducted By The National Certification Board For Diabetes Educators

Purpose. The job analysis described in this report was conducted by the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE) in order to 1) provide a basis for documenting the continuing validity of the Certification Examination for Diabetes Educators, 2) define new areas that should be assessed in future certification examinations, and 3) ensure that the content of certification examinations is job related. Methods. The study involved developing a diabetes educator job task list and survey, distributing 1,100 surveys, and analyzing survey responses from a multidisciplinary and geographically representative sample of certified diabetes educators. Results. Three hundred and thirty-nine surveys were suitable for analysis, with relevant demographic subgroups adequately represented. Based on survey data, an examination matrix and detailed content outline was constructed that will be used by NCBDE to assemble future test forms. Conclusions. Certification examination specifications were developed directly related to the important activities that diabetes educators perform. Future forms of the certification examination will continue to be matched to job-related, criterion-referenced test specifications and will have strong evidence of content validity. Future forms of the exam will contain 200 items at specified cognitive levels, with a representative sampling of tasks within three core areas from the detailed content outline. This study of the role of certified diabetes educators (CDEs) was conducted in 2004 for the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE) by its testing agency, Applied Measurement Professionals. The purpose of this study was to describe the CDE's job with enough detail to 1) provide a valid basis for a national, state-of-the-art, pr Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Educator (diabetes Educator)

The Diabetes Educator (diabetes Educator)

Journal description The Diabetes Educator is the official journal of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). It is a peer-reviewed journal intended to serve as a reference source for the science and art of diabetes management. The Diabetes Educator, an ISI-ranked journal, publishes original articles that relate to aspects of patient care and education, clinical practice and/or research, and the multidisciplinary profession of diabetes education as represented by nurses, dietitians, physicians, pharmacists, mental health professionals, podiatrists, and exercise physiologists. RG Journal Impact: 1.53 * RG Journal impact history 2017 RG Journal impact Available summer 2018 2015 / 2016 RG Journal impact 1.53 2011 RG Journal impact 3.11 2010 RG Journal impact 2.23 2009 RG Journal impact 1.73 2008 RG Journal impact 1.62 2007 RG Journal impact 1.64 2006 RG Journal impact 1.01 2005 RG Journal impact 0.87 2004 RG Journal impact 0.43 2003 RG Journal impact 0.58 2002 RG Journal impact 0.82 2001 RG Journal impact 0.97 2000 RG Journal impact 0.82 RG Journal impact over time Additional details Cited half-life 7.00 Immediacy index 0.24 Eigenfactor 0.00 Article influence 0.78 Website The Diabetes Educator website Other titles The Diabetes educator ISSN 0145-7217 OCLC 2776215 Material type Periodical Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper Continue reading >>

Certified Diabetes Educator On Staff

Certified Diabetes Educator On Staff

The purpose of the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE) certification program is to conduct certification activities in a manner that upholds standards for competent practice in diabetes education. The Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE®) credential demonstrates that the certified health care professional possesses distinct and specialized knowledge, thereby promoting quality care for persons with diabetes. Certification is a voluntary testing program used to assess and validate qualified health care professionals’ knowledge in diabetes education. It is an evaluative process that demonstrates that rigorous eligibility requirements have been met (National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators). Diabetes self-management training, also called diabetes education, gives patients the knowledge and skills to be able to effectively manage their diabetes on a daily basis. Through a collaborative process, diabetes educators help their patients identify barriers, facilitate problem solving and develop coping strategies (American Association of Diabetes Educators). Continue reading >>

How To Become A Certified Diabetes Educator

How To Become A Certified Diabetes Educator

There is no cure for diabetes, requiring patients to rely on medication, diet and lifestyle changes to manage the disease. People with diabetes look to experienced educators to teach them how to eat, how exercise affects their symptoms, and what complications to watch for while monitoring their conditions. A diabetes educator has an extensive background with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and earns a specific certification after accumulating experience and passing an exam. Preparing for Role of CDE A certified diabetes educator, or CDE, is a health professional who works directly with patients in a number of settings, ranging from outpatient counseling groups to inpatient hospital rooms and doctors’ offices. To earn the specialty certification, a CDE studies diet, exercise, lifestyle and other health issues and counsels patients in all aspects of the disease, from prevention to daily blood sugar monitoring. Your general healthcare education and direct-care background prepare you for the next step as a specialist in diabetes education. Medical Licensure Required To sit for the certified diabetes educator exam given by the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators, you first must prove you already hold medical or healthcare credentials. The exam is given to a host of professionals, including licensed nurses, physicians, clinical psychologists and nutritionists. You also may hold a master’s degree in social work to sit for the certification exam. Proven Experience In addition to holding a degree and healthcare credentials. You must be able to prove that you have been active in diabetes care for a minimum of 1,000 hours, with 400 of those hours having taken place within the year preceding your application for certification. You must have been in professional pract Continue reading >>

Guidance For Becoming A Diabetes Educator/cde

Guidance For Becoming A Diabetes Educator/cde

How do I become a diabetes educator? One must be a healthcare professional who has a defined role as a diabetes educator, not for those who may perform some diabetes related functions as part of or in the course of other usual and customary duties. Practice as a diabetes educator means actively employed for compensation, providing a direct or indirect professional contribution to the care and self-management education of people with diabetes. Diabetes education, also referred to as diabetes self-management education or diabetes self-management training, is performed by health care professionals who have appropriate credentials and experience consistent with the particular profession's scope of practice. Diabetes self-management education is defined as the interactive, collaborative, ongoing process involving the person with diabetes or pre-diabetes and/or the caregivers and the educator(s). The process includes: Assessment of the individual's specific education needs Identification of the individual's specific diabetes self-management goals Education and behavioral intervention directed toward helping the individual achieve identified self-management goals Evaluation(s) of the individual's attainment of identified self-management goals Proper documentation of all education encounters Diabetes educators can be found in a variety of settings: hospitals, physician offices, clinics, home health, wellness programs, to name a few. They most often work within accredited or recognized diabetes education programs. This means that the diabetes education program has met requirements set forth by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and can bill for diabetes self-management training through two different codes: G0108 and G0109, which are for individual and group diabetes ed Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Certified Diabetes Educators

Everything You Need To Know About Certified Diabetes Educators

In this article, we will explore what it takes to look for a Certified Diabetes Educator, where to look for one, and what questions to ask when you get there, among other things. We will also explore how to become a CDE, and what kind of degree, license, hours and examination that you will need to pass in order to become a Certified Diabetes Educator. Personal perspective on becoming a CDE My own story of becoming a Certified Diabetes Educator may help to illustrate the process of actually becoming a Certified Diabetes Educator. It is a process, and it is a challenge to get the 1,000 hours of diabetes education that is required. Many people with diabetes do enter careers in healthcare or related fields, and do become Certified Diabetes Educators. Their experience as a person with diabetes is very valuable to their client. I am a registered nurse, which is one of the licenses that you can hold in order to become a CDE. Degrees and licensure needed in order to become a CDE One must be in one of the following disciplines holding an active and current license which is unrestricted in the United States in order to become a Certified Diabetes Educator according to NCBDE (National Certification Board of Diabetes Educators): A clinical psychologist A registered nurse An occupational therapist An Optometrist A pharmacist A physical therapist A physician (M.D. or D.O.) A podiatrist A dietitian or dietitian nutritionist holding active registration with the Commission on Dietetic Registration A physician assistant holding active registration with the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants A clinical exercise professional holding active certification with American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) as a Certified Clinical Exercise Physiologist (ACSM CEP), previo Continue reading >>

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