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Certified Diabetes Educator Daily Activities

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  1. libbybeth

    Metformin and Extreme Exhaustion

    As I am typing, I am barely able to sit up and stay awake.
    Basically, I was on metformin for a few weeks. Everything was going good and my numbers were lowering, when suddenly I started to feel kind of tired. I wondered if it was the metformin. My husband told me Sunday morning to wake-up and see if I felt good and if I did, to take the metformin. I felt great, so I took it.
    As the day wore on, I got more and more exhausted. Every muscle in my body ached and I could hardly move. It has been two days since then, the same thing.
    I called a 24 hour nurse that my insurance provides and she said to go to the emergency room because I feel more exhausted than even when I was first diagnosed with diabetes.
    I am frightened that I have lactic acidosis and don't understand why the symptoms aren't going away even though I didn't take the medication today or yesterday.
    I went to the doctor this morning. I was there all day and just got back. She told me that I must be tired because my blood sugar is still high. And I said,"It's lower than before and I wasn't as tired then as I am now." And she kept repeating herself and forcing glipizide on me and saying that's what would make me feel better.
    I asked her to give me blood tests just in case and she said that no, I didn't need any blood tests and just to take the new medicine.
    And I don't know what to do anymore. I don't know why I am exhausted and I don't know what to do. I keep crying because the medicine has made me feel even sicker than I did when my blood sugar was 350. I thought I would stop taking the pills and the symptoms would go away, but that haven't. Please help.

  2. libbybeth

    Also, I took a multi-vitamin just now in case my vitamins and minerals are imbalanced somehow. She wouldn't even check that for me.

  3. libbybeth

    Oh and just so you know, my highs right now are 180, which is still high and I'm working on it being lower, but that's much better than the 350 it was before. Also, I am only taking 500 mg of metformin once a day. It was working way better (although maybe some of it was change in diet) than I expected it to.

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Certified Nurse Educators earn competitive salaries and work in educational settings, as well as regular nurse settings. Learn more here: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs...

Why You Need A Certified Diabetes Educator

By Gary Scheiner MS, CDE As we all know, there is no shortage of fancy gadgets for those of us with diabetes. We have pumps and pens for delivering insulin. Meters and continuous monitors for measuring blood sugar levels. Digital scales for counting carbs. Pedometers and accelerometers for tracking physical activity. Not to mention the growing number of cell phone apps and online programs for collecting and tracking data. With all this technology at our disposal, one would think that blood sugar control would be a snap. No such luck. Unfortunately, technology is only as good as those who use it. Without the skill to apply it properly, blood sugar control often remains suboptimal. That’s where Certified Diabetes Educators (CDEs) come in. CDEs to the Rescue! CDEs know that you want to manage your diabetes well. And who wouldn’t? Keeping blood sugar levels within an acceptable range most of the time allows you to feel and perform your best. It allows women to have healthy babies and makes it safe to work and drive. Not to mention the prevention of nasty long-term complications. Given the time, energy and resources that you put into managing your diabetes, you deserve positive resu Continue reading >>

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  1. PAPERBALL

    Starting it or raising the dose was deeply unpleasant for me, so if your doc isn't having you phase it in gradually, maybe you can ask her if you can try a really low dose at first. I also made sure not to take it without food or I would be in a world of hurt :-(

  2. SINA180

    That Metaformin(?) didn't help me lose weight. I have been at a stand still since Dec. When I first started taking it I would get very nauseous. My doctor told me to eat more when taking the pill. She started me on the pill to help with my facial hair. I know diabetics take it to lower insulin levels but my levels are already low. I'm going to start taking it again next week to help with my facial hair.

  3. PAPERBALL

    As soon as I started Met & a moderate low-carb diet, it was the first time I couldn't finish a bowl of pasta (and it was whole wheat, btw).
    I've had similar effects to what you're describing, too...suddenly watching calories & exercising actually seemed to make me lose weight. Huh? ;-)
    On a whole other subject...although if I go over 200g of carbs I'll gain weight, I have also found that if I go lower than about 150-160g of carbs a day, I get nauseous & lose my appetite, especially if I've been exercising regularly. Yesterday I had to force myself to eat more than 1200 cal, and I was dragging all through my workout. I'm not diabetic & my blood sugar is normal, normal, normal every time it's tested - knock wood - so I know it's not that. Has this happened to anyone else on metformin?
    paperball
    Edited by: PAPERBALL at: 5/27/2011 (22:30)

    Pounds lost: 12.9



    0

    6.5

    13

    19.5

    26

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Certified Diabetes Educator (cde)

We’re seeking a passionate, skilled, and energetic Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) to work at our growth-phase NYC-based startup. Our team is a talented and diverse group developing innovative ways to empower people to use their data to lead healthier lives. Job Description We’re looking for someone who wants to be a leader in a new approach to diabetes education. You’ll be expected to use your expertise as a diabetes educator in new, exciting ways, using mobile technology and advanced analytics to provide education and support to people with diabetes when they need it most. Job Responsibilities Provide diabetes education and coaching entirely via text message within the One Drop mobile app Use our 12-lesson diabetes coaching curriculum to deliver a new paradigm of diabetes education Get to know One Drop users and learn about their motivations for managing diabetes and their barriers to getting there Answer users’ questions and provide them with resources to help them manage their diabetes effectively Encourage, support and empower users to make healthy behavioral changes Support users who are dealing with tough emotions and diabetes-related stress Give users real-time in Continue reading >>

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  1. Natalia Fuentes

    Pharmaceuticals

    Comparisons

    Health

    Medicine and Healthcare



    What is the difference between Humulin and Humalog?




    1 Answer







    They differ in how fast they take to reach peak effect and how long their effect lasts.
    Humulin is a medium acting insulin which reaches peak effect at about 6 to 10 hours and keeps working for up to 16 hours. Because it will not cause a rapid blood sugar drop it's considered safe and is mainly used to maintain a baseline blood sugar level throughout the day. NPH insulin
    Humalog is a fast acting insulin which starts working within about 5 minutes and peaks at about 1-2 hours and is normaly used to combat the sharp rise of blood sugar after a meal. It is also used to rapidly bring down a very highly elevated blood sugar level. Because of this it is not as "safe" as NPH since overshooting a dose can cause a dangerous hypoglycemic episode. Insulin lispro (the Insulin aspart /Novolog link is more detailed).

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