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Cereal For Diabetics Special K

Cereal - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Cereal - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

I love cereal. Especially the children's sugary stuff. I went to a farmer's market store and bought what I thought was healthy cereal. But I tested really high after I ate it. Does anyone on here eat cereal and keep their numbers low? Any cereal suggestions? Honey Nut Cheerios with unsweetened almond milk also couple tbsp of peanut butter for more protein (not in the cereal though) I love cereal too!!! Although I tried the Special K cereal and my numbers were ridiculously high!! If I try again, I'm going to add some protein to it- like 2 eggs or some breakfast meat. Always eat protein with those carbs!! Maybe it'll help! Regular special k with fairlife milk. That milk has half the sugar and twice the protein of regular milk. Regular Cheerios with cinnamon and Stevia! Or if I eat other cereal eat something with a lot of protein beforehand! I miss cereal! When are you all finding that you can tolerate it best? We have Honey Nut Cheerios and I have unsweetened vanilla almond milk and I would loooooooove to have a serving of that. Maybe with breakfast as long as I have an egg, too? Maybe I'll indulge for Mother's Day. Lol Cereals are carbs, so even if they are healthy you have to keep your serving moderate. for example cereal may not work as a breakfast on it's own anymore, you may have to eat a small portion and complete breakfast with something else. I love cereal too, but I would rather have a a filling breakfast, so I stick with eggs and a slice of toast or eggs and a little bit of cereal. I have been SUPER sensitive at breakfast, but I was so happy to find out I can eat Special K Protein with Fairlife Milk. I think the super high protein milk is what makes it tolerable for me. Continue reading >>

10 Best Cereals For Diabetics 2018

10 Best Cereals For Diabetics 2018

Home / Cereal /10 Best Cereals for Diabetics 2018 The hardest part of having diabetes is figuring out what you can and cant eat without sacrificing the quality of your meals. Often, even dietary staples like cereal require in-depth analysis and perhaps even a doctors permission before you can enjoy a serving. Because cereal is easy, accessible, and convenient, not being able to grab a bowl can be very frustrating for a lot of diabetics. Fortunately, not all breakfast cereals are off limits. Wondering which option proves to be the best cereal for diabetics ? Check out this list of our top 10 picks and find out which breakfast cereals you can indulge in minus the risk and guilt. How to Choose the Right Cereal for Diabetics Diabetics process certain components in food in a different way from individuals without the condition. For that reason, diabetics cant simply indulge in whatever food they want without facing a few health risks and potential complications along the way. Just as you would take your time choosing any other food, its equally important that you consider some things before you buy a box of cereal. By taking these factors into account, you can be sure to get a satisfying breakfast treat minus the health dangers. Carbohydrate Content.Carbohydrates are the most common macronutrient in any persons diet. These components provide us energy once their broken down sugars. In cereal, simple carbohydrates are the most abundant component which is one of the main reasons why theyre not commonly recommended for diabetics. But there are some cereals that contain complex carbohydrates carbs that take longer for the body to digest. When you consume this type of carb, your body receives energy in slower doses across a longer period of time because theyre not instantly dige Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cereal Plus Low Carb Alternatives

Diabetic Cereal Plus Low Carb Alternatives

Here's a comment someone made on our Facebook page: What kind of cold cereal do you guys eat – checked the super market and (omg) so high in carbs and sugar and you can eat 1/4 cup of 1/2 cup (I would literally starve on this ) any suggestions ? Have you had a similar experience from looking at food labels on breakfast cereals? Or perhaps you haven't looked at the labels and not sure if cereals are okay for diabetes. Well, we've got you covered because today we're going to go over the ins and outs of breakfast cereals, share some low carb alternatives you can buy, and share a couple of recipes you can enjoy too. The Truth About Breakfast Cereals Breakfast Cereals are NOT healthy! Let's look at 2 popular breakfast cereals from the US and Australia. If you're from a different country, that's okay, most cereals are the same poor quality. General Mills Honey Nut Cheerios Noted as the US most popular cereal in 2013. In a 112 g serve we have: 440 calories 6 g fat 640 mg sodium 88 g carbs 8 g fiber 36 g sugar 44 g other carbs 8 g protein Ingredients: Whole grain oats, sugar, oat bran, modified corn starch, honey, brown sugar syrup, salt, tripotassium phosphate, canola and/or rice bran oil, natural almond flour, and then their long line of ADDED vitamins and minerals. Source Does this measure up as a healthy breakfast option? No way! Almost 1/3 sugar content and 132 g carbs, high sodium, low fiber, and low protein. In my opinion that's no way to start the day and yet it's the most popular cereal in the US. Notice on the box that the marketing claims it “Can Help Lower Cholesterol”. You will see all sorts of advertising scams occur on food packaging and you can't trust any of it. Although there is some evidence to suggest that soluble fiber (found in oats) can help lower c Continue reading >>

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Continue reading >>

Cereal: It’s What’s For Breakfast… Or Lunch, Or Dinner

Cereal: It’s What’s For Breakfast… Or Lunch, Or Dinner

Raise your hand if you currently eat or have ever eaten cereal. I wouldn’t be surprised if most of you raised your hand. Back in 2005, Good Morning America conducted a poll and found that 60% of Americans eat breakfast, and of those 60%, about 40% eat either hot or cold cereal. I’m a big breakfast cereal eater, mostly because it’s fast and easy, but also because I like it. People eat cereal at any time of day, too — it’s not just for breakfast anymore. And if you’re a Seinfeld fan, you probably remember the episode when Jerry’s girlfriend ate cereal for all three meals. All sorts of studies have been done looking at how breakfast impacts various factors, including obesity, Type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, and cholesterol, as well as alertness and productivity. And starting off the day by eating cereal is a smart way to help meet your fiber and whole-grain goals (most of us fall short on these). Did you know, too, that eating a whole-grain breakfast cereal can help reduce your risk of heart failure, and is a smart way to prevent accumulating fat around your midsection (also known as the dreaded spare tire)? Decisions, Decisions So, eating breakfast is good. Eating cereal is also good with one caveat: you need to choose a cereal that’s healthy. But how? The cereal aisle in the supermarket can be overwhelming. You know you should choose something that’s high in nutrition, but the worry is that the cereal will taste like packing peanuts. Must one sacrifice flavor for health? Choosing Wisely Here are some tips that can help: Read the Nutrition Facts label. Information on the front of the box can be misleading. For example, a cereal claiming to be “low in sugar” might not be so healthful in terms of fat, whole grains, or sodium. The label and the ingredi Continue reading >>

Healthy Cereal Brands For Diabetes

Healthy Cereal Brands For Diabetes

When you’re in a morning rush, you may not have time to eat anything but a quick bowl of cereal. But many brands of breakfast cereal are loaded with fast-digesting carbohydrates. These carbs usually rate high on the glycemic index. That means your body quickly breaks them down, which rapidly raises your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, that can be dangerous. Fortunately, not all cereals are made the same. Read on to learn about diabetes-friendly cereal options that can get you out of the door quickly, without putting you through a blood sugar rollercoaster ride. We’ve listed our recommendations from the highest rating on the glycemic index to the lowest rating. The glycemic index, or GI, measures how quickly carbohydrates raise your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, it’s best to choose foods with lower GI ratings. They take longer to digest, which can help prevent spikes in your blood sugar. According to the Harvard School of Public Health: low-GI foods have a rating of 55 or less medium-GI foods have a rating of 56-69 high-GI foods have a rating of 70-100 Mixing foods can influence how they digest and adsorb into your blood, and ultimately their GI rating. For example, eating high-ranked GI cereal with Greek yogurt, nuts, or other low-ranked GI foods can slow your digestion and limit spikes in your blood sugar. Glycemic load is another measure of how food affects your blood sugar. It takes into account portion size and the digestibility of different carbohydrates. It may be a better way to identify good and bad carb choices. For example, carrots have a high GI rating but a low glycemic load. The vegetable provides a healthy choice for people with diabetes. According to the Harvard School of Public Health: a glycemic load under 10 is low a glycemi Continue reading >>

Glucerna Cereal Vs Special K | Diabetic Connect

Glucerna Cereal Vs Special K | Diabetic Connect

I was out shopping today, and checked out the Glucerna Cereal then compared it to Kelloggs Special K. What to my amazement should I see? Special K was less carbs for the same amount, twice as much in the box, for the same price as the Glucerna! Cheerios you can have 1 cup for 20 gr. of carbs for less than both of them! And you can get a bigger box! I was at the grocery store tonight and looked at both of these cereals. Neither of them met the standards for cereal in this house. Both have bad ingredients like high fructose corn syrup in Special K and/or chemicals that I can't pronounce and don't want to learn how to AND the Glucerna cereal was 2-3 x the price of a simple box of Wheaties. If you want to eat cereal, which I do look for Mom's Best All Naturals.. they are inexpensive, a few ingredients, and they taste good. Special K has one with protein that has only 9 net carbs for about 3/4 cup, and I like the taste over glucerna. Here is the website. They have a store locator and also under special offiers you can request that a store in your area carries them and get a coupon. If you go on the left side bar, there is a link to mybrands.com where you can order it to be delivered to your home too. It's a little more expensive that way that what I pay in the store but it's an alternative if you don't have a store near you. YAY!!!! They carry the cereal at my local Family Dollar!!! And I'm planning on goin to get some tomorrow!!! One thing you need to look at too is the ingredients. There are the same number of carbs in a 1/3 cup of rice as there are in an apple, but the apple doesn't spike me and the rice will. So sometimes you have to look deeper than just the Nutrition box, read your ingredients. If it has any HFC in it or rice, it may be what causes spikes in some. I j Continue reading >>

Sodium Free Cereals (5mg Or Less Per Serving):

Sodium Free Cereals (5mg Or Less Per Serving):

Q: Jessie S., Ravenscrof, TN I was raised on a small farm in Kansas. We grew corn for the market. We grew up on Kellogg’s Corn Flakes. Still love your cereals, but since becoming an adult I've become diabetic. Could your company produce cereals for the thousands and thousands of us out here? It would be so awesome to once again have Kellogg’s on our table. One more thing, reducing the sodium content would be great, too. A: We understand that people with diabetes have special dietary needs. According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, most people with diabetes can enjoy all foods in moderation as a part of their meal plans, depending on blood glucose control and body weight. We encourage you to discuss dietary options with your healthcare professional or dietitian. It’s great to know that you read labels and care about your food choices. We use sodium to enhance the flavor, help preserve the freshness and improve the texture of our foods. At Kellogg, we are on a continuous journey to improve the nutrition credentials of our foods, including lowering the sodium content, without compromising taste or quality. We truly appreciate your desire for lower sodium foods and can understand how difficult it is to find products that meet your needs. The following products may be of interest to you: Sodium free cereals (5mg or less per serving): Frosted Mini-Wheats® Bite Size Original Frosted Mini-Wheats® Blueberry, Maple Brown Sugar and Strawberry Frosted Mini-Wheats Little Bites® Original Mini-Wheats® Unfrosted Bite Size Low sodium cereals (140 mg or less per serving): All-Bran® Original Apple Jacks® Cinnabon® cereal Cinnamon Jacks Cocoa Krispies® Corn Pops® Cracklin' Oat Bran® Crunchy Nut® Golden Honey Nut Flakes Crunchy Nut® Roasted Nut & Honey O's Froot Continue reading >>

Kellogs Special K Low Gi

Kellogs Special K Low Gi

Before bed my level was 4.8 and when i woke up it was 7.8. Then 2hrs after a bowl of kellogs special k low gi it was 14.8. Last night before bed. 1 x janumet Fist thing in the morning. 2 x diamicton 8h00. 1x janumet and 1x metformin 1000mg I do not think special k is that much low gi....... I THOUGHT I could eat ceral. Plus every registered dietation put me a diet that included it. After I took the bull by horns,, I decided it was NOT OK. I read every lable on every box of cereal in the grocery store. It took a while to not want it. Oatmeal for sure ..I loved loved loved cereal. It did lighten the load ,a little money wise tho .. ghezz that stuff is $$$$$$$$. Before diabetes I was a vegetarian, so a large part of my diet was healthy ( so I thought) breakfast cereals like Kashi with all the fiber. When I started to test with a bg meter, cereal was the first to go, too. Don't believe any of the advertisements. I don't like the whole GI index thing. The GI diet was started in the 1980's and tested on normal people, not diabetics. A few years ago it had a rebirth for diabetics. If you look at the whole GI list most of the things that they say are low GI would spike most of us. So my suggestion is forget GI and let your meter show you what to eat. Continue reading >>

Special K Protein Plus - No Spike Like Other Cereals

Special K Protein Plus - No Spike Like Other Cereals

Special K Protein Plus - no spike like other cereals Special K Protein Plus - no spike like other cereals Pre D days I ate cold cereal all the time for breakfast, but after dx, I found they all spiked me, even the all-bran hay pellets, although they didn't make me quite so high. For a while I could eat oatmeal, but lately I've spiked even with that. Well, a few days ago I was buying Special K for my kids and noticed the Special K Protein Plus box. It has only 14 g carbs and 5 g of fiber in a 3/4 C serving. I bought it and finally tried it today, as being a US Holiday I figured I'd have less stress with getting everything done in the AM and remembering to check levels at appropriate times without trying to be inconspicuous at work. Well, I was at 90 before I ate it. I bolused for 15 g. carbs (serving of cereal & 1/2 C milk), did a couple of chores (not anything strenuous) took a 15 min walk with my dog and after 1.5 hours was at 80!! Friend T2 since 4-16-2008 / 1000 mg Metformin Thanks for the tip. I love cereal but many of them spike me. I can eat about 3/4 cup of the Glucerna cereal but I find that spikes me too just not as bad. I definitely check out the Special K protein brand. I love the special K stuff...especially the protein waters---sometimes I will have one instead of a snack....I love the tropical fruit and lemonade protein waters--just something about the taste....the cereals are good too-haven't had them in a while so I might have to try them again--I'm getting in a breakfast rut..... Yep I tried that cereal...I wont' buy it again. To me *that is me personally, meaning maybe not to anyone else) it tastes like cardboard. I won't eat anything I dont' like even if it treats my bg well. I am glad you like it though MEDS... 1000 mg ER met, 2000IU vitamin D3, mul Continue reading >>

Should You Eat Cereal For Breakfast If You Have Diabetes?

Should You Eat Cereal For Breakfast If You Have Diabetes?

We've heard countless times that breakfast is the most important meal of the day—it can help jump start metabolism, prevent food cravings, and help people lose weight. The most common complaint of "non breakfast eaters" is that they don't have time in the morning to eat and that they are looking for quick breakfast ideas. Therefore, people often ask me, "Can I eat cold cereal for breakfast?" While it's probably better to eat something for breakfast than nothing at all, cold cereal is typically not the best choice for someone with diabetes who is trying to lose weight. The reason is multifactorial. First off, studies have shown that those persons with diabetes tend to have better blood sugars and weight control when starting the day with a higher fat, higher protein, lower carbohydrate breakfast. Protein and fat tend to be more satiating which can keep you feel full for longer, typically resulting in less overall calorie intake. In addition, blood sugars tend to rise higher after breakfast and many people are resistant to insulin in the morning which can also cause blood sugars to spike. Elevated blood sugars may cause additional carbohydrate cravings, which can lead to excess calorie and carbohydrate intake, often resulting in excess sugar in the blood. Secondly, many people overeat cereal which can lead to excess calorie and carbohydrate intake. A single serving of cereal is about 3/4 cup. Three-fourths cup of cereal will generally cost you about 120 calories and 24 g of carbohydrate. This amount of carbohydrates is equivalent to eating almost 2 slices of bread and this is without adding fruit or milk to your bowl. A typical cereal meal such as 3/4 cup with 1 banana and 1 cup of low-fat milk contains about 340 calories and 66 g of carbohydrate (about 4 slices of brea Continue reading >>

What Are Some Cereals That Diabetics Can Eat?

What Are Some Cereals That Diabetics Can Eat?

Cereals that consist of simple carbohydrates are not good choices for diabetics because they quickly break down into glucose, explains Healthline. Foods with a low glycemic index number are digested more slowly and consequently don't cause spikes in glucose levels. Glycemic load is another measurement of how quickly blood sugar levels raise by eating different kinds of carbohydrates; the lower the GL, the better. Cereals made with wheat bran or rice have very low numbers, while other cereals, such as cream of wheat, corn flakes and grape nuts, are among the highest, states Healthline. Oatmeal is second only to wheat bran cereals, and muesli, which is made of oats and whole grain wheat, has the fourth lowest GI and GL numbers. Eating other foods that have a high GI can slow their digestion, according to Healthline. For instance, eating a hard-boiled egg, Greek yogurt or a few nuts with a high GI cereal helps prevent spikes in blood sugar. Other good breakfast foods for diabetics include whole fruits, eggs and wheat or rye breads. Learn more about Nutrition & Diets Continue reading >>

Top 10 Healthiest Low Carb Cereals

Top 10 Healthiest Low Carb Cereals

By Elisabeth Almekinder RN, BA, CDE 4 Comments Would you like to find cereal options with fewer carbohydrates so that you can have some fruit or milk  in the morning without breaking the carb bank? Do higher carbohydrate cereals run your blood sugars up every time you eat them? We can help. We’ve put together a list of the top 10 healthiest and lowest carbohydrate options for diabetes. Whether you are on an American Diabetes Association (ADA) Diet or a Ketogenic diet, you can enjoy them with diabetes guilt free. If you are on a ketogenic diet, we hope that you are being followed by your doctor and nutritionist for needed lab work. Which cereals made our list of the top 10 healthiest for diabetes? We will break down each product for you that we’ve listed in the table below. You can find them on Amazon by clicking the link. You may also find some of these brands at your local grocery store. They are all made from plant sources including nuts and seeds that have a high fiber content. A high fiber content cancels out natural sugars and helps people with diabetes manage their blood sugars. High fiber foods are great for diabetes due to their low Glycemic Index. They don’t raise blood sugars as fast as non-fiber foods do. You will experience stability of blood sugars more often when you eat high fiber foods. They are granola cereals. If you don’t like granola, hang on until the end of the article and we will provide you with some grain-based choices. While higher in carbohydrates, the ones on our grain-based list are high in fiber also. These will be found in your community grocery store, so we won’t link those to Amazon. We know you will find a healthy breakfast option that also tastes delicious while helping you to manage your diabetes after you have read this a Continue reading >>

Choosing Cereal When You Have Diabetes

Choosing Cereal When You Have Diabetes

Early in the morning I had a habit of eating a bowl of cereal or a whole grain waffle. Sometimes for lunch or for dinner I ate cereal. It is such an easy meal and it is always available. And I got lazy cooking, especially sometimes for just me. A few years ago before I got into my heart problems I ate cereal constantly. I got addicted to cereal so much so that I had to have at least 10 different varieties of cereal boxes in my kitchen cabinet at all times. They included personal favorites like Honey Bunches of Oats, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, Special K, Froot Loops, Apple Jacks, Frosted Flakes, and Fruity Pebbles. As a diabetic, I was ignorant about the nutritional values of these cereals and how they affected me for so long. Sometimes I would eat all three meals with a different kind of cereal. I thought I was on a diet and watching what I was eating by eating limited portions of cereals. Little did I realize the sugars and carbs were eating my system up. Not all cereals are bad. During the past several years the cereal market has seen tremendous improvements with taste, nutritional facts, and additives among other qualities of healthy cereals. Most people watch what they eat. Most mothers are aware of the kinds of nutrition they are providing for their children, especially for breakfast. Still, there are plenty of children who either eat no breakfast or eat at least two bowls of breakfast cereal in the mornings. My children, even though they are in their twenties and thirties, still reach out for a bowl of cereal for a midnight snack. Cereal, like any American fast food, has made its way into our lives and turned as a tradition by itself. Even now I indulge myself with cereals when I feel like it. But I don't always crave them like before. I take it like medicine--a coup Continue reading >>

Cereal: Making Healthy Selections

Cereal: Making Healthy Selections

Spring has finally arrived! March happens to be National Nutrition Month®, and after a long winter, it’s always a good idea to “spring clean” your eating routine and focus on good nutrition. Speaking of nutrition, March 7 was National Cereal Day. To pay homage to cereal, this week, we’ll look at some facts (and foibles) about cereal, with tips on how to choose the healthiest cereal. Cereal history • 1863: Cereal is invented! James Caleb Jackson, a very religious vegetarian who ran a sanitarium in New York, created a breakfast cereal from graham flour. The dough was very hard and had to be soaked in milk overnight. Jackson called this cereal “granula.” Later, John Harvey Kellogg, a surgeon, made his own version and renamed it “granola.” • Early- to mid-1900s: Kellogg’s Corn Flakes, Quaker Puffed Rice and Puffed Wheat, Wheaties, Rice Krispies, and Chex cereals hit the scene. (Elizabeth Taylor graced the box of Chex cereal in the 1950s!) • Sugary cereals top the list. According to data from IBISWorld and IRI, top-selling cereals include Honey Nut Cheerios, Frosted Flakes, and Honey Bunches of Oats. • Cereal still rules. Sales of cereal have dropped over recent years, as consumers look for healthier higher-protein, higher-fiber breakfasts. But Nielsen data shows that 90% of American households nonetheless contain cereal. Ninety-four percent of millennials have cereal in their homes — for them, cereal serves as a snack, as well as breakfast. Nutrition tips for smart cereal choices Go to any supermarket and you’ll find shelves (and aisles) dedicated to cereal. How do you choose? It’s easy to spot the “kid-friendly” sugary cereals, but not so easy to find the cereals that provide decent nutrition without all the sugar and other undesirable Continue reading >>

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