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Celiac Disease And Low Blood Sugar

Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Celiac Disease And Diabetes

The estimated prevalence of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes is approximately 6%. Most patients with both conditions have asymptomatic celiac disease, or symptoms that may be confused for symptoms of their diabetes. For this reason, screening for celiac disease is recommended after a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, as well as counseling for the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes after a celiac disease diagnosis. Type 1 Diabetes In cases of type 1 diabetes, the immune system attacks and destroys the specialized cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. When the body can no longer produce sufficient insulin (a protein that regulates blood glucose concentration) the resulting chronically high glucose levels in the blood (hyperglycemia) cause blood vessel and nerve damage. This can lead to serious complications, such as: stroke, heart disease, kidney disease, and amputation. Symptoms for diabetes include: frequent urination, thirst, hunger, weight loss, dry mouth, and fatigue. The exact cause that starts the autoimmune reaction in type 1 diabetes is still not understood. There are genetic and environmental factors that can increase the risk of developing diabetes, as well as certain drugs that lead to the specific destruction of the beta cells. The condition is usually diagnosed in children or young adults, which is why it was once called juvenile diabetes. Diabetes is much easier to test for than celiac disease. A blood test, usually done after a period of fasting, measures how much glucose is in the blood. If it is over a certain threshold, the person has diabetes or pre-diabetes. If caught early enough, the autoantibodies (antibodies that attack the body) can be tested for before the patient actually has diabetes or pre-diabetes. Treating diabetes typic Continue reading >>

Gluten And Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

Gluten And Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

Although many people continue to buy gluten-free foods at grocery stores and restaurants, it appears the gluten-free trend is waning for those looking to lose weight or gain energy, according to Packaged Facts, a market research company. For those who have to restrict gluten for medical reasons, such as managing celiac disease, gluten-free foods are necessary. A key treatment for those with celiac disease, a recognized and diagnosable medical disorder, is to avoid gluten. But some celebrities and popular diet books have demonized gluten, elevating gluten-free diets to the mainstream. This exposure has led people with no medical reasons to attempt to eliminate gluten from their diets. “It’s caused a bit of hysteria,” says Pam Cureton, a registered dietitian at the Center for Celiac Research in Baltimore. Some people incorrectly associate a gluten-free diet as synonymous with choosing to restrict the amount of carbohydrate they eat. Consumers see the gluten-free label on packaging and assume it must be better. Often, however, the gluten-free food is lower in nutrients and higher in added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium, making it a less healthy choice for most people—especially for those with diabetes. Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance: What’s the Difference? Celiac disease, a chronic autoimmune intestinal disorder, affects about 1 percent of the general population. It’s about 8 percent more common among people with type 1 diabetes, according to the Celiac Disease Foundation. Celiac disease is characterized by intestinal damage, nutrient deficiencies, joint pain, severe fatigue, weakness, and infertility. Some people, however, have no obvious symptoms when they are diagnosed. Gluten sensitivity is more common than celiac disease. “It affects about 6 pe Continue reading >>

Balancing Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Balancing Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Have you ever stood in the middle of a see-saw, right over the center with one foot on each side? Trying hard not to put more weight on one side to keep it stable? Unless you are incredibly focused, it can be very difficult to keep a proper balance without one side touching the ground. The struggle is similar when trying to balance two medical conditions, such as diabetes and celiac disease. While each one has specific needs, they both need to stay balanced which can be hard to achieve. This article explains celiac disease and its relationship with diabetes. What is celiac disease? It’s a condition where the body recognizes gluten, a protein found in some foods, as a poison. The body tries to attack it to prevent it from being digested and entering into the bloodstream. When someone with celiac eats gluten (which is found in foods that are made with rye, wheat, or barley), the small intestines react by changing the lining. Normally, there are long, fingerlike structures that line our intestines that absorb the nutrients in the food that we eat. With celiac disease, those finger-like structures become flat to protect the body from absorbing the gluten. Additionally, the gut stops making digestive enzymes, to also prevent from any absorption. The image below gives a good illustration of what happens in the small intestines when gluten is eaten. The problem with this is that over time, it permanently damages the small intestines and prevents nutrients and vitamins from being absorbed. Long-term malabsorption can cause issues such as: Osteoporosis Anemia Infertility Organ disorders Delayed puberty Stunted growth Inability to gain weight Weak tooth enamel Seizures Depression Currently, 1 in 133 healthy people have celiac disease, and that number seems to be increasing. Bec Continue reading >>

New Diagnosed W/ Celiac Disease, Now Hypoglycemia?

New Diagnosed W/ Celiac Disease, Now Hypoglycemia?

New diagnosed w/ Celiac Disease, now Hypoglycemia? New diagnosed w/ Celiac Disease, now Hypoglycemia? I just have a quick question. I was recently diagnosed with Celiac Disease about 2 weeks ago after a confirmed biopsy and blood test. My Celiac Disease was fairly severe with almost total villi flattening. With this, I've also had a pacemaker put in last year, put on meds for low blood pressure this year and been diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy a couple months ago after a biopsy/tests were done. I am also seeing a Hematologist this months due to off and on anemia with low retic counts (bone marrow production of red blood cells). All and all, this has been a rough year for me at age 23. Over the course of this last year, I've had many hospital visits and about 50% of the time, they would tell me my blood sugar is low on the blood test results. I never thought anything of it, but last week I had another blood test come back showing a low random glucose of 2.9. My GP thinks I may have reactive hypoglycemia because this isn't the first it has been low after eating (probably 5 or 6 hospital documented cases). Anyways, my question is: Does anybody know if my Celiac's Disease could be causing this hypoglycemia or if low blood pressure could contribute to it? My GP thinks it is unrelated, but how can one 23 year old have so many "unrelated" issues? Also, she warned it is a precursor for Type 2 diabetes, which runs heavily in my family (all men on dad's side diagnosed with type 2 diabetes before 30). I am scared this is going to be my fate as well. I am 5'8" 155lbs and an active runner/weight lifter. Is it possible this is a prediabetes type symptom or more likely celiac related? Re: New diagnosed w/ Celiac Disease, now Hypoglycemia? Sorry I'm not an expert, but I can tell Continue reading >>

Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes

Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes

What is Type 1 Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects how your body uses blood sugar, called glucose. Glucose is the main source of energy for the brain and for the cells that make up muscle and tissue of the body. Type 1 diabetes, formerly known as juvenile diabetes, is an autoimmune condition that is usually diagnosed in children, teenagers and young adults. In this form of diabetes, the body does not make insulin, which is the hormone needed to get glucose from the bloodstream into cells. Only about 5 percent of people with diabetes have this form of the disease and although there is no cure, proper treatment can make this condition manageable. Common symptoms of diabetes include frequent urination, feeling very thirsty, hungry and tired, blurred vision, cuts and bruises that are slow to heal, weight loss, and tingling, pain or numbness in the hands and feet. What is the Connection between Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease? Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease are both immune-mediated conditions and share a similar genetic profile, resulting in a significant amount of overlap in patients Around 3-8 % of people with type 1 diabetes will have biopsy-confirmed celiac disease, so people with this condition would benefit from regular celiac disease screening Celiac disease associated with type 1 diabetes is usually asymptomatic (showing no symptoms) and may only be found upon screening Celiac disease and type 1 diabetes have many of the same signs and symptoms, such as abdominal pain, gas, bloating, malabsorption, weight loss, and abnormal liver function tests. This can cause celiac disease to be overlooked. Untreated celiac disease may contribute to irregular blood glucose levels Unexplained hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, can be a sign of malabsorption related to Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Coeliac Disease - Symptoms, Diagnosis, Coeliac In Children

Diabetes & Coeliac Disease - Symptoms, Diagnosis, Coeliac In Children

Diabetes and Coeliac Disease (Coeliac Sprue or Gluten Allergy) For coeliacs, gluten consumption can damage the lining of the small intestine Coeliac disease (also known as celiac disease) is a condition that occurs when the lining of the small intestine is damaged by gluten. Gluten has an adverse reaction that causes the immune system to attack the lining of the bowel. Gluten is a common protein that is found in: The damaged lining of the small intestine means that foods are not absorbed properly. Several groups are more at risk from developing celiac disease, and these include type 1 diabetics . What symptoms are common in coeliac disease? Like diabetes itself, coeliac disease can be diagnosed with no symptoms, and the symptoms can be extremely subtle. If symptoms are presented, they may include: Losing weight from an inability to absorb nutrients from food Children that are not growing at the expected rate for their age may also be presenting a sign of coeliac disease. In babies and young children , coeliac disease can cause them to gain weight, become paler, and be lethargic and unhappy. In children, coeliac disease often starts manifesting itself when cereals are introduced into the diet. All of the symptoms of coeliac disease can also be indicative of other conditions, so it is essential to seek professional diagnosis before jumping to any conclusions. However, if left untreated, coeliac disease can lead to bone disease, anaemia and even cancer. How large is the risk of coeliac disease in the UK? Recent research has found that coeliac disease affects approximately 1 in 300 people throughout the UK and Europe. In some areas of the world, coeliac disease is more prevalent. For instance, the West coast of Ireland has a high coeliac concentration with approximately 1 Continue reading >>

Wheat Intolerance & Hypoglycemia

Wheat Intolerance & Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia can be a side effect of wheat intolerance.Photo Credit: jeka1984/iStock/Getty Images Aglaee Jacob is a registered dietitian. She has experience working with people who have diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and obesity issues. Jacob obtained a bachelor of science and a master of science, both in nutrition, from Laval University in Quebec City, Canada. If your blood sugar levels drops too low, your body will send you signals. Shaking, sweating, feeling weak, dizzy or light-headed, being irritable, anxious or confused are all signs of a hypoglycemic reaction. Low blood sugar can happen even if you do not have diabetes. Consult your doctor if you regularly suffer from hypoglycemia to have some investigation and testing done to determine the source of your blood sugar lows. One of these tests should check for wheat intolerance, as it is one of the potential cause of your problem. Wheat intolerance is the result of a sensitivity to gluten. Celiac disease is a condition in which gluten exposure triggers an immune reaction and destroys the intestines, but gluten intolerance is actually more prevalent and can be responsible for symptoms that affect every part of your body. If you are gluten intolerant, you could have digestive issues, weight problems, autoimmune conditions like vitiligo, rheumatoid arthritis and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Hypoglycemia can also be a symptom of wheat or gluten intolerance, according to Dr. Stephen Wangen from the IBS Treatment Center in Seattle and author of "Healthier Without Wheat: A New Understanding of Wheat Allergies, Celiac Disease, and Non-Celiac Gluten Intolerance." If you are intolerant to wheat, you need to eliminate all foods made with this grain from your diet. Wheat is the most commonly used grain to prepare Continue reading >>

Information Paper On Hypoglycemia For Schools

Information Paper On Hypoglycemia For Schools

Does your child suffer any of the following symptoms: Itching and crawling sensation on the skin Foggybrain (such as in chronic fatigue syndrome) Bedwetting and hyperactivity (ADHD or ADD) in children If so, they may be suffering hypoglycemia (see explanation below), or they may simply benefit from following the rules of a hypoglycemic diet. It does not take a rocket scientist to determine that in general most of us are consuming far too much sugar, caffeine (chocolate and coffee) and refined carbohydrates in our diets. Food additives, flavourings, colourings and preservatives are also unwelcome additions to our diets, many of which are in specifically targeted food for children. For school aged children, this can mean low attention spans, poor memory, antisocial behaviour and poor grades. All of this can have a significant impact in the type of person your child will become at maturity. As a parent, you may gain benefit from your child becoming more focussed on their schooling and displaying a significant improvement in behaviour. You can help to achieve this with an accurate diagnosis of your childs medical condition, including foods that they should avoid. As an example, it has been shown in recent coeliac disease research (coeliac disease is an allergy to the gluten protein found in wheat, oats, barley and rye) that persons with undiagnosed gluten allergies are far less likely to obtain a university degree than the normal population, and far more likely to suffer from vitamin deficiencies, osteoporosis, iron deficient anaemia, irritable bowel syndrome and some intestinal cancers. If they remain undiagnosed, they are four times more likely to die at a younger age than the general population. Would you want such a bleak future for your child, when the answer could be Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Celiac Disease

What You Should Know About Celiac Disease

After years of living with Type 1 diabetes, you’re a pro at counting carbohydrates and adjusting insulin doses. Over the past year, however, your diabetes has become difficult to control. You’ve experienced weight loss, frequent bouts of diarrhea, and fatigue. You’ve also had fluctuating blood glucose levels – both hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia – and needed frequent insulin adjustments. You don’t know what’s wrong, and what’s worse, your doctor – make that doctors – can’t explain your symptoms, either. They’ve suggested everything from irritable bowel disease to depression, but nothing seems to help. Then one day, a friend mentions that a colleague of hers has a daughter who has Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, or intolerance to gluten. Her symptoms were similar to yours until her doctor put her on a special, gluten-free diet. Now she’s fine – as long as she doesn’t eat the wrong foods. You’ve never heard of celiac disease before, but you’re curious. What is this disease and what causes it? What foods are off-limits? Which are OK to eat? Most of all, how would giving up all gluten-containing foods affect your life and your diabetes control? Before you make another appointment with your doctor, you decide to do some research of your own. What is celiac disease? Celiac disease, sometimes called celiac sprue or gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is a hereditary, autoimmune disease in which the body launches an immune reaction when a person consumes gluten, a type of protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. For reasons still unknown to researchers, when people with celiac disease eat foods containing gluten, the immune system sees it as a toxin and launches an attack to prevent its absorption into the bloodstream. The effect of the attack is Continue reading >>

Gluten Sensitivity

Gluten Sensitivity

Diabetes and gluten sensitivity are both autoimmune diseases with some similar symptoms. People with gluten sensitivity cannot tolerate the protein in certain grains. Recent research revealed links between gluten sensitivity and diabetes. Gluten is found in grains such as wheat, barley and rye. Gluten sensitive people who eat them experience intestinal inflammation and irregular blood sugar. Treatment includes a gluten-free diet. Experts are learning more about gluten sensitivity and celiac disease. Gluten can trigger increased insulin production. This leads to imbalanced blood sugar, creating a link to diabetes. People with diabetes have high blood sugar levels. Use a blood glucose monitor regularly to determine whether your blood sugar is too high or too low. The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation helped fund a study conducted by the London School of Medicine and University of Cambridge. The study showed a genetic similarity between gluten insensitivity and diabetes. People with celiac disease should check their blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, watch for symptoms of gluten sensitivity but remember not all people with diabetes are sensitive to gluten. According to the ADA, abdominal pain is associated with gluten intolerance. If someone with celiac disease eats foods with gluten, the body reacts. It damages the small intestine and interferes with the absorption of nutrients in food. A gluten-free diet may help you feel better and prevent permanent damage to your body. Symptoms of gluten insensitivity can be similar to symptoms of diabetes including weight gain, depression, anxiety and hormonal imbalance. If you experience ongoing gastrointestinal upset or any of these symptoms, discuss gluten intolerance screening with your medical provider. Celiac disease Continue reading >>

Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Gluten is a protein found primarily in wheat. It is what gives bread its chewy texture. In Qubec, an estimated 76,000 people suffer from celiac disease or about 1% of the population. Among people with type 1 diabetes, however, the prevalence is between 4% and 9%, or about one in 25. Like type 1 diabetes, celiac disease is an autoimmune disease. In people with this disease, eating gluten triggers an abnormal reaction by the immune system, damaging the walls of the small intestine. This damage interferes with the absorption of such nutrients as iron, calcium, and some vitamins. Over the long term, nutritional deficiencies caused by the disease can lead to anemia (a deficiency in iron, folic acid or vitamin B12), osteoporosis (brittle bones due to a lack of calcium and vitamin D), fertility problems, and an increased risk of certain cancers. Although we do not yet understand all the mechanisms, recent research clearly demonstrates that people with type 1 diabetes are at greater risk of developing celiac disease. Sufferers can experience a wide range of symptoms. The most common are: In some cases, celiac disease is silent; that is, there are no symptoms. In other cases, sufferers develop dermatitis herpetiformis, an intense burning and itching rash characterized by blisters on the elbows, knees, buttocks and upper back. Genetic factors have been associated with celiac disease. Whats more, the likelihood of developing the disease climbs to 10% if an immediate family member (parent, sibling) has the disease. People suffering from another autoimmune disease (type 1 diabetes, thyroid disease) or Down syndrome are also more at risk. However, genes do not account for everything. The mechanisms that trigger the onset of symptoms are still poorly understood. In some cases, stress Continue reading >>

Connections Between Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Connections Between Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Daniel Leffler, M.D., is director of research at the Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and is an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. He divides his time between patient care and research in celiac disease and other digestive disorders. A recipient of a National Institutes of Health career development grant, he is also a medical advisor to the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness. He is the co-author of Real Life with Celiac Disease: Troubleshooting and Thriving Gluten Free. In this article, he answers reader questions about the link between celiac disease and diabetes. What are the connections between celiac disease and diabetes? We first have to distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Type 1 diabetes is early onset and is an autoimmune disease that develops typically in children and adolescents. Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in adults, is not an autoimmune disease, and is associated with obesity, high cholesterol and related disorders collectively known as “metabolic syndrome.” Type 1 diabetes is highly linked to celiac disease on a genetic level, and 5 to 10 percent of people with type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease. Because celiac disease is usually diagnosed later in life, it is most common to have diabetes first. It’s quite uncommon for someone to be diagnosed with celiac disease first and then develop type 1 diabetes, unless the person is diagnosed with celiac disease very young. In contrast, we don’t know a lot about type 2 diabetes and celiac disease. Our group just published a research study that shows those with celiac disease are much less likely to get type 2 diabetes compared to people without celiac disease. This was an unexpected finding and to our knowledge is the first study lo Continue reading >>

Tips For Treating Your Patients With Type 1 Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Tips For Treating Your Patients With Type 1 Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Tips for Treating Your Patients with Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease celiac disease , Clinical Dietitian , diabetes , type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. Individually, they each require a high level of knowledge and vigilance to manage. Counting carbs, reading labels, buying specialty foods, doctor visits, deciphering food additives, you name it. Now imagine combining the two conditions. Carb counting just got a lot more complicated. The Link Between Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease Both Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease are classified as autoimmune disorders, which means a persons own body is attacking itself in some capacity. For Type 1 diabetes, the body has destroyed the beta cells on the pancreas, which produce insulin. And for celiac disease, the body attacks its own small intestine when gluten is consumed, resulting in damage to the intestinal lining. So whats the connection between Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease? According to the Celiac Disease Foundation (CDF), having one autoimmune disorder puts you at increased risk for developing another.The incidence of celiac disease in individuals with Type 1 diabetes is six to ten times higher than in the general population.For this reason, CDF recommends screening for celiac disease in all patients who have been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, even if they are asymptomatic because many of the symptoms of celiac disease can easily be mistaken for complications of Type 1 diabetes: What to Know When Treating a Patient with Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease If it werent enough of a challenge to count and balance intake of carbohydrates and remove all traces of gluten from ones diet, now you are tasked with helping your clients do both at the same time. Here are some tips to remember: Even if a pa Continue reading >>

Celiac And Hypoglycemia

Celiac And Hypoglycemia

Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease 09/30/2015 This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc. Subscribe to Celiac.com'sFREE weekly eNewsletter What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes I was wondering if anyone else suffers from feelings of low blood sugar? When I first went gluten free about 2 months ago my feelings of low blood sugar went away but they are starting to come back. Anyone have this? or have any advice on getting it more under control? In my experience it was yeast overgrowth. I had bad boughts of it until I started taking Candex and probiotics everyday. Interest Continue reading >>

Anyone Suffered With Low Blood Sugar (hypos) As A Symptom Of Coeliac Disease?

Anyone Suffered With Low Blood Sugar (hypos) As A Symptom Of Coeliac Disease?

Anyone suffered with low blood sugar (Hypos) as a symptom of Coeliac disease? One of my main symptoms of Coeliac is/was hypoglycaemia. Just wondering if anyone else has had the same or similar/. Got them a lot before I went gluten free......I just make sure I eat regular....and if I'm going out I carry a eat natural bar in my handbag...got them under control now....scared me at first before I knew what they were......I find a yogurt and a banana mid afternoon help stop them... I have had so many tests now regarding the diagnosis of Coeliac. I have recently been told by a specialist that I do not have Coeliac disease but I am gluten intolerant (my GP says I am neither!!) The reason why I am replying is that since all this began (3ish yrs ago) I have been suffering with hypo's. If i go more than 3hrs without food I feel one coming on and it take a good hour or so to get myself feeling right again.... I did suffer really badly but I have them under control now. The biggest change for me was taking ALL sugars and fruit (because of fruit sugars) out of my diet. A steady drip, drip of high protein, medium fat, low complex carbs helped/ helps me. I got the all-clear on Reactive Hypoglycemia in Feb this year. All the symptoms disappeared all of a sudden. My endocrinologist put this down, possibly, to having had a small intenstine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) which can disrupt food uptake in the intestine. He said that the course of anti-biotics I'd had for a chest infection could have cleared up the SIBO too. However, the reason for my 'cure' was never followed up. I would say if you are having ongoing problems it is worth researching. My endo said SIBO was common in coeliacs. Thanks for all the replies. My hypo's were solved by cutting out gluten. Now I'm on a gluten free diet Continue reading >>

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