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Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Balancing Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Balancing Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Have you ever stood in the middle of a see-saw, right over the center with one foot on each side? Trying hard not to put more weight on one side to keep it stable? Unless you are incredibly focused, it can be very difficult to keep a proper balance without one side touching the ground. The struggle is similar when trying to balance two medical conditions, such as diabetes and celiac disease. While each one has specific needs, they both need to stay balanced which can be hard to achieve. This article explains celiac disease and its relationship with diabetes. What is celiac disease? It’s a condition where the body recognizes gluten, a protein found in some foods, as a poison. The body tries to attack it to prevent it from being digested and entering into the bloodstream. When someone with celiac eats gluten (which is found in foods that are made with rye, wheat, or barley), the small intestines react by changing the lining. Normally, there are long, fingerlike structures that line our intestines that absorb the nutrients in the food that we eat. With celiac disease, those finger-like structures become flat to protect the body from absorbing the gluten. Additionally, the gut stops making digestive enzymes, to also prevent from any absorption. The image below gives a good illustration of what happens in the small intestines when gluten is eaten. The problem with this is that over time, it permanently damages the small intestines and prevents nutrients and vitamins from being absorbed. Long-term malabsorption can cause issues such as: Osteoporosis Anemia Infertility Organ disorders Delayed puberty Stunted growth Inability to gain weight Weak tooth enamel Seizures Depression Currently, 1 in 133 healthy people have celiac disease, and that number seems to be increasing. Bec Continue reading >>

Eating Right With Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Eating Right With Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Managing diabetes means monitoring your carbohydrate intake to help prevent spikes in your blood sugar levels. An additional diagnosis of celiac disease adds another layer of complexity to eating. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which people cannot tolerate gluten.1 Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye—it helps dough rise and keep its shape and texture. Treatment of celiac includes eating a gluten-free diet. Common foods that are made with gluten include:2 pasta; bread; cereal; beverages such as beer; couscous; tortillas; crackers; cookies, cakes, muffins, and pastries; dressings, sauces, and gravies; and wheat-based flours such as white flour, wheat flour, kamut, semolina, spelt, and wheat bran. This list might seem overwhelming, but there are a variety of gluten-free versions of popular foods such as bread, pasta, and crackers that can be found in your local grocery store. For people with celiac and diabetes, however, it is important to consider the carb count—especially because many gluten-free foods are made with flours that contain less fiber and have a higher glycemic index. The golden rule? Get in the habit of checking the labels of anything you put in your mouth or on your skin (for both gluten and carbs). Hide-and-Seek with Gluten Labels can sometimes be deceiving. Just because something is labeled as “wheat-free” does not mean it is gluten-free. Always examine labels for buzz words such as wheat, barley, or rye, and if you have any questions, contact the manufacturer directly before eating. Certain additives in packaged foods contain traces of gluten—ask your healthcare provider or a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) who specializes in celiac disease for a complete list of unsafe ingredients and foods. It is also impo Continue reading >>

Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Celiac Disease And Diabetes

The estimated prevalence of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes is approximately 6%. Most patients with both conditions have asymptomatic celiac disease, or symptoms that may be confused for symptoms of their diabetes. For this reason, screening for celiac disease is recommended after a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, as well as counseling for the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes after a celiac disease diagnosis. Type 1 Diabetes In cases of type 1 diabetes, the immune system attacks and destroys the specialized cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. When the body can no longer produce sufficient insulin (a protein that regulates blood glucose concentration) the resulting chronically high glucose levels in the blood (hyperglycemia) cause blood vessel and nerve damage. This can lead to serious complications, such as: stroke, heart disease, kidney disease, and amputation. Symptoms for diabetes include: frequent urination, thirst, hunger, weight loss, dry mouth, and fatigue. The exact cause that starts the autoimmune reaction in type 1 diabetes is still not understood. There are genetic and environmental factors that can increase the risk of developing diabetes, as well as certain drugs that lead to the specific destruction of the beta cells. The condition is usually diagnosed in children or young adults, which is why it was once called juvenile diabetes. Diabetes is much easier to test for than celiac disease. A blood test, usually done after a period of fasting, measures how much glucose is in the blood. If it is over a certain threshold, the person has diabetes or pre-diabetes. If caught early enough, the autoantibodies (antibodies that attack the body) can be tested for before the patient actually has diabetes or pre-diabetes. Treating diabetes typic Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Coeliac Disease - Symptoms, Diagnosis, Coeliac In Children

Diabetes & Coeliac Disease - Symptoms, Diagnosis, Coeliac In Children

Diabetes and Coeliac Disease (Coeliac Sprue or Gluten Allergy) For coeliacs, gluten consumption can damage the lining of the small intestine Coeliac disease (also known as celiac disease) is a condition that occurs when the lining of the small intestine is damaged by gluten. Gluten has an adverse reaction that causes the immune system to attack the lining of the bowel. Gluten is a common protein that is found in: The damaged lining of the small intestine means that foods are not absorbed properly. Several groups are more at risk from developing celiac disease, and these include type 1 diabetics . What symptoms are common in coeliac disease? Like diabetes itself, coeliac disease can be diagnosed with no symptoms, and the symptoms can be extremely subtle. If symptoms are presented, they may include: Losing weight from an inability to absorb nutrients from food Children that are not growing at the expected rate for their age may also be presenting a sign of coeliac disease. In babies and young children , coeliac disease can cause them to gain weight, become paler, and be lethargic and unhappy. In children, coeliac disease often starts manifesting itself when cereals are introduced into the diet. All of the symptoms of coeliac disease can also be indicative of other conditions, so it is essential to seek professional diagnosis before jumping to any conclusions. However, if left untreated, coeliac disease can lead to bone disease, anaemia and even cancer. How large is the risk of coeliac disease in the UK? Recent research has found that coeliac disease affects approximately 1 in 300 people throughout the UK and Europe. In some areas of the world, coeliac disease is more prevalent. For instance, the West coast of Ireland has a high coeliac concentration with approximately 1 Continue reading >>

Tips For Treating Your Patients With Type 1 Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Tips For Treating Your Patients With Type 1 Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Tips for Treating Your Patients with Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease celiac disease , Clinical Dietitian , diabetes , type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. Individually, they each require a high level of knowledge and vigilance to manage. Counting carbs, reading labels, buying specialty foods, doctor visits, deciphering food additives, you name it. Now imagine combining the two conditions. Carb counting just got a lot more complicated. The Link Between Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease Both Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease are classified as autoimmune disorders, which means a persons own body is attacking itself in some capacity. For Type 1 diabetes, the body has destroyed the beta cells on the pancreas, which produce insulin. And for celiac disease, the body attacks its own small intestine when gluten is consumed, resulting in damage to the intestinal lining. So whats the connection between Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease? According to the Celiac Disease Foundation (CDF), having one autoimmune disorder puts you at increased risk for developing another.The incidence of celiac disease in individuals with Type 1 diabetes is six to ten times higher than in the general population.For this reason, CDF recommends screening for celiac disease in all patients who have been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, even if they are asymptomatic because many of the symptoms of celiac disease can easily be mistaken for complications of Type 1 diabetes: What to Know When Treating a Patient with Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease If it werent enough of a challenge to count and balance intake of carbohydrates and remove all traces of gluten from ones diet, now you are tasked with helping your clients do both at the same time. Here are some tips to remember: Even if a pa Continue reading >>

Connections Between Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Connections Between Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Daniel Leffler, M.D., is director of research at the Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and is an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. He divides his time between patient care and research in celiac disease and other digestive disorders. A recipient of a National Institutes of Health career development grant, he is also a medical advisor to the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness. He is the co-author of Real Life with Celiac Disease: Troubleshooting and Thriving Gluten Free. In this article, he answers reader questions about the link between celiac disease and diabetes. What are the connections between celiac disease and diabetes? We first have to distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Type 1 diabetes is early onset and is an autoimmune disease that develops typically in children and adolescents. Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in adults, is not an autoimmune disease, and is associated with obesity, high cholesterol and related disorders collectively known as “metabolic syndrome.” Type 1 diabetes is highly linked to celiac disease on a genetic level, and 5 to 10 percent of people with type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease. Because celiac disease is usually diagnosed later in life, it is most common to have diabetes first. It’s quite uncommon for someone to be diagnosed with celiac disease first and then develop type 1 diabetes, unless the person is diagnosed with celiac disease very young. In contrast, we don’t know a lot about type 2 diabetes and celiac disease. Our group just published a research study that shows those with celiac disease are much less likely to get type 2 diabetes compared to people without celiac disease. This was an unexpected finding and to our knowledge is the first study lo Continue reading >>

Eat A Gluten-free Diet For Type 2 Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Eat A Gluten-free Diet For Type 2 Diabetes And Celiac Disease

(NaturalNews) New research finds that almost one in four adolescents in the United States have diabetes or pre-diabetes, according to The New York Times. These are not children with juvenile diabetes but full-on type 2 diabetes. More than 25 million adults already have diabetes and 79 million may have prediabetes, yet few people consider a diabetes diet. There is a definite correlation between diet and diabetes symptoms. Studies suggest that eating a gluten-free diet without dairy could be good for diabetes and celiac disease, a condition characterized by an allergy to gluten. Diabetes and celiac The only treatment for celiac disease is following a gluten-free diet. Gluten is a protein found in most grains, including wheat, barely and rye. Adopting a gluten-free diet relieves symptoms in people with celiac and those who are sensitive to gluten, yet a study published in Diabetologia journal reports that diabetics should consider a gluten-free diet too. The study observed people with type 2 diabetes on the Paleo diet versus the Mediterranean diet. The Paleo diet calls for no grains, no dairy, no salt. It recommends fruits, vegetables, nuts, seafood and lean meats. The diet is based on how early man ate and discourages any processed foods. The Mediterranean diet also allows fruits, vegetables, seafood and lean meats. The main difference is that the Mediterranean diet recommends unrefined grains, such as whole grain products. A little dairy is also acceptable on the diet. The results of this study found that people on the Mediterranean diet had very little, if any, improvement in diabetes symptoms. The group who followed the Paleo diet experienced a reverse in diabetes symptoms, showing a clear correlation between a gluten-free diet and diabetes. The Mediterranean group exp Continue reading >>

Should I Screen My Child For Type 1 Diabetes And Celiac Disease?

Should I Screen My Child For Type 1 Diabetes And Celiac Disease?

I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when I was 10 years old. No one in my family had ever been diagnosed with an autoimmune disease, and my parents could not have foreseen that their little girl would end up comatose in an emergency room with blood glucose levels 10 times the normal level. But what if there had been a way for my parents to know I was at risk for Type 1 diabetes? Would they have been overcome with worry? Would they have parented differently? Twenty years after my diabetes diagnosis I gave birth to the first of my two children. Curiosity about my kids’ futures with potential autoimmune diseases came along with the packages of diapers, but we agreed early on that we were not going to succumb to fear or worry. My husband and I have always felt that we’d be well-equipped to face diabetes if it came our way. Many parents I know with diabetes themselves, or who have one child with diabetes, occasionally check the blood sugar level of a particularly thirsty non-diabetic toddler or a seems-sleepier-than-usual non-diabetic sibling. But there is no palm reading for as-of-yet unpricked fingers. I can’t sit around worrying for what may or may not happen. I am sure I will see the symptoms if they appear. I’m sure I’m equipped to handle a diagnosis. Why put myself or my kid through unnecessary worry, stress, or pain? Unless something might be done to catch it earlier. That’s where TrialNet, an international network of researchers who are exploring ways to prevent, delay and reverse the progression of Type 1 diabetes, comes in. I remember over 20 years ago when a researcher came into my hospital room and offered to screen my older brother for Type 1 diabetes. He was 16 and decided that he didn’t want to be screened and didn’t want to know. I respected Continue reading >>

Gluten And Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

Gluten And Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

Although many people continue to buy gluten-free foods at grocery stores and restaurants, it appears the gluten-free trend is waning for those looking to lose weight or gain energy, according to Packaged Facts, a market research company. For those who have to restrict gluten for medical reasons, such as managing celiac disease, gluten-free foods are necessary. A key treatment for those with celiac disease, a recognized and diagnosable medical disorder, is to avoid gluten. But some celebrities and popular diet books have demonized gluten, elevating gluten-free diets to the mainstream. This exposure has led people with no medical reasons to attempt to eliminate gluten from their diets. “It’s caused a bit of hysteria,” says Pam Cureton, a registered dietitian at the Center for Celiac Research in Baltimore. Some people incorrectly associate a gluten-free diet as synonymous with choosing to restrict the amount of carbohydrate they eat. Consumers see the gluten-free label on packaging and assume it must be better. Often, however, the gluten-free food is lower in nutrients and higher in added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium, making it a less healthy choice for most people—especially for those with diabetes. Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance: What’s the Difference? Celiac disease, a chronic autoimmune intestinal disorder, affects about 1 percent of the general population. It’s about 8 percent more common among people with type 1 diabetes, according to the Celiac Disease Foundation. Celiac disease is characterized by intestinal damage, nutrient deficiencies, joint pain, severe fatigue, weakness, and infertility. Some people, however, have no obvious symptoms when they are diagnosed. Gluten sensitivity is more common than celiac disease. “It affects about 6 pe Continue reading >>

Gluten Sensitivity

Gluten Sensitivity

Diabetes and gluten sensitivity are both autoimmune diseases with some similar symptoms. People with gluten sensitivity cannot tolerate the protein in certain grains. Recent research revealed links between gluten sensitivity and diabetes. Gluten is found in grains such as wheat, barley and rye. Gluten sensitive people who eat them experience intestinal inflammation and irregular blood sugar. Treatment includes a gluten-free diet. Experts are learning more about gluten sensitivity and celiac disease. Gluten can trigger increased insulin production. This leads to imbalanced blood sugar, creating a link to diabetes. People with diabetes have high blood sugar levels. Use a blood glucose monitor regularly to determine whether your blood sugar is too high or too low. The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation helped fund a study conducted by the London School of Medicine and University of Cambridge. The study showed a genetic similarity between gluten insensitivity and diabetes. People with celiac disease should check their blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, watch for symptoms of gluten sensitivity but remember not all people with diabetes are sensitive to gluten. According to the ADA, abdominal pain is associated with gluten intolerance. If someone with celiac disease eats foods with gluten, the body reacts. It damages the small intestine and interferes with the absorption of nutrients in food. A gluten-free diet may help you feel better and prevent permanent damage to your body. Symptoms of gluten insensitivity can be similar to symptoms of diabetes including weight gain, depression, anxiety and hormonal imbalance. If you experience ongoing gastrointestinal upset or any of these symptoms, discuss gluten intolerance screening with your medical provider. Celiac disease Continue reading >>

Celiac Disease And Type I Diabetes Linked

Celiac Disease And Type I Diabetes Linked

“The presence of autoantibodies against tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) implies that celiac disease was present already at the time of Type 1 diabetes onset in all children having both diseases,” he said. “Hence, celiac disease may precede and cause Type 1 diabetes in children with both diseases.” The researchers suggest that a “change in diet in individuals with genetic susceptibility may reduce the risk of developing Type 1 diabetes.” They add that “all Type 1 diabetes children and their siblings should be routinely screened for celiac disease-related antibodies.” Source: Gluten Free Society’s Stance: Gluten sensitivity is the only 100% confirmed cause of any autoimmune disease. Type 1 diabetes, like celiac disease, is an autoimmune disease. The HLA-DQ genotype risks for type 1 diabetes (juvenile diabetes) are the same for celiac disease. Gluten Free Society suggests that anyone who has a diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes without a diagnosis of celiac disease avoid gluten and other grain based foods. Remember the basis of how genes work. Gluten positive HLA-DQ genes means that you should avoid grain to prevent the onset of illness. Having the positive HLA-DQ genes for type I diabetes or celiac disease does not mean that you will develop these conditions. However; gluten positive genes are related to over 190 conditions. Diabetes and celiac disease are just 2 diseases in a long list of problems that can develop. If you are confused on this issue, we highly recommend you watch this video on gluten sensitivity. If you have been diagnosed with Type I diabetes and want to determine your HLA-DQ genotype, click here. Gluten Free Warrior Commentary Continue reading >>

The Link Between Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes

The Link Between Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes

Home The Link Between Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes The Link Between Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Managing type 1 diabetes is old hat to 31-year-old Catherine Oddenino. The New Yorker has had the disease since she was 11, and is adept at counting carbohydrates and dosing insulin. But in her mid-20s she was thrown a curveball. Whenever she ate something, she felt like she had food poisoning. After a visit to her doctor, she cut dairy from her diet . But she was also sent to a gastroenterologist who, tipped off by the fact that she had diabetes, immediately tested her for celiac disease . Two weeks later and it was official: the culprit of her poisoning was gluten, not dairy. Now, on top of being keenly aware of how many carbohydrates are in each of her meals and how that will affect her blood sugar levels, Oddenino has to make sure not a speck of gluten is in the food she eats. Oddenino is by no means the only one living with this dietary juggling act. Study results vary but, according to the American Diabetes Association, an estimated one in 20 type 1 diabetics also has celiac disease. In contrast, the rate in the general population is one in 100. Diabetes and celiac disease are auto-immune disorders, along with some thyroid diseases , multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, among others. This means an overactive immune system causes the body to attack its own cells. The science is still emerging to explain how type 1 diabetes and celiac disease are related. According to Dr. Alessio Fasano, medical director of the Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland, there are two schools of thought: first, the diseases share common genes. A study published inThe New England Journal of Medicine in 2008 found almost every gene associated with celiac Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Diets: American Diabetes Association

Gluten-free Diets: American Diabetes Association

Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, barley and all foods that are made with these grains. Celiac disease is a digestivedisorder. When someone with celiac disease eats foodcontaining gluten, their body reacts by damaging the small intestine.Uncomfortable symptoms such as abdominal pain often occur. The damage tothe small intestinealso interferes with the body's ability to make use of the nutrients in food. About 1% of the total population has celiac disease. It is more common in people with type 1 diabetes. An estimated 10% of people with type 1 also have celiac. The only way to manage celiac disease is to completely avoid all foods that have gluten. Following a gluten-free diet will prevent permanent damage to your body and will help you feel better. There are also many people who are said to have a gluten intolerance. When these people eat foods that contain gluten, they also experience uncomfortable symptoms. However, they test negative for celiac disease and actual damage to their small intestine does not occur. More research about gluten intolerance is needed, but avoiding foods with gluten should help to relieve these symptoms. Taking gluten out of your diet can be a difficult and frustrating change to make in your life, especially if you already feel limited by your diabetes. But there are many people who do it, and so can you! Gluten-Free Recipes for People with Diabetes Are you going gluten-free? If so, then this book is your guide to living a gluten-free (and taste-filled) lifestyle. Complete with recipes, meal plans, strategies, and tips, you wont need anything else to start feeling better and eating healthy. You can find resources and organizations that deal specifically with gluten-free issues by searching for "gluten-free" or "celiac disease" in your Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes In Celiac Disease: Prevalence And Effect On Clinical And Histological Presentation

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes In Celiac Disease: Prevalence And Effect On Clinical And Histological Presentation

Abstract Association between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes in adults is still somewhat unclear, and that between celiac disease and type 2 diabetes even less known. We studied these issues in a large cohort of adult celiac disease patients. The prevalence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in 1358 celiac patients was compared with the population-based values. Furthermore, patients with celiac disease and concomitant type 1 or type 2 diabetes and those with celiac disease only underwent comparisons of clinical and histological features and adherence to gluten-free diet. The prevalence of type 1 diabetes (men/women) was 8.0 % /1.8 % in celiac patients and 0.7 % /0.3 % in the population, and that of type 2 diabetes 4.3 % /2.5 % and 4.4 % /3.0 %, respectively. Celiac patients with concomitant type 1 diabetes were younger (45 years vs 65 years and 52 years, P < 0.001) and more often screen-detected (43 % vs 13 % and 14 %, P < 0.001), had less other gastrointestinal diseases (8 % vs 40 % and 25 %, P = 0.028), more thyroidal diseases (18 % vs 16 % and 13 %, P = 0.043) and lower dietary adherence (71 % vs 95 % and 96 %, P < 0.001) compared with celiac patients with concomitant type 2 diabetes and patients with celiac disease only. Patients with concomitant type 2 diabetes had more hypercholesterolemia than the other groups (8 % vs 6 % and 4 %, P = 0.024), and both diabetes groups more hypertension (47 % and 31 % vs 15 %, P < 0.001) and coronary artery disease (29 % and 18 % vs 3 %, P < 0.001) than the patients with celiac disease only. Type 1 diabetes was markedly overrepresented in celiac disease, especially in men, whereas the prevalence of type 2 diabetes was comparable with the population. Concomitant type 1 or type 2 diabetes predisposes celiac patients to severe co-morbid Continue reading >>

Did You Know? Celiac Disease More Common In People With Type 1 Diabetes

Did You Know? Celiac Disease More Common In People With Type 1 Diabetes

Ever wonder what your providers are testing for when they are doing blood tests? Testing for celiac disease is popular for those with T1D, since symptoms often go unnoticed and those diagnosed with T1D may be at a higher risk. What is Celiac Disease? Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder that causes damage to the villi of the small intestine. The villi of the small intestine are hair-like structures that are used to absorb nutrients as they travel through the digestive system. CD is generally discovered through symptoms of malabsorption including diarrhea, abdominal pain, iron deficiency, fatigue, and weight loss—although many people who have CD do not display symptoms. The cause of CD can be influenced by both genetic and environmental factors, similar to type 1 diabetes (T1D). The main treatment for CD is avoiding intake of gluten, a type of protein found in bread (described further below). The prevalence of CD is between 1% and 2% of the total population of North America, South America, the Middle East, North Africa, and Asia. The disease incidence is between 10% and 15% for people with first-degree relatives who have it or for people with another autoimmune diseases (Yap, 2015). Recent studies have shown an increase in prevalence in certain parts of the world, particularly North America and Europe. Although diagnosed cases are increasing, there are estimates of extremely high numbers of undiagnosed cases as well. The prevalence of people with a dual diagnosis of T1D and CD has been reported to be up to 20% depending on the location of the study. A recent Question of the Day answered by 524 people on Glu suggests that the co-prevalence of T1D and CD in our community is about 11 percent. What is Gluten? Gluten is a molecule that can be found in several grain Continue reading >>

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