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Celebrities With Type 1 Diabetes Uk

Tv Presenter Dominic Littlewood: How Type 1 Diabetes Nearly Killed Me Twice

Tv Presenter Dominic Littlewood: How Type 1 Diabetes Nearly Killed Me Twice

Television presenter and consumer journalist Dominic Littlewood is best known for hosting Cowboy Builders and Cowboy Traders with Melinda Messenger, as well as being a regular on BBC1’s The One Show. Here Dominic, who is 48, single, and lives in London, reveals how he has come close to death from type 1 diabetes. I remember the exact day I was diagnosed with diabetes – August 11, 1975. I was 10 and holidaying in Devon with my parents and brothers and sisters when I became dangerously ill. My weight dropped to 4st and my mother knew something was seriously wrong. Initially, she thought I was dying of leukaemia. My dad suggested taking me to a local hospital but Mum insisted we rushed back to Essex, where we lived, because if I were admitted to hospital, at least they’d be nearby. I’ll never forget the journey home. The traffic was horrendous, there was a heatwave so the car was stifling, and it took an agonising eight hours. Unknowingly, my parents were making my then-undiagnosed diabetes worse because they kept giving me fruit and drinks, thinking they were full of goodness. But they were full of sugar and sent my blood sugar levels soaring. When we got home my parents called a doctor who, unbelievably, diagnosed constipation and prescribed laxatives. But Mum wasn’t happy and took me to A&E where I was diagnosed properly. Sometimes a major illness can trigger diabetes and I’d just got over chickenpox, so perhaps that played a part. But I reached hospital just in time because my parents were told I probably wouldn’t have lasted the night. I was given drugs via drips, but these caused terrifying hallucinations. I thought people entering my room were evil and out to harm or kill me. I stayed in hospital for two weeks, whereas now people diagnosed with diabete Continue reading >>

Celebrities With Diabetes

Celebrities With Diabetes

Several celebrities have been diagnosed with diabetes and have continued to succeed in their high-profile careers. Wasim Akram, Steve Redgrave, Rob Green,Dom Littlewood, Christopher Biggins, Halle Berry, Patti Labelle to name a few...read their stories below. John Prescott, Tom Hanks, Emily Lilly, Salma Hayek, Nick Jonas, Randy Jackson, Vanessa Williams, Chaka Khan, Aretha Franklin, Jimmy Tarbuk Christopher Biggins- TV personality has Type 2 Diabetes Christopher Biggins, 61, was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes three years ago, after starting to feel unwell. How does he manage the demands of his diabetes with those of his work and life.? With heightened awareness, good knowledge and organisation, he keeps his diabetes under control and still lives the life he desires. Dom Littlewood- TV Presenter has Type 1 Diabetes From scuba diving to dancing, water skiing to flying how does Dom Littlewood control his diabetes to enable him to get the best out of life? When television presenter Dominic Littlewood travels anywhere, one of the first things he packs is his insulin. Diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes 33 years ago, the daily injections he has to give himself have become as much a part of his routine as brushing his teeth. Read his story He makes glucose monitoring and diabetes management an integral part of his life, allowing him to maximise freedom- fun- elsewhere. (The Independant 2010) Wasim Akram- Pakistan International Cricketer has Type1 diabetes In 1997, Pakistan's famous all-rounder Wasim Akram was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Wasim Akram blames the onset of his diabetes due to stress during his career. Read Wasim Akrams transcript. The subsequent diagnosis was a big blow to him. Though he eventually come to terms with it, it was his wife, Huma, who hastened the proce Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Coeliac disease is more common in people who have Type 1 diabetes If you have coeliac disease and Type 1 diabetes, you should get guidance from a dietitian about how to manage your diet. Coeliac disease is more common in people who have Type 1 diabetes because they are both autoimmune diseases. Between 4 and 9% of people with Type 1 diabetes will also have coeliac disease. There is no increased risk of coeliac disease in people with Type 2 diabetes. Diagnosis For most people, Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed before coeliac disease, although it can happen the other way around. Some people with Type 1 diabetes appear to have mild or no obvious symptoms of coeliac disease, but their gut lining will still be damaged when they eat gluten. Coeliac disease can be missed in people with Type 1 diabetes as the symptoms of ill health can be attributed to the diabetes. When coeliac disease is diagnosed before diabetes, the symptoms of diabetes tend to be more severe and there is a higher likelihood of other autoimmune diseases.1 Recurrent hypoglycaemia can be a sign of coeliac disease in people with Type 1 diabetes.2 In children, having diabetes and growth problems may mean they also have coeliac disease.3 Some people with Type 1 diabetes may test negative for coeliac disease early in their diagnosis, but then positive at a later stage. British Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (BSPGHAN) recommended that children with Type 1 diabetes should be retested after three years or if symptoms occur. However, we would refer to the updated NICE guidelines which recommend that people with Type 1 diabetes should be tested for coeliac disease at diagnosis and retested if any symptoms of coeliac disease develop. If you have concerns speak with your GP. How coeliac dise Continue reading >>

Famous People & Celebrities With Diabetes

Famous People & Celebrities With Diabetes

Tweet With an ever increasing number of people developing type 1 and type 2 diabetes, it has never been more important to look to role models in order to gain insight and inspiration. It is often easy to look at celebrities assuming that their lives consist exclusively of wining, dining and socialising. However, many high flying celebrities, sportsmen and socialites actually have diabetes yet never appear to allow having this condition interfere with their aspirations, goals and ambitions. It is for these reasons that they are such great role models to many people with the condition. Below are just a handful of the celebrities, sportsmen, politicians and socialites who have diabetes yet have not let the condition hold them back from attaining their goals and dreams. Pioneers of diabetes As well as the celebrities listed below, there are numerous individuals, whom are considered pioneers - for either their contribution to diabetes research and understanding or those whose resiliance is positively uplifting. See the complete list of diabetes pioneers. If there any celebrities or pioneers you'd like us to profile, let us know. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid so Continue reading >>

Famous People With Diabetes

Famous People With Diabetes

Diabetes is a pain, but it doesn’t have to stop you from achieving your greatest ambitions. Here are over 200 people with diabetes that have risen to the very top of their respective fields. If you have someone to add, please post a link in the comments! Jack Benny, 1950s television host, type 1 Wilford Brimley, of television and films, “Cocoon” and “The Firm”, type 2 Delta Burke, of television’s “Designing Women”, type 2 James Cagney, producer, director and actor, type not known Drew Carey, comedian, type 2 Nell Carter, of the television show “Gimme a Break”, type 2 Dick Clark, host of “American Bandstand”, type 2 Paula Deen, television chef, type 2 Dale Evans, actress, singer and wife of Roy Rogers, type 2 Stephen Furst, actor on the television shows “St. Elsewhere” and “Babylon 5”, type 2 Victor Garber, “Alias”, type 1 Jackie Gleason, funny star of “The Honeymooners”, type 2 Tom Hanks, type 2 Salma Hayek, gestational diabetes Gabriel Iglesias, American comedian, actor, writer, producer and voice actor, type 2 Randy Jackson of “American Idol”, type 2 Gordon Jump, actor on “WKRP in Cincinnati”, type 2 Larry King, “Larry King Live”, type 2 Mabel King, actress who played Mama on “What’s Happening”, type not known Jerry Lewis, comedian, type 1 George Lucas, creator of Star Wars Saga, type 2 Marcello Mastroianni, actor who appeared in 142 films, type not known Jerry Mathers, actor of “Leave It To Beaver” fame, type 2 Richard Mulligan, actor on the television show “Empty Nest”, type not known Minnie Pearl, entertainer, actress on the variety show “Hee Haw”, type 2 Aida Turturro, plays Tony’s sister on the Sopranos, type 2 Ehster Rolle, actress on the TV Show “Good Times”, type not known George C. Sc Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Week: 5 Celebrities Living With Type 2 Diabetes

National Diabetes Week: 5 Celebrities Living With Type 2 Diabetes

This week is National Diabetes Week, an issue affecting families across the UK with 3.5 million people diagnosed in Britain alone. We’re taking a look at some famous faces living with the disease and how Exante Diet can help prevent the one celebrity trend you won’t want to follow. 1. Tom Hanks He might be a major Hollywood star, but Tom Hanks admits he was “a total idiot” when it came to his unhealthy lifestyle, which he believes led to a Type-2 diagnosis in 2013. Speaking to US talk-show host David Letterman, Hanks revealed: “I went to the doctor, and he said, ‘You know those high blood sugar numbers you’ve been dealing with since you were 36? Well, you’ve graduated! You’ve got type 2 diabetes, young man,” Hanks went on to say that if he had taken his doctors’ advice to lose weight and follow healthier lifestyle things may have been different. 2. Sue Cleaver Coronation Street star Sue, who plays Eileen Grimshaw in the soap, 52 lost a whopping three stone back in 2011 following a collapse on set related to her condition. Clever went on to be a spokesperson for Diabetes UK, saying: “People with diabetes need the right support to look after themselves so I, along with Diabetes UK, want to make sure that all people living with the condition receive all the right services they need.” 3. Susan Boyle The Britain’s Got Talent Winner and singing sensation Susan Boyle struggled to give up the sweet stuff following her revelation she was suffering from Type-2. As a non-smoker and teetotaler, Susan reportedly tried hard to reign in her chocolate addiction and overhaul her diet in a bid to keep her insulin levels under control. 4. Cheryl Fergison Best known for her role as Heather Trott in Eastenders, Cheryl joined forces with Diabetes UK to launch the Continue reading >>

15 Celebrities With Diabetes

15 Celebrities With Diabetes

The Oscar-winning actress was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 22 after slipping into a weeklong coma. In 2007, however, Berry flummoxed the media when she announced that she'd weaned herself off insulin, which type 1 diabetics typically inject, as they can't produce insulin on their own. It turns out the star had type 2 diabetes—the kind that's typically associated with being overweight—all along: Berry's healthy, fit bod threw her doctors for a loop. Are you young and fit? You might still be at risk for type 2 diabetes. "I'm not counting on a cure. But I'm not going to let this control me," the NFL starting quarterback told Men's Health in a recent interview. In 2008, after losing 35 pounds and feeling drained of energy, Culter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and immediately began treatment to manage the condition, which affects 2 million other Americans. Cutler wears an insulin pump, monitors his blood sugar, and says, "Now I can play at 100 percent of my ability." While pregnant with her daughter, Valentina, actress Hayek developed gestational diabetes, high blood sugar that occurs in up to 10% of pregnant women. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after pregnancy, but women who have had it are up to 60% more likely to develop diabetes in the next 10-20 years, according to the National Institutes of Health. Luckily, there are ways you can slash your diabetes risk. When diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, pop star Jonas' blood sugar level was over 700—normal blood sugar levels range from 70-120, and a level as high as 700 puts you at risk of coma and death. Jonas was hospitalized and has since learned to manage his diabetes. Once called juvenile diabetes, type 1 is the most common type of diabetes among people younger than 20, but can strike at any age. Continue reading >>

18 Celebrities With Type 2 Diabetes

18 Celebrities With Type 2 Diabetes

Famous people with diabetes People often think that type 2 diabetes strikes only the overweight and sedentary, or unhealthy eaters. But anyone can be diagnosed with diabetes, even world-class athletes, or the rich and famous. The following celebrities all had some risk factors for diabetes (such as weight, ethnicity, or family history), but many were still shocked to hear the diagnosis. They’ve all made healthy changes in their lives, and many now speak out about the dangers of type 2 diabetes. Gabourey Sidibe When Oscar nominee Gabourey Sidibe was diagnosed with diabetes, she took charge of her health, secretly going under the knife after more than a decade of trying to lose weight naturally. “I truly didn’t want to worry about all the effects that go along with diabetes,” she told People. “I genuinely [would] worry all the time about losing my toes.” Since having bariatric surgery in 2016, the Brooklyn-born actress, beloved for her breakout role in the 2009 film Precious, continued to make positive lifestyle changes by working with a nutritionist and amping up her fitness regimen. S. Epatha Merkerson This Emmy award-winning actress won us over as Lt. Van Buren on Law & Order and then as hospital administrator Sharon Goodwin on Chicago Med. In her off-screen life, Merkerson is both a diabetes patient and advocate. She encourages others to reach their A1c goals. Even though she had a family history of type 2 diabetes, “my diagnosis was a wake-up call,” she told USA Today in 2016. “I knew I had to start making serious changes to my lifestyle to take control of my health.” That included making more nutritious food choices and taking up brisk walking. Tom Hanks When Tom Hanks announced in 2013 that he had type 2 diabetes, he joined millions of other Ame Continue reading >>

Celebrities With Diabetes Slideshow

Celebrities With Diabetes Slideshow

The Oscar-winning actor announced he has type 2 diabetes when late-night host David Letterman commented on his newly slim figure in October 2013. "I went to the doctor and he said, ‘You know those high blood sugar numbers you’ve been dealing with since you were 36? Well, you’ve graduated. You’ve got type 2 diabetes, young man.'" Hanks added that the condition is controllable, but he joked that he couldn't get back down to his high-school weight of 96 pounds. "I was a very skinny boy!" The talk show host has type 2 diabetes. "It's definitely controllable," King has said on his show. Diabetes makes heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and other serious health problems more likely. King has had bypass heart surgery. Diabetes wasn't the only thing that raised his risk for ticker trouble: King had been a heavy smoker, and smoking hurts the heart. But by taking care of his diabetes (and quitting smoking), King helps his ticker and the rest of his body. Salma Hayek The Oscar-nominee had gestational diabetes, which happens during pregnancy, while expecting her daughter, Valentina. Hayek has a family history of diabetes. Experts say all women should get checked for gestational diabetes when they are 24-28 weeks pregnant. Those at risk for type 2 diabetes are checked at their first prenatal visit. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after delivery, but it could return with a later pregnancy. It can also make you more likely to get type 2 diabetes later on. This singer went public with his type 1 diabetes in 2007. He has said that his symptoms included weight loss and thirst. When diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, his blood sugar was over 700 -- and normal blood sugar levels are from 70 to 120. Jonas was hospitalized, but he learned to manage his condition. Once called Continue reading >>

On World Diabetes Day 2017, What Is Diabetes, What’s The Difference Between Types 1 And 2 And What Are The Signs?

On World Diabetes Day 2017, What Is Diabetes, What’s The Difference Between Types 1 And 2 And What Are The Signs?

DIABETES is a life-long health condition which affects around 3.5 million people in the UK alone. Today is World Diabetes Day, and experts estimate there are up to 549,000 people living with diabetes who don't know it yet. But what is it exactly and what are the difference between the two types? Getty Images What is diabetes? It is a condition caused by high levels of glucose - or sugar - in the blood. Glucose levels are so high because the body is unable to properly use it. In people diagnosed with diabetes, their pancreas doesn't produce any insulin, or not enough insulin. Getty Images Insulin is a hormone typically produced by the pancreas and allows glucose to enter the cells in the body, where it's used for energy. What are the signs to look out for with diabetes? The common signs you may have diabetes include: going to the toilet a lot, especially at night being really thirsty feeling more tired than usual losing weight, without trying to genital itching or thrush cuts and wounds that take longer to heal blurred vision The symptoms are caused by high levels of glucose remaining in the blood, where it cannot be used as energy. These signs are common in children and adults alike. But, adults suffering type 1 diabetes can find it harder to recognise their symptoms. Diabetes UK's four T's campaign aims to raise awareness of the key signs. What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? All types of diabetes cause blood glucose levels to be higher than normal, but the two different types do this in different ways. The distinction lies in what is causing the lack of insulin - often described as the key, that allows glucose to unlock the door to the cells. With type 1 diabetes, a person’s pancreas produces no insulin, but in type 2 cells in the body become r Continue reading >>

Celebrities With Type 1 Diabetes

Celebrities With Type 1 Diabetes

1 / 14 Type 1 diabetes is a condition where the body doesn't produce insulin, the hormone that converts glucose into energy. The condition affects about 3 million people in the United States alone, and everyone with type 1 diabetes — including celebrities — must replace their insulin every day. So, every time you take the steps needed to monitor your condition, remember that you’re in some pretty famous company. Continue reading >>

Celebrities Don Onesies In Type 1 Diabetes Campaign

Celebrities Don Onesies In Type 1 Diabetes Campaign

Si King of the Hairy Bikers and England rugby star Chris Pennell are two of those supporting the #TypeOnesie campaign for JDRF. Chris lives with the condition, as does Si’s teenage son Dylan. Worcester Warriors player Chris said: “There’s been some remarkable work in pioneering Type 1 diabetes research recently. And with World Diabetes Day fast approaching, now more than ever is the time to help raise funds for JDRF.” He added: “The rugby lads and I have had a great laugh dressed as a #TypeOnesie and encourage others to do the same! Please get involved and spread the word.” The #TypeOnesie campaign sees people across the UK being sponsored to wear onesies to work or school, on or near November 14 which is World Diabetes Day. It will raise vital funds allowing JDRF to support research into projects like smart insulins – which would change lives with Type 1 diabetes by giving almost perfect blood glucose control with just one injection a day. Si King’s son Dylan was diagnosed aged four and is one of the 29,000 children in the UK with the condition. Si, sporting a blue JDRF onesie, shared his excitement about smart insulin approaching human trials. He said: “Smart insulin would mean the world to my family. It would mean not draining blood five or six times a day. It would psychologically free you up from thinking about the condition all the time. How marvellous is that?” There’s that dichotomy between having to maintain good management of the condition, but also having to ensure it doesn’t dominate your life He added: “Type 1 diabetes is tough. There’s that dichotomy between having to maintain good management of the condition, but also having to ensure it doesn’t dominate your life. Smart insulins would be an enormous leap forward.” Si recen Continue reading >>

List Of People With Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

List Of People With Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries. Diabetes mellitus type 1, also known as type 1 diabetes, or T1DM (formerly known as insulin-dependent diabetes or juvenile diabetes) is a condition in which the body does not produce insulin, resulting in high blood sugar levels in the body.[1][2] Whereas type 2 diabetes is typically diagnosed in middle age and treated via diet, oral medication and/or insulin therapy, type 1 diabetes tends to be diagnosed earlier in life, and people with type 1 diabetes require insulin therapy for survival.[1] The following is a list of notable people—including writers, artists, athletes, entertainers, and others—who have been documented as having type 1 diabetes. List of people[edit] Crystal Bowersox Damon Dash Sam Fuld Nick Jonas Este Haim Theresa May Mary Tyler Moore Anne Rice Derek Theler Name Lifespan Nationality Notability Ref. Akram, WasimWasim Akram 1966– Pakistani Cricketer, television personality [3] Bassinger, BrecBrec Bassinger 1999– American Actress [4] Bean, DexterDexter Bean 1987– American Auto racing driver [5] Bigard, Jean-MarieJean-Marie Bigard 1954– French Actor [6] Bowersox, CrystalCrystal Bowersox 1985– American Singer-songwriter and actress [7] Boynton, NickNick Boynton 1979– Canadian Ice hockey defenceman [8] Brass, DarrenDarren Brass 1972– American Tattoo artist [9] Burgalat, BertrandBertrand Burgalat 1963– French Musician and music producer [10] Canyon, GeorgeGeorge Canyon 1970– Canadian Country music singer [11] Channing, CarolCarol Channing 1921– American Actress, comedian [12] Clarke, BobbyBobby Clarke 1949– Canadian Ice hockey centre [13] Coker, BenBen Coker 1989– British Associ Continue reading >>

'you Can Still Do What You Want To': Theresa May On How Diabetes Has Changed Her Life

'you Can Still Do What You Want To': Theresa May On How Diabetes Has Changed Her Life

When she came down with a heavy cold in November 2012, former Home Secretary and Prime Minister Theresa May’s first thought was that she should get it checked out by her GP. Her husband had just had a similar cold that had developed into bronchitis, so it made sense for her to get it looked at before the same thing happened to her. But she had no idea that this was a visit to the GP that would change her life forever. While she was there, she mentioned to her GP that she had recently lost a lot of weight, though she hadn’t thought much about it and had put it down to 'dashing about' in her role as Home Secretary. But the GP decided to do a blood test anyway. Suddenly, she was being told that she had diabetes. The news came as a shock, though looking back she realises she had some of the classic symptoms. As well as the weight loss, she was drinking more water than usual and making more frequent trips to the bathroom. But, it wasn’t something she thought about much at the time. “That summer was the Olympics, so life was in a different order,” she says. “There was a lot more going on, so I didn’t really notice.” She was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, but, when the medication didn’t work she went for further tests and, eventually, the news came back that she had Type 1. The more people can see that people with diabetes can lead a normal life doing the sort of things that other people do, the easier it is for those who are diagnosed with it to deal with it “My very first reaction was that it’s impossible because at my age you don’t get it,” she says, reflecting the popular misconception that only younger people get diagnosed with Type 1. In fact, one in five people diagnosed with Type 1 are over 40 when they develop it. “But, then my reaction wa Continue reading >>

The Athletes Who Have Triumphed Over Type 1 Diabetes

The Athletes Who Have Triumphed Over Type 1 Diabetes

Talk of sport and Type 1 diabetes may evoke memories of Gary Mabbutt, the former Tottenham Hotspur defender who represented his country at the highest level and lifted the UEFA Cup and FA Cup, twice, whilst often having to inject himself with insulin at half-time. But while the physical demands of diabetes are known to many sports fans, the battles that sufferers experience off the pitch, dealing with the psychological repercussions of their condition, are in need of greater recognition. Of the estimated four million people with diabetes in the UK, 10 per cent have Type 1. This means they cannot produce insulin, instead having to self-administer the energy source either though injections or a pump. It’s an essential, daily routine that can have debilitating emotional side-effects. Research by Diabetes.org.uk shows that people with Type 1 are twice as likely to suffer from depression and more prone to anxiety and eating disorders. But very few diabetics get access to the psychological support they need. Since men in particular struggle to ask for help, young athletes such as Exeter Chiefs' England rugby international Henry Slade, 22, and Southend United footballer Ben Coker, 25, are now encouraging diabetes sufferers to tackle depression head on. “With diabetes, you are living with it 24/7, 365 days a year and yet you might just get a couple of hours with your GP each year to discuss it,” explains Coker, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 15. “When I was first diagnosed my biggest worry was that I may not be able to play football again,” he says. Thankfully, the experts said exercise was the best thing he could do. “Injecting myself every day was demoralising. Fortunately, I can feel the support around me - not just from my team-mates and th Continue reading >>

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