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Cdl And Diabetes Type 2

Orlando Cdl Physical Facts: Diabetes And The Commercial Driver Physical Exam (cdl Medical Exam)

Orlando Cdl Physical Facts: Diabetes And The Commercial Driver Physical Exam (cdl Medical Exam)

Orlando CDL Physical Facts Will Diabetics Ever Rule the World? Maybe Not But At Least They Can Now Drive Around It for A Living Orlando CDL Physical Facts: Diabetes and the Commercial Driver Physical Exam ( CDL Medical Exam ) Not too long ago, being an insulin-dependent diabetic meant you couldnt drive commercially because you couldnt pass the CDL physical examor the CDL medical exam . Of course, this resulted in many drivers being considerably upset. But this was not the fault of any or all DOT physical locations or doctorsit was the law. Then, the law was changed in 2003 to add a Diabetes Exemption as part of the commercial driver physical exam (CDL physical / CDL physical exam) process. Yet, to qualify for this diabetes exemption you already had to have been driving commercially for 3 years with your insulin-dependent diabetes under control (A1C of 7 10) as evidenced by a successful commercial driver medical exam that covered the full range of physical tests and testing. Because this exemption caught most of these drivers in a catch-22 (they couldnt previously drive with insulin-dependent diabetes but had to have been driving for 3 years while being insulin-dependent in order to qualify for the exemption), only 4 people were able to pass the CDL physical exam and obtain their CDL physical certification between 2003 and 2005. In 2005, the law regarding diabetics and the commercial driver physical exam was amended. Intrastate insulin-dependent drivers are able to be certified. Interstate drivers on the other hand, must still qualify for the commercial driver physical exemption as determined by the commercial driver physical exam (CDL physical / CDL physical exam). Unfortunately, the exemption to the CDL physical requirements regarding insulin-treated diabetes, can tak Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Trucking: Three Things You Need To Know

Diabetes In Trucking: Three Things You Need To Know

Tom Milam, CEO of health care provider TrueLifeCare, will tell you that there are three things motor carriers and their drivers need to know about diabetes and how it impacts the trucking industry: There's a 50% higher occurrence of diabetes in truck drivers than the national average; Drivers with diabetes can apply for a medical waiver with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) to allow them to operate a commercial vehicle, as long as they meet its specific criteria; Yet while the use of insulin is no longer a complete barrier to being able to operate a commercial vehicle on the road, a driver must be able to prove they are maintaining stable blood sugars; not an easy task. “Managing diabetes on one's own is a daunting task. Add to that the high mobility of truck drivers and it's nearly impossible,” Milam explained to Fleet Owner. “That’s where companies like ours come into play; developing diabetes management programs for employers who have high incidences of diabetes in their workforce,” he added. “We coach drivers – via telephone – about ways to manage their disease and stabilize blood sugars in order to keep them healthy and on the road.” Milam said there are two key facts fleets need to keep in mind diabetes: First, that there is no cure and, second, diabetes is progressive, meaning that as symptoms worsen, the disease causes more harm to your body, especially without attentive personal management. “The most immediate impact for drivers with diabetes is losing their jobs,” he stressed. “Truck drivers can lose their ability to drive if they require insulin to manage their disease, an almost automatic ‘do not certify’ condition,” Milam said. “Today, nearly 20% of all people with diabetes use insulin therapy. While dr Continue reading >>

Can A Person With Diabetes Get A Cdl? Part 1

Can A Person With Diabetes Get A Cdl? Part 1

Home Truckers Health Can a Person with Diabetes Get a CDL? Part 1 Can a Person with Diabetes Get a CDL? Part 1 Diabetes pathology is where the sugar (glucose) levels in the blood are very high. There are 2 types, type 1 where the body does not produce insulin and type 2, the most common, where the body does not use or produces insulin correctly. If there is no insulin, glucose stays in the blood and over the time that sugar excess can cause serious diseases in the kidneys, nerves, eyes, heart, strokes, etc. Many truck drivers have diabetes, as truckers have a 50% more of chances to develop this disease, because of theirlifestyle, in comparison to the US national population average. There are drivers who already have this disease and are considering the possibility to become a commercial truck driver. So, is it possible to work as a commercial truck driver having diabetes? Yes, it is. Basically, the drivers, who have diabetes, can request a medical waiver with the FMCSA to have the permission to operate CMVs, since they fulfill FMSCAs specific criteria. We are going to explain you everything you need to know about Diabetes in relation to a truck driver. Type 2 Diabetes Can a driver get a CDL? Yes. People with this type of diabetes, that do not take insulin, only have to comply with their state guidelines regarding to getting and preserving their CDL. It will not be necessary to submit for the Federal Diabetes Exemption and the driver would be able to cross state lines. But it is advisable to submit for the Federal Diabetes Exemption if the driver already knows that will need to take insulin soon. Type 1 Diabetes Can a driver get a CDL? Yes, but the driver will have to comply with some medical criterions and also submit for the Federal Diabetes Exemption. Drivers with di Continue reading >>

End Of The Road: Diabetes Care When Insulin May Not Be An Option

End Of The Road: Diabetes Care When Insulin May Not Be An Option

Go to: PRESENTATION J.U. is a 53-year-old man with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes who requires a commercial driver’s license (CDL) for his occupation as a truck driver and mechanic. His diabetes was controlled with increasing doses of metformin and glipizide during the first 4 years after his diagnosis. Despite nutrition counseling, diabetes education classes, and physician visits every 3–6 months, nonadherence with therapeutic lifestyle changes contributed to his A1C fluctuating between 7.2 and 10.2% over 3 years. His health care provider recommended insulin therapy numerous times, but J.U.’s needle fear, lifestyle preferences, and fear of losing his job led to patient refusal and clinical inertia. He is seen for an urgent appointment after his Department of Transportation (DOT) physical was failed for hyperglycemia (glucose > 200 mg/dl) and significant levels of glucose in the urine. He reports fatigue, polyphagia, polydipsia, and polyuria. He has not been compliant with self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) or recommended therapeutic lifestyle changes. At the time of this visit, his diabetes medication regimen consists of metformin 1,000 mg twice daily and glipizide 10 mg twice daily with meals. His A1C is 8.1%, weight is 207 lb (BMI 32.5 kg/m2), blood pressure is 110/72 mmHg, pulse is 80 bpm, serum creatinine is 0.9 mg/dl, total cholesterol is 116 mg/dl, triglyceride level is 207 mg/dl, LDL cholesterol is 46 mg/dl, and HDL cholesterol is 29 mg/dl. He has a known history of hyperlipidemia treated with a statin, hypertension treated with an ACE inhibitor, and gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with a proton pump inhibitor. He has smoked two packs of cigarettes per day for 32 years, with multiple failed quit attempts, and denies alcohol or illicit drug use. Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Trucking: Three Things You Need To Know

Diabetes In Trucking: Three Things You Need To Know

Diabetes in trucking: Three things you need to know Tom Milam, CEO of health care provider TrueLifeCare, will tell you that there are three things motor carriers and their drivers need to know about diabetes and how it impacts the trucking industry: There's a 50% higher occurrence of diabetes in truck drivers than the national average; Drivers with diabetes can apply for a medical waiver with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) to allow them to operate a commercial vehicle, as long as they meet its specific criteria; Yet while the use of insulin is no longer a complete barrier to being able to operate a commercial vehicle on the road, a driver must be able to prove they are maintaining stable blood sugars; not an easy task. Managing diabetes on one's own is a daunting task. Add to that the high mobility of truck drivers and it's nearly impossible, Milam explained to Fleet Owner. Thats where companies like ours come into play; developing diabetes management programs for employers who have high incidences of diabetes in their workforce, he added. We coach drivers via telephone about ways to manage their disease and stabilize blood sugars in order to keep them healthy and on the road. Milam said there are two key facts fleets need to keep in mind diabetes: First, that there is no cure and, second, diabetes is progressive, meaning that as symptoms worsen, the disease causes more harm to your body, especially without attentive personal management. The most immediate impact for drivers with diabetes is losing their jobs, he stressed. Truck drivers can lose their ability to drive if they require insulin to manage their disease, an almost automatic do not certify condition, Milam said. Today, nearly 20% of all people with diabetes use insulin therapy. While Continue reading >>

How To Pursue Your Cdl If You Have Diabetes

How To Pursue Your Cdl If You Have Diabetes

Have diabetes and want to pursue a CDL? While you will have to take some extra steps, it is totally possible and will be worth the effort if this is the career path you are passionate about. Some History First Prior to 2005, people with diabetes taking insulin were not able to become truck drivers. Thanks to a 2005 transportation bill, however, things have since changed. Now a person with Type 1 Diabetes who takes insulin is able to drive in interstate commerce. Although there are numerous requirements that the individual must meet, it is now possible for those with diabetes to become CDL drivers. What is Necessary to Obtain a CDL if You Have Diabetes Those with Type 2 diabetes that do not take insulin only need to follow their state guidelines related to obtaining and keeping a CDL. They will not need to file a Federal Diabetes Exemption and can still cross state lines; however, if you find out that you are going to be on insulin, you will have to file for the Federal Diabetes Exemption. Those with Type 1 Diabetes can get a CDL but will need to meet certain medical criteria and file for the Federal Diabetes Exemption. To begin, applicants for the Federal Diabetes Exemption with Type 1 diabetes will need to have been taking their insulin for at least 2 months prior to applying for the exemption. Applicants with Type 2 diabetes must have been taking their insulin for one month. You will need to have a health evaluation performed by a physician that is listed as a “medical examiner” on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) National Registry. Other evaluations may include tests conducted by an endocrinologist, ophthalmologist, or optometrist. There is also a list of medical criteria which must be met, including: • You must not have had had one o Continue reading >>

Rules And Routines For Truckers With Diabetes

Rules And Routines For Truckers With Diabetes

Truck drivers often work long hours, travel great distances and are responsible for the safe operation of large trucks. Long haul truck drivers have more than twice the risk of diabetes due to high stress and unhealthy food options. A study published in 2010 stated “”88% of truck drivers suffered from at least one risk factor including smoking, hypertension or obesity. There is a rate of 28% in long haul truck drivers at risk for sleep apnea, a condition which limits proper sleep”. Because of these problems, truck drivers may have been targeted about their health and driving. Recently there has been a lot of confusion about truckers with diabetes obtaining a CDL license. Learn more about the rules for truckers with diabetes. Years ago, there was a ban that prevented truck drivers with diabetes who used insulin from driving commercial vehicles for interstate operation. In 2003, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMSCA) introduced the Diabetes Exemption Program. This permitted people with insulin treated diabetes to drive a commercial vehicle in interstate commerce; however, you needed three years of previous commercial driving experience to qualify. By 2005, this was changed. Even if you are on insulin, there is no need to show previous commercial driving experience. While the new law alleviated the need to have previous driving experience for individuals with diabetes who take insulin, there are 57 provisions, guidelines and screenings to pass in order to get a CDL. Applicants must also watch state requirements related to obtaining a commercial driver license. Drivers with insulin treated diabetes must show they have control of the condition while on insulin. Those with type 1 diabetes must be on insulin for a minimum of 2 months before they can appl Continue reading >>

Wisconsin Dmv Official Government Site - Wisconsin State Waivers For Cdl Drivers

Wisconsin Dmv Official Government Site - Wisconsin State Waivers For Cdl Drivers

Wisconsin DMV offers waivers to drivers who are insulin-dependent or who do not meet federal vision standards . Please be aware that a Wisconsin State Waiver (intrastate) is not the same as a federal waiver (interstate) and cannot be used in conjunction with a Federal Medical Examiners card. Drivers who wish to obtain a FederalWaiver/Variance for interstate driving should contact the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) at (703) 448-3094. When would you need a Wisconsin State Waiver? Operate a Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV)in intrastate commerce Have less than 20/40 vision in either eye or less than 70-degree field of vision in either eye Operate a Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV) in intrastate commerce How to apply for aState Diabetes or Vision Waiver: Ifyou are applying for adiabetes waiver, your driving record will need to be free of any moving violations or at-fault accidentsdue to the diabetesin the past 3 years to qualify for the waiver. you are applying for a vision waiver, your driving record will need to be free of any moving violations or at-fault accidents in the past 3 years to qualify for the waiver. Submit a Driving Description which includes the following information: type of vehicle you intend to drive (i.e. straight truck, tractor/trailer combination, tank, etc.) type of driving you intend to do (i.e. long-distance transport, local transport, etc.) number of hours and miles you will drive, listed by daytime and nighttime operation modifications made to the vehicle you intend to drive If you are applying for a diabetes waiver: Submit 2separate Medical Examination Report MV3644 completed by 2 different healthcare professionals (MD, DO, APNP or PA-C). Examinations must beconducted within 90 days of its receipt at the DMV. Submita Certificate Continue reading >>

Driving On Insulin: Diabetes Forecast

Driving On Insulin: Diabetes Forecast

I am a 74-year-old who has had diabetes for the past 20 years. I work part-time driving large trucks 3 1/2 days or more every week. I now take two pills a day. How am I going to be able to keep my Department of Transportation (DOT) license if I need to start using insulin? The exam states in large print not to use insulin. I sent a request to DOT in Washington for an exemption, but with the doctors they want me to see and the papers they want me to fill out, I'm not sure if it's worth it. Herb Bertsche, Woodburn, Indiana Katie Hathaway, Associate Director, Legal Advocacy, American Diabetes Association, responds: The situation you are facing is common and is why ADA has been fighting for so long on behalf of commercial drivers with diabetes. For many years, federal law prohibited anyone with insulin-treated diabetes from operating a commercial motor vehicle in interstate commerce. While some states permitted people who use insulin to drive within their state, that only allowed a few people to maintain jobs in commercial driving. These rules, dating back to the 1970s, were based on a misunderstanding of diabetes, especially how the disease is managed today. It is true that some people, because of the complications of diabetes, cannot safely drive a commercial vehicle. That is not true for most people. Fairness requires that each person be judged as an individual based on how diabetes affects him or her. ADA worked for many years, through Congress and the administrative process, to eliminate this blanket ban. In 2003, we succeeded, and the Diabetes Exemption Program was born, establishing a system of individual assessment. This was a big step forward, but the program contained a provision that disqualified anyone who hadn't been driving a commercial vehicle while using in Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Dot Medical Waivers

Type 1 Diabetes And Dot Medical Waivers

I thought I would tap the hive mind on here to give me some advice/information on obtaining a Class A CDL license with insulin dependent Type 1 diabetes. I did a search on here but it looks like the thread I found was over 2 years old and I didn't want to look at old/changed info. I did a search online and saw that there is a waiver that can be obtained and that an insulin dependent Type 1 diabetic cannot be outright disqualified as a driver anymore. I'm hoping that at some point my husband will take an interest in driving and eventually want to team with me, but he's insulin dependent. It's well controlled, and it's been over 20 years since he was hospitalized for anything related to his diabetes. He has no peripheral vascular disease (yet), no eye problems, and really no other problems other than taking a long acting insulin before bed and fast acting insulin before each meal. He checks his blood sugars regularly, and when he feels he's getting low a quick glass of orange juice usually does the trick. I was just wondering if the medical waivers are difficult to obtain, and if anyone on here has had to obtain the same waivers and what it was like and what it is that we might need to keep in mind. Now that I've started CDL school he's actually seemed more interested in the idea, and I would like to encourage him as much as I can. A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles: Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds. Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds. Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or Continue reading >>

Qualifications Of Drivers; Diabetes Standard

Qualifications Of Drivers; Diabetes Standard

Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). FMCSA proposes to permit drivers with stable, well-controlled insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) to be qualified to operate commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. Currently, drivers with ITDM are prohibited from driving CMVs in interstate commerce unless they obtain an exemption from FMCSA. This NPRM would enable individuals with ITDM to obtain a Medical Examiner's Certificate (MEC), from a medical examiner (ME) at least annually in order to operate in interstate commerce if the treating clinician (TC) who is the healthcare professional responsible for prescribing insulin for the driver's diabetes, provides documentation to the ME that the condition is stable and well-controlled. You must submit comments on or before July 6, 2015. You may submit comments identified by docket number FMCSA-2005-23151 using any one of the following methods: To avoid duplication, please use only one of these four methods. See the “Public Participation and Request for Comments” heading under the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below for instructions regarding submitting comments. If you have questions about this proposed rule, contact Ms. Linda Phillips, Medical Programs Division, FMCSA, 1200 New Jersey Ave SE., Washington DC 20590-0001, by telephone at 202-366-4001, or by email at [email protected] If you have questions about viewing or submitting material to the docket, call Ms. Barbara Hairston, Program Manager, Docket Services, telephone 202-366-9826. Table of Contents for Preamble A. Purpose and Summary of the Major Provisions B. Benefits and Costs C. Privacy Act IV. Legal Basis for the Rulemaking B. Brief History of Physical Qualification Standards for CMV Drivers With ITDM VI. Reasons for the Proposed Changes B. W Continue reading >>

Dot Physical Medical Requirements: Managing Blood Sugar, Pre-diabetes, And Diabetes For Commercial Drivers

Dot Physical Medical Requirements: Managing Blood Sugar, Pre-diabetes, And Diabetes For Commercial Drivers

During the course of checking your DOT physical medical requirements, your blood sugar will be checked. This is to determine whether or not you have diabetes as a factor in determining your safety as a commercial driver. Of course, you must meet all other DOT physical medical requirements for your DOT medical certification if you are diabetic. If you have Type 2 diabetes and do not use insulin, you may still qualify for medical certification. On the other hand, if you are a Type 2 insulin-dependent diabetic or are moving to insulin, you will need to get a DOT medical certification diabetes exemption in order to drive commercially in interstate commerce. Getting DOT medical certification after meeting DOT physical medical requirements, used to be much harder if you had diabetes. However, in 2005, George Bush passed an act that made it a little easier. (Find out more about the specifics of diabetes and DOT medical certification.) Yet, nobody really ever wants to go through the exemption process if they don’t have to…. The best way to prevent this is by making sure you keep your blood sugar under control so that you don’t become an insulin-dependent diabetic and can get your DOT medical certification without the hassle. Here are 3 simple tips for keeping blood sugar under control and preventing Type 2 Diabetes from progressing to insulin-dependence: Managing Diabetes for the DOT Physical Tip 1: Watch Your Weight & Get Moving! Weight is a big factor in Type 2 Diabetes prevention and maintenance. Losing just 5 – 10 pounds can help improve blood sugar stabilization. This can be done through diet and/or exercise—ideally both. A good diet – made up of healthy foods, limited red meat, good oils and fats (monounsaturated live Olive, Canola, Safflower, etc.), and plent Continue reading >>

Commercial Truck Driving And Diabetes: Can You Become Truck Driver With Diabetes

Commercial Truck Driving And Diabetes: Can You Become Truck Driver With Diabetes

In this article we will explore what it takes to get a commercial driver’s license with diabetes, and how to get an insulin waiver for Type 1 and Type 2 persons who use insulin. We will look at requirements for Type 1 vs. Type 2 diabetes. We will look at insulin vs. non-insulin users. We will look at state vs. interstate CDL requirements. We will also look at the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) diabetes waiver program, and how you can be evaluated to drive a commercial vehicle across state lines when you have diabetes and use insulin. Intrastate guidelines for CDL with diabetes If you want to work in the trucking industry only within your state, and you do not plan to cross any state lines, you can get approved to drive a commercial vehicle in your state. For drivers driving within state lines, you do not need to apply for the Federal Diabetes Exemption. Likewise, you would not need to apply for the Federal Diabetes Exemption if you do not use insulin. Whatever rules and regulations your state has for holding a CDL with diabetes is what you have to follow for intrastate or interstate trucking. It is important to know that most commercial driving will be considered interstate, not intrastate driving, even if you do not cross state lines. If you are carrying cargo or passengers to or from another state, this is also considered as interstate commercial driving. For information on intrastate commercial driving, check with your home state for CDL requirements and see if they are applicable to you. They vary from state to state, with each state having its own regulations. You can look up the laws governing your state by visiting this page at the American Diabetes Association website, You can type your home state in the search for laws and requirements fo Continue reading >>

Feds Greenlight Exemption For Truckers With Diabetes

Feds Greenlight Exemption For Truckers With Diabetes

Certain truck drivers who suffer from diabetes will be allowed to operate commercial motor vehicles in spite of their health conditions, federal regulators said Tuesday. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is exempting dozens of truck drivers who use insulin to treat their diabetes from rules that would otherwise prohibit them from operating a truck. "FMCSA evaluated the eligibility of the drivers and determined that granting the exemptions to these individuals would achieve a level of safety equivalent to or greater than the level that would be achieved by complying with the current regulation," the agency wrote in the Federal Register. The rules are intended to prevent truck drivers from endangering other drivers on the road. Federal regulators have begun cracking down on truckers who violate these and other safety regulations, particularly in the wake of the crash that nearly killed comedian Tracy Morgan. The FMCSA said Tuesday that these 72 drivers who use insulin to treat their diabetes have it reasonably under control and do not pose any additional danger to other drivers on the road. They will receive a two-year exemption from the rules. The FMCSA is not exempting all drivers who use insulin from the rules, however — only those that it believes do not pose a risk on the roads. Furthermore, truck drivers that no longer need insulin to treat their diabetes are also exempt from the rules. Continue reading >>

Insulin Diabetes And The Cdl Truck Driver

Insulin Diabetes And The Cdl Truck Driver

There still appears to be some confusion concerning whether or not persons with insulin diabetes are able to obtain a CDL license. For years, there was a ban that prevented those with diabetes who used insulin from driving commercial vehicles within interstate operation. However, in 2003, the FMCSA introduced the Diabetes Exemption Program which allowed individuals with insulin treated diabetes the ability to operate a CMV in interstate commerce. In the beginning, this new regulation still had its problems. Mainly, it still required that people with insulin diabetes must have already driven commercially for the previous three years. If not, they would not be qualified for the exemption. Therefore, this three year rule made the new regulation, basically worthless for any new, potential CDL holders. This three year rule made it so difficult, that from 2003 to 2005, only four exemptions were issued. Then, in late 2005, everything changed for the better. Due to the effort by the American Diabetes Association, President Bush signed into law, doing away with the three year requirement. There is no longer any need to show previous commercial driving experience, even if you are on insulin. However, there still are 57 other screenings, guidelines and provisions that one must pass in order to be granted the exemption. Also, one must abide by any particular state requirements in regards to the commercial driver license. There are many questions and answers floating around the net stating that it is not possible to receive a CDL if you have insulin diabetes. The Truth is . . . it is now possible to do so, with some exceptions, thanks to the new regulations of the Diabetes Exemption Program, signed into law in 2005. Until the physical qualification standards within the regulations a Continue reading >>

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