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Cdc Prediabetes Video

National Diabetes Prevention Program

National Diabetes Prevention Program

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP) is an evidence-based lifestyle change program for preventing type 2 diabetes. It can help people cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes in half. The Diabetes Prevention Program research study showed that making modest behavior changes helped participants lose 5% to 7% of their body weight—that is 10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person. These lifestyle changes reduced the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58% in people with prediabetes. Participants work with a lifestyle coach in a group setting to receive a 1-year lifestyle change program that includes 16 core sessions (usually 1 per week) and 6 post-core sessions (1 per month). For more information about the National Diabetes Prevention Program curriculum, go to www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention or watch the CDC's Diabetes Prevention Program video online, or download and print the National DPP Infographic (PDF). What Is the Benefit of Being Part of a National DPP? Various organizations throughout Utah will soon be part of the National DPP, led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It is proven to help people with prediabetes prevent or delay development of type 2 diabetes. Being part of a group provides support from other people who are facing similar challenges and trying to make the same changes you are. Together you can celebrate successes and find ways to overcome obstacles. Eligible Participants The target for this program are adults 18 and older who are at high risk for developing Type 2 diabetes based on fasting glucose or A1C or via a short risk survey. You can download and print the CDC Prediabetes Infographic (PDF) for more information. National DPP Features Trained lifestyle Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is a serious health condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Approximately 84 million American adults—more than 1 out of 3—have prediabetes. Of those with prediabetes, 90% don’t know they have it. Prediabetes puts you at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The good news is that if you have prediabetes, the CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program can help you make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and other serious health problems. Causes Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy. If you have prediabetes, the cells in your body don’t respond normally to insulin. Your pancreas makes more insulin to try to get cells to respond. Eventually your pancreas can’t keep up, and your blood sugar rises, setting the stage for prediabetes—and type 2 diabetes down the road. Symptoms & Risk Factors You can have prediabetes for years but have no clear symptoms, so it often goes undetected until serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes show up. It’s important to talk to your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested if you have any of the risk factors for prediabetes, which include: Being overweight Being 45 years or older Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Being physically active less than 3 times a week Ever having gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds Race and ethnicity are also a factor: African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at higher risk. Getting Tested You can get a simple blood Continue reading >>

Prediabetes?

Prediabetes?

Season 2 Videos Prediabetes: Are You Aware? You’ve Got Prediabetes. What Now? What Are Health Care Professionals Doing? Family Mealtime Makeover Put Prediabetes in Reverse (30 seconds) Joan’s Personal Story Could You Have Prediabetes? Reversing Prediabetes Continue reading >>

What Is Prediabetes?

What Is Prediabetes?

Take the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Prediabetes Risk Test to see if you are at risk for developing diabetes. 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Prediabetes.2018. 2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Research-Based Prevention Programs.Prediabetes is when blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnosed as Type 2 Diabetes. The following risk factors increase your chances of prediabetes and developing Type 2 Diabetes: Having a parent or sibling who has Type 2 Diabetes A previous Gestational Diabetes Diagnosis Having had a baby with a birth weight of 9 or more pounds. Healthy eating and exercise are key to delaying or preventing the onset of Type 2 Diabetes. By losing 5 to 7 percent of your weight, you can reduce the chances of developing Type 2 Diabetes by 58% (71% for individuals over 60). For a 200 pound individual, that is only a weight loss of 10 to 14 pounds. When it comes to prediabetes, simple life changes can make a big difference. Click on a link to the left to learn more about diabetes prevention, Diabetes Prevention Programs, healthy eating, and more. Continue reading >>

Adorable Hedgehogs Want You To Know About This Common Health Problem

Adorable Hedgehogs Want You To Know About This Common Health Problem

Adorable Hedgehogs Want You to Know About This Common Health Problem Hedgehogs and other cute animals are featured in new public health campaign videos about prediabetes. Credit: YouTube Screengrab/Do I Have Prediabetes To raise awareness about prediabetes, a new campaign features something most people can't resist adorable animal videos. With videos staring puppies, hedgehogs and baby goats, the campaign aims to teach people about their risk of prediabetes by walking them through a brief, 1-minute prediabetes risk test. "Hedgehogs on vacation. A perfect way to spend a minute," one ad starts , while a background video shows hedges lounging on a tropical beach. "So is taking a 1-minute prediabetes risk test," the ad says. The goal of the government-backed campaign is to encourage people to learn their risk of prediabetes and discover how to reduce their chances of developing the condition. More than 1 in 3 American adults, or 84 million people, have prediabetes, but nearly 90 percent don't know they have it, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC put together the campaign in partnership with the American Diabetes Association, the American Medical Association and the Ad Council. [ Animal Morality: 6 Amazing Videos ] People with prediabetes have abnormally high blood sugar levels, and although the levels are not high enough to diagnose these individuals with diabetes, people with prediabetes often go on to develop type 2 diabetes . This can increase the risk of serious health problems such as blindness, heart attack or stroke, the CDC says. "The number of Americans estimated to be at risk for developing type 2 diabetes is staggering," Dr. William T. Cefalu, chief scientific medical and mission officer of the American Diabetes Associatio Continue reading >>

Prediabetes | Wisconsin Department Of Health Services

Prediabetes | Wisconsin Department Of Health Services

What is the National Diabetes Prevention Program? The National Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to help people with prediabetes, or those at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, make lifestyle changes to prevent type 2 diabetes. Evidence shows participants in the program can reduce their risk for developing type 2 diabetes by 58%. For those 60 or older, risk reduction is 71%. If you participate in the National DPP, you can expect: A CDC-approved, evidence-based curriculum with lessons, handouts, and other resources to help you make healthy changes. Year-long support. During the first six months of the program, you will meet about once a week, during the second six months, you'll meet once or twice a month. A lifestyle coach specially trained to facilitate discussion and help you learn new skills, set and meet goals, and stay motivated. A support group with similar goals and challenges. Together, you will share ideas, celebrate successes, and work to overcome obstacles. In some programs, participants stay in touch with each other during the week. It's easier to make changes when you're working as a group, rather than doing it on your own. A goal to lose 5% to 7% of your starting weight (that's about 1014 pounds for someone who weighs 200 pounds). Mike joined the CDC-led National DPP and found support he needed to make healthy lifestyle changes, and reverse his prediabetes diagnosis. Continue reading >>

Prevent Type 2 Diabetes With The Preventt2 Program

Prevent Type 2 Diabetes With The Preventt2 Program

What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, or sugar, for our bodies to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ that lies near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. When you have type 2 diabetes, your body can’t use its own insulin as well as it should. This causes sugar to build up in your blood. Type 2 diabetes is a serious condition. It can lead to health issues such as heart attack; stroke; blindness; kidney failure; or loss of toes, feet, or legs. What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a blood glucose (sugar) level that is higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. One in three American adults has prediabetes, and most do not even know they have it. If you have prediabetes and do not lose weight or do moderate physical activity, you can develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. Am I at Risk for Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes? You are at increased risk for developing prediabetes and type 2 diabetes if you: Are 45 years of age or older; Are overweight; Have a family history of type 2 diabetes; Are physically active fewer than three times per week; or Ever had diabetes while pregnant (gestational diabetes) or gave birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds. If you think you may be at risk, a health care provider can do a blood test to see if you have diabetes or prediabetes. What is the PreventT2 Lifestyle Change Program? PreventT2 is part of the National Diabetes Prevention Program, led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It is proven to help people with prediabetes prevent or delay development of type 2 diabetes. What Is the Benefit of Being Part of a PreventT2 Program? As part of a Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Before people develop diabetes, they almost always have prediabetes first. Prediabetes is a condition where a person's blood sugar level is higher than normal but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as diabetes. Prediabetes affects 86 million people in the United States (4.5 million New Yorkers), and 90% of the people with diabetes do not know they have it. Without lifestyle changes, 15-30% of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 3-5 years. People with pre-diabetes are also at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, and for having heart disease and stroke. The good news is that people can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by: Participating in a CDC-recognized diabetes prevention lifestyle change program to learn skills and get resources to help make healthy changes. Watch what some program participants have to say: Losing small amounts of weight (5 to 7 percent of total body weight) Making healthy food choices Being more physically active, 150 minutes per week There are many resources available to help people find out if they are at risk for prediabetes, and to help people with prediabetes prevent or delay diabetes: To find out if you or a loved one are at risk for prediabetes, take the online risk test For more information about prediabetes and the online risk test, watch the Prediabetes video. Are you a health care provider who wants more information on how to diagnose patients with prediabetes? Visit Prediabetes: A Healthcare Provider's Toolkit for Action for more information Learn more about the National Diabetes Prevention Program near you: 86 Million Americans Have Prediabetes Prediabetes can be reversed. Know where you stand. Text RISKTEST to 97779 and take the short test. DoIHavePrediabetes.org Continue reading >>

Are You One Of The 33% With Prediabetes? 90% Don't Realize It

Are You One Of The 33% With Prediabetes? 90% Don't Realize It

Developing Type 2 diabetes is a bit like getting dumped in a relationship (only much worse). Even if you are blind-sided when it occurs, it really doesn't occur overnight. Instead, you may miss the many warning signs, until your doctor tells you the bad news (about diabetes, that is, and not about your relationship). The just released 8th Edition of the International Diabetes Federation's (IDFs) Diabetes Atlas confirms that the global diabetes epidemic continues to get worse. This year 10 million more people are living with diabetes than in 2015, meaning that 1 in 11 adults now has diabetes, for a total of 425 million people. Diabetes includes type 1 diabetes (otherwise known as juvenile-onset diabetes) in which you don't make enough insulin and type 2 diabetes (previously known as adult-onset diabetes, although now more and more children are developing it) in which your body doesn't effectively use the insulin you produce. There are other types of diabetes but the vast majority (around 90%) of all diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes. A major aim for World Diabetes Day, which is today, and Diabetes Awareness Month (which is this month, November) is to help "people learn their risk for prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes along with steps to take to potentially reverse course," as Heather Hodge, Director of Chronic Disease Prevention Programs at the YMCA-USA (also known as the Y-USA for short, in case you don't have enough time to say the MCA) explained. The lead up to type 2 diabetes can be missed at two different stages. The first is not properly addressing obesity or being overweight, which are major risk factors for type 2 diabetes. As the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery indicates, over 90% of those with type 2 diabetes are overweight or have obesity. Continue reading >>

Cdc, Ama And Others Launch Prediabetes Awareness Campaign

Cdc, Ama And Others Launch Prediabetes Awareness Campaign

CDC, AMA and others launch prediabetes awareness campaign Written by Brian Zimmerman| July 25, 2017| Print | Email The American Medical Association, the American Diabetes Association, the Ad Council and the CDC on Tuesday launched a campaign to raise awareness about prediabetes. The organizations created a website where individuals can take a one-minute, prediabetes risk assessment while watching a one-minute video of puppies playing. The campaign seeks to spread the message that prediabetes can be reversed by making everyday lifestyle changes like diet and exercise habits. "Through this campaign, we want to not only ensure that more people learn whether they have prediabetes, but we also want to emphasize the importance of talking with their physician as soon as they discover they may be at risk for the condition," said AMA President David O. Barbe, MD. "After taking the risk test, we encourage anyone who learns they may be at risk for prediabetes to consult their doctor to confirm their diagnosis and learn about lifestyle changes that will help them prevent type 2 diabetes." To learn more about the campaign, click here . Continue reading >>

How To Make Diabetes Awareness Month Count With Patients

How To Make Diabetes Awareness Month Count With Patients

How to make diabetes awareness month count with patients Clinical practices play a crucial role in identifying patients at risk of diabetes. With 86 million adults with prediabetes in the U.S., there is an urgency to increase patient engagement. November is National Diabetes Awareness Month and a great time to start. Following is a five-step action plan with the resources physicians need to find local evidence-based diabetes prevention programs (DPPs), screen patients for prediabetes, persuade diagnosed patients to enroll in a program and bill for their time. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 90 percent of people with prediabetes don't know they have it. Prediabetes is a reversible condition, and the CDC has developed an evidence-based lifestyle change program that has been proved effective in reducing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Patients work with trained lifestyle coaches in small groups to make lasting lifestyle changes that include physical activity, healthy eating and stress reduction. The year-long program is available in person and online and cuts the risk of type 2 diabetes by more than half. Follow these simple steps to screen patients and refer those with prediabetes to local evidence-based DPPs: Find the diabetes prevention program nearest you by using the CDCs program finder or by calling 1-800-DIABETES Print this flyer from the AMAs Prevent Diabetes STAT website and post it in your waiting room and exam rooms; if your practice has video monitors in the waiting area, consider also showing the Ad Councils Do I Have Prediabetes videos Have copies of this prediabetes risk assessment and this summary of the National Diabetes Prevention Program available for your patients and clinical staff Screen your patients for pr Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

Overview More than one in three American adults have prediabetes and are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, a serious health condition that can lead to heart attack and stroke. Surprisingly, nearly 90 percent of people with prediabetes don't even know they have it. But prediabetes can be reversed through weight loss, diet changes and increased physical activity. The first step to reversing the condition is evaluating one's personal risk so that they can take action as soon as possible. In the first-ever national prediabetes awareness campaign, new PSAs assert that no matter how busy life may be, no one is excused from prediabetes. The campaign encourages people to learn their risk of type 2 diabetes by taking a short online test at DoIHavePrediabetes.org, which also features information about prediabetes as well as lifestyle programs and tips to help people reverse their risk. Continue reading >>

So...do I Have Prediabetes?

So...do I Have Prediabetes?

With a little exercise and a change in diet, it often can be reversed. Let's face it, there are millions of reasons why we don't find the time to make healthy lifestyle choices. Kids, jobs, cat videos on the Internet — we're busy. But whatever your reason, prediabetes is real. So find out if you have prediabetes by taking the test now. You won't regret it. Join the National DPP You're not alone in this. There are hundreds of Diabetes Prevention Programs in local communities that are proven to help people with prediabetes make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. We're sure there's one that's right for you. "But I'm a busy mom...I don't have time to eat right and exercise!" Yes, making lifestyle changes may seem hard. But it doesn’t have to be. In fact, some of them can even be fun. Continue reading >>

The Weight Watchers Program*

The Weight Watchers Program*

Recognized as a National Diabetes Prevention Program by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).** Positive lifestyle changes, such as losing weight and being more physically active, not only lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, but also improve your overall well-being and the well-being of your family.*** Numerous expert panels recommend lifestyle changes as a key strategy for weight loss, and highlight that group support and trained Leaders are critical keys to success.‡ Weight Watchers has been tested in those with prediabetes and the results show significant weight loss and improvements in blood sugar control in 6 months, and most importantly, sustained those improvements over 12 months.† PROVEN PROGRAM You'll make healthier food choices and discover fun ways to move more each day to help you lose weight. SUPPORT Real-world weight-loss strategies from a trained Leader and members just like you. FLEXIBILITY You can start the program at any time. The DPP curriculum is incorporated in the standard Weight Watchers program, which is repeated frequently through the year. There numerous times and locations so you can find the meeting that fits your life. * The Weight Watchers program and guidance is not intended as a substitute for medical diagnosis or treatment; you should always consult your physician or health care provider about any health care issues. ** Weight Watchers has received pending recognition from the CDC as a provider of diabetes prevention services as of August 2015. ***CDC Website. “About Prediabetes & Type 2 Diabetes.” † Marrero et al. Comparison of commercial and self-initiated weight loss programs in people with prediabetes: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Public Health 2016;106(5):949-956. ‡ Jensen MD et al. 2013 Continue reading >>

Cdcs New Pre-diabetes Campaign Is Misguided, Mayo Physician Says

Cdcs New Pre-diabetes Campaign Is Misguided, Mayo Physician Says

UCare generously supports MinnPosts Second Opinion coverage; learn why . CDCs new pre-diabetes campaign is misguided, Mayo physician says Take the Prediabetes Risk Test video from the Ad Council In January, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American Medical Association , in partnership with the Ad Council , launched a new campaign to increase the publics awareness of pre-diabetes. According to the CDC , some 86 million American adults may have pre-diabetes, which the agency says is characterized by blood glucose (sugar) levels [that] are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Pre-diabetes increases the risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke, says Ann Albright , director of the CDCs Division of Diabetes Translation, in a video released on MedScape with the campaign. Indeed, Albright says that without treatment a structured lifestyle program that provides real-life support for healthful eating, increasing physical activity, and enhancing problem-solving skills some 15 to 30 percent of people with pre-diabetes will go on to develop full-fledged diabetes within five years. The campaign is encouraging people to talk with their physicians about getting tested for pre-diabetes. Diabetes is certainly a serious disease. It can lead to disabling and sometimes life-threatening health complications, including heart disease, kidney failure, blindness and amputations. More than 29 million Americans, or 9.3 percent of the U.S. population, have the disease a number that has increased four-fold over the past three decades. But many experts are not convinced that pre-diabetes, a term coined by the ADA a few years ago and used almost exclusively in the United States, deserves the Continue reading >>

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