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Cdc National Diabetes Statistics Report 2017

15 Things We Learned From The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report

15 Things We Learned From The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report

An estimated 10 percent of the United States population has diabetes, according to a recent report by the Centers for Disease Control. Of the 30.3 million people included in that estimate, 23.1 million people have been diagnosed with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The remaining 7.2 likely have diabetes without knowing it. (The report did not differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but with 90 to 95 percent of diagnosed diabetes being type 2, the statistics presented are more representative of the type 2 population.) Here are some of the highlights from this CDC report. 25.2 percent of people aged 65 years or older have diabetes, compared with 17 percent of people aged 45 to 64 and 4 percent of people aged 18 to 44. 1.5 million new cases of adult diabetes were diagnosed in 2015 (or 6.7 per 1,000 people). More than half of these cases were in people aged between 45 and 64. 84.1 million people had prediabetes in 2015, which is about 33.9 percent of U.S. adults older than 18. “Nearly half (48.3%) of adults aged 65 years or older had prediabetes,” the report said. More men have diabetes than women: 36.3 percent versus 29.3 percent. One area in which the report did differentiate type 1 from type 2 was in reference to rates of diabetes in children. Using data from the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study, they determined that 17,900 people under the age of 20 years old were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes between 2011 and 2012. 5,300 children between the ages of 10 and 19 were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the same time frame. “Among children and adolescents younger than age 20 years, non-Hispanic whites had the highest rate of new cases of type 1 diabetes compared to members of other U.S. racial and ethnic groups,” the report stated. “Among children an Continue reading >>

Cdc: 100 Million Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

Cdc: 100 Million Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

The growth of diabetes in the United States may be slowing, but it is still increasing. Just how bad can it get? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides The National Diabetes Statistics Report, a periodic publication that provides updated statistics about diabetes in the United States for a scientific audience. It includes information on prevalence and incidence of diabetes, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, deaths, and costs. Estimates for the 2017 report were derived from CDC data systems, the Indian Health Service, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the U.S. Census Bureau, and published studies. Both fasting glucose and HbA1c levels were used to derive estimates for undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes. The report also found that an estimated 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed among adults in 2015. However, nearly 1 in 4 four adults living with diabetes, or 7.2 million Americans, did not know they had the condition, according to the report. Only 11.6% of adults with prediabetes knew they had it. From the results, it was found that more than 100 million U.S. adults are now living with diabetes or prediabetes, according to the report. That would be every third person in the United States. The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, which estimates diabetes and its burden in the United States, shows that as of 2015, 30.3 million U.S. residents, or 9.4% of the population, have diabetes; another 84.1 million have prediabetes. The report shows that disease numbers have held steady — the 2014 report estimated that 29.1 million people, or 9.3% of the population, have diabetes — but the cost and health burdens related to the condition continue to grow. Diabetes was the seventh Continue reading >>

Summer Updates From Cdc’s National Center For Chronic Disease Prevention And Health Promotion

Summer Updates From Cdc’s National Center For Chronic Disease Prevention And Health Promotion

CDC's NCCDPHP Significant Publications and Activities (June – July 2017) Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC) ·On July 28, DCPC released its third annual Skin Cancer Prevention Progress Report, which follows up on The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer. Key findings from the 2017 update include: oThere are more than 30,000 sunburn-related emergency department visits each year, which cost a total of $11.2 million. oThe incidence of melanoma among younger adults has decreased slightly, but has continued to increase steadily among older adults; oThe prevalence of indoor tanning among adults and high school students has declined; o17 States and the District of Columbia have prohibited indoor tanning for minors under 18; oOver 50% of high school students and 33% of adults still get sunburned each year; oThe percentage of schools providing sun safety and skin cancer education has decreased. Website: ·In July 2017, CDC awarded a new five-year FOA to support a comprehensive and coordinated approach to Cancer Prevention and Control. This FOA includes funding for three programs: oThrough the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP), CDC funds 50 states, the District of Columbia, 5 US territories, and 14 American Indian/Alaska Native tribes or tribal groups to increase cancer screening rates by implementing evidence-based strategies and population-level activities within health systems and providing direct screening services. Website: oThrough the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP), CDC supports coalitions in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, 6 U.S. Associated Pacific Islands and Puerto Rico, and 8 tribes or tribal groups, to assess the burden of cancer in jurisdictions, create cancer con Continue reading >>

One Third Of Americans Are Headed For Diabetes, And They Don't Even Know It

One Third Of Americans Are Headed For Diabetes, And They Don't Even Know It

One third of Americans may be on their way to developing full-blown type 2 diabetes, and most of them don't even know it. A recent report from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that more than 84 million Americans, or roughly one-third of the population, have prediabetes, a condition marked by higher-than-normal blood sugar. Of that group, 90 percent aren't aware they have the condition. The primary risk factors for type 2 diabetes are genetics and lifestyle — excess weight, obesity and lack of exercise contribute to this alarming medical trend. "People with prediabetes who don't change their lifestyle are at a much higher risk of developing heart disease and stroke and can develop type 2 diabetes within five years if left untreated," said William T. Cefalu, MD, chief scientific, medical & mission officer of the American Diabetes Association. The health risks go beyond heart disease and stroke. As diabetes worsens over time, blindness, kidney disease and lower-limb amputation are also major health risks. Diabetes was the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States in 2015, according to the CDC. This population of diabetes "ticking time bombs" is particularly alarming, because in many cases type 2 diabetes can be avoided, simply by leading a healthy lifestyle. Type 2 diabetes is often progressive, and within 10 years of diagnosis, 50 percent of individuals need to use insulin to control their blood glucose levels, according to the ADA. More than 30 million Americans — 9.4 percent of the U.S. population — are already battling diabetes, according to the CDC's National Diabetes Statistics Report, which used data through 2015. The CDC found that of those cases, 7.2 million were undiagnosed. "The country needs to take this seriously, ratc Continue reading >>

New Cdc Report: How Many Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes?

New Cdc Report: How Many Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes?

Advertisement Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2015. More than 100 million U.S. adults are now living with diabetes or prediabetes, according to a new report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The report finds that as of 2015, 30.3 million Americans – 9.4% of the U.S. population –have diabetes. Another 84.1 million have prediabetes, a condition that if not treated often leads to type 2 diabetes within five years. The report confirms that the rate of new diabetes diagnoses remains steady. However, the disease continues to represent a growing health problem. It also includes county-level data for the first time, and shows that some areas of the country bear a heavier diabetes burden than others. Key findings from the National Diabetes Statistics Report The report finds that: In 2015, an estimated 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed among people ages 18 and older. Nearly 1 in 4 four adults living with diabetes – 7.2 million Americans – didn’t know they had the condition. Only 11.6% of adults with prediabetes knew they had it. Rates of diagnosed diabetes increased with age. Among adults ages 18-44, 4% had diabetes. Among those ages 45-64 years, 17% had diabetes. And among those ages 65 years and older, 25% had diabetes. Rates of diagnosed diabetes were higher among American Indians/Alaska Natives (15.1%), non-Hispanic blacks (12.7%), and Hispanics (12.1%), compared to Asians (8.0%) and non-Hispanic whites (7.4%). Other differences include: Diabetes prevalence varied significantly by education. Among U.S. adults with less than a high school education, 12.6% had diabetes. Among those with a high school education, 9.5% had diabetes; and among those with more than a high school education, Continue reading >>

More Than 100 Million Americans Have Been Diagnosed With Diabetes Or Prediabetes, Latest Cdc Report Reveals

More Than 100 Million Americans Have Been Diagnosed With Diabetes Or Prediabetes, Latest Cdc Report Reveals

The new ‘National Diabetes Statistics Report’ released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on 18th July 2017, says that over 100 million adults in U.S. are presently living with prediabetes or diabetes. According to the report, as of 2015, 9.4 % of the U.S. population, i.e., 30.3 million people have diabetes and 84.1 million were diagnosed with prediabetes, which if left untreated causes type 2 diabetes in five years. Further Reading It is confirmed by the study that the rate of diagnoses of new diabetes remains stable, yet, the disease continues to be a growing health issue. And in 2015, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. Brenda Fitzgerald, M.D, the Director of CDC said: “Although these findings reveal some progress in diabetes management and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes. More than a third of U.S. adults have prediabetes, and the majority don’t know it. Now, more than ever, we must step up our efforts to reduce the burden of this serious disease.” Diabetes, even though a serious condition that increases the risk of severe health complications such as, premature death, loss of vision, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and amputation of toes, feet, or legs, can usually be managed through physical activities, diet, as well as the suitable use of insulin and other medications to control levels of blood sugar. In order to provide information on diabetes prevalence and incidence, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, mortality, and costs in the U.S, CDC releases the National Diabetes Statistics Report approximately every two years. For the first time, the newly released report contains county-level data, which shows that a few Continue reading >>

One-third Of Americans With Prediabetes, New Report. That Also Means Higher Risk For Cancer.

One-third Of Americans With Prediabetes, New Report. That Also Means Higher Risk For Cancer.

More than a third of American adults are now living with prediabetes – with the majority unaware they have the condition – according to a new government report that can offer fresh motivation for millions to not only lower their risk of developing diabetes, but also of cancer. Along with a host of serious complications, having type 2 diabetes increases the risk of many cancers. Adults with diabetes have about twice the risk of developing cancers of the liver, pancreas and endometrium. There’s a clear but smaller increase in risk for colon and post-menopausal breast cancers. The two diseases – diabetes and cancer – share several key risk factors, including obesity and lack of physical activity. The CDC report finds that as of 2015, close to 10 percent – 30.3 million Americans –have diabetes. That rate of new diabetes diagnoses remains steady in recent years. Another 84 million adults have prediabetes, a condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes. While the report did not differentiate between the two major types of the disease, type 2 diabetes accounts for about 95% of all diabetes cases. Linking diabetes to cancer – how to prevent both diseases with lifestyle change. The report gathered estimated prediabetes incidence using the latest available data from The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Key findings from the CDC’s National Diabetes Statistics Report include: In 2015, an estimated 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed among people ages 18 and older. Nearly 1 in 4 four adults living with diabetes – 7.2 million Americans – didn’t know they had the condition. Only 11.6 percent of adults with prediabetes knew they had it. Rates of diagnosed diabetes increased with age. Among those ages 18-44, 4 percent had diab Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Statistic Report, 2017

National Diabetes Statistic Report, 2017

Diabetes cases are beginning to level off, but the number is still enormous: more than 100 million people in the United States have diabetes or prediabetes. Much work still needs to be done. In July, CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation (DDT) released the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017. The report presents the “state of the disease” in our nation, providing the most recent scientific data on: Diabetes incidence (new cases) Diabetes prevalence (existing cases) Short- and long-term complications Risk factors for complications Prediabetes Mortality (death rate) Costs Diabetes is a serious disease that can often be managed through physical activity, diet, and use of insulin and oral medications to lower blood sugar levels. People with diabetes are at increased risk of additional serious health complications including vision loss, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputation of toes, feet or legs, and premature death. As many as 2 out of 5 Americans are expected to develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Prediabetes is a serious health condition in which a person’s blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough yet to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Without weight loss (for those who need it), healthy eating, and moderate physical activity, many people living with prediabetes will go on to develop type 2 diabetes. The National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017 analyzes health data through 2015, providing statistics across ages, races, ethnicities, education levels, and regions. This report reflects a point-in-time analysis, and its data provides vital perspective on the current status of diabetes and can help focus prevention and control efforts going forward. Key findings: 30.3 million Americans—nearly 1 in 10—have diabetes. Continue reading >>

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released the 2017 Diabetes Statistics Report with estimates for “prevalence and incidence of diabetes, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, deaths, and costs.” Where are we now? There are 30.3 million people with diabetes (9.4% of the US population) including 23.1 million people who are diagnosed and 7.2 million people (23.8%) undiagnosed. The numbers for prediabetes indicate that 84.1 million adults (33.9% of the adult U.S. population) have prediabetes, including 23.1 million adults aged 65 years or older (the age group with highest rate). The estimated percentage of individuals with type 1 diabetes remains at 5% among those with diabetes. The statistics are also provided by age, gender, ethnicity, and for each state/territory so you can search for these specifics. The CDC has produced wonderful infographics, “A Snapshot of Diabetes in the U.S.” and “Prediabes: Could it be You?” for everyone to use and reproduce. They illustrate estimates for diabetes, prediabetes, the cost of diabetes (dollars, risk of death, medical costs), specifics about type 1 and type 2 diabetes, risk factors for type 2 diabetes, and a “What You Can Do” section. If we compare the numbers with previous estimates, we see that there has been an increase in those with diabetes and a decrease in those with prediabetes. However, the numbers are all still extremely high, and the costs and health burdens are staggering! What can we do with these statistics? Use them to help focus efforts to prevent and control diabetes in the U.S. Share the positive messages regarding prevention strategies with those at risk of developing or with type 2 diabetes Distribute the information to local media and Continue reading >>

What Are The Latest Diabetes Numbers From The Cdc?

What Are The Latest Diabetes Numbers From The Cdc?

The National Diabetes Statistics Report is a periodic publication of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that provides updated statistics about diabetes in the United States (1). It includes information on: prevalence and incidence of diabetes and prediabetes acute and long-term complications risk factors for complications # of deaths Diabetes costs. These data can help focus efforts for diabetes prevention and control in the United States. The estimates in this document were derived from various data systems of CDC, the Indian Health Service (IHS), the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the U.S. Census Bureau, and other sources.Both fasting glucose and hemoglobin A1C (A1C) levels were used to derive estimates for undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes. Most estimates of diabetes in this report do not differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Because type 2 diabetes accounts for 90% to 95% of all diabetes cases, the data presented are likely to be more characteristic of type 2 diabetes. More details to come. CDC. (2017). National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017. Retrieved July 24, 2017, from Which groups have the highest levels of diabetes? Overall, an estimated 30.3 million people of all ages—or 9.4% of the U.S. population—had diabetes in 2015. 23.8% were not aware of or did not report having diabetes. The percentage of adults with diabetes increased with age. The group with the highest prevalence where those aged 65 or older. This group reached reaching a high of 25.2% diabetes prevalence. Compared to non-Hispanic whites, the age-adjusted prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes was higher among Asians, non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics during 2011–2014. New cases of diabetes totaled an estimated 1.5 million among Continue reading >>

New Report Reveals “state Of Diabetes” In The Us

New Report Reveals “state Of Diabetes” In The Us

Are You One in 100 Million? More than 100 million Americans are living with diabetes (30.3 million) or prediabetes (84.1 million), according to the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017, released July 18. This report represents the “state of the disease” in our nation: prevalence and incidence, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, deaths, and costs. Research confirms that while diabetes cases are still growing, they’re not growing as fast as in previous years. This is encouraging news—prevention efforts are having an impact. But the numbers are still staggering, and certain populations are setting off alarm bells: older people and minorities are more likely to get diabetes, and youth are being diagnosed earlier in life. It’s critically important that diabetes management/control and type 2 diabetes prevention efforts continue going strong to stop the devastation of this disease. Read more key findings in the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017, and find out what CDC is doing to tackle diabetes and prediabetes at www.cdc.gov/diabetes. For more information: Continue reading >>

Current Burden Of Diabetes In The U.s.

Current Burden Of Diabetes In The U.s.

Diabetes is one of the most common and costly chronic diseases. An estimated 23.1 million people in the United States are diagnosed with diabetes at a cost of more than $245 billion per year.1,2 The CDC estimates that another 7.2 million people have diabetes but remain undiagnosed, while another 84.1 million adults 18 years and older have prediabetes.1 The highest rates of diabetes are found among minority populations and older Americans; however, across the United States, the overall prevalence continues to increase as overweight and obesity rates rise.3 Individuals with diabetes are at greater risk than other similar adults for many common problems, including coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertension, depression, pain, polypharmacy, and functional disability.4 Diabetes remains the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults in the United States, and the leading cause of end-stage renal failure. Annual updates on the impact of diabetes on the health of the U.S. population are available from the CDC National Diabetes Statistics Report . Despite significant advances in therapy over the past several years, diabetes remains the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Intensive treatment of glucose, blood pressure, and lipid levels in individuals with diabetes substantially reduces the risk of developing diabetes-related complications. However, under current models of care, many individuals with diabetes are not achieving the targets for optimal care recommended by clinical experts. In the most recent reports from the National Committee for Quality Assurance on health maintenance organizations (HMOs), 31 percent of patients continue to have an A1C greater than 9 percent, while 35 percent have blood pressure of ≥140/90 mm Hg.5 This gap between curr Continue reading >>

Prediabetes, Diabetes Affects More Than 100 Million Americans

Prediabetes, Diabetes Affects More Than 100 Million Americans

The National Diabetes Statistics Report found that 1 in 4 patients are unaware they have diabetes. The CDC recently released the National Diabetes Statistics Report, which indicated more than 100 million adults in the United States are living with diabetes or prediabetes. The investigators reported that in 2015, 30.3 million Americans—9.4% of the US population—had diabetes, while 84.1 million had prediabetes. While new diagnoses are at a steady pace, diabetes is a public health concern representing the seventh leading cause of death in 2015, according to the study. Additionally, the report shows that some areas of the country have a higher incidence of diabetes. “Although these findings reveal some progress in diabetes management and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes,” said CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, MD. “More than a third of US adults have prediabetes, and the majority don’t know it. Now, more than ever, we must step up our efforts to reduce the burden of this serious disease.” Diabetes can typically be managed through exercise, diet, and medications to control blood glucose levels. Without these strategies, patients may be at an increased risk of premature death, vision loss, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and amputation, according to the CDC. The National Diabetes Statistics Report provides important information regarding disease prevalence, prediabetes, complication risks, complications, mortality, and costs. The CDC estimates that nearly 1 in 4 adults living with diabetes were unaware of their condition, while only 11.6% of patients with prediabetes knew their diagnosis, according to the report. The report also showed that diagnoses increases with age. While only 4% of adults aged 18 to 44 years Continue reading >>

The Burden Of Diabetes

The Burden Of Diabetes

Worldwide Prevalence of Diabetes 2 IDF. Diabetes Atlas Update 2015. Available at: Current estimated prevalence: 415 million worldwide By 2040, 642 million people worldwide are expected to have diabetes Prevalence of Diabetes and Prediabetes in the United States 3 1. CDC. National diabetes fact sheet, 2008. 2. CDC. National diabetes fact sheet, 2011. 3. CDC. National diabetes statistics report, 2014. 4. CDC. National diabetes statistics report. 2017. Prediabetes 33.9% of US population Diabetes 9.4% of US population 20081 20112 20143 20174 Projected Prevalence of Diabetes in the United States: 1990 to 2050 4 1. National Diabetes Surveillance System. 2. CDC. National diabetes fact sheet, 2011. 3. Boyle JP, et al. Popul Health Metr. 2010 Oct 22;8:29. Year 1 1 2 3 3 3 3 Prevalence of Diagnosed Diabetes in Different US Ethnic and Racial Groups 5 CDC. National diabetes statistics report, 2017. US Adults ≥18 Years of Age Annual Incidence of Diabetes in US Children and Adolescents 6 *Incidence of type 2 diabetes not reported for children 0-9 years. API, Asians/Pacific Islanders; H, Hispanics; non-Hispanic blacks; NA, Native American; NHW, non-Hispanic whites; NHB. Mayer-Davis EJ, et al. N Engl J Med. 2017;376:1419-1429. Rate (per 100,000 per year) US Population, 0-19 Years of Age Race and Ethnicity Age of Onset Years T2D Prevalence Parallels Prevalence of Obesity 7 BMI, body mass index (in kg/m2); CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; NHANES, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (x-axis lists last year of each survey). *NHANES 1994 data. 1. Flegal KM, et al. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1998;22:39-47. 2. Flegal KM, et al. JAMA. 2002 ;288:1723-1727. 3. Flegal KM, et al. JAMA. 2010;303:235-241. 4. Flegal KM, et al. JAMA. 2012;307:491-497. 5. Ogden CL Continue reading >>

Overview

Overview

The importance of both diabetes and these comorbidities will continue to increase as the population ages. Therapies that have proven to reduce microvascular and macrovascular complications will need to be assessed in light of the newly identified comorbidities. Lifestyle change has been proven effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. Based on this, new public health approaches are emerging that may deserve monitoring at the national level. For example, the Diabetes Prevention Program research trial demonstrated that lifestyle intervention had its greatest impact in older adults and was effective in all racial and ethnic groups. Translational studies of this work have also shown that delivery of the lifestyle intervention in group settings at the community level are also effective at reducing type 2 diabetes risk. The National Diabetes Prevention Program has now been established to implement the lifestyle intervention nationwide. Another emerging issue is the effect on public health of new laboratory based criteria, such as introducing the use of A1c for diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or for recognizing high risk for type 2 diabetes. These changes may impact the number of individuals with undiagnosed diabetes and facilitate the introduction of type 2 diabetes prevention at a public health level. Several studies have suggested that process indicators such as foot exams, eye exams, and measurement of A1c may not be sensitive enough to capture all aspects of quality of care that ultimately result in reduced morbidity. New diabetes quality-of-care indicators are currently under development and may help determine whether appropriate, timely, evidence-based care is linked to risk factor reduction. In addition, the scientific evid Continue reading >>

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