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Cdc Diabetes Risk Factors

Diabetes Quick Facts

Diabetes Quick Facts

The Big Picture More than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes, and 1 in 4 of them don’t know they have it. More than 84 million US adults—over a third—have prediabetes, and 90% of them don’t know they have it. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States (and may be underreported). Type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90% to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes; type 1 diabetes accounts for about 5%. In the last 20 years, the number of adults diagnosed with diabetes has more than tripled as the American population has aged and become more overweight or obese. Risk You’re at risk for developing prediabetes or type 2 diabetes if you: Are overweight Are age 45 or older Have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Are physically active less than 3 times a week Have ever had gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant) or given birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at higher risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. American Indians/Alaska Natives are twice as likely as whites to have diabetes. During their lifetime, half of all Hispanic men and women and non-Hispanic black women are predicted to develop diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an immune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake). Known risk factors for type 1 diabetes include: Family history (having a parent, brother, sister with type 1 diabetes) Age (it’s more likely to develop in children, teens, and young adults) In the United States, whites are more likely to develop type 1 diabetes than African Americans and Hispanic/Latino Americans. You’re at risk for developing gestational diabetes (diabetes w Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes You’re at risk for developing prediabetes if you: Are overweight Are 45 years or older Have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Are physically active less than 3 times a week Have ever had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or given birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds Are African American, Hispanic/Latino American, American Indian, or Alaska Native (some Pacific Islanders and Asian Americans are also at higher risk) You can prevent or reverse prediabetes with simple, proven lifestyle changes such as losing weight if you’re overweight, eating healthier, and getting regular physical activity. The CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program can help you make healthy changes that have lasting results. Type 2 Diabetes You’re at risk for developing type 2 diabetes if you: Have prediabetes Are overweight Are 45 years or older Have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Are physically active less than 3 times a week Have ever had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or given birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds Are African American, Hispanic/Latino American, American Indian, or Alaska Native (some Pacific Islanders and Asian Americans are also at higher risk) You can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes with simple, proven lifestyle changes such as losing weight if you’re overweight, eating healthier, and getting regular physical activity. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an immune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake). Risk factors for type 1 diabetes are not as clear as for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Known risk factors include: Family history: Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 1 diabetes. Age: You can get type 1 diabetes at any age, but Continue reading >>

So...do I Have Prediabetes?

So...do I Have Prediabetes?

With a little exercise and a change in diet, it often can be reversed. Let's face it, there are millions of reasons why we don't find the time to make healthy lifestyle choices. Kids, jobs, cat videos on the Internet — we're busy. But whatever your reason, prediabetes is real. So find out if you have prediabetes by taking the test now. You won't regret it. Join the National DPP You're not alone in this. There are hundreds of Diabetes Prevention Programs in local communities that are proven to help people with prediabetes make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. We're sure there's one that's right for you. "But I'm a busy mom...I don't have time to eat right and exercise!" Yes, making lifestyle changes may seem hard. But it doesn’t have to be. In fact, some of them can even be fun. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Risk Test

Diabetes Risk Test

Could you have diabetes and not know it? One in four Americans with diabetes has it and doesn’t know it. Take the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Risk Test below to see if you are at risk for type 2 diabetes. A PDF version of the Diabetes Risk Test is also available here (PDF, 324 KB) . The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is jointly sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with the support of more than 200 partner organizations. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that can develop during pregnancy in women who don’t already have diabetes. Every year, 2% to 10% of pregnancies in the United States are affected by gestational diabetes. Managing gestational diabetes will help make sure you have a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. Causes Gestational diabetes occurs when your body can’t make enough insulin during your pregnancy. Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that acts like a key to let blood sugar into the cells in your body for use as energy. During pregnancy, your body makes more hormones and goes through other changes, such as weight gain. These changes cause your body’s cells to use insulin less effectively, a condition called insulin resistance. Insulin resistance increases your body’s need for insulin. All pregnant women have some insulin resistance during late pregnancy. However, some women have insulin resistance even before they get pregnant. They start pregnancy with an increased need for insulin and are more likely to have gestational diabetes. About 50% of women with gestational diabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes, but there are steps you can take to prevent it. Talk to your doctor about how to lower your risk and how often to have your blood sugar checked to make sure you’re on track. Gestational diabetes typically doesn’t have any symptoms. Your medical history and whether you have any risk factors may suggest to your doctor that you could have gestational diabetes, but you’ll need to be tested to know for sure. Complications Having gestational diabetes can increase your risk of high blood pressure during pregnancy. It can also increase your risk of having a large baby that needs to be delivered by cesarean section (C-section). If you have ges Continue reading >>

Age Of Onset For Type 2 Diabetes: Know Your Risk

Age Of Onset For Type 2 Diabetes: Know Your Risk

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 21 million people were diagnosed with diabetes in 2012. The CDC also notes that 90 to 95 percent of cases in adults involve type 2 diabetes. In the past, type 2 diabetes was most prevalent in older adults. But due to widespread poor lifestyle habits, it’s more common in younger people than ever before. Type 2 diabetes is often preventable. Learn what you can do to prevent or delay its onset, no matter your age. Middle-aged and older adults are still at the highest risk for developing type 2 diabetes. According to the CDC, there were a total of 1.7 million new total diabetes cases in 2012. In 2012, adults aged 45 to 64 were the most diagnosed age group for diabetes. New cases of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in people aged 20 years and older were distributed as follows: ages 20 to 44: 371,000 new cases ages 45 to 64: 892,000 new cases age 65 and older: 400,000 new cases People aged 45 to 64 were also developing diabetes at a faster rate, edging out adults aged 65 and older. Type 2 diabetes used to be only prevalent in adults. It was once called “adult-onset” diabetes. Now, because it is becoming more common in children, it’s simply called “type 2" diabetes. While type 1 diabetes, which is believed to be due to an autoimmune reaction, is more common in children and young adults, type 2 diabetes is rising in incidence, attributed in part to poor lifestyle habits. According to the American Diabetes Association, about 5,090 people under the age of 20 are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes every year. A 2012 study published in Diabetes Care considered the potential future number of diabetes cases in people under the age of 20. The study found that, at current rates, the number of people under the age o Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

More than 30 million Americans have diabetes (about 1 in 10), and 90% to 95% of them have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes most often develops in people over age 45, but more and more children, teens, and young adults are also developing it. Causes Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that acts like a key to let blood sugar into the cells in your body for use as energy. If you have type 2 diabetes, cells don’t respond normally to insulin; this is called insulin resistance. Your pancreas makes more insulin to try to get cells to respond. Eventually your pancreas can’t keep up, and your blood sugar rises, setting the stage for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. High blood sugar is damaging to the body and can cause other serious health problems, such as heart disease, vision loss, and kidney disease. Symptoms & Risk Factors Type 2 diabetes symptoms often develop over several years and can go on for a long time without being noticed (sometimes there aren’t any noticeable symptoms at all). Because symptoms can be hard to spot, it’s important to know the risk factors for type 2 diabetes and to see your doctor to get your blood sugar tested if you have any of them. Getting Tested A simple blood test will let you know if you have diabetes. If you’ve gotten your blood sugar tested at a health fair or pharmacy, follow up at a clinic or doctor’s office to make sure the results are accurate. Management Unlike many health conditions, diabetes is managed mostly by you, with support from your health care team (including your primary care doctor, foot doctor, dentist, eye doctor, registered dietitian nutritionist, diabetes educator, and pharmacist), family, and other important people in your life. Managing diabetes can be challenging, but everything you do to improve y Continue reading >>

Hispanic Health: Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Hispanic Health: Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Government leaders and close-knit families. Olympic athletes and celebrated artists. This month we commemorate Hispanic and Latino culture, connection, and contributions. During National Hispanic Heritage Month, September 15–October 15, we celebrate the culture of US residents who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico, and the Spanish-speaking nations of Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. And while recognizing their many contributions and achievements, let’s also acknowledge Hispanic and Latino people’s greater risk for type 2 diabetes and take action to prevent it. Greater Diabetes Risk Over their lifetimes, 40% of US adults are expected to develop type 2 diabetes. That number is even higher for Hispanic men and women—more than 50%. Diabetes is a disease in which blood sugar levels are above normal. Most of the food we eat is turned into blood sugar for our bodies to use for energy. The pancreas makes a hormone called insulin to help blood sugar get into the body’s cells. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use its own insulin as well as it should. This causes sugar to build up in the blood, which over time can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, vision loss, and nerve damage leading to amputation of a foot or leg. Currently, more than 30 million Americans have diabetes, and 1 in 4 of them don’t know they have it. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake) and can’t yet be prevented. It’s usually diagnosed in children and young adults. Type 2 diabetes develops over many years and is usually diagnosed in adults (though increasingly in children, teens, a Continue reading >>

Supporting Ama And Cdc Prediabetes Campaign

Supporting Ama And Cdc Prediabetes Campaign

Quest Diagnostics supports the American Medical Association (AMA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in their efforts to raise awareness of prediabetes. It’s a serious but largely unrecognized health condition: An estimated 90% of the 86 million Americans with prediabetes don’t even know they have it.1 The good news is, prediabetes is preventable with even small changes in diet and exercise. Or, for patients already diagnosed with prediabetes, it can be reversed or even cured. That’s a win for everyone. Learn more about prediabetes, its risk factors, and testing options from Quest Refer patients to a simple, one-minute online quiz for assessing their prediabetes risk. Learn more about tests for diagnosing prediabetes or predicting future risk of developing it. References 1.American Diabetes Association. diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/. Last reviewed May 18, 2015. Last accessed June 26, 2016. Continue reading >>

Risk Factors

Risk Factors

Season 2 Videos Diabetes & Smoking: A Dangerous Duo Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes (30 seconds) Know the Risk Factors Continue reading >>

Cdc: 100 Million Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

Cdc: 100 Million Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

The growth of diabetes in the United States may be slowing, but it is still increasing. Just how bad can it get? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides The National Diabetes Statistics Report, a periodic publication that provides updated statistics about diabetes in the United States for a scientific audience. It includes information on prevalence and incidence of diabetes, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, deaths, and costs. Estimates for the 2017 report were derived from CDC data systems, the Indian Health Service, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the U.S. Census Bureau, and published studies. Both fasting glucose and HbA1c levels were used to derive estimates for undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes. The report also found that an estimated 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed among adults in 2015. However, nearly 1 in 4 four adults living with diabetes, or 7.2 million Americans, did not know they had the condition, according to the report. Only 11.6% of adults with prediabetes knew they had it. From the results, it was found that more than 100 million U.S. adults are now living with diabetes or prediabetes, according to the report. That would be every third person in the United States. The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, which estimates diabetes and its burden in the United States, shows that as of 2015, 30.3 million U.S. residents, or 9.4% of the population, have diabetes; another 84.1 million have prediabetes. The report shows that disease numbers have held steady — the 2014 report estimated that 29.1 million people, or 9.3% of the population, have diabetes — but the cost and health burdens related to the condition continue to grow. Diabetes was the seventh Continue reading >>

What Is Prediabetes And Are You At Risk?

What Is Prediabetes And Are You At Risk?

Having prediabetes means your blood sugar (glucose) levels are higher than normal—but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Many people with prediabetes who do not change their lifestyle by losing weight and being more physically active will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. People with prediabetes also are more likely to get heart disease or have a stroke. Many US adults have prediabetes but don’t know it. Learn more about prediabetes risk factors and find out if you or your loved ones are at risk. Prediabetes: Could it Be You? This CDC infographic provides an overview of prediabetes health outcomes, prevention strategies, and how to get help. PDF Version[PDF-462KB] | Web Version [JPG-30KB] Prediabetes: Am I at Risk? Learn about who is at risk for prediabetes and how you can prevent type 2 diabetes. Could You Have Prediabetes? Screening Quiz Continue reading >>

Chronic Disease Prevention And Health Promotion

Chronic Disease Prevention And Health Promotion

Working to Reverse the US Epidemic At A Glance 2016 The rate of new cases of diagnosed diabetes in the United States has begun to fall, but the numbers are still very high. More than 29 million Americans are living with diabetes, and 86 million are living with prediabetes, a serious health condition that increases a person’s risk of type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is working to reverse the US diabetes epidemic by tracking disease trends, focusing on prevention, identifying effective treatments, and improving medical care. Public Health Problem People with diabetes either don’t make enough insulin (type 1 diabetes) or can’t use insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). Insulin allows blood sugar (glucose) to enter cells, where it can be used for energy. When the body doesn’t have enough insulin or can’t use it effectively, blood sugar builds up in the blood. High blood sugar levels can lead to heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney failure, and amputation of toes, feet, or legs. Type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90% to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes, and type 1 diabetes accounts for about 5%. The health and economic costs for both are enormous: Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States in 2013 (and may be underreported). Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, lower-limb amputations, and adult-onset blindness. More than 20% of health care spending is for people with diagnosed diabetes. People who have one or more of the following risk factors should talk to their doctor about getting their blood sugar tested: Being overweight. Being 45 years or older. Having a family history of type 2 diabetes. Being physically active less than 3 times a week. Ever having g Continue reading >>

Press & Social Media

Press & Social Media

Press & Social Media To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: A Snapshot: Diabetes In The United States Error processing SSI file Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention General Information And Resources

Diabetes Prevention General Information And Resources

Nearly 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, and another 84 million America adults are at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). To find out more information on preventing diabetes, see the CDC website which gives risk factors, when you should be tested, a fact sheet and frequently asked questions (FAQ’s): Healthy lifestyle choices can help prevent type 2 diabetes, even if diabetes runs in a family, diet and exercise can help prevent the disease. If you already have been diagnosed with diabetes, the same healthy lifestyle choices can help prevent potentially serious complications from occurring. If you have pre-diabetes, lifestyle changes can slow or halt the progression from pre-diabetes to diabetes. Excerpted from the Mayo Clinic website, and the following tips & additional information on preventing diabetes, can also be found on the site: Eat healthy foods. Choose foods low in fat and calories. Focus on fruits, vegetables and whole grains. For every 1,000 calories you consume, try to have at least 14 grams of fiber, because fiber helps control blood sugar levels. Get physical. Aim for 30 minutes of moderate physical activity a day. Take a brisk daily walk. Ride a bike. Swim laps, or if you cannot fit in a longer workout, spread out 10-minute or longer sessions throughout the day. Lose excess pounds. If you’re overweight, losing 5 to 10 percent of your body weight can reduce the risk of diabetes. To keep your weight in a healthy range, focus on permanent changes to your eating and exercise habits. Motivate yourself as the benefits of losing weight, such as having a healthier heart, having more energy and improved self-esteem are so important to your well-being. The Connecticut Department of Public He Continue reading >>

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