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State Health Department Offers Advice On Upcoming Flu Season

State Health Department Offers Advice On Upcoming Flu Season

This Week's Facts: The Indiana General Assembly will convene for Organizational Day of the 2011 Session on Tuesday, November 16, 2010. The Senate will convene at 1:00p.m. and the House at 1:30 p.m. Indiana citizens can stay informed and keep track of your legislators, current issues and laws. Friday Fast Facts The U.S. Census Bureau released the dataset American’s Families and Living Arrangements: 2010 this week, which shows American men and women are waiting longer to marry. See the press release here. Last week, the Census Bureau released the report Fertility of American Women: 2008 which shows Nearly 1 in 3 Unmarried Women Who Give Birth Cohabit, as stated by its press release. ------------------------------- Friday Facts Editorial Team: ------------------------------------- The Indiana State Department of Health advises Hoosiers to Prepare, Plan and Prevent the Influenza Virus. After last year’s H1N1 epidemic, many people were left unprepared, ill-informed and afraid of the influenza. The first step in preparation is to increase knowledge about the influenza virus and know whether it is a pandemic or not. You can avoid the flu by practicing good health habits such as washing your hands frequently, covering your mouth when you cough or sneeze and staying home when you’re sick. See the Indiana Department of Health’s Influenza website for more tips. If you need to find out where you can get vaccinated, the Google Flu Shot locator offers a searchable map showing where clinics are throughout the State. Preparation, Planning and Prevention can help you and your family stay safe during this year’s flu season. November 15th is America Recycles Day! Since 1997, this has been a nationally recognized day dedicated to promoting recycling in your community. The America Continue reading >>

Fast Facts - Data And Statistics About Diabetes

Fast Facts - Data And Statistics About Diabetes

Unless otherwise noted, all references in Fast Facts are from the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017 (link is external). The Fact Sheet is the product of a joint collaboration of the CDC, NIDDK, the American Diabetes Association, and other government and nonprofit agencies. Sources of data for Fast Facts that do not come from the Statistics Report: Approximately 1.25 million American children and adults have type 1 diabetes. Type 1 prevalence figure calculated from prevalence data from the CDC’s SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study and from data in the National Diabetes Statistics Report showing that type 1 diabetes represents 5% of diagnosed diabetes. Costs of diabetes. American Diabetes Association: Economic Costs of Diabetes in the United States in 2012. Diabetes Care 36: 1033—1046, 2013. 85.2% of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report MMWR 2003 The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes in the U.S. increased by 382% from 1988 to 2014 Calculated from NIHS data Diabetes kills more Americans every year than AIDS and breast cancer combined Diabetes: Health, United States, 2010: 69,201 deaths Breast cancer 40,676 deaths, 2009 AIDS, 21,601 deaths, 2009 A person with diagnosed diabetes at age 50 dies 6 years earlier than a counterpart without diabetes Diabetes Mellitus, Fasting Glucose, and Risk of Cause-Specific Death Other Sources of Statistics State by State and County Level Diabetes Statistics State by state diagnosed prevalence and county level diabetes statistics can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's web site. Economic Cost of Diabetes in the US 2012 A summary and links to the study and supplementary data can be found on DiabetesPro at professional.diabetes.org/cost. Continue reading >>

Facts

Facts

Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in North Carolina. An estimated 750,000 (1 in 10) North Carolina adults have been diagnosed with diabetes. An additional 280,000 North Carolina residents may have diabetes and not know it. An estimated 2.5 million (1 in 3) North Carolinians may have prediabetes. Without lifestyle changes to improve their health, 15% - 30% of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five years. Type 2 diabetes accounts for over 90% of diagnosed diabetes cases in adults, and being overweight/obese is a key risk factor to its development. Complications from diabetes can include amputations, chronic kidney disease, heart attack/stroke, vision loss, hearing loss, erectile dysfunction, low birth weight, sleep apnea and possibly Alzheimer’s disease. 60% of all non-traumatic lower-limb amputations among people aged 20 years or older occur in people with diagnosed diabetes. Three key components of diabetes treatment include optimal control of blood glucose, blood pressure and blood cholesterol. See CDC’s Diabetes Interactive Atlas for the latest statistics about diabetes and risk factors by county. The Economic Burden of Elevated Blood Glucose Levels in 2012: Diagnosed and Undiagnosed Diabetes, Gestational Diabetes Mellitus, and Prediabetes Continue reading >>

What’s Your Diabetes “eye Q”?

What’s Your Diabetes “eye Q”?

By the dLife Editors From 1997 to 2011, the number of adults with diagnosed diabetes who reported visual impairment—that is, trouble seeing even with their glasses or contact lenses—increased from 2.7 million to 4.0 million, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Don’t let this be you. Take control today. See how you do on this diabetic eye disease quiz, and schedule your next eye exam today. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Number (in Millions) of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older with Diagnosed Diabetes Reporting Visual Impairment, United States, 1997-2011.” October 2, 2014. Accessed May 2013. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is a serious health condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Approximately 84 million American adults—more than 1 out of 3—have prediabetes. Of those with prediabetes, 90% don’t know they have it. Prediabetes puts you at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The good news is that if you have prediabetes, the CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program can help you make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and other serious health problems. Causes Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy. If you have prediabetes, the cells in your body don’t respond normally to insulin. Your pancreas makes more insulin to try to get cells to respond. Eventually your pancreas can’t keep up, and your blood sugar rises, setting the stage for prediabetes—and type 2 diabetes down the road. Symptoms & Risk Factors You can have prediabetes for years but have no clear symptoms, so it often goes undetected until serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes show up. It’s important to talk to your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested if you have any of the risk factors for prediabetes, which include: Being overweight Being 45 years or older Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Being physically active less than 3 times a week Ever having gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds Race and ethnicity are also a factor: African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at higher risk. Getting Tested You can get a simple blood Continue reading >>

Facts & Statistics About Diabetes

Facts & Statistics About Diabetes

Hundreds of millions of people worldwide suffer from diabetes, a disease that affects the body’s ability to manage blood glucose levels. A very serious condition, diabetes can lead to additional health problems including kidney failure, blindness, heart disease, amputations and death. In the United States, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is an agency that provides extensive information about Diabetes and other diseases, including research updates. To date, researchers have been able to identify genetics and “triggers” that cause diabetes, but prevention has yet to be determined. Diabetes – Facts & Statistics Diabetes is a serious medical condition that affects millions of people worldwide. In 2014, reports indicated that globally, about 422 million adults suffered from diabetes, up from 108 million in 1980. This is a rise proportionally in adults from 4.7% to 8.5%. It also was the cause of death for over 1.5 million people in 2012. For that same year in the United States, it was estimated that 29.1 million people have diabetes, representing about 9.3% of the population. This total represents 21 million diagnosed cases, but another 8.1 million people who have diabetes remain undiagnosed or treated. Since many people either will have to deal with this disease themselves or they will know others with diabetes, it is important to learn more about it. There are ways to reduce the severity of the effects of diabetes, and to help your body deal with sugar/glucose blood levels effectively. YouTube Special Feature Basic Issues of Diabetes To understand how diabetes affects health, start with the basic issues of this disease and how these issues can become detrimental. The blood stream circulates around the body, taking and removing important elements Continue reading >>

About Diabetes

About Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic (long-lasting) disease that affects how your body turns food into energy. Most of the food you eat is broken down into sugar (also called glucose) and released into your bloodstream. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin, which acts like a key to let the blood sugar into your body’s cells for use as energy. If you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use the insulin it makes as well as it should. When there isn’t enough insulin or cells stop responding to insulin, too much blood sugar stays in your bloodstream, which over time can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, vision loss, and kidney disease. There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes, but healthy lifestyle habits, taking medicine as needed, getting diabetes self-management education, and keeping appointments with your health care team can greatly reduce its impact on your life. 30.3 million US adults have diabetes, and 1 in 4 of them don’t know they have it. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the US. Diabetes is the No. 1 cause of kidney failure, lower-limb amputations, and adult-onset blindness. In the last 20 years, the number of adults diagnosed with diabetes has more than tripled as the American population has aged and become more overweight or obese. Types of Diabetes There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant). Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake) that stops your body from making insulin. About 5% of the people who have diabetes have type 1. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often develop quickly. It’s usually diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults. If you have type 1 diabetes, you’ll need t Continue reading >>

It's Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

It's Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

November is National Diabetes Month. Here’s to managing your diabetes for a longer, healthier life. There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes, but a healthy lifestyle can really reduce its impact on your life. What you do every day makes the difference: eating a healthy diet, being physically active, taking medicines if prescribed, and keeping health care appointments to stay on track. The Basics More than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 1 out of 4 of them don’t know they have it. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant, which can put the pregnancy and baby at risk and lead to type 2 diabetes later). With type 1 diabetes, your body can’t make insulin (a hormone that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy), so you need to take it every day. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2 diabetes; about 5% of the people who have diabetes have type 1. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes. Most people with diabetes—9 out of 10—have type 2 diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t use insulin well and is unable to keep blood sugar at normal levels. If you have any of the risk factors below, ask your doctor if you should be tested for diabetes. The sooner you find out, the sooner you can start making healthy changes that will benefit you now and in the future. More than 30 million US adults have diabetes—and 1 out of 4 of them don’t know they have it. At least 1 out of 3 people will develop diabetes in their lifetime. Medical costs for people with diabetes are twice as high as for people without diabetes. Risk of death for adults with diabetes is 50% higher than for adults without diabetes. Type 2 diabetes risk factors include: Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facts

Type 1 Diabetes Facts

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that occurs when a person’s pancreas stops producing insulin, the hormone that controls blood-sugar levels. T1D develops when the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells are mistakenly destroyed by the body’s immune system. The cause of this attack is still being researched, however scientists believe the cause may have genetic and environmental components. There is nothing anyone can do to prevent T1D. Presently, there is no known cure. Who T1D affects Type 1 diabetes (sometimes known as juvenile diabetes) affects children and adults, though people can be diagnosed at any age. With a typically quick onset, T1D must be managed with the use of insulin—either via injection or insulin pump. Soon, people who are insulin dependent may also be able to use artificial pancreas systems to automatically administer their insulin. How T1D is managed Type 1 diabetes is a 24/7 disease that requires constant management. People with T1D continuously and carefully balance insulin intake with eating, exercise and other activities. They also measure blood-sugar levels through finger pricks, ideally at least six times a day, or by wearing a continuous glucose monitor. Even with a strict regimen, people with T1D may still experience dangerously high or low blood-glucose levels that can, in extreme cases, be life threatening. Every person with T1D becomes actively involved in managing his or her disease. Insulin is not a cure While insulin therapy keeps people with T1D alive and can help keep blood-glucose levels within recommended range, it is not a cure, nor does it prevent the possibility of T1D’s serious effects. The outlook for treatments and a cure Although T1D is a serious and challenging disease, long-term management options cont Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Facts And Figures

Diabetes: Facts And Figures

Quick Facts 40% of Wisconsin adults are expected to develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime.1 8% of Wisconsin adults have diabetes.2 28% of Wisconsin adults have diabetes and don't know it.3 37% of Wisconsin adults have prediabetes.3 Approximately 356,000 adults and 6,500 children and adolescents in Wisconsin have been diagnosed with diabetes.2,4,5 It is estimated that an additional 138,000 have diabetes but are undiagnosed.3 The direct (medical care) and indirect (lost productivity) costs of diabetes in Wisconsin total an estimated $3.9 billion annually.6 Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States.7 What is diabetes? According to the National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, or sugar, for our bodies to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ that lies near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn't make enough insulin or can't use its own insulin as well as it should. This causes sugar to build up in your blood. Diabetes can cause serious health complications including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations. The three main types of diabetes are: type 1 diabetes (link is external), type 2 diabetes (link is external), and gestational diabetes (link is external). Another condition called prediabetes (link is external) is almost always a precursor to type 2 diabetes. Modest behavior changes can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in people who have prediabetes. More Facts and Figures For diabetes data on the national, state, and county levels, see the CDC Data and Statisti Continue reading >>

Tobacco Facts From The Cdc

Tobacco Facts From The Cdc

According to the Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General, 2014 recent research has uncovered even more dangers and risks associated with smoking. They include: Since the first Surgeon General’s report on smoking and health was published 50 years ago, more than 20 million Americans have died because of smoking. If current rates continue, 5.6 million Americans younger than 18 years of age who are alive today are projected to die prematurely from smoking- related disease. Most of the 20 million smoking-related deaths since 1964 have been adults with a history of smoking; however, 2.5 million of those deaths have been among nonsmokers who died from diseases caused by exposure to secondhand smoke. More than 100,000 babies have died in the last 50 years from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, complications from prematurity, complications from low birth weight, and other pregnancy problems resulting from parental smoking. In the United States, smoking causes 87 percent of lung cancer deaths, 32 percent of coronary heart disease deaths, and 79 percent of all cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). One out of three cancer deaths is caused by smoking. This report concludes that smoking causes colorectal and liver cancer and increases the failure rate of treatment for all cancers. The report also concludes that smoking causes diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis and immune system weakness, increased risk for tuberculosis disease and death, ectopic (tubal) pregnancy and impaired fertility, cleft lip and cleft palates in babies of women who smoke during early pregnancy, erectile dysfunction, and age-related macular degeneration. Secondhand smoke exposure is now known to cause strokes in nonsmokers. This report finds that Continue reading >>

So...do I Have Prediabetes?

So...do I Have Prediabetes?

With a little exercise and a change in diet, it often can be reversed. Let's face it, there are millions of reasons why we don't find the time to make healthy lifestyle choices. Kids, jobs, cat videos on the Internet — we're busy. But whatever your reason, prediabetes is real. So find out if you have prediabetes by taking the test now. You won't regret it. Join the National DPP You're not alone in this. There are hundreds of Diabetes Prevention Programs in local communities that are proven to help people with prediabetes make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. We're sure there's one that's right for you. "But I'm a busy mom...I don't have time to eat right and exercise!" Yes, making lifestyle changes may seem hard. But it doesn’t have to be. In fact, some of them can even be fun. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Quick Facts

Diabetes Quick Facts

The Big Picture More than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes, and 1 in 4 of them don’t know they have it. More than 84 million US adults—over a third—have prediabetes, and 90% of them don’t know they have it. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States (and may be underreported). Type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90% to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes; type 1 diabetes accounts for about 5%. In the last 20 years, the number of adults diagnosed with diabetes has more than tripled as the American population has aged and become more overweight or obese. Risk You’re at risk for developing prediabetes or type 2 diabetes if you: Are overweight Are age 45 or older Have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Are physically active less than 3 times a week Have ever had gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant) or given birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at higher risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. American Indians/Alaska Natives are twice as likely as whites to have diabetes. During their lifetime, half of all Hispanic men and women and non-Hispanic black women are predicted to develop diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an immune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake). Known risk factors for type 1 diabetes include: Family history (having a parent, brother, sister with type 1 diabetes) Age (it’s more likely to develop in children, teens, and young adults) In the United States, whites are more likely to develop type 1 diabetes than African Americans and Hispanic/Latino Americans. You’re at risk for developing gestational diabetes (diabetes w Continue reading >>

Disease Diabetes

Disease Diabetes

Diabetes is a growing problem in Minnesota. In 2015, 7.6 percent of Minnesota adults (about 320,000)1 had been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or 2). That number does not account for the nearly 1 in 4 people who don’t know they have it. There’s a great deal of information available about diabetes types, risk factors, symptoms and managing your disease. The following is intended to be a summary of basic diabetes information, leading to additional trusted sources for more detail. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a set of diseases that occurs when glucose (sugar) builds up in your blood. It is caused by problems with insulin, a hormone that helps your body use glucose. Glucose provides energy to your body. It is found in carbohydrates in food2. Common types of diabetes Type 1 diabetes Develops when the pancreas (an organ near your stomach) stops making insulin. Type 1 often starts in childhood, but adults can develop it2. Type 2 diabetes Develops when the pancreas slows down its production of insulin or the body cannot use the insulin. Type 2 diabetes is on the rise worldwide. About 95 percent of all diabetes cases are type 22. Most cases occur among adults. Gestational diabetes (GDM) Affects women during pregnancy and usually goes away after pregnancy. Between two and 10 percent of women have had GDM2. Who is at risk for diabetes? Type 1 diabetes We know some genes can increase risk of type 1 diabetes, but we do not know what triggers it or how to prevent it. Having a family history of type 1 may put you at greater risk2. Also, non-Hispanic whites are more likely to experience type 1 diabetes than other ethnic groups. Type 2 diabetes Many people are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes: Older adults: Diabetes is more common among older adults2. Ethnic groups: Other than Continue reading >>

National Data From Cdc.gov

National Data From Cdc.gov

Available from no other source, this comprehensive collection of diabetes-related data from national health surveys, state-based telephone surveys, vital statistics, and other data sources documents trends in diabetes prevalence and incidence; diabetes-related complications and use of health care services; preventive care practices; and disability in the United States. Continue reading >>

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