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Cdc Diabetes Prevention Program Curriculum

Curricula And Handouts

Curricula And Handouts

Your organization must use an approved curriculum that meets the CDC requirements for recognition. Newly developed curricula must be submitted, reviewed, and approved by CDC prior to its use. On this page, learn about curriculum requirements and download a CDC-developed curriculum in English or Spanish. For questions and more information about the PreventT2 curriculum visit the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) or PreventT2 Resources. Continue reading >>

Cdc Picks Apha Foundation To Put Diabetes Prevention Program In Pharmacies

Cdc Picks Apha Foundation To Put Diabetes Prevention Program In Pharmacies

CDC picks APhA Foundation to put diabetes prevention program in pharmacies Project IMPACT: Diabetes Prevention will expand access for at-risk adults in underserved communities CDC has selected the APhA Foundation, in partnership with the Kroger Co. and Solera Health, to build infrastructure within community pharmacies to expand access to an innovative evidence-based lifestyle change program designed to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes among adults with prediabetes. Called Project IMPACT: Diabetes Prevention, the program will deliver the CDC-recognized National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP) curriculum to at least 7,500 at-risk adults in underserved communities in the United States over the next 5 years. Pharmacists, dietitians, and technicians at Kroger pharmacy locations will be trained to deliver the National DPP curriculum, and Solera Healtha preventive care benefits managerwill support community outreach efforts with its technology platform. The programs hybrid model of care will combine face-to-face, telehealth, and digital technology solutions so that providers can tailor the program to the participants and help them successfully complete the program. The APhA Foundation announced today it has entered into a 5-year cooperative agreement with CDC to implement Project IMPACT: Diabetes Prevention to scale the National DPP in underserved areas through pharmacies. We are excited to have the opportunity to collaborate with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to create infrastructure within highly accessible community pharmacies to deliver evidence-based diabetes prevention lifestyle change programs to the people who need it the most, said APhA Foundation Senior Vice President of Research and Innovation Benjamin Bluml, RPh. Working wi Continue reading >>

Coaches Corner | I Can Prevent Diabetes!

Coaches Corner | I Can Prevent Diabetes!

Curriculum from CDC Website for the National Diabetes Prevention Program The content of the I CAN Prevent Diabetes Program is based on the National Diabetes Prevention Program and the Lifestyle Intervention curriculum. The complete Lifestyle Intervention curriculum for 16 weekly core sessions, 15 options for monthly post-core sessions and other resources and tools can be found at the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions Division of Diabetes Translation enhanced website for the National Diabetes Prevention Program . For example, CDC has developed a widget that can appear on your organizations website or blog that can serve as a screening tool for prediabetes. In addition to raising awareness, the widget can be used as a first step towards referring individuals to Lifestyle Intervention programs in your area. Find the prediabetes screening widget here and click share to find out how to add the widget to your website. The website also has a video that you might use to recruit patients with prediabetes for your program. Minnesota Regional Lifestyle Coach Training Co-sponsored by the Minnesota Department of Health Diabetes Program and the Diabetes Training and Technical Assistance Center The Minnesota Department of Health periodically partners with the Diabetes Training and Technical Assistance Center (DTTAC) at Emory University to bring National Diabetes Prevention Program Lifestyle Coach Training to Minnesota . Organizations may contact the Minnesota Diabetes Program to coordinate training or to learn about upcoming Minnesota trainings. Once a training date is established, each participant will register on-line with DTTAC for the two day training. For more information about the Minnesota Regional lifestyle coach training contact the Minnesota Department of HealthDi Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Prevention Program

National Diabetes Prevention Program

Maurice Saliba is a highly recognized motivational speaker and trainer with more than thirty years experience in the health and fitness business. He has been featured on many well-known programs about how to stay healthy and defeat disease. Maurice founded Hope 80/20 because his passion is to create a large scale solution for the health burdens of people in our communities and corporations. Maurice was among the first group of people in the nation to be certified as a Diabetes Prevention Coach by the CDC. One-third of the adults in America are considered pre-diabetic. Ten percent of adults develop diabetes every year. At that rate, by the year 2050, 33% of American adults will have diabetes. Heres the truthdiabetes is preventable! Maurice has worked with literally thousands of people to shed tens of thousands of pounds. Many have been taken off of their medications by their physicians. Others have reduced their medications dramatically. Their reduction in weight has improved the quality of their lives. Diabetes is one of the most dangerous diseases affecting adults today, but it doesnt have to be that way. By making some adjustments in how and what you eat, increasing your daily activity, and learning a little about health and nutrition, you can take control of your life today and in the future. The Diabetes Prevention Program is based on curriculum developed by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Research has proven it works. The CDC conducted a study of 3000 adults broken into three groups. The first group made no changes in diet or activity. The second group only took medication for diabetes. The third group completed the CDC Diabetes Prevention Program. The results are illustrated in the graphic below. Adults under 60-years-old who completed the program reduced Continue reading >>

Dttac Lifestyle Coach Training

Dttac Lifestyle Coach Training

Home Focus Areas Diabetes DTTAC Lifestyle Coach Training The Diabetes Training and Technical Assistance Center (DTTAC) at Emory University trains Lifestyle Coaches and Master Trainers for the National DPP and offers ongoing webinars for Lifestyle Coaches and Program Coordinators. DTTAC offers both in-person and virtual Lifestyle Coach training to prepare individuals to serve as Lifestyle Coaches to deliver the evidence-based National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP). DTTAC Lifestyle Coach Training is based on DTTACs 8 key principles that we've learned are critical to the success of the Lifestyle Coach and participants in the program. All DTTAC Lifestyle Coach Trainings Include: Instruction from an expert DTTAC Master Trainer with experience delivering the DPP Ongoing support through Common Ground , DTTACs online learning community for Lifestyle Coaches Access to a link for a refresher webinar, as recommended by CDC DTTAC Lifestyle Coach Training is open to individuals who are affiliated with organizations that have pending recognition, or intend to apply for CDC recognition, and includes the most up-to-date information on the recognition process and the national program. Your Options for Lifestyle Coach Training The prices described here reflect the cost for in-person trainings scheduled after March 1, 2018. However, if you book a training before March 1, to be delivered any time in 2018, the price for in-person training would be $750 per person. DTTAC Virtual Lifestyle Coach Training is a four-week, interactive and innovative virtual training that meets CDC training standards and provides Lifestyle Coaches with the skills, knowledge and experience needed to successfully facilitate the National DPP lifestyle change program. Virtual training is offered quarter Continue reading >>

Cdcs Diabetes Prevention Program Questions And Answers #4

Cdcs Diabetes Prevention Program Questions And Answers #4

Q.Theres a lot of talk about obesity and Type 2 diabetes and it seems a lot of the program is about managingweight. What does the program have available (lifestyle-wise) for those T2D patients who have lost weightsince diagnosis and/or who are not overweight? A.The National DPP and the MDPP benefit are for individuals with prediabetes/high risk for type 2 diabetes and are overweight. It is not for people who already have diabetes. Medicare Part B beneficiaries with diabetes have access to the following nutrition benefits: Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT): Medicare Part B beneficiaries have a benefit for 3 hours of MNT during the first 12 months of diagnosis and 2 hours of MNT in each year following the diagnosis of diabetes, chronic kidney disease, or post kidney transplant. Beneficiaries can have additional hours of MNT as long as the RDN obtains a new referral during each year of treatment. For more information visit . Diabetes Self-Management Training (DSMT): DSMT includes education for eating healthy, being active, monitoring blood sugar, taking drugs, and reducing risks. Medicare may cover up to 10 hours of initial DSMT. This training may include 1 hour of individual training and 9 hours of group training in the first year, and 2 hours of follow-up training in subsequent years. Q. This program short of the curriculum seems similar to an IBT for Obesity program. Any idea whether there might be an overlap in terms of payers and which program might be more profitable for the health care provider or RDN? A. Medicares Intensive Behavioral Therapy (IBT) for Obesity benefit and the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program benefit are considered distinct benefits. They each have different eligibility criteria and coverage parameters, and requirements for CMS payment. IBT for O Continue reading >>

Cdc Recognizes First Fully Mobile Diabetes Prevention Program

Cdc Recognizes First Fully Mobile Diabetes Prevention Program

CDC Recognizes First Fully Mobile Diabetes Prevention Program The first fully mobile translation of the national Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) has been recognized by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Noom, a global health coaching company that combines mobile technology with human behavioral coaching, was notified last week that its program had met the CDC's Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program Standards (DPRP) for delivering a quality, evidence-based program. There are also a number of other mobile apps and "virtual-technology" modes, some of which are combined with in-person classes, that have been approved by the CDC to deliver the National DPP and currently have "pending recognition," a CDC spokesperson said. This is in addition to more than 100 online programs and more than 1000 recognized programs nationwide delivering the DPP. "Both in-person and virtual delivery of national DPP lifestyle-change program is critical," the spokesperson told Medscape Medical News in an email. "Both are needed and both can be successful." CDC recognition of any method of delivering this program means that quality has been assessed according to the accepted national standards, and "clinicians can look to this as a means for ongoing monitoring and technical assistance for these programs by CDC," the spokesperson added. Users are not yet reimbursed by Medicare, however. This will come as of January 1, 2018, when coverage for the DPP will be expanded to include all eligible at-risk beneficiaries with prediabetes aged 65 years or older or those with a history of gestational diabetes at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. In the meantime, there are several commercial plans "that provide some form of coverage and have done so well in advance of the pending CMS coverage," Continue reading >>

Programs & Initiatives In Communities Somali Diabetes Prevention Program Curriculum Adaptation

Programs & Initiatives In Communities Somali Diabetes Prevention Program Curriculum Adaptation

Somali Diabetes Prevention Program Curriculum Adaptation The Diabetes Unit and University of the Minnesotas Health and Nutrition Extension program are working together to make adaptations to the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) curriculum for the Somali population. The Extension program has a long history of working with low income and diverse cultural groups, making them an ideal partner for this project. Each cultural group is unique in how it receives and interprets health information. In order to have the best chance for information to be understood and adopted, it should be relatable and culturally relevant. Taking into consideration cultural beliefs, customs and habits when asking people to make changes to their daily lives. The DPP is a cost-effective, proven program, led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The DPP helps participants make real lifestyle changes like eating healthier, including physical activity in their daily lives, and improving problem-solving and coping skills. The DPP is most often offered in English and uses western cultural references. This limitation leaves out high risk groups that can benefit from this lifestyle change program. Starting in the fall of 2015, Extension began working with in-house Somali educators and Somali cultural guides on planning, translating, piloting and documenting the cultural adaptations to the DPP curriculum. Gathering information from focus groups and meeting with community members, Extension has made changes to better relate and work with the Somali community to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. Despite being one of the healthiest states in the country, Minnesota has one the nations widest disparities in health between its white and nonwhite populations. One of these disparities is in pr Continue reading >>

Questions & Support| Ndpp | Diabetes | Cdc

Questions & Support| Ndpp | Diabetes | Cdc

Many organizations are offering a CDC-recognized program. Based on their experiences, CDC has posted answers to frequently asked questions that address many of the challenges or uncertainties you might encounter. You may also be able to find organizations in your area that are willing to share lessons they learned along the way. CDC can provide technical assistance to help you deliver an effective program and solve challenges to achieve and maintain recognition status. Send your questions to [email protected] . Frequent Questions about Offering a Program What is the "CDC's Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program (DPRP) Standards and Operating Procedures" (Recognition Standards, for short)? A document that describes, in detail, all the requirements for organizations that are part of DPRP. All organizations must read and understand this document before applying for recognition. My organization is thinking of offering a CDC-recognized lifestyle change program in our community. What should we do first? Organizations are strongly encouraged to read the CDC Recognition Program Standards and Operating Procedures and complete the Capacity Assessment [PDF 58.4KB] before applying for recognition. If your organization does not have capacity at this time, you may want to support other sites in your area. What can organizations do if they feel that the cost of participating in a CDC-recognized lifestyle change program is too burdensome for participants? The cost for participation in a CDC-recognized lifestyle change program depends on a variety of things, including the host organizations funding/resources, ability to work with partners and garner reimbursement for services via private or public insurers, and whether the program is offered at a worksite as part of a benefits package t Continue reading >>

Prevent T2 Frequently Asked Questions

Prevent T2 Frequently Asked Questions

The new PreventT2 curriculum, launched in March 2016, is based on the original 2002 Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) trial and follow-up studies for the prevention of type 2 diabetes (T2). This new curriculum still promotes modest weight loss (5%-7% of current weight if overweight or obese) and increased physical activity through a 12-month lifestyle change program. The curriculum also reflects new literature on self-efficacy, physical activity, and diet. CDC wanted to provide an approved curriculum at no cost to increase the number of organizations offering the lifestyle change programs. The original CDC curriculum is still valid, as are other curricula that have been approved by the CDCs Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program (DPRP). The PreventT2 curriculum is an additional curriculum option that meets the current Standards. 3. What is different about this new curriculum? The look and feel of the PreventT2 curriculum is different, building on lessons learned from the previous curriculum, including new topics proven to promote success. The sequence of modules has also changed. Introductory and closing module topics are the same, and there is a recommended sequence for the first 6 months. Then, lifestyle coaches can choose sequencing for months 7-12, based on interests and needs of participants, for greater flexibility. Some modules have also been combined into fewer sessions: PreventT2 has 9 session options for months 7-12, compared to 16 possible sessions in the original National DPP curriculum. This change in the PreventT2 curriculum was because data indicated that many organizations have been delivering 9 sessions on average during months 7-12, even though more were provided. Based on social science research, the new English curriculum was written at the sixth-g Continue reading >>

Resources For Health Care Professionals

Resources For Health Care Professionals

To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: Individuals at risk for type 2 diabetes may be more likely to join a CDC-recognized diabetes prevention lifestyle change program if their health care professional recommends it. Individuals at risk for type 2 diabetes may be more likely to consider a lifestyle change program if their health care professional recommends it. In addition, the recognition program requires that at least 50% of participants be diagnosed with prediabetes through blood testing (or have a history of gestational diabetes); this is often done by a health care professional. The new PreventT2 curriculum comes with ready-to-use, and adaptable promotional materials that can be easily modified to add your organization logo and contact information. CDC provides resources for encouraging health care professionals to refer at-risk patients to your lifestyle change program. These resources will help you educate health care professionals about the program and offer them tools for easy referrals. Continue reading >>

National Association Of Chronic Disease Directors

National Association Of Chronic Disease Directors

See also cross cutting CDC Resources and Guidance on this website that has information specific to diabetes prevention activities. Prevent Diabetes STAT (Screen, Test, Act Today) - In an effort to raise awareness of prediabetes, the CDC and American Medical Association (AMA) have developed a suite of resources, including helpful information and tools for healthcare providers, state and local health departments, patients, employers, insurers, and community organizations to help stakeholders Prevent Diabetes STAT. The website also includes brief videos to inform stakeholders about the National Diabetes Prevention Program (The National DPP), a link to organizations delivering CDC-recognized The National DPP (in-person and virtual) by state, the curriculum for The National DPP and an online screening tool to help people determine their own risk for type 2 diabetes. Visitors are encouraged to take the nationally recognized prediabetes risk test and encourage colleagues, family members and patients to Prevent Diabetes STAT. Prevent Diabetes STAT toolkit - includes information about The National DPP as well as strategies on how to engage health care teams and patients. It includes sample letters, handouts and scripts the health care team can use with their patients to raise awareness of prediabetes and to assist with identifying those at risk. STEPS Forward - The American Medical Association (AMA) in collaboration with the CDC created a resource, the STEPS Forward module: "Preventing Type 2 Diabetes in At-Risk Patients." This module is available at no cost online, and allows physicians to obtain 1 CME credit. Case Studies, resources and tools provide information about preventing type 2 diabetes and the CDC-recognized lifestyle change program. Awareness of Prediabetes: A Spotl Continue reading >>

National Dpp Curriculum - Common Ground

National Dpp Curriculum - Common Ground

National DPP Lifestyle Change Program Curriculum The National DPP lifestyle change program is a one year lifestyle change program which consists of weekly sessions in Months 1-6 followed by monthly sessions in Months 7-12 for a total of a one year program. The National DPP curriculum was developed by DTTAC in collaboration with CDC and partners from Indiana University (Plan Forward) and University of Pittsburgh (Group Life Balance). The curriculum can be downloaded from CDC's website . Months 1-6 (formerly known as the "core curriculum") consist of 16 weekly sessions designed to help participants develop lifelong skills for healthier living using a step-by-step approach. Participants learn basic skills related to healthier eating and physical activity, how to deal with elements in the external environment that may be standing in the way of lifestyle change, and how to sustain long-term change. Months 7-12 (formerly known as the "post-core curriculum") are delivered after the 16-week core phase, and consist of at least six monthly sessions that provide additional support and learning opportunities for participants to help them maintain changes for a lifetime. These sessions provide additional information on many healthy lifestyle-related topics, and revisit key themes from the first six months, such as self-monitoring, goal setting, staying motivated, and overcoming barriers. DTTAC specializes in training Lifestyle Coaches on the National DPP lifestyle change program curriculum, which is available on CDC's website . Note: There is more than one DPRP-approved curriculum for the National DPP, but they all contain the same essential, evidence-based elements as the National DPP lifestyle change program curriculum described above. Continue reading >>

Update On The National Diabetes Prevention Program

Update On The National Diabetes Prevention Program

Today's Dietitian Vol. 18 No. 4 P. 24 Learn what the National DPP is all about and how dietitians can get involved. A massive, multifaceted problem often requires a solution of the same proportions. Diabetes is a health crisis dietitians know well, and the numbers of those who have the disease or may develop it are staggering. But through the National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), along with hundreds of organizations, stakeholders, and trained professionals are working to reach and then help millions of Americans delay and possibly prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. The CDC estimates that 29.1 million Americans have diabetes, and 8 million of them don't even know it. What's worse, prediabetes affects even more people—an estimated 86 million people aged 20 and older. The vast majority, about 90% of people with elevated blood glucose that isn't high enough to be considered diabetes, have yet to be diagnosed. That's crucial, because prediabetes not only puts people at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, it also puts them at higher risk of heart disease and stroke, according to the 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report. But if the CDC and a whole host of other organizations across the country have anything to say about it, type 2 diabetes won't be a reality for the many millions of Americans they seek to reach through the National DPP. What Is the National DPP? Established five years ago, the National DPP is the largest effort of its kind to prevent type 2 diabetes. Managed by the CDC, the National DPP is a framework built on the National Institutes of Health's landmark DPP study that concluded in 2002, which showed lifestyle modifications, including healthful eating, moderate weight loss, an Continue reading >>

Requirements For Cdc Recognition

Requirements For Cdc Recognition

To receive email updates about the National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP) enter your email address: To ensure high quality and impact, CDC sets standards for organizations that wish to offer an in-person or online lifestyle change program. CDC-recognized lifestyle change programs feature a CDC-approved curriculum and a trained lifestyle coach to help participants make lasting healthy changes. To gain CDC recognition, your organization must show that it can meet CDC standards and effectively deliver a proven diabetes prevention lifestyle change program. Use of a CDC-approved curriculum. You can use a curriculum developed by CDC, or you can develop your own or use that of another organization (with permission), as long as CDC approves it. Ability to begin offering the lifestyle program within 6 months of receiving approval from CDC. Capacity and commitment to deliver the program over at least 1 year, including at least 16 sessions during the first 6 months and at least 6 sessions during the last 6 months. Ability to submit data on participants progress including attendance, weight loss, and physical activity every 6 months. Trained lifestyle coaches who can help build participants skills and confidence to make lasting lifestyle changes. Designated individual(s) to serve as the diabetes prevention program coordinator. In addition, the recognition program requires that at least 35% of participants be diagnosed with prediabetes through blood testing (or have a history of gestational diabetes). Continue reading >>

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