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Rates Of New Diagnosed Cases Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes On The Rise Among Children, Teens

Rates Of New Diagnosed Cases Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes On The Rise Among Children, Teens

Fastest rise seen among racial/ethnic minority groups. Rates of new diagnosed cases of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are increasing among youth in the United States, according to a report, Incidence Trends of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes among Youths, 2002-2012 (link is external), published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. In the United States, 29.1 million people are living with diagnosed or undiagnosed diabetes, and about 208,000 people younger than 20 years are living with diagnosed diabetes. This study is the first ever to estimate trends in new diagnosed cases of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in youth (those under the age of 20), from the five major racial/ethnic groups in the U.S.: non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanics, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans. However, the Native American youth who participated in the SEARCH study are not representative of all Native American youth in the United States. Thus, these rates cannot be generalized to all Native American youth nationwide. The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study (link is external), funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), found that from 2002 to 2012, incidence, or the rate of new diagnosed cases of type 1 diabetes in youth increased by about 1.8 percent each year. During the same period, the rate of new diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes increased even more quickly, at 4.8 percent. The study included 11,244 youth ages 0-19 with type 1 diabetes and 2,846 youth ages 10-19 with type 2. “Because of the early age of onset and longer diabetes duration, youth are at risk for developing diabetes related complications at a younger age. This profoundly lessens their quality of life, shortens their life expectanc Continue reading >>

Why Hispanics Are At A Higher Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes | Everyday Health

Why Hispanics Are At A Higher Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes | Everyday Health

Family culture and poor access to healthcare may play a role in Hispanic people's increased risk for type 2 diabetes. For decades, Martin Gomez enjoyed tacos and burritos without a care. The carbohydrate-laden comfort food kept him energized so he could work hard, bringing his paychecks home from his job as a landscaper to support his extended family. But little did he realize that same food would one day threaten everything. Gomez, a 56-year-old Hispanic resident of Houston, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at a health fair about 15 years ago. Because diabetes requires blood sugar management through diet and lifestyle changes, as well as medication in many cases, he worried whether he would be able to keep his job in landscaping or whether he would ever be able to eat his familys cooking again. He wasnt sure he would have enough time in the day to work in exercise, diet tracking, pharmacy visits and doctors visits. Poorly managed diabetes can lead to life-threatening complications such as kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, neuropathy, and vision issues. At first, Gomez says through a translator, his diabetes diagnosis felt like a death sentence. Why There Are Higher Rates of Diabetes Among Hispanic People Gomezs situation is hardly unusual. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) , 50 percent of Hispanic adults in the United States are expected to develop the chronic disease type 2 diabetes a rate that is higher than for the average adult, who has a 40 percent likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes. The CDC also estimates that Hispanic people are 50 percent more likely to die from the disease than white people are. While Hispanic people overall are estimated to be at a higher risk for diabetes, theyre not the only group: The prevalen Continue reading >>

Hispanic Health: Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Hispanic Health: Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Government leaders and close-knit families. Olympic athletes and celebrated artists. This month we commemorate Hispanic and Latino culture, connection, and contributions. During National Hispanic Heritage Month, September 15–October 15, we celebrate the culture of US residents who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico, and the Spanish-speaking nations of Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. And while recognizing their many contributions and achievements, let’s also acknowledge Hispanic and Latino people’s greater risk for type 2 diabetes and take action to prevent it. Greater Diabetes Risk Over their lifetimes, 40% of US adults are expected to develop type 2 diabetes. That number is even higher for Hispanic men and women—more than 50%. Diabetes is a disease in which blood sugar levels are above normal. Most of the food we eat is turned into blood sugar for our bodies to use for energy. The pancreas makes a hormone called insulin to help blood sugar get into the body’s cells. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use its own insulin as well as it should. This causes sugar to build up in the blood, which over time can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, vision loss, and nerve damage leading to amputation of a foot or leg. Currently, more than 30 million Americans have diabetes, and 1 in 4 of them don’t know they have it. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake) and can’t yet be prevented. It’s usually diagnosed in children and young adults. Type 2 diabetes develops over many years and is usually diagnosed in adults (though increasingly in children, teens, a Continue reading >>

Cdc: More Than 100 Million U.s. Adults Have Diabetes

Cdc: More Than 100 Million U.s. Adults Have Diabetes

The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes greatly varies by region, race and age, according to a new report from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. While the rate of new diabetes cases is steady, a report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that a third of adults in the United States currently are living with diabetes or prediabetes. The National Diabetes Statistics Report found that as of 2015 30.3 million Americans are living with diagnosed diabetes and another 84.1 million have prediabetes, a condition that if left untreated leads to diabetes within five years. “Although these findings reveal some progress in diabetes management and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes,” said CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, M.D. in a statement. “More than a third of U.S. adults have prediabetes, and the majority don’t know it. Now, more than ever, we must step up our efforts to reduce the burden of this serious disease.” The report, which is released every two years, provides information on diabetes prevalence and incidence, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, mortality and costs in the U.S. According to the CDC, diabetes continues to represent a growing health problem. It was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2015, and the disease is more prevalent in some area of the country than others. The southern and Appalachian areas of the United States had the highest rates of diagnosed diabetes and of new diabetes cases. While it can often be managed through physical activity, diet and the appropriate use of insulin and other medications to control blood sugar levels, people with diabetes are at increased risk of serious health complications Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention Programs For Hispanics

Diabetes Prevention Programs For Hispanics

Diabetes prevention programs for Hispanics Significant health disparities exist in the Hispanic community compared with their non-Hispanic counterparts in the United States. In terms of diabetes, specifically, recent data from the CDC indicate that Hispanics are 65% more likely to have diabetes, 55% more likely to be diagnosed with end-stage renal disease and 45% more likely to die of diabetes. The health care challenge posed by these statistics becomes even more alarming because Hispanics are one of the fastest growing ethnic groups in the United States and may constitute 30% of the population by 2060. Besides these disparities around diabetes diagnoses and outcomes, the Hispanic population is also at greater risk for prediabetes. Based on fasting glucose or HbA1c levels, it is estimated that nearly 38% of Hispanics aged 20 years or older have prediabetes. It seems as if a Hispanic diabetes time bomb is waiting to explode unless culturally sensitive and targeted interventions are developed and implemented in this community to improve diabetes awareness and emphasize its prevention. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases was working with a budget of nearly $2 billion for fiscal year 2016, and a large portion of this amount generally funds development of community-based diabetes programs targeting diabetes prevention and/or improving diabetes-related outcomes in underserved communities. However, it is disappointing that these funds fail to translate into significant improvements in diabetes-related health outcomes in high-risk communities. Although there is no denying the role of biological and lifestyle factors in the growing numbers of prediabetes cases in this community, we are probably discounting the role of a few other important facto Continue reading >>

Growing Number Of Hispanics Affected By Diabetes

Growing Number Of Hispanics Affected By Diabetes

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. 11/14/2011 05:35 pm ETUpdatedNov 14, 2011 Growing Number Of Hispanics Affected By Diabetes A new report shows that diabetes, a disease which has hit the Latino community especially hard, has turned into a staggering global epidemic affecting 366 million people, or more than 8 percent of the world's adult population. According to the International Diabetes Federation, the number of adults with diabetes is projected to increase to 552 million people by 2030, or 9.9 percent of the world's adults, which "equates to approximately three more people with diabetes every 10 seconds." World Diabetes Day is held every year on Nov. 14. "The estimates confirm that diabetes continues to disproportionately affect the socially disadvantaged, and is increasing especially rapidly in low- and middle-income countries," the report said. Diabetes has taken a heavy toll on the Hispanics in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). According to the World Health Organization , there are currently 346 million people worldwide who have diabetes and one in 10 adults is expected to have it by 2030, making it the seventh leading cause of death. The CDC conducted a study to examine the prevalence of diabetes among Hispanics in six U.S. geographical areas--California, Florida, Illinois, New York/New Jersey, Texas, and Puerto Rico-- from 1998 to 2002. Some important findings in the CDC investigation were the fact that Hispanics have double the risk of developing diabetes compared with non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics tend to diabetes at a younger age and that the prevalence of diabetes decreased with higher education levels. Among Hispanics with less than a high school education, 11.8 perce Continue reading >>

Solera Health And Blue Mesa Health Inc. Announce Spanish-language Diabetes Prevention Program Partnership At J.p. Morgan Health Care Conference 2018

Solera Health And Blue Mesa Health Inc. Announce Spanish-language Diabetes Prevention Program Partnership At J.p. Morgan Health Care Conference 2018

Solera Health and Blue Mesa Health Inc. Announce Spanish-Language Diabetes Prevention Program Partnership at J.P. Morgan Health Care Conference 2018 January 10, 2018 / in Press Releases / by admin Partnership will increase access to the Diabetes Prevention Program to millions of Spanish-speaking patients at high-risk for type 2 diabetes. SAN FRANCISCO, CA January 10, 2018 Blue Mesa Health Inc., a US-based digital therapeutics company with offices in New York and Vancouver, BC, is pleased to announce the launch of Transformemos, a Spanish-language Diabetes Prevention Program within the Solera Health network of preventive health programs. This program is based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Prevenga el T2 (2016) Spanish-language curriculum and meets the requirements for CDC program recognition. Blue Mesa Health Inc. (Blue Mesa) launched its digital Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) Transform in 2015 to the U.S. enterprise payer market. The program is designed to address the problem of rising chronic disease-related health costs in the U.S., where one-half of all individuals are either prediabetic or diabetic. Blue Mesas personalized diabetes prevention program includes digital learning modules, home health monitoring via wireless scales and activity trackers combined with remote health coaching and group social support to guide participants through a clinically validated 16-week program followed by ongoing maintenance sessions. The goal of the program is for participants to lose 5-7% of their body weight which is correlated with a 58% reduction in progression to type 2 diabetes. We launched the Transformemos program in 2017 in a limited fashion to learn how to best meet the needs of individuals whose primary language is Spanish. We have received Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

One Third Of Americans Are Headed For Diabetes, And They Don't Even Know It

One Third Of Americans Are Headed For Diabetes, And They Don't Even Know It

One third of Americans may be on their way to developing full-blown type 2 diabetes, and most of them don't even know it. A recent report from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that more than 84 million Americans, or roughly one-third of the population, have prediabetes, a condition marked by higher-than-normal blood sugar. Of that group, 90 percent aren't aware they have the condition. The primary risk factors for type 2 diabetes are genetics and lifestyle — excess weight, obesity and lack of exercise contribute to this alarming medical trend. "People with prediabetes who don't change their lifestyle are at a much higher risk of developing heart disease and stroke and can develop type 2 diabetes within five years if left untreated," said William T. Cefalu, MD, chief scientific, medical & mission officer of the American Diabetes Association. The health risks go beyond heart disease and stroke. As diabetes worsens over time, blindness, kidney disease and lower-limb amputation are also major health risks. Diabetes was the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States in 2015, according to the CDC. This population of diabetes "ticking time bombs" is particularly alarming, because in many cases type 2 diabetes can be avoided, simply by leading a healthy lifestyle. Type 2 diabetes is often progressive, and within 10 years of diagnosis, 50 percent of individuals need to use insulin to control their blood glucose levels, according to the ADA. More than 30 million Americans — 9.4 percent of the U.S. population — are already battling diabetes, according to the CDC's National Diabetes Statistics Report, which used data through 2015. The CDC found that of those cases, 7.2 million were undiagnosed. "The country needs to take this seriously, ratc Continue reading >>

Resources For Hispanic And Latino Americans

Resources For Hispanic And Latino Americans

NDEP has diabetes prevention and management resources designed specifically for people of Hispanic and Latino ancestry. These resources can be used by community health workers, diabetes educators, and health care providers to meet the needs of this audience. En Espaol: Find a complete listing of NDEP Spanish language resources in the NDEP Online Resource Center . Select Language and then Spanish under Search Criteria. Use the flipchart, guides, posters, and other resources in the toolkit to talk to people in your community about how they can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. Find training resources to help you use the toolkit and start a community outreach program. Fotonovela: Do it for them! But for you too. (Hazlo por ellos! Pero por ti tambin.) This bilingual (Spanish and English) fotonovela features stories of Latinas talking each other about how they are preventing or delaying type 2 diabetes. Movimiento Por Su Vida Music Video (Movement for Your Life) This music video encourages Hispanics and Latinos to be more physically active to prevent type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Hispanic Health

Hispanic Health

Hispanics or Latinos are the largest racial/ethnic minority population in the US. Heart disease and cancer in Hispanics are the two leading causes of death, accounting for about 2 of 5 deaths, which is about the same for whites. Hispanics have lower deaths than whites from most of the 10 leading causes of death with three exceptions—more deaths from diabetes and chronic liver disease, and similar numbers of deaths from kidney diseases. Health risk can vary by Hispanic subgroup—for example, 66% more Puerto Ricans smoke than Mexicans. Health risk also depends partly on whether you were born in the US or another country. Hispanics are almost 3 times as likely to be uninsured as whites. Hispanics in the US are on average nearly 15 years younger than whites, so steps Hispanics take now to prevent disease can go a long way. Doctors and other healthcare professionals can: Work with interpreters to eliminate language barriers, when patient prefers to speak Spanish. Counsel patients on weight control and diet if they have or are at high risk for high blood pressure, diabetes, or cancer. Ask patients if they smoke and if they do, help them quit. Engage community health workers (promotores de salud) to educate and link people to free or low-cost services. Problem Hispanics have different degrees of illness or health risks than whites. 35% less heart disease and 49% less cancer; A lower death rate overall, but about a 50% higher death rate from diabetes; 24% more poorly controlled high blood pressure; 23% more obesity; 28% less colorectal screening. Hispanic subgroups have different degrees of health risk and more need to receive preventive screenings as recommended. Mexicans and Puerto Ricans are about twice as likely to die from diabetes as whites. Mexicans also are nearly tw Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Diabetes Among Hispanics --- Selected Areas, 1998--2002

Prevalence Of Diabetes Among Hispanics --- Selected Areas, 1998--2002

Persons using assistive technology might not be able to fully access information in this file. For assistance, please send e-mail to: [email protected] . Type 508 Accommodation and the title of the report in the subject line of e-mail. Prevalence of Diabetes Among Hispanics --- Selected Areas, 1998--2002 Diabetes disproportionately affects Hispanics in the United States ( 1 ). However, the Hispanic population is composed of culturally distinct subpopulations that tend to be regionally concentrated (2), and the prevalence of diabetes can differ in these subpopulations (3). CDC analyzed data from Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) surveys to estimate the prevalence of diabetes among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white adults residing in six states and among Hispanics in Puerto Rico, assessing disparities by geographic location. This report summarizes the findings of that analysis, which indicated that Hispanics continued to have a higher prevalence of diabetes than non-Hispanic whites and that disparities in diabetes between these two populations varied by area of residence. These findings underscore the need to target Hispanics and other populations with higher prevalence of diabetes to eliminate racial/ethnic disparities. BRFSS conducts state-based, random-digit--dialed telephone surveys of the U.S. civilian, noninstitutionalized population aged >18 years in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and other U.S. territories. Respondents were considered to have diabetes if they answered "yes" to the question, "Has a doctor ever told you that you have diabetes?" Women who were told that they had diabetes, but only during pregnancy, were classified as not having diabetes. All respondents who reported being of Hispanic origin were considered to be His Continue reading >>

Cdc: Black Children More Likely To Die From Diabetes Than Whites And Hispanics

Cdc: Black Children More Likely To Die From Diabetes Than Whites And Hispanics

CDC: Black children more likely to die from diabetes than whites and Hispanics Written by Brian Zimmerman| May 23, 2017| Print | Email African-American children with diabetes are twice as likely to die from the chronic health condition compared to their white and Hispanic peers, according to the CDC's most recent Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report . To detect possible disparities in relation to diabetes deaths among children and adolescents, CDC researchers analyzed health data on deaths with diabetes listed as the underlying cause among individuals up to 19 years of age in the U.S. compiled in the National Vital Statistics System from 2000 to 2014. The analysis revealed diabetes-related death rates for black children were 2.04 per 1 million, while the rates for Hispanic children and white children were 0.61 per 1 million and 0.92 per 1 million, respectively. "The findings indicate that although the diabetes mortality among children and adolescents has not changed significantly in the United States, disparities by race/ethnicity persist and warrant further research and investigation so that targeted interventions for prevention of diabetes deaths among children and adolescents can be developed and implemented," the report's authors concluded. Continue reading >>

Cdc: Diagnoses Of Type 1, 2 Diabetes Up Sharply Among Youth

Cdc: Diagnoses Of Type 1, 2 Diabetes Up Sharply Among Youth

CDC: Diagnoses of type 1, 2 diabetes up sharply among youth While the obesity epidemic has been partially blamed for increases in type 2 diabetes diagnoses, researchers are unsure of the cause for increases in type 1 diagnoses because it is caused by genetics. By Amy Wallace|April 21, 2017 at 2:56 PM April 21 (UPI) -- Researchers are trying to determine the cause of the significant increases in the number of newly diagnosed cases of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in U.S. youth. The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study, conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, and the National Institutes of Health, or NIH, found that from 2002 to 2012, the rate of newly diagnosed cases of type 1 diabetes in youth increased about 1.8 percent per year, and the rate of newly diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes increased by 4.8 percent. The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine , included 11,244 children and teenagers from birth to age 19 with type 1 diabetes, and 2,846 children and teens age 10 to 19 with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the beta cells of the pancreas are attacked by the immune system destroying their ability to make insulin. A genetic predisposition increases risk for the condition, specific causes of its development are not known. In type 2 diabetes, the body develops insulin resistance due to long-term excess glucose in the diet, sending insulin-producing cells first into overdrive and then failure because they can't produce the proper level of insulin. Type 2 diabetes also has a genetic predisposition, but is often caused by obesity and lifestyle. The study is the first to estimate trends in newly diagnosed cases of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in youth from five major racial/ethnic groups in the Un Continue reading >>

New Cdc Report: More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

New Cdc Report: More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

More than 100 million U.S. adults are now living with diabetes or prediabetes, according to a new report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The report finds that as of 2015, 30.3 million Americans – 9.4 percent of the U.S. population –have diabetes. Another 84.1 million have prediabetes, a condition that if not treated often leads to type 2 diabetes within five years. The report confirms that the rate of new diabetes diagnoses remains steady. However, the disease continues to represent a growing health problem: Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2015. The report also includes county-level data for the first time, and shows that some areas of the country bear a heavier diabetes burden than others. “Although these findings reveal some progress in diabetes management and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes,” said CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, M.D. “More than a third of U.S. adults have prediabetes, and the majority don’t know it. Now, more than ever, we must step up our efforts to reduce the burden of this serious disease.” Diabetes is a serious disease that can often be managed through physical activity, diet, and the appropriate use of insulin and other medications to control blood sugar levels. People with diabetes are at increased risk of serious health complications including premature death, vision loss, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and amputation of toes, feet, or legs. The National Diabetes Statistics Report, released approximately every two years, provides information on diabetes prevalence and incidence, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, mortality, and costs in the U.S. Key findings from Continue reading >>

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