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Causes And Prevention Of Diabetes

Diabetes Causes And Methods Of Prevention

Diabetes Causes And Methods Of Prevention

Diabetes causal factors are different for each type of diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes is an autoimmune disease whose exact causes are simply not well understood at this time. Factors associated with risk for Type 1 diabetes may include genetically inherited vulnerability and exposure to one or more environmental factors, possibly including viral exposure. At this time there appears to be little or nothing that people can do to avoid risk of getting Type 1 diabetes. In contrast to the uncertainty surrounding Type 1 diabetes, there are clear risk factors for Type 2 Diabetes: Advancing Age. All people are at increased risk for developing Type 2 diabetes as they age. While type Type 2 diabetes can occur in people of any age, it is much more common in people aged 40 or older. Although recent evidence suggests that more and more children are falling victim to type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetic Association reports that roughly one in six overweight children falls into the pre-diabetic category. Many of these pre-diabetic children go on to develop full blown type 2 diabetes (CDC, 2008). Race and Ethnicity. Type 2 diabetes occurs more commonly among certain ethnic groups than others. African Americans, Native Americans, Hispanic Americans, Pacific Islander, and Asian American are at greater risk for developing the illness than are Caucasians. Family History of Diabetes. People who have close blood relatives (siblings or parents) who have diabetes are at increased risk of getting diabetes themselves compared to people who do not have a blood relative with the disease. Personal History of Gestational Diabetes or High Birth Weight Baby. Mothers who experienced temporary Gestational diabetes during pregnancy, or who gave birth to a high birth weight baby (9 lbs or larger) are at incr Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes type 1 and type 2 definition and facts Diabetes is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Insulin produced by the pancreas lowers blood glucose. Absence or insufficient production of insulin, or an inability of the body to properly use insulin causes diabetes. The two types of diabetes are referred to as type 1 and type 2. Former names for these conditions were insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes, or juvenile onset and adult onset diabetes. Symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes include increased urine output, excessive thirst, weight loss, hunger, fatigue, skin problems slow healing wounds, yeast infections, and tingling or numbness in the feet or toes. Some of the risk factors for getting diabetes include being overweight or obese, leading a sedentary lifestyle, a family history of diabetes, hypertension (high blood pressure), and low levels of the "good" cholesterol (HDL) and elevated levels of triglycerides in the blood. If you think you may have prediabetes or diabetes contact a health-care professional. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that result from defects in insulin secretion, or its action, or both. Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes (as it will be in this article) was first identified as a disease associated with "sweet urine," and excessive muscle loss in the ancient world. Elevated levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia) lead to spillage of glucose into the urine, hence the term sweet urine. Normally, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin lowers the blood glucose level. When the blood glucose elevates (for example, after eating food Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

The Facts Diabetes is a condition where people don't produce enough insulin to meet their body's needs and/or their cells don't respond properly to insulin. Insulin is important because it moves glucose, a simple sugar, into the body's cells from the blood. It also has a number of other effects on metabolism. The food that people eat provides the body with glucose, which is used by the cells as a source of energy. If insulin isn't available or doesn't work correctly to move glucose from the blood into cells, glucose will stay in the blood. High blood glucose levels are toxic, and cells that don't get glucose are lacking the fuel they need. There are two main kinds of diabetes: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. More than 90% of all people with diabetes have type 2. A 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) report estimated that about 3.4 million Canadians have diabetes. Only about two-thirds of people with type 2 diabetes are aware of it and are receiving treatment because, for many people, early symptoms are not noticeable without testing. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas cannot make insulin. Everyone with type 1 diabetes requires insulin injections. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body does not use insulin properly. It usually occurs in adults, although in some cases children may be affected. People with type 2 diabetes usually have a family history of this condition and are most often overweight. People with type 2 diabetes may eventually need insulin injections. This condition occurs most commonly in people of First Nations descent, Hispanics, and North Americans of African descent. Another less common form is gestational diabetes, a temporary condition that occurs during pregnancy. According to the CDA, depend Continue reading >>

Taking On Diabetes For World Health Day

Taking On Diabetes For World Health Day

Since 1950, the World Health Organization (WHO) holds an annual event to raise global awareness about important health issues that know no borders. Past World Health Days have focused on crucial, international public health issues such as antimicrobial resistance, road safety, and mental illness. This year spotlights the prevention, treatment, and management of diabetes. Read on to learn more. Take Action To Halt The Rise Of Diabetes It’s clear why the WHO is concerned. In 2008, around 347 million people across the world had diabetes, and the numbers are growing, especially in low- and middle-income countries. In 2012, diabetes was the direct cause of nearly 1.5 million deaths, with 80 percent of those occurring in low- and middle-income countries. The WHO projects that diabetes will be the world’s 7th leading cause of death by 2030. But there’s good news: most diabetes is preventable. Simple lifestyle measures have proven to be effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes. Maintaining normal body weight, engaging in regular physical activity, and eating a healthy diet can reduce the risk of the disease. And the cases that are caused by genetic or environmental factors are treatable. Read on to learn more about this condition and its symptoms, when to seek a diagnosis, and how to make smart choices around diet and exercise that can help keep you out of harm’s way. Of Course I’ve Heard of Diabetes. But What Is It, Really? Diabetes occurs when the pancreas cannot produce enough of the crucial hormone insulin, or when the body does not respond appropriately to insulin — which is called “insulin resistance.” Insulin helps regulate the body’s blood sugar levels which, when stable, provide the energy we need for our bodies to function pro Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes And How To Prevent And Treat It

What Causes Diabetes And How To Prevent And Treat It

What is diabetes? Diabetes – I’m sure we’ve all heard about it, but how many of us actually know what it means? The term diabetes actually refers to a group of diseases that can arise due to a rage of causes. In general, people who have diabetes have high blood glucose. This state can also be referred to as high blood sugar or hyperglycemia. Diabetes can be classified into two common main types – type 1 and type 2. They are brought about by different causes. Diabetes can be classified into two common main types – type 1 and type 2. They are brought about by different causes. What are the causes of diabetes? Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, meaning that the body’s immune system attacks and destroys its own beta cells even though its normal function is to protect the body from infection by destroying viruses, bacteria and other harmful foreign substances. Diabetes then occurs when there is insufficient insulin due to the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs in children and young adults, although it is possible for it to occur in persons of any age. Genetic Susceptibility One important factor in determining a person’s likelihood of developing type 1 diabetes is heredity. Many genes that are passed down from biological parent to child have been found to be influential in determining susceptibility to and protection from type 1 diabetes. Autoimmune Destruction of Beta Cells Research has suggested that insulin itself might be an important trigger for the immune system attacking the beta cells. Put simply, people who are susceptible to developing type 1 diabetes have immune systems that respond to insulin as if it were an antigen (or foreign substance). Environmental Factors Environme Continue reading >>

Help Us Save The Life Of A Child With Diabetes 1

Help Us Save The Life Of A Child With Diabetes 1

What is Diabetes? Diabetes Mellitus, commonly referred to as "diabetes," means "sweet urine." Diabetes mellitus means "to flow, honey" in Greek Diabetes that affects the body's ability to produce or respond to insulin. Insulin is a hormone that allows blood glucose (blood sugar) to enter the cells of the body and be used for energy. Diabetes results from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both. In diabetes, too much glucose stays in the blood. Elevated levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia) lead to spillage of glucose into the urine. As a result of elevated levels of blood glucose, two problems occur: body cells become starved for energy, and, over time, the high glucose levels can damage the nerves, eyes, kidneys, heart and blood vessels. Diabetes is not an infectious disease, like a cold or flu. You can’t "catch" it from someone else, and no one can catch it from you. Diabetes is a lifelong disease. Men with diabetes often have erectile dysfunction which can begin before the diagnosis of diabetes is made. It is recommended that men with unexplained erectile dysfunction be screened for diabetes with a fasting blood glucose test. Normal blood sugar: 65 -140. High blood sugar: 250-350 Very high blood sugar: (over 350) What happens when blood sugar falls too low? When blood sugar falls too low, the body will begin a process to increase blood sugar. The process is listed below. The pancreas releases a hormone called glycogenThe muscles and liver convert their stored glycogen back into glucose. When the stored glycogen is used up, the liver, kidneys, and small intestines can break down protein into glucose. Symptoms of Diabetes Symptoms of diabetes include: irritability vomiting There are 4 main types of diabetes Secondary diabetes mellitus refers to elevat Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Causes And Prevention

Diabetes: Causes And Prevention

Source: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Diabetes is a serious, life-long disease. It cannot be cured, but careful control of blood sugar can prevent or delay the complications of this disease. A great deal of research is underway to find out exactly what causes diabetesand how to prevent it. Risk Factors for Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetesis an autoimmune disease. An autoimmune disease occurs when the body's system for fighting infection -- the immune system -- turns against a part of the body. At present, scientists do not know exactly what causes the body's immune system to attack the cells, but they believe that both genetic factors and environmental factors, such as viruses, are involved. Studies have begun to try to identify these factors and prevent type 1 diabetesin people at risk. Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes -- the most common form -- is linked to obesity, high blood pressure, and abnormal cholesterol levels. About 80 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight. Being overweight can keep your body from using insulin properly. Being over 45 years of age and overweight or obese raises the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Other risk factors include: having a first-degree relative -- a parent, brother, or sister -- with diabetes being African American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian American or pacific Islander, or Hispanic American/Latino. Other risk factors include: having gestational diabetes, or giving birth to at least one baby weighing more than 9 pounds having blood pressure of 140/90 or higher, or having been told that you have high blood pressure. having abnormal cholesterol levels -- an HDL cholesterol level of 35 or lower, or a triglyceride level of 250 or higher being inactive or Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Overview Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin These pages are about type 2 diabetes. Read more about type 1 diabetes. Another type of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some pregnant women and tends to disappear after birth. Symptoms of diabetes The symptoms of diabetes occur because the lack of insulin means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. Typical symptoms include: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk See your GP if you think you may have diabetes. It's very important for it to be diagnosed as soon as possible as it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Causes of type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to function properly, or the body's cells don't react to insulin. This means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity and tends to be diagnosed in older people. It's far more common than type 1 diabetes. Treating type 2 diabetes As type 2 diabetes usually gets worse, you may eventually need medication – usually tablets – to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. Complications of type 2 diabetes Diabetes can cause serious long-term heal Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care - Symptoms

Diabetic Foot Care - Symptoms

Diabetic Foot Care (cont.) Prevention of diabetic foot problems involves a combination of factors. Good diabetes control Regular leg and foot self-examinations Knowledge on how to recognize problems Choosing proper footwear Regular exercise, if able Avoiding injury by keeping footpaths clear Having a doctor examine the patient's feet at least once a year using a monofilament, a device made of nylon string that tests sensation Continue Reading A A A Diabetic Foot Care (cont.) Age: The older the patient, the more likely they are to have serious problems with the feet and legs. In addition to diabetes, circulatory problems and nerve damage are more common in the elderly person with diabetes. The elderly may also be more prone to sustaining minor trauma to the feet from difficulties with walking and stumbling over obstacles they cannot see. Duration of diabetes: The longer the patient has had diabetes, the more likely they have developed one or more major risk factors for diabetic lower extremity problems. Seriousness of infection: Infections that involve gangrene almost universally go on to amputation and also carry a high risk of death. Ulcers larger than about 1 inch across have a much higher risk of progressing on to limb amputation, even with proper treatment. Infections involving deep tissues and bone carry a much higher risk of amputation. Quality of circulation: If blood flow is poor in the patient's legs as a result of damage to the blood vessels from smoking or diabetes or both, it is much more difficult to heal wounds. The likelihood of more serious infection and amputation is greater. Compliance with the treatment plan: How well the patient follows and participates in the treatment plan developed with doctors and nurses is crucial to the best recovery possible. Continue reading >>

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic medical condition in which sugar, or glucose, levels build up in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin helps move the sugar from your blood into your cells, which are where the sugar is used for energy. In type 2 diabetes, your body’s cells aren’t able to respond to insulin as well as they should. In later stages of the disease your body may also not produce enough insulin. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels, causing several symptoms and potentially leading to serious complications. In type 2 diabetes your body isn’t able to effectively use insulin to bring glucose into your cells. This causes your body to rely on alternative energy sources in your tissues, muscles, and organs. This is a chain reaction that can cause a variety of symptoms. Type 2 diabetes can develop slowly. The symptoms may be mild and easy to dismiss at first. The early symptoms may include: constant hunger a lack of energy fatigue weight loss excessive thirst frequent urination dry mouth itchy skin blurry vision As the disease progresses, the symptoms become more severe and potentially dangerous. If your blood sugar levels have been high for a long time, the symptoms can include: yeast infections slow-healing cuts or sores dark patches on your skin foot pain feelings of numbness in your extremities, or neuropathy If you have two or more of these symptoms, you should see your doctor. Without treatment, diabetes can become life-threatening. Diabetes has a powerful effect on your heart. Women with diabetes are twice as likely to have another heart attack after the first one. They’re at quadruple the risk of heart failure when compared to women without diabetes. Diabetes can also lead to complications during pregnancy. Diet is an imp Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes And Treatments

Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes And Treatments

Diabetes, often referred to by doctors as diabetes mellitus, describes a group of metabolic diseases in which the person has high blood glucose (blood sugar), either because insulin production is inadequate, or because the body's cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Patients with high blood sugar will typically experience polyuria (frequent urination), they will become increasingly thirsty (polydipsia) and hungry (polyphagia). Here are some key points about diabetes. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Diabetes is a long-term condition that causes high blood sugar levels. In 2013 it was estimated that over 382 million people throughout the world had diabetes (Williams textbook of endocrinology). Type 1 Diabetes - the body does not produce insulin. Approximately 10% of all diabetes cases are type 1. Type 2 Diabetes - the body does not produce enough insulin for proper function. Approximately 90% of all cases of diabetes worldwide are of this type. Gestational Diabetes - this type affects females during pregnancy. The most common diabetes symptoms include frequent urination, intense thirst and hunger, weight gain, unusual weight loss, fatigue, cuts and bruises that do not heal, male sexual dysfunction, numbness and tingling in hands and feet. If you have Type 1 and follow a healthy eating plan, do adequate exercise, and take insulin, you can lead a normal life. Type 2 patients need to eat healthily, be physically active, and test their blood glucose. They may also need to take oral medication, and/or insulin to control blood glucose levels. As the risk of cardiovascular disease is much higher for a diabetic, it is crucial that blood pressure and cholesterol levels are monitored regularly. As smoking might have a serious effect on c Continue reading >>

Articles Ontype 2 Diabetes

Articles Ontype 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a life-long disease that affects the way your body handles glucose, a kind of sugar, in your blood. Most people with the condition have type 2. There are about 27 million people in the U.S. with it. Another 86 million have prediabetes: Their blood glucose is not normal, but not high enough to be diabetes yet. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. It's what lets your cells turn glucose from the food you eat into energy. People with type 2 diabetes make insulin, but their cells don't use it as well as they should. Doctors call this insulin resistance. At first, the pancreas makes more insulin to try to get glucose into the cells. But eventually it can't keep up, and the sugar builds up in your blood instead. Usually a combination of things cause type 2 diabetes, including: Genes. Scientists have found different bits of DNA that affect how your body makes insulin. Extra weight. Being overweight or obese can cause insulin resistance, especially if you carry your extra pounds around the middle. Now type 2 diabetes affects kids and teens as well as adults, mainly because of childhood obesity. Metabolic syndrome. People with insulin resistance often have a group of conditions including high blood glucose, extra fat around the waist, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol and triglycerides. Too much glucose from your liver. When your blood sugar is low, your liver makes and sends out glucose. After you eat, your blood sugar goes up, and usually the liver will slow down and store its glucose for later. But some people's livers don't. They keep cranking out sugar. Bad communication between cells. Sometimes cells send the wrong signals or don't pick up messages correctly. When these problems affect how your cells make and use insulin or glucose, a chain reac Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Definition, Causes And Symptoms

Diabetes: Definition, Causes And Symptoms

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects your body’s ability to produce or use insulin. Insulin is a hormone. When your body turns the food you eat into energy (also called sugar or glucose), insulin is released to help transport this energy to the cells. Insulin acts as a “key.” Its chemical message tells the cell to open and receive glucose. If you produce little or no insulin, or are insulin resistant, too much sugar remains in your blood. Blood glucose levels are higher than normal for individuals with diabetes. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. What is Type 1 diabetes? When you are affected with Type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not produce insulin. Type 1 diabetes is also called juvenile diabetes, since it is often diagnosed in children or teens. This type accounts for 5-10 percent of people with diabetes. What is Type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin, or when the cells are unable to use insulin properly, which is called insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes is commonly called “adult-onset diabetes” since it is diagnosed later in life, generally after the age of 45. 90-95 percent of people with diabetes have this type. In recent years Type 2 diabetes has been diagnosed in younger people, including children, more frequently than in the past. Are there other forms of diabetes? Gestational diabetes occurs during pregnancy and affects about 18 percent of all pregnancies, according to the American Diabetes Association. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after pregnancy, but once you've had gestational diabetes, your chances are higher that it will happen in future pregnancies. In some women pregnancy uncovers Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes and these women will need to continue d Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it's never too late to start. Consider these tips. When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is a big deal. It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, such as if you're overweight or you have a family history of the disease. Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds. It's never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes down the road, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association. 1. Get more physical activity There are many benefits to regular physical activity. Exercise can help you: Lose weight Lower your blood sugar Boost your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range Research shows that aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes. The greatest benefit comes from a fitness program that includes both. 2. Get plenty of fiber It's rough, it's tough — and it may help you: Reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control Lower your risk of heart disease Promote weight loss by helping you feel full Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains and nuts. 3. Go for whole grains It's not clear why, but whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and cereals. Look Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy Eye Disease Causes, Prevention And Treatment

Diabetic Retinopathy Eye Disease Causes, Prevention And Treatment

Diabetic retinopathy is an eye disease experienced by those with diabetes. Unmanaged diabetes can cause complications to the blood vessels of the light sensitive tissue in the back of the eye – the retina. Diabetic retinopathy in its early stages may be symptomless and only mild vision impairments may be noticed. This can be confused with aging and is often overlooked. Over time, if left untreated, diabetic retinopathy can result in blindness. Diabetic retinopathy can occur in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The longer diabetes goes uncontrolled, the higher the risk of developing diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy causes When sugar levels are high within the bloodstream it can damage blood vessels. Too much sugar can also cause blockages to the blood vessels in the retina, preventing oxygenated blood from reaching it. The eye attempts to make new blood vessels, but they do not develop properly so they leak. There are two types of diabetic retinopathy: early diabetic retinopathy and advanced diabetic retinopathy. Early diabetic retinopathy: In this form of diabetic retinopathy new blood vessels are not produced. The walls of the blood vessels going to the retina become weak and tiny bulges can begin to protrude. This can cause blood and fluid to leak into the retina. Large blood vessels can also become irregular in diameter, and more blood vessels can become blocked. Nerve fibers in the retina can begin to swell and even the central part of the retina may swell. At this stage treatment is definitely required. Advanced diabetic retinopathy: Damaged blood vessels begin closing off, which causes abnormal blood vessels to grow and fluid to leak and can be a jelly-like substance in the center of the eye. Scar tissue causes the retina to detach from the eye. The new Continue reading >>

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