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Cataract Due To Type 1 Diabetes What Is The Condition Listed In The Statement

Cataract - Diabetes Self-management

Cataract - Diabetes Self-management

A cloudy lens in the eye that may cause vision problems. The lens is the part of the eye that focuses light on the retina, which in turn translates the light into the impulses transmitted to the brain. Cataract is a painless condition. Some signs of a cataract include impaired distance vision, blurring of vision, decreased night vision, sensitivity to glare and bright light, a frequent need for new eyeglasses prescriptions, seeing halos around lights, needing brighter lights to read, and monocular diplopia, or double vision in one eye. A certain type of cataract is associated with a phenomenon some call gaining second sight, in which a person with farsightedness is able to see close objects again for a time. -- Keep an eye on your vision! Learn about preventive steps and treatments for diabetic retinopathy from retinal specialist Dr. Charles Wykoff. >> Over 70% of Americans over 65 have at least some clouding of the lens, and 18% to 50% have full-blown cataracts. People with diabetes have a higher risk of developing cataracts in their 30s or 40s. Cataracts usually develop slowly with age, possibly due to the effects of free radicals, damaging molecules that can sometimes overwhelm the bodys natural ability to neutralize them. Cataracts may also be present at birth in some cases. They may affect one or both eyes. Besides age and damage caused by free radicals, additional factors that may contribute to cataracts include diabetes, smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, overexposure to the sun, radiation, long-term use of certain steroids, previous eye injuries, and a family history of cataracts. Most people with cataracts do not have any vision difficulties. But when cataracts interfere with daily living, the recommended treatment is surgery, often a technique called pha Continue reading >>

Cataracts | University Of Utah Health

Cataracts | University Of Utah Health

Cataract surgery is one of the best ways to treat advanced cataracts. A cataract, a clouding of the natural lens of the eye, blurs vision and can eventually lead to blindness. To improve your vision with cataract surgery, your doctor removes the clouded lens and inserts a clear artificial lens, known as an intraocular lens, or IOL, in its place. Cataracts dont return, so cataract surgery can improve the quality of your vision for years to come. The Moran Eye Center offers the most advanced laser cataract surgery available and our cataract surgery team is dedicated to excellence in both the consultation and treatment of all types of cataracts. Our cataract surgeons use only state-of-the-art equipment and have experience with complicated cataract surgery cases. This helps to ensure exact diagnoses and best practices in medical and surgical care. Contact us at 801-581-2352 to schedule a consultation. Understanding Cataracts: Causes, Symptoms, & Treatment Scientists believe there are several contributing factors in developing cataracts, the first one being age; given enough time, everyone will mostly likely develop cataracts. However, about one in six people over the age of 40 in the US has a cataract. Other contributing factors include the following: Expectations for the course of the disease Your tolerance for specific medications, procedures, or therapies In its early stages, vision loss caused by a cataract may be treated with different eyeglasses, a magnifying glass, or stronger lighting. When these are no longer helpful, cataract surgery is the only effective treatment available for most people. It is important to note that a cataract only needs to be removed when vision loss interferes with everyday activities such as driving, reading, or watching television. You an Continue reading >>

Efficacy Of Biodegradable Curcumin Nanoparticles In Delaying Cataract In Diabetic Rat Model

Efficacy Of Biodegradable Curcumin Nanoparticles In Delaying Cataract In Diabetic Rat Model

Efficacy of Biodegradable Curcumin Nanoparticles in Delaying Cataract in Diabetic Rat Model Contributed equally to this work with: Charitra N. Grama, Palla Suryanarayana Affiliation: Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom Contributed equally to this work with: Charitra N. Grama, Palla Suryanarayana Affiliation: National Institute of Nutrition, Hyderabad, India Affiliation: National Institute of Nutrition, Hyderabad, India Affiliation: National Institute of Nutrition, Hyderabad, India Affiliation: National Institute of Nutrition, Hyderabad, India * E-mail: [email protected] (MNVRK); [email protected] (GBR) Affiliation: Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom * E-mail: [email protected] (MNVRK); [email protected] (GBR) Affiliation: National Institute of Nutrition, Hyderabad, India Curcumin, the active principle present in the yellow spice turmeric, has been shown to exhibit various pharmacological actions such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anti-carcinogenic activities. Previously we have reported that dietary curcumin delays diabetes-induced cataract in rats. However, low peroral bioavailability is a major limiting factor for the success of clinical utilization of curcumin. In this study, we have administered curcumin encapsulated nanoparticles in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic cataract model. Oral administration of 2 mg/day nanocurcumin was significantly more effective than curcumin in delaying diabetic cataracts in rats. The significant delay in progression of diabetic cataract by nanocurcumin is attributed to its ability to intervene the biochemical pathways of disease progression such a Continue reading >>

On Complications: The 411 On Diabetic Eyes

On Complications: The 411 On Diabetic Eyes

Complications: preventing them is the motivation behind almost everything we do in managing our diabetes. Yet how much do we really know about how to live with them? After all, life doesn't stop with a diabetes complication. I've been thinking that even if you're diligent with your diabetes management, that isn't necessarily a guarantee (nor is it easy!). You could have amazing BG control, but still develop some damage. Totally unfair, right? This is the catalyst behind a new monthly series here at the 'Mine, taking a closer look at complications one by one, to help all of us be well-educated and prepared to deal with what may come. Because you just never know... btw, did you know that January is National Eye Care Month? So we're kicking off this series with diabetic eye disease. We discovered a great source to turn to in Dr. Paul Chous, an optometrist in the Seattle, WA, area who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 5. He himself dealt with diabetic retinopathy as a PoliSci grad student in the mid-80s, before making a career change to become an optometrist. He has written a book called Diabetic Eye Disease: Lessons from a Diabetic Eye Doctor and has contributed numerous articles to dLife. He also speaks at conferences around the country to eye doctors on life with diabetes, so if your doctor sounds especially well-versed in diabetes management, you can probably thank this guy. Let's get started... What exactly is diabetic eye disease? Most people are familiar with the "Big Bad" of diabetic eye disease: diabetic retinopathy. It's the most well-known complication associated with the eyes, but there are actually seven different conditions that can affect a PWD's eyes: Cataracts; Glaucoma; Dry Eye Disease; Cranial Nerve Palsy; Ischemic Optic Neuropathy; Retinal Vascul Continue reading >>

2012 Icd-9-cm Diagnosis Code 366.41 : Diabetic Cataract

2012 Icd-9-cm Diagnosis Code 366.41 : Diabetic Cataract

ICD-9-CM 366.41 is a billable medical code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis on a reimbursement claim, however, 366.41 should only be used for claims with a date of service on or before September 30, 2015. For claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015, use an equivalent ICD-10-CM code (or codes). You are viewing the 2012 version of ICD-9-CM 366.41. Convert to ICD-10-CM : 366.41 converts approximately to: 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E08.36 Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition with diabetic cataract 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E09.36 Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus with diabetic cataract 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E10.36 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic cataract 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E11.36 Type 2 diabetes mellitus with diabetic cataract 2015/16 ICD-10-CM E13.36 Other specified diabetes mellitus with diabetic cataract Cataract due to drug induced diabetes mellitus Diabetic cataract associated with type I diabetes mellitus Diabetic cataract associated with type II diabetes mellitus Drug induced diabetes with diabetic cataract ICD-9-CM Volume 2 Index entries containing back-references to 366.41: Cataract (anterior cortical) (anterior polar) (black) (capsular) (central) (cortical) (hypermature) (immature) (incipient) (mature) 366.9 secondary (chemical-induced) (due to chronic condition) (due to infection) (drug-induced) 249.0 complicating pregnancy, childbirth, or puerperium (maternal) 648.0 with manifest disease in the infant 775.1 ICD-9-CM codes are used in medical billing and coding to describe diseases, injuries, symptoms and conditions. ICD-9-CM 366.41 is one of thousands of ICD-9-CM codes used in healthcare. Although ICD-9-CM and CPT codes are largely numeric, they differ in that CPT codes describe medical procedures and services. Can't find a code? St Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetic Retinopathy

What is Diabetes Mellitus? Diabetes mellitus, or simply diabetes, is a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood glucose (sugar) levels, either because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or because cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. There are three main types of Diabetes Mellitus (DM): Type 1: This results from not making insulin. Type 1 diabetics need insulin, either by self-injection or using an insulin pump. Type 2: This results from insulin resistance, where cells fail to use insulin properly. This is sometimes accompanied by reduced insulin secretion. Patients are treated with diet, exercise, oral medication, or a combination. Type 3: Gestational Diabetes: Diabetes occurring during pregnancy. How is Diabetes Mellitus diagnosed? Diabetes may have symptoms in some people, and no symptoms in others. Generally, Type 1 diabetes presents with increased thirst (polydipsia), frequent urination (polyuria), and increased hunger (polyphagia). Symptoms may develop over weeks to months. Untreated, this condition may cause a person to lose consciousness and become very ill (diabetic ketoacidosis). Left untreated, glucose can absorb into the lens of the eye, leading to temporary changes in lens shape and vision changes, including blurred vision. Types 2 and 3 diabetes may have minimal symptoms. A single, elevated blood glucose measurement can make a diagnosis, or it may require either single or multiple measurements of blood glucose to determine the degree of impairment of glucose metabolism. Your doctor is the person to help you determine if you might have diabetes. How is Diabetes Mellitus treated? Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease for which there is treatment but no known cure. Treatment is aimed at keeping blood glucose le Continue reading >>

Evaluation Of Neonatal Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rat Model For The Development Of Cataract

Evaluation Of Neonatal Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rat Model For The Development Of Cataract

Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity Evaluation of Neonatal Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rat Model for the Development of Cataract 1Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Nutrition, Jamai-Osmania, Hyderabad 500007, India 2Department of Pathology, National Institute of Nutrition, Hyderabad 500007, India Received 3 March 2014; Accepted 2 August 2014; Published 19 November 2014 Copyright 2014 Madhoosudan A. Patil et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) generally follows prediabetes (PD) conditions such as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Although studies reported an association of IGT or IFG with cataract, the experimental basis for PD associated cataract is not known. Hence, we evaluated neonatal streptozotocin (nSTZ) induced rat model to study PD associated cataractogenesis by injecting STZ to two-day old rats. While majority (70%) of nSTZ injected pups developed IGT (nSTZ-PD) by two months but not cataract even after seven months, remaining (30%) nSTZ rats developed hyperglycemia (nSTZ-D) by two months and mature cataract by seven months. Lens biochemical analysis indicated increased oxidative stress as indicated by increased SOD activity, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonyl levels in nSTZ-D cataractous lens. There was also increased polyol pathway as assessed by aldose reductase activity and sorbitol levels. Though nSTZ-PD animals have not shown any signs of lenticular opacity, insolubilization of proteins along with enhanced polyol pathway was observed in the lens. Further there was increased oxidative s Continue reading >>

Essay About Me2400 Icd9cm Wk02 Assign - 391 Words

Essay About Me2400 Icd9cm Wk02 Assign - 391 Words

Topics: Hypertension , Pneumonia , Acute respiratory distress syndrome Pages: 3 (391 words) Published: August 2, 2015 Locate each main term in the Alphabetic Index. Refer to any subterms indented under the main term. Follow cross-reference instructions if the needed code is not located under the first main entry consulted. Verify the code in the Tabular List. Read and be guided by any instructional terms in the Tabular List. Assign codes to the highest level of specificity. I. Identify the main term for each diagnostic statement and assign the correct ICD code: 1. Cataract due to type 1 diabetes Main Term: Cataract ICD-9-CM Codes:250.51, 366.41 Main Term: Congestive ICD-9-CM Code: 428.0 Main Term: Lymphangitis ICD-9-CM Code: 457.2 4. Atherosclerotic heart disease, native artery Main Term: Atherosclerotic ICD-9-CM Code: 414.01 Main Term: Distress ICD-9-CM Code: 518.52 Main Term: Pernicious ICD-9-CM Code: 281.0 7. Primary malignancy of the roof of the mouth Main Term: Malignancy ICD-9-CM Code: 145.5 10. Benign neoplasm of the proximal third of esophagus Main Term: Esophagus ICD-9-CM Code: 150.8 Main Term: Septicemia ICD-9-CM Code: 038.10 Main Term: Pneumococcal ICD-9-CM Code: 320.1 Main Term: Hypertension ICD-9-CM Code: 401.0 Main Term: Otosclerosis ICD-9-CM Code: 387.2 II. Using a Word document, write a 3 to 5 sentence response to the following: As a part of your job in the medical office, you will be working with claim forms. What is the purpose of the ICD code on the medical... Continue reading >>

Coding Diabetes Mellitus With Associated Conditions

Coding Diabetes Mellitus With Associated Conditions

Overseen by AHIMA’s coding experts for the Journal of AHIMA website, the Code Cracker blog takes a look at challenging areas and documentation opportunities for coding and reimbursement. Check in each month for a new discussion. There has been some confusion among coding professionals regarding interpretation of the coding guideline of “with.” An area that contains many instances of using this guideline in ICD-10-CM is coding Diabetes Mellitus with associated conditions. There are 53 instances of “with” subterm conditions listed under the main term Diabetes. The ICD-10-CM Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting states the following at Section I.A.15: The word “with” should be interpreted to mean “associated with” or “due to” when it appears in a code title, the Alphabetic Index, or an instructional note in the Tabular List. The word “with” in the Alphabetic Index is sequenced immediately following the main term, not in alphabetical order. There was a recent clarification regarding this guideline published in the first quarter 2016 issue of AHA Coding Clinic on page 11. According to this clarification, the subterm “with” in the Index should be interrupted as a link between diabetes and any of those conditions indented under the word “with.” Following this guidance as we look to the main term Diabetes in the ICD-10-CM Codebook Index, any of the conditions under the subterm “with” such as gangrene, neuropathy, or amyotrophy (see below for the full list) can be coded without the physician stating that these conditions are linked. The classification assumes a cause-and-effect relationship between diabetes and certain diseases of the kidneys, nerves, and circulatory system. The following are all the subterms under “with” under th Continue reading >>

Free Unfinished Flashcards About Ch 4 And 5 Test

Free Unfinished Flashcards About Ch 4 And 5 Test

? coding is when it takes more than one code to describe a condition to its fullest the code 042 should only be coded when this diagnosis has been confirmed ? is the most common condition coded from the circulatory system which is not a type of histology of neoplasm which digit in a diabetes code indicates the type of diabetes the code range 303 - 305 has how any 5th digit subclassifications digestion starts when food is taken into the mouth and ends when it ? the body through the anus what are listed only in the tabular and no where else in the icd9 the ? system consists of both male and female genital organs and urinary tract an ectopic pregnancy occurs when a fetrilized egg implants itself outside the which is an abnormality of a structure or organ which is the main term in the index for an abnormal investigation ? is a abnormality that you are born with test 5hiv infection can be reported if documented as 'suspected or possible' when a pt is admitted for chemotherapy assign the code for the malignancy as the first listed diag assignment of diabetes codes are not affected by whether the pt is on insulin if a phy documents that the pt diabetes is poorly controlled a 5th digit for out of control shold be assigned icd9 presumes a cause and effect relationship between hypertension and chronic kidney disease icd 9 cm presumes a cause and effect relationship between hypertension and heart disease a 5th digit of 3 (in remission) should be assigned to 305.0x for someone who has abused alcohol in the past but no longer drinks alcohol the site in which a maligant neoplasm has spread to is the primary site status asthmaticus is a term used for a very severe type of asthmatic attack if a pt is admitted for dehydration due to chemotherapy the dehydration is the first listed diag Continue reading >>

Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease

Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease

Points to Remember Diabetic eye disease comprises a group of eye conditions that affect people with diabetes. These conditions include diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema (DME), cataract, and glaucoma. All forms of diabetic eye disease have the potential to cause severe vision loss and blindness. Diabetic retinopathy involves changes to retinal blood vessels that can cause them to bleed or leak fluid, distorting vision. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes and a leading cause of blindness among working-age adults. DME is a consequence of diabetic retinopathy that causes swelling in the area of the retina called the macula. Controlling diabetes—by taking medications as prescribed, staying physically active, and maintaining a healthy diet—can prevent or delay vision loss. Because diabetic retinopathy often goes unnoticed until vision loss occurs, people with diabetes should get a comprehensive dilated eye exam at least once a year. Early detection, timely treatment, and appropriate follow-up care of diabetic eye disease can protect against vision loss. Diabetic retinopathy can be treated with several therapies, used alone or in combination. NEI supports research to develop new therapies for diabetic retinopathy, and to compare the effectiveness of existing therapies for different patient groups. What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease can affect many parts of the eye, including the retina, macula, lens and the optic nerve. Diabetic eye disease is a group of eye conditions that can affect people with diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy affects blood vessels in the light-sensitive tissue called the retina that lines the back of the eye. It is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes Continue reading >>

Cataracts: 75% Of Dogs Develop Blindness Within 1 Year Of This Diagnosis

Cataracts: 75% Of Dogs Develop Blindness Within 1 Year Of This Diagnosis

In this video Dr. Karen Becker discusses a common sight-robbing eye disease of pets -- cataracts. Download Interview Transcript Cataracts are a clouding of the lens of the eye. The condition can be so minor it doesn’t even interfere with vision, and it can be serious enough to cause permanent blindness in your dog, or less often, your cat. Canine cataracts are much more common and clinically significant than feline cataracts. Most cataracts in dogs are an inherited condition, however, diabetes is also a common and preventable cause. Other causes for cataracts in dogs are systemic drug toxicity, other underlying eye conditions, trauma to the eye, and the aging process. Surgery is the best option to restore vision to pets with severe cataracts. Fortunately, the majority of dogs and cats don’t necessarily need cataract surgery. Another less serious eye condition called nuclear sclerosis is often mistaken for cataracts in older dogs. There are many things pet owners can do to prevent degenerative eye disease in their dog or cat. Diabetes is a primary cause of cataracts in dogs, and it is almost 100 percent preventable by keeping your pet at a normal weight. There are also many natural supplements that support eye health in pets and prevent or slow the progression of degenerative eye disease. By Dr. Becker Cataracts are a clouding of the lens of the eye. The lens is inside a clear capsule, and the cataract clouds up the inside of the capsule. So a cataract isn't a film over the eye itself. It's a change inside the clear sack that contains the lens. Clouding or fogging of the lens can be so minor it doesn't even interfere with vision. This is called an incipient cataract. An immature cataract clouds a greater portion of the lens and can cause some blurred vision. Over tim Continue reading >>

Green Cataract | Cataract And Other Lens Disorders | Jama Ophthalmology | Jama Network

Green Cataract | Cataract And Other Lens Disorders | Jama Ophthalmology | Jama Network

This photograph accompanied the article in the American Journal of Ophthalmology 8 describing ghost cell glaucoma following a closed vitrectomy. The greenish color of the cataract, of the hypopyon, and of the centrifuged aqueous tap were not mentioned. Reprinted with permission. The patient in case 1 was 75 years old when this photograph of her left eye was taken. It shows rubeosis, hyphema, and a mature greenish cataract. The 74-year-old man in case 2 had hemorrhagic glaucoma and no light perception. A, This photograph of the right eye shows rubeosis and chronic hyphema with a mature green cataract. B, The left eye was normal. There was a striking heterochromia. This 51-year-old man (case 3) with a left ocular ischemic syndrome after carotid occlusion had rubeosis, uveitis, glaucoma, total retinal detachment, and a green cataract. This man (case 4) was struck in the left eye by a baseball with detachment of the retina never operated on. At the time of this photograph of the left eye, he was 39 years old and he had no light perception, fine rubeosis, and an intraocular pressure of 50 mm Hg. There was a shrunken, hypermature greenish cataract. A 63-year-old man (case 5) with an old perforating injury in the right eye had rubeosis, glaucoma, retinal detachment, green cataract, and no light perception. A young white woman (case 6) with juvenile diabetes had severe diabetic retinopathy with retinal detachments and no light perception in both eyes. She was 27 years old when this photograph was taken with a mature green cataract in her right eye. When the patient (case 7) was 76 years old, the left eye had a green cataract, rubeosis, hyphema, and corneal edema secondary to uncontrolled glaucoma. Histological examination of case 7 showed loss of ganglion cells and marked glau Continue reading >>

Galactosemic Cataract

Galactosemic Cataract

A galactosemic cataract is cataract which is associated with the consequences of galactosemia . The presence of presenile cataract, noticeable in galactosemic infants as young as a few days old, is highly associated with two distinct types of galactosemia: GALT deficiency and to a greater extent, GALK deficiency. [1] :4 An impairment or deficiency in the enzyme, galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), results in classic galactosemia, or Type I galactosemia. [2] Classic galactosemia is a rare (1 in 47,000 live births), autosomal recessive disease that presents with symptoms soon after birth when a baby begins lactose ingestion. Symptoms include life-threatening illnesses such as jaundice , hepatosplenomegaly (enlarged spleen and liver), hypoglycemia , renal tubular dysfunction, muscle hypotonia (decreased tone and muscle strength), sepsis (presence of harmful bacteria and their toxins in tissues), and cataract among others. [3] :516 The prevalence of cataract among classic galactosemics is markedly less than among galactokinase-deficient patients due to the extremely high levels of galactitol found in the latter. Classic galactosemia patients typically exhibit urinary galactitol levels of only 98 to 800mmol/mol creatine compared to normal levels of 2 to 78mmol/mol creatine. [1] :21 Galactokinase (GALK) deficiency, or Type II galactosemia, is also a rare (1 in 100,000 live births), autosomal recessive disease that leads to variable galactokinase activity levels: ranging from high GALK efficiency to undetectably-low GALK efficiency. The early onset of cataract is the main clinical manifestation of Type II galactosemics, most likely due to the high concentration of galactitol found in this population. [4] GALK deficient patients exposed to high-galactose diets show Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Complications

Type 1 Diabetes Complications

Type 1 diabetes is complicated—and if you don’t manage it properly, there are complications, both short-term and long-term. “If you don’t manage it properly” is an important if statement: by carefully managing your blood glucose levels, you can stave off or prevent the short- and long-term complications. And if you’ve already developed diabetes complications, controlling your blood glucose levels can help you manage the symptoms and prevent further damage. Diabetes complications are all related to poor blood glucose control, so you must work carefully with your doctor and diabetes team to correctly manage your blood sugar (or your child’s blood sugar). Short-term Diabetes Complications Hypoglycemia: Hypoglycemia is low blood glucose (blood sugar). It develops when there’s too much insulin—meaning that you’ve taken (or given your child) too much insulin or that you haven’t properly planned insulin around meals or exercise. Other possible causes of hypoglycemia include certain medications (aspirin, for example, lowers the blood glucose level if you take a dose of more than 81mg) and alcohol (alcohol keeps the liver from releasing glucose). There are three levels of hypoglycemia, depending on how low the blood glucose level has dropped: mild, moderate, and severe. If you treat hypoglycemia when it’s in the mild or moderate stages, then you can prevent far more serious problems; severe hypoglycemia can cause a coma and even death (although very, very rarely). The signs and symptoms of low blood glucose are usually easy to recognize: Rapid heartbeat Sweating Paleness of skin Anxiety Numbness in fingers, toes, and lips Sleepiness Confusion Headache Slurred speech For more information about hypoglycemia and how to treat it, please read our article on hy Continue reading >>

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