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Cashew Nuts And Diabetes Type 2

Can Diabetics Eat Nuts

Can Diabetics Eat Nuts

Diabetes management requires a significant adjustment not only on lifestyle but also in a diet. This includes forfeiting even some of your favorite dishes. The good news is that diabetics can still consume nuts without worrying too much about their health. Nuts consumption can help even in reducing the risk of ailments that are often associated with diabetes. Often time’s diabetics wonder whether it’s safe to consume nuts or not. Most of them end up questioning different scenarios as to whether to consume or not to consume nuts. The answer to their questions is that they should not worry about consumption of nuts. Diabetics can comfortably consume nuts because of the great nutritional value they harbor. Nuts Nuts are generally defined as seeds or fruits in a hard inedible shell. They are also the seeds of various trees and commonly known as tree nuts. The more general use of nuts has been included in this article i.e. those in hard shells (e.g. chestnut) and others that are technically legumes (e.g. peanut) and seeds (e.g. pecans). Some of the most common nuts are as listed below. Almonds Peanuts Pine nuts Walnuts Coconuts Acorns Chestnuts Cashew nuts Filberts/Hazelnuts Macadamia nuts Brazil nuts Pistachios According to a report published in “Choose My Plate” by the USDA program; nuts were included to a diet as proteins. However, nuts are contains a lot of other nutrients such as anti-oxidants, unsaturated fats, vitamins and most importantly fiber. It’s important to note that despite the numerous healthy nutrients nuts contain, they have high calories. Nuts contain very high nutritional value and don’t have unhealthy fats that can block arteries. The calories are just a minor setback in nuts consumption without major side effects to your health. To avoid con Continue reading >>

Are Cashews Good For You?

Are Cashews Good For You?

Cashews have a buttery, sweet, and salty taste, an unmistakable shape, and they are an excellent source of vitamins and minerals. They grow on cashew nut trees, which are native to subtropical climates. Try making a cashew honey nut coleslaw with this recipe! Raw, unsalted cashews are often used in vegan recipes as well as in Indian cooking. Many of us eat cashews after they have been roasted and salted, which turns them into a delicious snack. What Are the Health Benefits of Cashews? Although cashews are one of the lowest-fiber nuts, they are packed with vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. These include vitamins E, K, and B6, along with minerals like copper, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, iron, and selenium, all of which are important for maintaining good bodily function. Heart Health Research shows that eating more nuts, such as cashews, can lower your risk for cardiovascular disease. This may occur by reducing blood pressure and “bad” cholesterol levels. Nuts are naturally cholesterol-free and contain good amounts of heart-healthy fats, fiber, and protein. They also contain arginine, which protects the inner lining of artery walls. Other vitamins and minerals in nuts, like potassium, vitamins E and B6, and folic acid, also help to fight heart disease. Blood Health The copper and iron in cashews work together to help the body form and utilize red blood cells. This in turn keeps blood vessels, nerves, the immune system, and bones healthy and functioning properly. Eye Health We’ve all heard that carrots are good for your eyes, but it might come as a surprise that cashews are too! They contain high levels of lutein and zeaxanthin, which act as antioxidants when consumed regularly. These compounds protect the eyes from light damage (which can turn into blindness in t Continue reading >>

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

Getty Images What to Eat to Beat Type 2 Diabetes What makes a food “super”? When it comes to type 2 diabetes, it’s not just about foods that pack lots of nutrients. For a diabetes-friendly diet, you also need foods that will help keep your blood sugar levels in check. “Look for items that contain healthy fats and are high in vitamins, minerals, and fiber,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, a certified diabetes educator at Burgess Health Center in Onawa, Iowa. It’s also crucial to eat a wide variety of foods to make sure you’re getting a healthy mix of phytochemicals and essential fatty acids. Add these 11 superfoods to your grocery cart to keep your diet diabetes-friendly. Continue reading >>

Tree Nuts For The Stop Prediabetes Diet

Tree Nuts For The Stop Prediabetes Diet

Regularly including nuts in your diet lowers body weight and waistline. Reduces the risk factors for type 2 diabetes and helps stop prediabetes metabolic syndrome. I have posted about the benefits of nuts as part of the diabetes diet. In another more recently published study in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition (Dec. 2011)*, researchers compared risk factors for heart disease, type 2 diabetes and prediabetes metabolic syndrome in people who ate nuts to people who did not eat nuts. They found that compared to people who did not eat nuts, people who ate nuts such as almonds, cashews and pistachios had a: lower body weight, lower body mass index (BMI) lower waist circumference They also had a lower risk of developing heart disease, type 2 diabetes and prediabetes metabolic syndrome. The study used data from 13,292 men and women participating in the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). Nut eaters were defined as those who ate more than one quarter of an ounce of nuts per day. In addition, eating nuts was also linked to a lower prevalence of four risk factors for prediabetes metabolic syndrome suggesting that nuts help to stop prediabetes. Regular Nutrientology readers know these risk factors well: abdominal obesity high blood pressure high blood sugar levels low “good cholesterol” HDL levels I thought it was helpful that the researchers also specifically differentiated between “nuts” and “tree nuts.” This helps to reduce the thinking of peanuts as nuts. As the smart readers of Nutrientology know, peanuts are actually legumes (a type of bean) and peanuts grow in the ground, not in trees. Another common misconception involving nuts is the fear of their fat content. Yes, nuts do contain fats, and you should not sit do Continue reading >>

Cashews Help Treat Diabetes

Cashews Help Treat Diabetes

School of Montreal researchers recommend us one good way cashew extract may treat type two diabetes. New research published inside the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research suggests cashew seed extract may play an important role in preventing and treating diabetic issues. The cashew is a tree in the flowering plant family Anacardiaceae. The plant is native to northeastern Brazil. Scientists at the School of Montreal and the School of Yaoundé in Cameroon studied how cashew products affected the responses of rat liver cells to insulin. In Canada, over 3 million Canadians have diabetes and this number is expected to reach 3.7 million by 2020, according to the Canadian Diabetes Association. In U.S.A, according to the American Diabetes Association, from the 2007 National Diabetes Fact Sheet, there are total 23.6 million children and adults in the United States - 7.8% of the population - have diabetes. 1.6 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in people aged 20 years and older each year. Scientists viewed cashew tree leaves, bark, seeds and apples. They found that the cashew seed extract increased the absorption of blood sugar by the cells. Extracts of other plant parts had no such effect, indicating that cashew seed extract likely contains active compounds, that can have potential anti-diabetic properties. In most people who have diabetes, a disorder called insulin resistance prevents the body from processing the hormone, which regulates energy and the processing of sugars in the body. Deficiency of insulin can lead to heart or kidney diseases over time. The cashew nut is a popular snack, and its rich flavor means it's often eaten without treatment, lightly salted or sugared. Cashews are a staple in vegan diets. They are utilized as a base in sauces and gravie Continue reading >>

Nuts And Diabetes | Charlesworth Nuts

Nuts And Diabetes | Charlesworth Nuts

INTRODUCTION Tree nuts such as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts are packed full of beneficial nutrients for people with diabetes. Eating nuts regularly may even help prevent the onset of diabetes later in life! If you have diabetes, individualised advice from an Accredited Practising Dietitian is recommended. WHY ARE NUTS SO GOOD FOR YOU? Nuts are high in so many different vitamins, minerals and nutrients: 1. Healthy fats People with diabetes have an increased risk of developing heart disease later in life. This risk can be reduced by replacing unhealthy saturated fats in the diet with healthy polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, such as those found in nuts. Some people with diabetes also benefit from replacing some of the carbohydrate rich foods in their diet with foods rich in monounsaturated fats. Nuts have also been shown to improve the cholesterol and triglyceride levels of those with diabetes. Nuts high in monounsaturated fat include macadamias, cashews, almonds, pistachios, and pecans. Nuts high in polyunsaturated fat include walnuts, hazelnuts, pine nuts and Brazil nuts. One type of polyunsaturated fat that is particularly beneficial for the heart is omega-3 – nuts high in omega-3 include walnuts and pecans. 2. Low Glycemic Index Cashews, chestnuts and pecans have a low glycaemic index (GI), which means the carbohydrate they contain is broken down slowly by the body. This results in a slow, steady rise in blood glucose levels, which is beneficial for people with diabetes. While the GI of other nuts has not been tested, all nuts, with the exception of chestnuts, are low in carbohydrate and high in protein. This means they are likely to have a low GI but further research is required t Continue reading >>

Nuts And Seeds Address 4 Problems | Reverse Diabetes

Nuts And Seeds Address 4 Problems | Reverse Diabetes

Author Sidebar: I didn't really care that much for nuts (or seeds) as a snack. I preferred potato chips or pretzels; or, a piece of fruit such as an apple or some grapes. But, after I recovered from my coma and returned to work, I realized that I needed something healthier than potato chips for a snack. :-) I started with salted, roasted peanuts; but, after doing some research, I discovered that roasted nuts tended not to be healthy because the heat caused damaged to the healthy fats within the nuts. In addition, I discovered that peanuts were one of the least healthy nuts. So, I gradually transitioned to raw nuts (no salt, not roasted), mainly almonds, pecans and walnuts; and, sometimes macadamia nuts, Brazil nuts, and pumpkin seeds. Beyond helping with blood pressure, cholesterol, weight gain, and other health issues, there are 4 major problems that nuts and seeds help address to have them quality as super fats that help reverse your diabetes. 1. Healthy Snacks: is key to help diabetics maintain proper glucose control, especially between major meals. Eating nuts and seeds make it a lot easier to prepare quick and healthy snacks. 2. Healthy Fats: is one of the areas where many diabetics are lacking from a nutrient content perspective. Nuts and seeds provide monounsaturated fats, oleic acid and Omega-3 fats to help address inflammation, oxidation, weight gain, blood glucose levels and insulin levels. 3. Cravings: is a problem area that nuts and seeds can help with because of their macronutrient and micronutrient content, especially the fat, protein and minerals. 4. Eating Fruits: can be better tolerated when eaten with a handful of nuts and seeds. Why? Because the protein and fat in the nuts and seeds offset the carbs in the fruit. Nuts and Seed | Reverse Diabetes| Othe Continue reading >>

Can My Child With Diabetes Eat Nuts?

Can My Child With Diabetes Eat Nuts?

Julia Sudnitskaya/iStock/Thinkstock Nuts are a terrific snack or addition to a meal for children and adults with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Nuts give us magnesium, B vitamins, vitamin E, fiber, protein, nourishing fats and more! Controlling Blood Glucose Nuts' combination of protein and fat is especially helpful when trying to manage blood sugar, says Vandana Sheth, RDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. "The key is to watch portion size as they are calorie-dense." By combining nuts with a high-carbohydrate food such as cereal, bread or fruit, you can expect lower blood glucose readings after eating than if you or your child eat the high-carb food alone. As part of a research study, individuals with Type 2 diabetes had lower blood glucose after eating an ounce of mixed nuts with white bread, as opposed to eating the bread alone. A similar study among healthy adults showed that eating pistachios with rice or pasta also limited the rise in blood glucose readings after eating. Love nuts for their magnesium content, too. Among its many roles, this mineral may affect the release and activity of insulin, the hormone that helps control blood glucose levels. Interestingly, many people with Type 2 diabetes have low blood levels of magnesium. And, according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, magnesium is one of the underconsumed nutrients. Other good sources of magnesium are whole grains, beans and spinach. Nutrient Powerhouse There are so many ways to please the taste buds and nourish the body with nuts. Along with their distinct tastes, nuts each have a unique nutrient profile. And when you pair them with other nutrient-dense foods, you're getting a super dose of good-for-you nutrition. Toss chopped pistachios and diced peaches into yo Continue reading >>

The Best Nuts For Diabetes

The Best Nuts For Diabetes

It's no surprise that nuts are heart-healthy but it's also possible that they are beneficial foods for individuals with diabetes. Research suggests that that consuming tree nuts, in conjunction with other dietary changes, can improve blood sugar levels in individuals with non-insulin dependent, or type 2, diabetes and also improve blood cholesterol levels in these individuals. If you have diabetes, be careful of nuts with added sugar in any form, such as honey or chocolate, since these components are high in simple carbohydrate. Mixed Nuts and Diabetes Several research studies have examined the potential benefits of consuming a mixture of different nuts for individuals with diabetes. In one study, published in "Diabetes Care" in 2011, researches found that subjects with type 2 diabetes had increased energy after consuming 2 ounces of mixed nuts daily, compared to a control group. These individuals also had changes that indicated their blood sugar was lower during the study and their levels of "bad," LDL-cholesterol also dropped. The researchers concluded that nuts are a good replacement for carbohydrate foods that can improve glycemic control and blood cholesterol. Almonds decrease post-meal blood sugar surges, according to a research study published in the "Journal of Nutrition" in 2006. Researchers fed 15 healthy subjects five meals comparable in carbohydrate, fat and protein content; three test meals that consisted of almonds, bread, boiled rice and instant mashed potatoes; and two control meals. Blood samples, taken pre-meal and four hours after each meal, showed that almonds lowered the rise in blood sugar and insulin levels four hours after eating. Additional research, published in "Metabolism" in 2007, showed that eating almonds with a high glycemic index food re Continue reading >>

Nuts And Diabetes

Nuts And Diabetes

Tweet Nuts provide a number of benefits for people with diabetes. Studies suggest that nuts may even decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes. A study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition found that "nut consumption was associated with a decreased prevalence of selected risk factors for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.[138] This page explores the various benefits of nuts for people with type 2 diabetes. Do different nuts have different health benefits for people with diabetes? Yes. Some nuts have benefits that others don't. Almonds contain a lot of nutrients, particularly vitamin E Walnuts contain healthy omega-3 fatty acids Cashews offers lots of magnesium Almonds, peanuts, and pistachios all reduce 'bad' cholesterol Almost all nuts offer something good for people with diabetes. Salted nuts, however, should be avoided. Excessive salt consumption is consistently linked to an increased risk of heart disease. Nuts and cholesterol One of the most prominent characteristics of nuts for people with diabetes is their effect on cholesterol levels. Avoiding high cholesterol levels is essential for people with diabetes, because exposure to high blood glucose levels increases the risk of the arteries narrowing. Almonds, peanuts, and pistachios all reduce "bad" cholesterol very effectively. "Bad" cholesterol refers to small, dense particles of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), too much of which can clog the arteries. Almonds, walnuts, pistachios, pecans, and hazelnuts reduce "bad" cholesterol by increasing levels of high-density-lipoprotein (HDL), or 'good' cholesterol. HDL clears out 'bad' cholesterol, thus reducing the risk of heart disease. Nuts and the glycemic index (GI) The glycemic index measures the speed at which your body Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Nuts For Your Health

Best And Worst Nuts For Your Health

Should you go nuts? Nuts are nature's way of showing us that good things come in small packages. These bite-size nutritional powerhouses are packed with heart-healthy fats, protein, vitamins, and minerals. Here's a look at the pros and cons of different nuts, as well as the best and worst products on supermarket shelves today. Of course, you can get too much of these good things: Nuts are high in fat and calories, so while a handful can hold you over until dinner, a few more handfuls can ruin your appetite altogether. And although nuts are a healthy choice by themselves, they'll quickly become detrimental to any diet when paired with sugary or salty toppings or mixes. Best nuts for your diet Almonds, Cashews, Pistachios All nuts are about equal in terms of calories per ounce, and in moderation, are all healthy additions to any diet. "Their mix of omega-3 fatty acids, protein, and fiber will help you feel full and suppress your appetite," says Judy Caplan, RD, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Watch the video: Guilt-Free Snack: Honey-and-Chili Glazed Almonds The lowest-calorie nuts at 160 per ounce are almonds (23 nuts; 6 grams protein, 14 grams fat); cashews (16 to 18 nuts; 5 grams protein, 13 grams fat); and pistachios (49 nuts; 6 grams protein, 13 grams fat). Avoid nuts packaged or roasted in oil; instead, eat them raw or dry roasted, says Caplan. (Roasted nuts may have been heated in hydrogenated or omega-6 unhealthy fats, she adds, or to high temperatures that can destroy their nutrients.) Worst nuts for your diet Macadamia Nuts, Pecans Ounce for ounce, macadamia nuts (10 to 12 nuts; 2 grams protein, 21 grams fat) and pecans (18 to 20 halves; 3 grams protein, 20 grams fat) have the most calories—200 each—along with the lowest amounts of Continue reading >>

Nuts Good For Some With Diabetes

Nuts Good For Some With Diabetes

July 8, 2011 -- Eating about 2 ounces of nuts daily in place of carbohydrates may be beneficial to people with type 2 diabetes by lowering bad cholesterol levels and improving blood sugar control, a new study shows. “There are two important factors in caring for diabetes: blood sugar control and heart health,” study researcher Cyril W.C. Kendall, PhD, of the University of Toronto, says in a news release. The study involved 117 people with type 2 diabetes who were randomly assigned to one of three groups. One group’s members ate about 2 ounces of mixed nuts daily, another a healthy muffin, and the third half nuts and half muffin. Researchers say those whose diet included 2 ounces of nuts showed better results after three months in both blood sugar and LDL "bad" cholesterol levels than participants in the other two groups. The nuts consisted of a mixture of unsalted and mostly raw almonds, pistachios, walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, peanuts, cashews, and macadamias. The muffin was concocted to be a healthy whole wheat product, sweetened with apple concentrate but with no sugar added. The muffins had similar protein content to the nuts from the addition of egg white and skim milk powder. Calories from monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) in the nuts were the same as the carbohydrate calories in the muffin, the researchers write. During the three-month study, participants were asked to maintain their oral diabetes medications. The main outcome researchers looked for was change in a marker of blood sugar control called HbA1c. Kendall described the results of the study as “a very exciting and promising finding about the treatment” of type 2 diabetes. The researchers write that the reduction in the HbA1c level was significantly more in those in the nuts-only group than pa Continue reading >>

Need To Lower Your Blood Pressure? Eating A Handful Of These Could Have An Amazing Effect

Need To Lower Your Blood Pressure? Eating A Handful Of These Could Have An Amazing Effect

The nuts contain high levels of magnesium and potassium - which are essential elements in the human body. Magnesium helps keep heart rhythm steady, is vital for healthy bones and teeth, muscle function, the nervous system and keeps bowels healthy. The substance can also control blood sugar to combat insulin resistance which can lead to type 2 diabetes. But experts have since revealed there is a link between the amount of magnesium people eat and their blood pressure. Researchers at Indiana University have previously found people receiving an average of 368mg day for an average of three months had overall reductions in systolic blood pressure of 2mm of mercury (mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressure of 1.78 mm Hg. The study found taking 300mg/a day for just one month was enough to reduce blood pressure and increase blood flow. Cassandra Barns, nutritionist, spoke to Express.co.uk about the findings. She said: “Cashew nuts are a fantastic source of magnesium. “Magnesium may help to keep blood pressure in balance, potentially by helping to relax the blood vessel walls and allow them to dilate.” The NHS recommends men should have 300mg of magnesium a day - while women only need 270mg. A handful of cashew nuts - or 100g - contain 292mg of magnesium. High blood pressure can cause damage the arteries, which carry blood away from the heart, by damaging the cells of their lining. This can cause a hardening of the arteries called arteriosclerosis which can block blood flow to the heart, kidneys and brain. Hypotension can also lead to aneurysms, which can rupture and cause life-threatening internal bleeding. It can also lead to coronary artery disease and increase the risk of kidney damage and TIAs - or ministrokes. Thu, August 18, 2016 Here are 16 of the best superfoods foods Continue reading >>

Nuts Will Change Your Life

Nuts Will Change Your Life

Last year everyone was talking about how good nuts are for diabetes. This year they’re just as good, and new research shows it. If you aren’t eating lots of nuts yet, I’m going to try to get you started. Nuts are great because they are seeds and fruit combined. They are literally full of life. According to Wikipedia, while fruit seeds are separate from the fruit itself, in nuts (according to the botanical definition of the term), the seeds and fruit (which the seed will use to grow if planted) are bound up together, making them among the most nutritious foods on the planet. New research from Louisiana State University found that people who regularly eat tree nuts — including almonds, macadamias, pistachios, walnuts, and cashews — have lower risks for Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Their C-reactive protein (a major marker of inflammation) levels were lower. Their HDL (“good cholesterol”) levels were higher. According to The Huffington Post, the study was funded by the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research & Education Foundation. Study results often show what the funders wanted them to show, but I tend to believe this one. It appeared in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition and was based on analyzing data from NHANES, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the gold standard for this kind of study in the US. This research confirms dozens of other studies. As Web Editor Diane Fennell wrote in 2011, “Nuts are well known for their nutritional benefits, including their high levels of heart-healthy fats, protein, antioxidants…, plant sterols (natural substances found in plants that can help lower cholesterol), fiber, and minerals.” Nutritionist Amy Campbell explained in this article that nuts are good because they h Continue reading >>

Go Nuts To Help Lower Your Blood Sugar

Go Nuts To Help Lower Your Blood Sugar

Open this photo in gallery: If you have Type 2 diabetes - i.e. your blood glucose (sugar) is higher than it should be - consider replacing some of the carbohydrates in your diet with a handful or two of nuts. According to a new study, eating about half a cup of nuts each day can help people with diabetes lower their blood glucose and cholesterol levels. These new findings add to mounting evidence that nuts confer important health benefits. Numerous studies have linked nuts with protection from heart attack, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes and even Alzheimer's disease. Despite nuts' high fat content, studies - including this one - haven't linked them with weight gain. Scientists suspect it's actually the fat content that makes them so healthy: Nuts contain mainly unsaturated fat - polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats - and only small amounts of cholesterol-raising saturated fat. They also deliver plant protein, some fibre and phytochemicals, which may also play a role. The current study, published in the August issue of Diabetes Care, was led by David Jenkins, director of the Risk Factor Modification Centre at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. Researchers told 117 people with type 2 diabetes to replace some of the usual carbohydrates in their diet with nuts, a healthy muffin or a combination of the two. One group was given roughly 2.5 ounces (475 calories worth) of unsalted mixed nuts, a second group received a low-sugar, whole-wheat muffin, and remaining participants followed a half nut/half muffin regimen. The unsalted nut mixture included raw almonds, pistachios, walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, peanuts, cashews and macadamias. The muffin had a similar protein content to the nuts from the addition of egg whites and skim-milk powder. After three months, Continue reading >>

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