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Carrying Insulin In Checked Baggage

Traveling With Diabetes

Traveling With Diabetes

For diabetics, especially those on insulin, travel can be daunting. This article aims to help diabetics reduce the stress of traveling and make planning for a trip as enjoyable as possible. The most common concern of diabetics is carrying medications in the luggage. Generally, airport security will allow passengers to board the airplane with insulin, insulin syringes and insulin pumps as well as all diabetes medications, nutrition and supplies. As long as the rooms are properly ventilated and air-conditioned, there is no need to bring medications in coolers. The advent of the insulin pens and portable glucose kits as well as insulin pumps make it easy and handy to carry medication. Insulin pens are either refillable or disposable and come with cartridges that can be stored in a small portable case as small as an eyeglasses case. This makes it easy for pens to be stored in a carry-on bag or even a shoulder bag. Modern glucose meters are small and handy. Some as small as a mid-sized cellular phone, others a little bigger than a ballpoint pen—allowing for easy storage of materials and blood glucose paraphernalia. Storing insulin in check-in baggage is not advised because of the variable temperatures in the holding area. If you do have insulin in your check-in luggage, make sure it is well protected and sealed with a bubble wrap and towel or an airtight container packed in the middle of the suitcase. Arrive at the airport at least 2-3 hours before the flight. Pack medications in a clear resealable bag and if possible bring prescription labels for each medication and medical device. Carry medications in your carry-on bags for easier inspection. This also ensures that the medications are kept within reach in case of rerouting, airport delays or the possibility of a lost or Continue reading >>

How To Take Insulin And Needles On A Plane

How To Take Insulin And Needles On A Plane

How to Take Insulin and Needles on a Plane Kathryn Walsh, Leaf Group Updated August 29, 2018 Prepare in advance when traveling on a plane with insulin and needles. (Photo: Creatas Images/Creatas/Getty Images ) How to Get Pain Medications to My Vacation Destination Traveling is uncertain enough. Don't compound your stress levels by worrying about how your insulin and needles will fare on the flight . The TSA is good about making sure that diabetics can travel with everything they need, so being separated from those essentials isn't a likelihood. Passing through airport security with needles, medication, an insulin pump or other diabetic equipment is as simple as notifying an agent about what you're carrying. The screening process may take a few minutes longer than it would otherwise, so get to the airport early. The TSA has a strict 3-1-1 policy , which limits the quantities of liquids, gels and aerosols that passengers can pack in carry-on bags. Medications and other medically-necessary supplies are an exception. Travelers are permitted to pack insulin in either checked or carry-on bags in quantities greater than 3.4 ounces (the maximum size allowed for liquids under the 3-1-1 rule). Insulin pumps, syringes, ice packs and other equipment related to diabetes management are also exempt from the rule, provided the traveler is also carrying the insulin itself. TSA agents should also allow passengers with diabetes to carry juice or any other medically-necessary liquids through security, even in quantities exceeding 3.4 ounces. Packing Insulin, Syringes and Other Equipment While the TSA allows diabetic travelers to pack all their necessary supplies in carry-on luggage, agents are required to thoroughly screen all of these items. That means all insulin, syringes and other sup Continue reading >>

Air Canada - Health And Travel Tips

Air Canada - Health And Travel Tips

Air travel in commercial aircraft is fast, convenient, and safe with the vast majority of passengers reaching near and distant destinations safely and without deleterious health effects. However, the aircraft environment and travel related factors can cause certain stresses on the traveller, and several tips can make travel more enjoyable. Thispage has been prepared by the Aerospace Medical Association to provide passengers with general health information and useful air travel tips. Reserve a seat by the wing if you are prone to air sickness. Seek the advice of your physician if there is any question. Allow ample time to check in and reach your departure gate. Wear loose, comfortable clothing and comfortable shoes that have been worn previously. Do not place anything under the seat in front of you so you can stretch and exercise your legs. Stand and walk about the cabin periodically. Always carry your prescription medication on board in your carry-on baggage . This is especially important if you are taking medication for heart disease, diabetes, or seizures. Passengers with severe allergies should carry one or more Epipens as they would under any other circumstances. If youre travelling with medical marijuana, always allow additional time for security screening. Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) officers will require that you present medical documentation, and will call local authorities to verify the validity of the documents. Carrying properly packaged medical marijuana is permitted for travel within Canada only. Flying outside of Canada with medical marijuana is illegal and prohibited by airport authorities. For more information, visit the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) or Government of Canada websites . Although insulin does not g Continue reading >>

Traveling With Diabetes

Traveling With Diabetes

Having diabetes should never hold you back from doing the things you love or from embarking on new adventures. However, when it comes to traveling, especially to destinations far off the beaten path, managing all the details of your diabetes care in addition to the details of travel – tickets, itineraries, connections, and reservations, to name a few – may seem overwhelming. You may be concerned about simply getting your supplies onto the airplane, not to mention time zone changes, new climates, or counting carbohydrates in the jungle or desert. Even a simple pleasure like sightseeing can feel difficult to manage with diabetes. However, with a little forethought and planning, many obstacles can be overcome. Here are some tips to help make your travels as stress-free as possible. Getting through the airport If you’re traveling by plane, you may encounter a few hassles at the airport, where upgraded security measures and baggage restrictions have become the norm, and flight changes or delays are always a possibility. Wearing a medical ID bracelet or necklace and showing it to security personnel is a good first step toward explaining why you are carrying medicines and diabetes supplies and is sometimes sufficient since more people are becoming knowledgeable about diabetes. A letter from your doctor that includes the date, your name, your diagnosis of diabetes, and a list of all the supplies (blood glucose meter, strips, lancets, etc.) and medicines you use can also smooth your way through security. If you use insulin, make sure that the type of insulin and dosage or pump, as well as the supplies you need for administering it, are listed as well. (This list might include an insulin pen and needles, syringes, or pump infusion sets.) Personally, I made such a list, had Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Travel: Planning Is Key

Diabetes And Travel: Planning Is Key

Traveling with diabetes can be comfortable and safe as long as you plan carefully. Good planning includes talking to your health care provider and doing a little research before leaving, careful packing, and knowing about airport security. Talk to your health care provider about your travel plans. If you're on insulin, ask about getting a prescription for a glucagon kit. Make sure your immunizations, your immunization record and your written health record are up to date, especially if traveling abroad. Take a copy of the immunization record and health report if needed. Make sure that all medications you carry and all diabetes supplies have their prescription labels on them. If you use a daily or weekly medication reminder pack, take the original prescription labels with you. Refill any prescriptions that may expire during your travel. Outside of the U.S., some medications, such as insulin, are sold in different strengths. Keep your health insurance card on you at all times. Review health insurance policy for travel information. Is your travel destination in your provider network? If not, learn what you have to do in order to have insurance coverage out of network. For insulin pump or continuous glucose monitoring sensor users, check the insulin pump manufacturer's website or call their customer service phone number for information about traveling. Go to the Transportation Security Administration website and learn about any rules for traveling with diabetes supplies and equipment. Look for information about using a blood glucose meter, insulin pump or personal continuous glucose monitor on a plane. Check the Center for Disease Control website to see if you need immunizations for countries outside of the U.S. Bring enough supplies and medications to last longer than the Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Travel -- 10 Tips For A Safe Trip

Diabetes And Travel -- 10 Tips For A Safe Trip

If you have diabetes, preparing for even daily activities can require advanced planning. So how do you prepare for travel, which can disrupt your diabetes care routine? Here are 10 tips for traveling when you have diabetes. #1 -- Keep your supplies close at hand. Whether you’re traveling by plane, train, or automobile, make sure your diabetes supplies are easily accessible. If you’re flying, be sure to put all of your supplies in your carry-on bags. Back-up insulin should also be kept in your carry-on, because checked baggage can be exposed to extreme cold or heat that can spoil insulin, and ruin glucometers. If you're using a device to keep your insulin cool, be sure it is a cold pack, and not a freezer pack--freezing insulin destroys its efficacy. The same rules apply for storing supplies while driving or on a train. #2 – Try to stick to your routine. Traveling can really throw people with diabetes off schedule, and at no fault of their own. The delay of a flight may mean sitting on the runway for hours, or if you’re traveling out of your time zone, it may mean feeling hungry when you should be asleep. When you have diabetes, you need to think ahead and stick to your routine as much as possible. If you pack extra snacks for the plane, you may want to store them in an insulated bag with an ice pack. Tracey Lucier, Nutrition Educator at Joslin Diabetes Center, also recommends writing your seat number on the bag and asking a member of the cabin crew to store it a refrigerated trolley. For a list of snacks that don’t need a cooler for storage, check out the list at right. #3 -- Get documentation. Carry a note from your doctor stating that you have diabetes, and need to have your medication with you at all times. If you’re going to a country where they speak a Continue reading >>

Air Travel & Your Rights

Air Travel & Your Rights

Diabetes & You > Know Your Rights > Air Travel & Your Rights What are some general things to keep in mind when travelling by air? Remember that most airlines are more than happy to assist passengers with special needs if you need help, speak to an airline staff representative. To avoid any unexpected delays, you can also make arrangements with the airline ahead of time, if you know in advance that you will require additional assistance at any point during your journey. Always be sure to give yourself plenty of time. The Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) recommends that you go through pre-boarding security well in advance of your flight, especially during peak travel periods, in case any additional screening is required. Always carry appropriate snacks with you in case your flight or in-flight meal is delayed, or the meal provided does not have enough carbohydrates (for those using insulin or other medications that may cause hypoglycemia). For more information about security screening procedures, please see additional questions and answers below. Be aware of time zone changes and schedule your meals and medications accordingly. Meet with your healthcare team in advance of your trip to work out timing of meals and medications, if needed. Also discuss with your healthcare team what to do in case you get sick during your flight or while youre on holiday. If you choose to sleep while travelling by air, set the alarm on your watch or cell phone to wake you at meal or medication time. Try to do some form of activity during your journey: walk around in the terminal prior to boarding, consider doing simple stretch exercises in your seat or move your ankles in circles and raise your legs occasionally, or move around periodically in the aisles to help stretch your Continue reading >>

Air Travel And Insulin

Air Travel And Insulin

Tweet Travelling abroad with insulin has caused many people with diabetes problems in the past. Despite airline security, people with diabetes are able to carry insulin with them in hand luggage. A letter from your doctor is essential. It should clearly explain the necessity of carrying both insulin and syringes/insulin pump onboard. The letter should explain that you need insulin and you should present it at security to staff. If you encounter further problems, speak with a senior manager because air travel and insulin should no longer be a problem for people with diabetes. Why can’t I just put my insulin in the hold? Research from insulin manufacturers advises that insulin supplies are kept in hand luggage. This is because airline travel can cause baggage to freeze and affect the insulin. If insulin must go into the hold it should be well insulated or housed in an airtight container if possible, and placed as close to the middle of your suitcase as possible. How do I tell if my insulin has been damaged during the flight? You should examine the insulin for any trace of crystals. If some are found, you should discard this insulin and seek local supplies. Keep an accurate testing routine up to make sure your insulin hasn’t been affected. Should I give my insulin to the cabin crew? It can be standard protocol for cabin crew to request all medication for storage during the flight. Will I be allowed on the plane with my insulin and syringes/needles? With a doctor’s letter in hand, there should be no problem boarding with your insulin. However, it is worth checking the airline policy before you travel and phoning them up to make sure if you are concerned. Insulin User identity cards are available from Diabetes UK and independent companies. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitu Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens ,needles & Blood Monitoring Kits.

Insulin Pens ,needles & Blood Monitoring Kits.

insulin pens ,needles & blood monitoring kits. insulin pens ,needles & blood monitoring kits. I need to take supplies of insulin pens needles & checking equipment on a ryainair flight to spain i have a drs letter to explain , has anyone encountered difficulties with this airline as cant afford to have items confiscated only taking hand luggage.thanks 1.Re: insulin pens ,needles & blood monitoring kits. The airline doesn't mind a bit (even Ryanair!), in fact they won't even know.. The people who might mind are airport security at your departure airports, but with a doctor's letter this shouldn't be a problem. Lots of diabetics fly every day. 2.Re: insulin pens ,needles & blood monitoring kits. My husband is type 1 diabetic and has to take some needles, test sticks and other things in his hand luggage when we fly as he can't risk it all going in the hold. He takes a doctors letter and his prescription but has never been asked for it. That is with Thomas Cook however! Your doctors letter will cover you! 3.Re: insulin pens ,needles & blood monitoring kits. I've never had an issue in 25+ years of carrying insulin pens and hypodermics in my hand luggage. But if your bag is pulled aside for a search, be sure to tell them there are needles inside - they'll appreciate the courtesy, but won't bat an eyelid at the needles because they see many, many diabetics travelling with their kit. 4.Re: insulin pens ,needles & blood monitoring kits. thankx i am new to this having just been diagnosed type 1 at ripe old age of 57 so a bit nervous! all your replys are very reassuring thank you. 5.Re: insulin pens ,needles & blood monitoring kits. thankx i am new to this having just been diagnosed type 1 at ripe old age of 57 so a bit nervous! all your replys are very reassuring thank you. 6.Re: Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

Please notify the TSA officer that you have diabetes and are carrying your supplies with you. Insulin pumps and supplies must be accompanied by insulin, and insulin in any form or dispenser must be clearly identified. Continue reading >>

How To Prep For Air Travel With Type 1 Diabetes

How To Prep For Air Travel With Type 1 Diabetes

This edited excerpt is from The Savvy Diabetic A Survival Guide (reprinted by permission): Here are some tips for traveling away from home if you have Type 1 diabetes: Before you fly somewhere, learn the rules for transporting medications and supplies. If travelling during high-alert times, be aware that regulations may become more stringent. Remember that insulin is a fluid, and syringes, insulin pumps, and CGMS are devices that may cause concern at the gate. While it is generally considered safe to put your insulin, insulin pump, CGM receiver, and medicines through x-ray devices, the alarms may trigger with your pump, meter, and receiver. Whenever I go through security screening, I disconnect my pump and place it, my meter, and my CGM receiver in the plastic bins. I usually also tell the gate agent that I wear an insulin pump because I am diabetic. Read Family Detained at Airport Because of an Insulin Pump. If you are travelling in a non-English-speaking country, write down these words in the language of your destination: I have diabetes. I wear an insulin pump. I carry syringes to take insulin, which is my medication. I wear a device to monitor my blood glucose. Carry a travel letter from your doctor, and labels for supplies and meds. I also carry a script from my doctor for syringes and insulin, just in case. Be sure to keep all your essential medications, supplies, and medical equipment in your carry-on bag. On a recent trip, the airline lost my checked suitcase. The airline found my baggage the next day, in Hawaii. They delivered it to me 24 hours after my flight. Fortunately, it was on the flight home, and all my back-up supplies and extra pump were in my carry-on. Read They Were Convinced my Humalog Penfills Were Ammo. Pack snacks and low blood glucose treats o Continue reading >>

Tsa Permitted And Prohibited Items List

Tsa Permitted And Prohibited Items List

SeatGuru.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. Before you pack that hostess gift or favorite holiday treat in your carry-on, remember liquids, gels, and aerosols in containers larger than 3 ounces are not permitted through the security checkpoint. Never fear, cakes and pies are permitted, but may be subject to additional screening. TSA's list of holiday items that you should put in your checked bag, ship ahead, or leave at home if above 3.4oz: Creamy dips and spreads (cheese spread, peanut butter, etc.) Gift baskets with food items (salsa, jams, and sauces) While wrapped gifts are not prohibited, it is best to keep gifts unwrapped, whether they are in your carry-on or checked luggage. TSA officers may need to unwrap a gift to take a closer look inside. Either ship wrapped gifts ahead of time or wait until you arrive at your destination to wrap them. If you are traveling with small children or elderly adults, consider using the family lane to go through security with ease. Family Lanes, located at every security checkpoint, allow families and travelers with special needs to go through security at their own pace. Individuals carrying medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in excess of three ounces will be directed to these lanes. So, if you are traveling with liquid medications, baby formula, or baby food, look for the signage with the green circle at each security checkpoint. TSA will allow snow globes that contain less than 3.4 fluid ounces in carry on luggage (approximate size of a tennis ball). This is determined and allowed only if the entire snow globe is small enough to fit in one clear, quart siz Continue reading >>

Traveling With Syringes Requires Some Security Preparation

Traveling With Syringes Requires Some Security Preparation

Question: I have to give myself medically necessary injections. I carry a note from my doctor stating that the injections are prescribed. What would happen if the Transportation Security Administration opened my luggage, checked or carry-on, and found needles inside? Richard Showstack Newport Beach Answer: Assuming the syringes are for a legitimate medical purpose -- and in Showstack's case, they are -- probably nothing, says Suzanne Treviño, a spokeswoman for the TSA. "We come across this every day with passengers who have special needs," she says. "They just need to package them [the syringes] with their medications so it's obvious they're needed for a medical reason." Your journey through security also is going to be easier if you give the screener a heads-up that you have medical supplies with you, as a sort of preemptive move. The American Diabetes Assn., whose website has an entire section devoted to diabetic travelers, and the TSA recommend that a doctor's note accompany your medications. "The letter should explain what you need to do for your diabetes, such as take diabetes pills or insulin shots," the ADA website says. "It should list insulin, syringes and any other medications or devices you use." (Even if your condition is not diabetes, substitute the correct noun and supplies and the advice still makes sense.) Just to be sure, take half your supplies in your carry-on bag and half in your checked luggage. And, as with all things medical, make sure you have more than you need, the recent East Coast weather being a good reminder of how necessary it is to be prepared. You should also make sure you have prescriptions with you as well, for your medication and for your syringes. Not all states sell syringes without a prescription, and those that do sometimes limit Continue reading >>

How To Get Through Tsa With These 5 Diabetes Devices

How To Get Through Tsa With These 5 Diabetes Devices

Whether it is for business or pleasure, you have to pass through security before boarding your flight. The TSA allows for diabetes-related supplies, equipment and medication—including liquids—through the checkpoint once they have been properly screened by X-ray or hand inspection. If possible, pack all your supplies together in your carry-on bag so you have everything on hand. Before your screening begins, inform the officer conducting the screening about any supplies on you or in your carry-on. Here’s how you can fly through TSA with these 5 diabetes devices! 1. Insulin Pump/Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) Taking an insulin pump through airport security is quite common, but it’s always a good idea to carry the Airport Information Card when traveling. You may go through the airport metal detector with your insulin pump and CGM, as these devices are designed to withstand common electromagnetic interference. However, we do not recommend going through an airport body scanner with your pump and CGM, as Medtronic has not determined advanced imaging technology to be safe for insulin pump or CGM devices. If you do go through an airport body scanner, be sure to remove your insulin pump and CGM, but do not send your devices through the x-ray machine as an alternative. If you do not wish to remove your devices, explain to the officer that you cannot remove the insulin pump as it is under your skin with a needle, and request an alternative pat-down screening process. 2. Insulin Delivery Devices Be sure to have proof a physician prescribed your insulin and needles by providing a professional, pre-printed pharmaceutical label identifying the medication. Travel with your original insulin box and glucose meter that shows the pharmaceutical label. You will need these items in Continue reading >>

Travel

Travel

Whether for work or pleasure, travel can and should be fun and having diabetes doesn’t mean you can’t travel. With good planning, your trip can be safe, fun and hassle-free whether you’re going interstate or overseas. While traveling: Make sure you eat well, consider how different foods will affect you Make sure you check your blood glucose levels regularly For people with type 1 diabetes - carry the right lollies with you (overseas brands may not be as strong) If you are flying, prepare for long delays or misplaced baggage (just in case!) If traveling overseas, time zones and extreme climates may affect you and how you manage your diabetes, talk to your doctor or diabetes educator Below is information on planning your trip, travel insurance, airport regulation, what to ask your doctor, tips on what to pack and flying. Planning your travel itinerary & bookings (Three Months Prior) Plan travel itinerary and make bookings If you wear an electronic device to monitor blood glucose levels or infuse insulin, check with the airline to see if these devices can be operated in-flight Arrange travel insurance for health and belongings Check vaccination requirements When booking your flights, you may choose to tell the airline you have diabetes. This will be passed on to the cabin crew who are trained in meeting your needs during the flight. In general, ‘diabetic’ meals served in-flight can be quite bland and no longer necessary. However you may choose to order meals that are low in saturated fat and high in fibre and carbohydrate at the time you make your bookings. Be sure to make arrangements in advance so that you comply with Australian airline security regulations specifically for people with diabetes. The regulations are: You must carry all diabetes supplies includin Continue reading >>

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