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Carrots Diabetes Risk

Can Diabetics Eat Carrots?

Can Diabetics Eat Carrots?

Written by Fred Decker; Updated July 25, 2017 Carrots provide diabetics with a healthy and nutrient-rich carbohydrate option. Managing blood sugars as a diabetic is a lot more complicated than just avoiding sweets. Many seemingly-healthy foods can cause a rapid rise in blood glucose, and carrots are often listed among that number. In truth carrots are a healthy option for diabetics despite their naturally sweet flavor, and they can be eaten regularly as part of your balanced diet. Many diabetics and health conscious non-diabetics use a tool called the Glycemic Index, or GI, to help manage their blood sugar levels. The GI compares how much a fixed quantity of a given food raises blood sugars, comparing it against the same quantity of pure glucose. As the reference point, pure glucose is assigned a GI of 100. The higher the GI of a specific food, the more it boosts your blood sugar, so the lower the number the better. Carrots currently are assessed at a GI of 41 by the Glycemic Index Institute, which is a moderate level, but earlier and less-stringent testing resulted in a higher figure. This made intuitive sense, given that carrots taste naturally sweet, so people with diabetes have often been warned to limit their consumption of carrots because of that flawed early test. There's more to a food than its impact on your blood sugars though, and by any reasonable standard carrots are a superbly healthy mealtime option. A half-cup of cooked carrots supplies over two grams of dietary fiber nine percent of your daily value in its six grams of carbs, with just 27 calories. You'll also get more than double your daily value of vitamin A, and 13 percent of your day's vitamin K. That one-cup portion of raw carrot provides three grams of fiber, or 14 percent of your daily value, ag Continue reading >>

Carrot Juice And Diabetes: Know The Facts

Carrot Juice And Diabetes: Know The Facts

Juices. They come from fresh fruit and vegetables, so they're healthy, right? This is the common assumption. But…juicing isn't really all it's cracked up to be. Here we cover carrot juice and diabetes, the facts, myths, truths and research. By the time you finish reading this, you'll know the facts so you can make a more informed decision about consuming carrot juice in your diet. Nutrition facts We've written about carrots before over here. Here at Diabetes Meal Plans we encourage a lower carb diet and sometimes low carbers say “carrots aren’t low carb.” While they aren’t the lowest carb food, they do have lots of nutritional benefits and in our opinion it’s perfectly fine to eat carrots on a regular basis – whole carrots that is – carrot juice on the other hand. Well, keep on reading… Carrots contain many beneficial vitamins, minerals and compounds that support health. And, even though they are higher in carbs than other vegetables, they aren't so high that they are worth eliminating all together. Here's a great nutrition infographic from Dr. Axe. While the above nutrition looks promising, and is if you're eating whole carrots. This is NOT the case for carrot juice. Carrot and Carrot Juice Comparison Myths and Truths Did you pick up on a few differences in the above comparison? Take a look again and note the difference in calories, total carbs, dietary fiber, and sugar content. Calories: Even though the two measurements above are for 1 cup of carrots or carrot juice, the juice is almost double the calories. This is obviously because it requires more carrots in volume to make juice than it does to eat them raw. But this is something many people don't take into consideration. Total carbs: When you juice any fruit or vegetable it usually doubles the car Continue reading >>

Nature/nurture Study Of Type 2 Diabetes Risk Unearths Carrots As Potential Risk Reducers

Nature/nurture Study Of Type 2 Diabetes Risk Unearths Carrots As Potential Risk Reducers

Stanford University School of Medicine blog Nature and nurture have long been the 'tomayto' and 'tomahto' of lengthyarguments in both psychology and medicine.At the end of the day, of course, disease is caused neither strictly by genes nor strictly by the environment, but by the interactions between them. In a new study published in Nature Genetics, Stanford medical-systems expert Atul Butte , MD, PhD (whom I've written about at length in the past), has figured out a sophisticated way to crunch massive amounts of genetic and environmental data and pull faint but important signals out of the noise. Sifting through mountains ofdata gathered in biennial health-and-nutrition surveys run by the federal government's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ,Butteteased out a gene/environmentrelationship that may make you want to eat a carrot. Just over half of us, it'salready known,are walking around with two copies - one from dad, one from mom - of a particular version of a gene that seems to very slightly predispose us to developing type 2 diabetes at some point in our lives. Nothing much we can do about that. Unlike genes, however,our environment is something we can sometimes do something about. The Butte team's new work suggests that in people carrying a double dose ofthe gene version in question, low blood levels of the micronutrient beta-carotene (a vitamin A precursor found copiously in carrots and many other red, orange and yellow vegetables as well as in many vitamin supplements) are associated with not just a slight risk but a significantly increased riskfor type 2 diabetes, whereas inthose with high blood levels of the substance, that riskappears to besubstantially mitigated. A bit more offbeat is Butte et al.'s finding that another micronutrient - gamma-tocophe Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Diabetes

Best Foods For Diabetes

Learn more about great foods to eat for diabetes including cinnamon, nuts, oatmeal and more. With diabetes, it can be easy to fixate on all the foods you feel like you're missing out on. But there are lots of diabetic diet-friendly foods you can enjoy, and it's important to focus on the foods you can and should be eating more of. These diabetic diet-friendly foods are nutrient-packed powerhouses that can help you control your blood sugar and stay healthy. Pictured Recipe: Moroccan Kidney Bean & Chickpea Salad Pictured Recipe: Turkish Spice Mix Cinnamon This fragrant spice has been shown to lower cholesterol and keep blood sugar more stable. Just 1/4 teaspoon of cinnamon per day improved fasting blood sugar and cholesterol levels in one study published in the journal Diabetes Care, and other studies have shown similar effects. Get your cinnamon fix by sprinkling it into smoothies, yogurt, oatmeal or even your coffee. Another plus for cinnamon? It adds flavor to your food without adding sugar or salt. Pictured Recipe: Roasted Brussel Sprouts Nuts Walnuts in particular have been shown to help fight heart disease and can improve blood sugar levels, all thanks to walnuts' high levels of polyunsaturated fats. These healthy fats have been shown to help prevent and slow the progression of conditions like diabetes and heart disease. Almonds, pistachios and pecans also contain these beneficial fats. Nuts are low in carbohydrates and high in protein and fat, which makes them good for stabilizing blood sugar. Just be sure to watch your serving size. A 1/4-cup portion of shelled walnuts clocks in at 164 calories. Pictured Recipe: Quinoa & Chia Oatmeal Mix Oatmeal Whole grains, such as oats, are better for your blood sugar (the fiber helps minimize spiking) and may actually help impr Continue reading >>

Could Carrots Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Could Carrots Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Behind the headlines They say The Express reported in January 2013 that scientists found that carrots are packed with potent health-boosting antioxidants that seem to prevent Type 2 diabetes. We already know that eating a healthy, balanced diet and keeping to a healthy weight are key to reducing the risk of Type 2. However, the new findings shed light on the interaction between our genes and the content of the foods we eat and their impact on our risk of developing this condition. Researchers from Stanford University in California found that, in people with particular common genetic variations, high blood levels of beta carotene, which the body converts to a form of vitamin A, might lower the risk of Type 2 diabetes. They also found that high levels of gamma tocopherol (the major form of vitamin E in the diet, found in vegetable oils, nuts, seeds and wholegrains), might increase the risk of Type 2. The research, published in the journal Human Genetics, focused on the interactions that occur between the specific genetic variations found in different individuals and blood levels of key substances that have previously been linked to an increased risk of Type 2. On their own, none of the genetic factors showed an impressive impact on Type 2 risk. But when paired with the antioxidants, there were significant results. In people carrying a double dose of a specific variation (in the gene SLC30A4), which is known to increase the risk of Type 2, researchers found clear links between high blood levels of beta carotene and a reduced risk of Type 2. Whereas, the variations combined with high blood levels of gamma tocopherol were linked to an increased risk of the condition. These findings highlight the need for further studies to find out if beta carotene and gamma tocopherol are p Continue reading >>

Can Carrots Reduce The Effect Of Diabetes-causing Genes?

Can Carrots Reduce The Effect Of Diabetes-causing Genes?

In the latest revelation about the human genome, researchers say individuals with a certain genetic mutation that predispose them to diabetes may be able to rely on beta carotene to reduce their symptoms. Scientists from Stanford University report in the journal Human Genetics on an unique study in which they matched genetic variants linked to type 2 diabetes, in which people fail to make enough insulin to process glucose in the diet, against lifestyle risk factors associated with the disease, including diet and behaviors such as smoking and physical activity. Genetic analysis alone, in which scientists compare the genomes of those with diabetes against those without the disease, has previously identified 90 potential genetic changes that can increase the risk of diabetes, but none were especially strong contributors to the disease, and it wasn’t clear which combination of these DNA changes posed the greatest risk. Similarly, lifestyle factors such as diet or exposure to pollutants, which can be measured in blood or urine, couldn’t fully explain risk for the disease either. But by knitting the two databases together, the Stanford researchers say they may have identified some gene-environment match-ups that not only increase risk for diabetes, but may also help to protect against it as well. “Over the past seven to nine years, [researchers] have been finding genetic risk factors. Some of them are pretty potent and have a lot of effects, but a lot is still relative. We are not really finding the smoking guns of the genome that we were expecting, that would really tell us why diseases like Type 2 diabetes have some genetic basis,” says study author Dr. Atul Butte, an associate professor of systems medicine in pediatrics at Stanford. (MORE: Diet Strategies Show Prom Continue reading >>

How To Fight Type 2 Diabetes Through Your Food Choices And Diet Plan

How To Fight Type 2 Diabetes Through Your Food Choices And Diet Plan

If you have type 2 diabetes — the most common form of diabetes — eating a healthy, well-balanced diet is critical to controlling your weight, blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol. By enriching your diet and creating a meal plan tailored to your personal preferences and lifestyle, you'll be able to enjoy the foods you love while minimizing complications and reducing further risk. Although there isn’t any research that directly supports individual dietary choices in the fight against type 2 diabetes, it doesn’t hurt to maintain a balanced diet. More often than not, the average diet is lacking in these key nutrients: calcium magnesium fiber potassium vitamins A, C, D, and E vitamin B-12 for those on metformin Adding foods rich in these nutrients is often a great first step in diabetes management. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the following are considered to be diabetes superfoods: Fat-free milk and yogurt are both a good source of vitamin D, which promotes strong bones and teeth. Whole grains containing germ and bran are often rich in magnesium, chromium, and folate. Regardless of the type, berries are an excellent source of antioxidants and fiber. Citrus fruits, such as oranges, lemons, and limes, are high in vitamin C. Not only are beans high in fiber, they’re a solid source of potassium and magnesium. Omega-3 fatty acids may help reduce your risk of heart disease, so don’t shy away from salmon dishes. In addition to providing magnesium and fiber, nuts can help with hunger management. Some nuts and seeds also contain omega-3s. Tomatoes contain crucial nutrients such as vitamins C and E. Swap regular potatoes for sweet potatoes, which are chock-full of potassium and vitamin A. Dark green leafy vegetables like collards and kale a Continue reading >>

Carrot Health Insights | Social Risk And Diabetes

Carrot Health Insights | Social Risk And Diabetes

Social factors – how people live their lives – are strongly correlated with health outcomes. Examples of social risk factors include unstable housing, social isolation, and financial burdens. These risks can be quantified. The Carrot Health Social Risk Index (SRI) uses 31 unique variables to measure the level of social risk that an individual is exposed to. The map below shows the average Social Risk Index by county in the US (red = high risk, green = low risk): Carrot Health Social Risk Index Carrot Health’s data analysis shows that people with a high Social Risk Index have significantly worse health and cost outcomes. For example, the observed diabetes rate in the US correlates fairly well with SRI, as the following map demonstrates: Observed Diabetes Rate 80% higher smoking rate 65% higher annual occurence of Emergency Department visits 45% higher diabetes rate 36% higher annual rate of inpatient admissions Health plans and providers under risk models are beginning to use this kind of information when managing risk or planning interventions for individuals and populations. To learn more about how Carrot MarketView™ goes beyond clinical or claims data to improve the health of your population and help your organization succeed, schedule a demo today! Continue reading >>

Carrot Cake Study On Sugar In Type 2 Diabetes

Carrot Cake Study On Sugar In Type 2 Diabetes

Patients with type 2 diabetes are often advised to cut out sucrose (table sugar) all together. However, in recent years this traditional advice has been questioned by some researchers who suggest that moderate amounts of sugar can be safely consumed as part of the diet of patients with diabetes. Now a new study has been published that is consistent with this revised approach. It showed that patients who increased their daily sugar intake (in the form of carrot cake) but maintained a stable body weight, showed no adverse changes in their blood glucose. The study was conducted by the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics at London's Hammersmith Hospital. Three slices of carrot cake were added to the daily diets of nine, overweight type 2 diabetes patients over 24 days (bringing their daily total to 88g or 18 teaspoons of sugar). Consumption of the carrot cake slices was evenly distributed across the day. Several measurements were recorded at the beginning and end of the study, including the patients' weight, blood sugar (glucose) levels, cholesterol levels, and insulin sensitivity (which is a measure of how well the body responds to the hormone insulin). Professor Gary Frost, who led the study, explained 'In this study, the energy intake of these patients was balanced to their body weight, and their sucrose intake was spread evenly over a day. Correspondingly, they did not gain weight or show an increase in blood glucose levels at the end of the study; in addition, their cholesterol levels and insulin sensitivity did not change.' He added 'the results of this small, short-term study support other scientific studies, which suggest that there could be more flexibility with sucrose in the diets of patients with type 2 diabetes. There is evidence from other studies (reviewed Continue reading >>

Carrots: Benefits, Nutrition, Diet, And Risks

Carrots: Benefits, Nutrition, Diet, And Risks

Carrots are often thought of as the ultimate health food. Generations of parents have told their children: "Eat your carrots, they are good for you," or "Carrots will help you see in the dark." People probably first cultivated the carrot thousands of years ago, in the area now known as Afghanistan. It was a small, forked purple or yellow root with a bitter, woody flavor, quite different from the carrot we know today. Purple, red, yellow, and white carrots were grown long before the appearance of the sweet, crunchy, and aromatic orange carrot that is now popular. This type was developed and stabilized by Dutch growers in the 16th and 17th centuries. This feature is part of a collection of articles on the health benefits of popular foods. Find out more about the nutrients in carrots, their health benefits, tips for eating more carrots, and any precautions. Here are some key points about carrots. More detail is in the main article. Carrots were first grown in Asia, and they were not orange. Carrots contain antioxidants , which may protect against cancer . While they may not help you see in the dark, the vitamin A in carrots helps prevent vision loss. Carrots are available all year round and can be used in savory dishes, cakes, and juices. Carrots contain vitamin A, antioxidants, and other nutrients. Evidence suggests that eating more antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables, such as carrots, can help reduce the risks of cancer and cardiovascular disease. Carrots are also rich in vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Here are some ways in which carrots might be healthful. A variety of dietary carotenoids have been shown to have anti-cancer effects, due to their antioxidant power in reducing free radicals in the body. Studies have found a possible link between diets rich in caroteno Continue reading >>

Foods For Diabetics: Want To Keep Diabetes Away? Eat Walnuts, Apples, Carrots - Foods For Diabetics | The Economic Times

Foods For Diabetics: Want To Keep Diabetes Away? Eat Walnuts, Apples, Carrots - Foods For Diabetics | The Economic Times

Business News Magazines Panache Want To Keep Diabetes Away? Eat Walnuts, Apples, Carrots Want To Keep Diabetes Away? Eat Walnuts, Apples, Carrots While being active, staying hydrated, and checking blood glucose levels can work wonders, it is important to stick to a dietary plan that will ward off diabetes in the long run. A recent study showed that antioxidant-rich walnuts can nearly halve the risk of developing Type-2 diabetes. For patients, the ideal diabetic diet plan would be to have 1200-1600 calories per day. It is recommended that diabetics should eat good carbs, fats, and healthy proteins, but in small portions. ETPanache got in touch with doctors and dieticians to get you the ultimate list of foods you must consume to stay healthy. Also read: The comprehensive diabetes guide After news of walnuts as you new superfood to keep diabetes away, it's time to look at the other superhero nuts and seeds. They have protective effects for people with diabetes. Flaxseeds/linseeds, almonds, peanuts, pumpkin seeds, macadamia nuts, pistachios, cashew nuts, chia seeds, etc are the best nuts and seeds for diabetics as they reduce and regulate the insulin levels in the body. They are a good source of high biological value protein. Eggs have good cholesterol, also called as High Density Lipoprotein (HDL), which is good for heart health. Studies have shown that it improves insulin sensitivity. They give satiety and improve blood sugar levels. It has an active compound called curcumin which has shown to improve sugar, promote cardiovascular health, and protect against kidney diseases. Salmon have excellent amount of Omega-3 fatty acids (DHA and EPA) which is good for diabetics. The patients need good fat in their diet, and fish reduce inflammation and coronary risks which are comm Continue reading >>

Vegetables For Diabetics – What To Eat And Avoid

Vegetables For Diabetics – What To Eat And Avoid

Vegetables are a vital component of a healthy diet and this is particularly true for diabetics. Most fruits and vegetables are high in fiber and nutrient dense but low in calories making them ideal for diabetics who often need to watch their calorie intake. The general rule of thumb for diabetics is that root vegetables should be eaten in moderation (no more than 1 serving a day), while green and red vegetables are great choices and should be consumed in high amounts, preferably 3-5 servings a day. There are exceptions to this rule that we will discuss in more detail below. Root Vegetables & Tubers Root vegetables and tubers are relatively concentrated sources of sugars and starches and tend to contain only small amounts of fiber. This can be problematic for diabetics because they can produce a large glycemic response in situations when they are not combined with high fiber foods. The glycemic index of root vegetables and tubers range from moderate (40-60) to very high (80+). The lowest GI vegetables are yams, carrots and sweet potatoes with GI values of 38, 47 and 55 respectively. High GI root vegetables include potatoes (GI of 60-90), parsnip (97), rutabaga (71), and beets (65). If you like these vegetables, try and limit your intake to one serving (approx. 200g) a day. Cooking method also has a significant impact on the GI value of the vegetable. In general, boiling rather than baking or mashing a root vegetable will result in a lower GI. Boiled potatoes for example have a GI of around 70 compared to 80-90 for mashing or baking. Cooking root vegetables converts some of the starch into simple sugars which are more readily absorbed by the body, increasing their GI values. A raw carrot for example has a GI of just 15, while over-cooking a carrot until it turns to mush c Continue reading >>

Best Vegetables For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Vegetables For Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes often feel left out at big family meals and at restaurants, but it should not mean having to avoid delicious food. In fact, no food item is strictly forbidden for people with type 2 diabetes. Healthy eating for people with diabetes is all about moderation and balance. The best vegetables for type 2 diabetes are low on the glycemic index (GI) scale, rich in fiber, or high in blood pressure-lowering nitrates. Why choose vegetables? When considering foods to avoid, many people with diabetes might think about sugary or high-carbohydrate foods, such as cinnamon rolls or bread. Certain vegetables, though, can also cause blood glucose problems. The GI refers to how quickly foods cause blood sugar levels to rise. Foods high on the GI, such as most potatoes, rapidly release glucose, potentially triggering blood glucose spikes. They can also cause weight gain when eaten in excess. Low to moderate GI vegetables, such as carrots, offer better blood glucose control, and a lower risk of weight gain. Nitrates are chemicals that naturally occur in some vegetables. They are also used as preservatives in some foods. Eating nitrate-rich foods, not foods processed with added nitrates, can lower blood pressure, and improve overall circulatory health. This means that nitrate-rich foods, such as beets, are among the best vegetables for people with type 2 diabetes who have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. This is still true despite their high level of carbohydrates. The key to good food management, in this instance, is to reduce carbohydrate consumption elsewhere, such as by eliminating bread or sugary snacks. Fiber and protein are both very important in a healthful diabetes diet. Protein is vital for good health, and can help people feel fuller for longer, Continue reading >>

How The Humble Carrot May Beat Diabetes

How The Humble Carrot May Beat Diabetes

Scientists have found the humble veg is packed with potent health-boosting antioxidants which appear to prevent the disease. It is already well known that eating a healthy diet and keeping a healthy weight are key to keeping your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes low. But now research has revealed the actual foods we eat can influence whether or not people will get the condition. Scientists have found the humble veg is packed with potent health-boosting antioxidants which appear to prevent the disease. Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine in California have found that for people with a genetic predisposition to diabetes, beta carotene, which the body converts to a close cousin of vitamin A, may lower the risk for Type 2 diabetes. And they found that gamma tocopherol, the major form of vitamin E in the diet which is found in vegetable oils, nuts, seeds and wholegrains, may increase risk for the disease. The scientists discovered interactions are occurring between gene variants previously linked to increased risk for diabetes and blood levels of substances linked to risk. They found that, in people carrying a double dose of one specific gene variant which makes them more susceptible to the condition, there was a major link between beta carotene blood levels with the Type 2 diabetes risk, along with a high positive association of gamma tocopherol with risk for the disease. None of the genetic factors studied in isolation showed a particularly impressive impact on Type 2 diabetes risk. But when they were paired off one by one with the antioxidants, there were significant results. They found that, for those carrying two copies of the variant in the gene SLC30A4, higher beta-carotene vitamin levels were linked with lower blood glucose levels, according to th Continue reading >>

Got Pre-diabetes? Here’s Five Things To Eat Or Avoid To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Got Pre-diabetes? Here’s Five Things To Eat Or Avoid To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as having type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is an early alert that your diabetes risk is now very high. It is ten to 20 times greater compared to the risk for those with normal blood sugars. What you choose to eat, or avoid, influences this risk. Diabetes Prevention Programs Studies around the world, including Finland, China and the US have shown diabetes prevention programs prevent or delay progression to type 2 diabetes. When people eat more healthily, drop their body weight by 5-10% and walk for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, they lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by about 58% over two years. We recently gave 101 men with pre-diabetes a self-directed diabetes prevention program over six months. We found they were able to reduce their portion size of potato and meat and improve their variety of health foods. They were able to reduce the proportion of energy coming from junk food by 7.6% more than the group who didn’t change their diet and got a four-point increase in their scores from the Healthy Eating Quiz. These improved eating patterns were associated with an average weight loss of 5.5kg and better blood sugar regulation. This is great news for the 318 million adults around the world, including two million Australians, who have pre-diabetes. The original diabetes prevention studies started in the 1980s. Back then the advice was to reduce your total kilojoule intake by eating less fat, especially from take-away, processed and fried foods and to eat more foods rich in carbohydrate, such as vegetables, fruit and wholegrains. That advice worked because the world did not have the huge numbers of ultra-processed foods and drinks, many of whic Continue reading >>

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