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Carpal Tunnel Diabetic Neuropathy

Presence Of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome In Diabetics: Effect Of Age, Sex, Diabetes Duration And Polyneuropathy

Presence Of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome In Diabetics: Effect Of Age, Sex, Diabetes Duration And Polyneuropathy

, Volume 22, Issue3 , pp 259262 | Cite as Presence of carpal tunnel syndrome in diabetics: Effect of age, sex, diabetes duration and polyneuropathy Common thought is that diabetic neuropathy is a predisposing factor to entrapment syndromes. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most frequent entrapment neuropathy; females and old people are most frequently affected (Comi et al., 1978). Prevalence of CTS in diabetics and associated risk factors were studied in 401 patients (208 males and 193 females) with insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes using electrophysiological techniques. Median nerve sensory and motor conduction velocity, ulnar and peroneal nerve motor conduction velocity and sural nerve sensory conduction velocity were investigated in all patients. Diagnostic criteria for CTS were the presence of delayed median nerve sensory conduction velocity in the palm-wrist tract and of increased distal motor latency. Polyneuropathy was defined by slowing-down of conduction velocity in two or more nerves. Forty-five patients (11.2%), 36 females and 9 males, showed CTS. One-hundred-sixty-eight patients (41.8%), 74 females and 94 males, were suffering from peripheral neuropathy. The strongest risk factors for CTS, in order of importance, were: female sex, older age and presence of neuropathy. Polyneuropathy but not CTS was related to duration of diabetes. Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF. Blodgett R. G., Lippscomb P. R., Hill R. W.: Incidence of haematologic disease in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome J. Amer. med. Ass.182, 814, 1962. Google Scholar Comi G., Gualtieri G., Rodocanachi M., Lozza L.: Idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome: a clinical and electrophysiological study of 50 patients. In:Canal N., Pozza G. (Eds): Peripheral neuropathies. Continue reading >>

Question: Can You Get Carpal Tunnel And Neuropathy | Diabetic Connect

Question: Can You Get Carpal Tunnel And Neuropathy | Diabetic Connect

Well I personally don't think so, but it does have one thing in common. Slow reaction time to pain. I had carpal syndrome in my left hand from work and my right from a electrical shock of 277 volts. They operated on my left hand but it still bothers me some times. I did not have it done to my right hand so I still have it. Now I had my Neurologist check for Neuropathy and he said I do have it as peripheral, effecting all my extremities. So for what it is worth I think the two are different in one way, you can have an operation for carpal tunnel but not for the other that I know of. Hope this helps you. Hi Narelle! As others have noted, Carpal tunnel and Neuropathy are generally considered two different conditions. I was operated on for Carpal tunnel on both hands 5 or 6 years ago. Both conditions are nerve-related. In carpal tunnel, the nerve affected is pinched by the narrowing of the carpal tunnel in your wrist. The affected nerve travels through the carpal tunnel on its way into your hand from your arm. The pinching results in the tingling and pain experienced in your fingers. Repetitive motion may cause the narrowing of the carpal tunnel. Neuropathy is the term applied to nerve damage. It is a frequent complication experienced in diabetics with high BG levels being a strong contributing factor. I wonder, though, whether diabetic peripheral neuropathy might not result in or contribute to a carpal tunnel problem???? Yours is a good question. Somebody with a medical background (not I) is better suited to to address this. I hope we get more input. No they are two different problems. I have had carpel tunnel and for me it hurt worse than neuropathy. I don't have neuropathy in my hands. Once I stopped repetitive actions with my wrist I don't have a problem with carpel tu Continue reading >>

Surgery Effective In Diabetics With Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Surgery Effective In Diabetics With Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Home / Resources / Articles / Surgery Effective in Diabetics with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Surgery Effective in Diabetics with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Based on the study results, physicians should consider surgery as a viable treatment for diabetic patients with symptomatic CTS. Diabetics with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS), an acquired entrapment neuropathy causing pain and weakness of the hands, can benefit from surgery suggests research. Some in the medical community have questioned whether diabetics who undergo surgery for CTS release actually improve. Surgery is sometimes recommended to remove or "release" compression of the median nerve, the nerve that passes from the forearm to the palm. Hee-Kyu Kwon, M.D, Ph.D., (Korea University Hospital in Seoul) and her research colleagues conducted a study to compare the outcomes of CTS release surgery in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Two groups who received CTS release-one group with diabetes , the second without-were evaluated using several electrodiagnostic tests. Physicians use electrodiagnostic procedures to diagnose problems created when the electrical signals within nerves and muscles become weakened or stop altogether. No meaningful difference between the two groups was found. The authors concluded that, based on these results, physicians should consider surgery as a viable treatment for diabetic patients with symptomatic CTS. The results of the study were presented at the 51st Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Association of Electrodiagnostic Medicine in Savannah, Georgia, November 3-6, 2004. American Association of Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AAEM) The Solution to Proper Foot Care Proper foot care begins with professionally fitted footwear and inserts. Foot Solutions is you full service footwear location. Continue reading >>

Pharmacological Approach For The Management Of Patient With Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Associated To Diabetic Polyneuropathy. Case Report

Pharmacological Approach For The Management Of Patient With Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Associated To Diabetic Polyneuropathy. Case Report

PrintversionISSN 1806-0013On-lineversionISSN 2317-6393 Rev. dorvol.16no.4So PauloOct./Dec.2015 Pharmacological approach for the management of patient with carpal tunnel syndrome associated to diabetic polyneuropathy. Case report Francisco Nuton de OliveiraMagalhes 2 1Centro Universitrio Maurcio de Nassau, Recife, PE, Brasil. 2Universidade de So Paulo, So Paulo, SP, Brasil. Peripheral neuropathy and carpal tunnel syndrome are debilitating diseases associated to diabetes mellitus in 12 to 21% of cases. There are no significant evidences of the clinical differentiation between such painful syndromes and their specific management. This study aimed at reporting the clinical presentation of a patient with peripheral polyneuropathy associated to carpal tunnel syndrome, focusing on therapeuthic approaches and discussing clinical differentiation between both diseases. Male patient, 68 years old, married, retired, who looked for medical assistance complaining of burning pain, especially in left upper limb. He also referred pain in lower limbs with night exacerbation, in addition to numbness in extremities and pain intensity of 6 in the visual analog scale. Presence of trigger- points in trapezius and levator scapulae muscles. Patient was submitted to decompression surgery due to carpal tunnel syndrome diagnosis two years ago, however without postoperative improvement. Patient refers pain in upper and lower limbs, with nocturnal exacerbation, numbness and pain in extremities. He has history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2 and leprosy. At physical evaluation: painful boot and glove hypoesthesia and possible motor deficit in C6 and C7. Electromyography showed mixed peripheral polyneuropathy of lower limbs and median carpal syndrome to the left. There has been movement amp Continue reading >>

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel affects 15-20% of people with diabetes Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is found in the wrist, and occurs when a nerve in the carpal tunnel that controls sensation and hand movement becomes compressed. This nerve (median nerve) becomes pinched due to the swelling and can cause tingling, numbness and pain in the hand, fingers and forearm. Having diabetes can increase the risk of getting carpal tunnel, while researchers have also found that having carpal tunnel syndrome could be a predictor for developing diabetes. Carpal tunnel syndrome is more common in people with diabetes The relationship between diabetes and CTS is complicated, but carpal tunnel syndrome is generally believed to be more common in individuals with diabetes, even those without diabetic nerve complications . Carpal tunnel syndrome is widely reported in up to between 15-20% per cent of people with diabetes, with research suggesting the link between diabetes and carpal tunnel syndrome could be due to excessively high blood sugar levels. This can result in carpal tunnel tendons becoming glycosated, which occurs when glucose attaches to the tendon proteins and restricarpal tunnel syndrome their ability to move freely. When there is overly high sugar in the blood it may begin to start affecting the body years before a diagnosis of diabetes. The development of carpal tunnel syndrome could therefore be indicative of a future diabetes diagnosis. One study conducted at Kings College in London found that people diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome were 36 per cent more likely to be later diagnosed with diabetes . This was regardless of other risk factors for diabetes. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common entrapment neuropathy, a medical condition that occurs when a single nerve is damaged. Researchers a Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Mellitus Influence Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Does Diabetes Mellitus Influence Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Does Diabetes Mellitus Influence Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? aDepartment of Neurology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. bDepartment of Neurology, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. aDepartment of Neurology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. eBrain Convergence Research Center, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul, Korea. aDepartment of Neurology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. bDepartment of Neurology, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. cDepartment of Biostatistics, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. dNeurophysiology Laboratory, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul, Korea. eBrain Convergence Research Center, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul, Korea. Correspondence: Byung-Jo Kim, MD, PhD. Department of Neurology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, 73 Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Korea. Tel +82-2-920-6619, Fax +82-2-925-2472, [email protected] Received 2017 Feb 24; Revised 2017 Apr 28; Accepted 2017 Apr 28. Copyright 2017 Korean Neurological Association This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( ) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Diabetes mellitus (DM) has been proposed as a risk factor for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), but this remains controversial. We investigated the association between DM and CTS using both ultrasonography (US) and nerve conduction study (NCS) data. We analyzed a prospecti Continue reading >>

Carpal Tunnel May Predict Diabetes

Carpal Tunnel May Predict Diabetes

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome May Indicate Future Diabetes Risk Aug. 22, 2006 -- Carpal tunnel syndrome may be an early warning sign that diabetes is just around the corner. The carpal tunnel is found in the wrist. In carpal tunnel syndrome , a nerve in the carpal tunnel becomes pinched due to swelling of the nerve and/or nearby tendons. The pinched nerve can cause numbness, tingling, and sometimes pain in the fingers, hand, and forearm. It's well known that people with diabetes are more likely to get carpal tunnel syndrome. But researchers wanted to find out if the risk actually goes up before diabetes develops -- when a person has pre-diabetes. In pre-diabetes, fasting blood sugar is 100 to 125 mg/dL. Diabetes develops once the fasting blood sugar reaches 126. So, researchers, including Martin Gulliford, FRCP, of King's College in London, looked at 2,655 patients with pre-diabetes who later went on to develop diabetes. They were compared with nearly 5,300 people without the disease. Next, Gulliford's team scrolled back through nearly nine years of the patients' medical records. The researchers found that people who had been diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome were 36% more likely to later be diagnosed with diabetes, regardless of other diabetes risk factors. That finding appears in the latest issue of Diabetes Care. The study doesn't prove carpal tunnel syndrome causes diabetes. Only 82 patients in the study had been diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. That number may be too small to draw firm conclusions, the researchers note. But nerve problems are associated with diabetes, Gulliford's team says. If the study's finding is correct, it may show that high blood sugar and other metabolic abnormalities can start affecting the body years before diabetes is diagnosed. WebMD Continue reading >>

Shafa Orthopedic Journal

Shafa Orthopedic Journal

Carpal Tunnel Release Outcomes in Diabetic Versus Non-Diabetic Patients 1 Bone and Joint Disease Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran 2 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Imam Reza Hospital, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran * Corresponding author: Farzam Mokarami, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Imam Reza Hospital, AJA University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: + 98-2188028931, E-mail: [email protected] Shafa Orthopedic Journal: May 28, 2015, 2 (2) Published Online: May 23, 2015 To Cite: Mozaffarian K, Owjimehr M, Eskandari Sani B, Mokarami F, Sharifzadeh R. et al. Carpal Tunnel Release Outcomes in Diabetic Versus Non-Diabetic Patients, Shafa Ortho J. 2015 ;2(2):-. doi: 10.17795/soj-1234 . Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common compressive neuropathy. Diabetes mellitus is the most common disease that predisposes the patients to CTS. Diabetic neuropathy is a progressive disease and diabetics nerve is more susceptible to compression at known sites of anatomic constrains such as in the carpal tunnel; clinical results of carpal tunnel release has been questioned not to be as good as non-diabetic patients. Objectives: This study was carried out to compare the clinical and electrodiagnostic outcomes of diabetic and non-diabetic carpal tunnel release (CTR) surgery. Patients and Methods: Twenty diabetic hands (14 patients) and 18 non-diabetic hands (14 patients) that underwent CTR between Octobers 2009 - 2012 were evaluated. They were operated by one hand surgeon and were evaluated at least six months after the operation. Clinical symptoms as numbness, pain, paresthesia and nocturnal symptoms were evaluated. Electrodiagnostic results were evaluated pre- and post-operatively. Results: Af Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Print Overview Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal. Diabetic neuropathy is a common serious complication of diabetes. Yet you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle. Symptoms There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy. You may have just one type or symptoms of several types. Most develop gradually, and you may not notice problems until considerable damage has occurred. The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary, depending on the type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include: Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes A tingling or burning sensation Sharp pains or cramps Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain Autonomic neuropathy The autonomic nervous system controls your hea Continue reading >>

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome In Patients With And Without Diabetes Mellitus In Upper Egypt: The Impact Of Electrophysiological And Ultrasonographical Studies - Sciencedirect

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome In Patients With And Without Diabetes Mellitus In Upper Egypt: The Impact Of Electrophysiological And Ultrasonographical Studies - Sciencedirect

Carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with and without diabetes mellitus in Upper Egypt: The impact of electrophysiological and ultrasonographical studies Author links open overlay panel Abeer A.Tonya Open Access funded by Alexandria University Faculty of Medicine Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common entrapment neuropathy in the upper extremity. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) is the most valid way of diagnosing CTS in combination of these clinical symptoms together with positive signs by physical examination. Ultrasonography is a useful non-invasive diagnostic method for CTS and there is considerable correlation between the electrophysiological tests and the measurements of cross-sectional area (CSA) by ultrasonography. Many studies have shown that the carpal tunnel syndrome seems to occur more frequently in patients with diabetes mellitus and might be associated with the duration of diabetes mellitus, microvascular complications and degree of glycemic control. Although diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for CTS, reports about median nerve CSA measurements between CTS patients with and without DM are scant. This prospective study aimed to evaluate whether or not ultrasonographic findings of the median nerve is different between DM and non-DM-CTS patients. To correlate the diagnostic results in both DM and non-DM-CTS patients. Thirty six non-diabetic patients and twenty five diabetic patients with CTS were assessed. All patients were subjected to thorough history taking, full clinical examination, electrophysiological assessment of wrists and gray scale ultrasonography (US). High mean cross sectional area of median nerve (CSA) on ultrasonographical studies was detected with non-significant difference between both groups. Additionally, a non-significant differenc Continue reading >>

Carpal Tunnel And Neuropathy

Carpal Tunnel And Neuropathy

Here's a taste of what TheBody.com has to offer on this topic: Hi Dr. Henry,How can I tell the difference between Carpel Tunnel and Peripheral Neuropathy? I have pain and numbness in my hands and it is much worse at night - I lose almost all sensation on the surface of my skin, but my hands really hurt. This... University of Minnesota, School of Medicine ...The hand symptoms you describe would be much more consistent with carpal tunnel syndrome than due to HIV or drug related neuropathy. I would recommend an evaluation by a neurologist possible with nerve conduction Read more Understanding and Managing Peripheral Neuropathy ...and are easily distinguishable from DSPN. Today, many cases of mononeuropathy are due to repetitive stress injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome. Risk Factors for DSPN The prevalence of DSPN ranges from 9% to about 60% in the various... Read more ... Table of Contents What Is Peripheral Neuropathy? What Causes PN? Who Is at Risk of Developing PN? How Do You Know if You Have PN? PN Treatments Finding Support Read more The Body is a service of Remedy Health Media, LLC, 750 3rd Avenue, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10017. The Body and its logos are trademarks of Remedy Health Media, LLC, and its subsidiaries, which owns the copyright of The Body's homepage, topic pages, page designs and HTML code. General Disclaimer: The Body is designed for educational purposes only and is not engaged in rendering medical advice or professional services. The information provided through The Body should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or a disease. It is not a substitute for professional care. If you have or suspect you may have a health problem, consult your health care provider. Continue reading >>

Types Of Peripheral Neuropathy - Compression

Types Of Peripheral Neuropathy - Compression

Types of Peripheral Neuropathy - Compression Carpal tunnel syndrome is a localized peripheral neuropathy that affects the hands. At the base of the hand is a narrow place between bones and ligament where the median nerve and tendons are found. This area is called the carpal tunnel. When the median nerve, which runs from the forearm into the hand, becomes pressed, squeezed or inflamed at the wrist, the result may be numbness, pain and weakness in the hand and wrist, frequently reaching up along the arm. Symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) may increase gradually. Signs of CTS usually are first noticed at night. Common symptoms include burning, tingling or numbness in the palm of the hand and along the fingers, especially the thumb, index and middle finger. These feelings may intensify to the point where it becomes difficult to hold small objects or to make a fist. The pain associated with this condition can range from mild-to-severe. Carpal tunnel syndrome is typically the result of increased pressure on the median nerve and tendons in the carpal tunnel, rather than problem with the nerve itself. This pressure may be a result of arthritis, thyroid disease, trauma or injury to the wrist. CTS usually occurs in adults between 40 and 60 years of age, and is more common in women than men. In women, CTS may be caused by fluid retention due to pregnancy or menopause. Sometimes the exact cause of CTS cannot be identified. CTS sometimes may be caused by work-related, repetitive activities that involve forceful or awkward movements of the wrist or fingers. However, a Mayo Clinic study (published in the June 2001 journal of Neurology), found that significant computer use (defined as an average of six hours per day) does not increase the risk of developing CTS. If identified an Continue reading >>

Why Do People With Diabetes Get Carpal Tunnel?

Why Do People With Diabetes Get Carpal Tunnel?

Why Do People With Diabetes Get Carpal Tunnel? Posted by ADW Diabetes | Mar 31, 2015 | Diabetes Management , Health & Wellness | 0 | People with diabetes are up to fifteen times more likely to get carpal tunnel syndrome. This condition is a type of neuropathy that affects the forearm, wrist and hand. Discover why people with diabetes are more prone to getting carpal tunnel syndrome. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a type of entrapment neuropathy. The median nerve becomes compressed and entrapped in the carpal tunnel, a rigid tunnel located at the base of the hand. The median nerve runs from your forearm through the carpal tunnel and into your hand. When the surrounding tendons become thick or swell, the tunnel narrows and pressure is put on the median nerve at the wrist. This discomfort can radiate up your arm, causing discomfort during routine tasks such as typing and lifting. It can also lead to weakness and numbness as well as pain in the wrist and hand. There was a time when experts believed people got carpal tunnel syndrome from excessive computer keyboarding. Now carpal tunnel is associated with medical conditions such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and hypothyroidism. It is also linked with mental stress, smoking, obesity, alcohol abuse and genetic factors. People with diabetes benefit from maintaining a healthy weight and quitting unhealthy habits such as smoking and excessive alcohol consumption. Minimize stress by exercising at least 30 minutes, 5 times a week and incorporate stretching including tai chi and yoga. Add meditation and breathing techniques for stress reduction. The reason for the swelling associated with carpal tunnel syndrome is still unknown. Women are three times more likely to develop the condition than men because they have a n Continue reading >>

Oh My Aching Hands: It May Not Be Neuropathy

Oh My Aching Hands: It May Not Be Neuropathy

Arthur Segal had Type 2 diabetes for many years. So when he began to have trouble opening medication bottles and turning door knobs, using a knife and counting his change, he assumed it was neuropathy and that nothing could be done. Most people with diabetes have heard of a condition called diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy takes many forms and its effects vary from person to person. Because of this, treatment is often difficult and outcomes vary depending on the nature of the individual case. However, your pain may not be due to diabetic neuropathy at all. Long-term diabetics with hand pain may actually be suffering from other hand conditions. These two often-overlooked conditions are carpal tunnel syndrome and trigger finger. According to Dr. Keith Segalman, orthopedic hand surgeon with the Curtis Hand Center at Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore, MD, both of these conditions are more prevalent in diabetics than in the general public. Surprisingly, these conditions are not caused by poor circulation, nor are they forms of diabetic neuropathy. In long-term diabetics, advanced glycation end-products, or AGEs, can collect on the tendons in the palms of the hand. The accumulation causes the tendons to thicken, thereby causing nerve compression by pressing on the nerve in the carpal tunnel. This leads to numbness and tingling, similar to neuropathy symptoms, especially when the hands are in certain positions. Many diabetics also find that they have stiffness or restricted movement in one or more fingers. This may be due to trigger finger. Trigger finger results when the thickened tendons can no longer slide easily through the cartilage rings along the fingers. The rubbing causes the tendon to swell even further to the point where the tendon can no longer slide thr Continue reading >>

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