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Caribbean Diet Plan For Diabetics

Sample Low Cholesterol Caribbean Meal Plan

Sample Low Cholesterol Caribbean Meal Plan

Breakfast totals: 295Calories,Total Fat 17g (sat 3.5g), Cholesterol 164mg, Carbohydrate 32g, Fiber 5g, Protein 8g Soup and salad get a heart-healthy, Caribbean flair with black bean soup and salad. When it comes to soup and salad, make sure you watch out for sodium content. While it doesn't necessarily affect cholesterol, sodium can elevate your blood pressure -- another factor that contributes to heart disease. of recipe Cuban Tossed Salad (note use 1 fl. oz of olive oil, rather than cup called for in recipe -- it will taste just as good and lower the fat and calorie content) Lunch totals: 447Calories,Total Fat 21g (sat 4g), Cholesterol 16mg, Carbohydrate 51g, Fiber 13g, Protein 19g Take advantage of the fresh seafood so plentiful in the Caribbean when following a cholesterol-friendly meal plan. Round it out with extra fiber-rich foods like beans or swap traditional white rice for brown rice. For an another healthy seafood dish, try this Poached Red Snapper with Avocado Sauce. Beverage: Your choice sugar-free beverage, 8 oz. 1 serving (1/12 recipe) Caribbean Stovetop Paella 2 c. salad served with 1.5 T. vinaigrette Dinner totals: 451Calories,Total Fat 22g (sat 3g), Cholesterol 26mg, Carbohydrate 43g, Fiber 2g, Protein 19g Choose fruit for dessert. It's naturally sweet and another good source of cholesterol-lowering fiber. Enjoy a single piece of fruit, or combine papaya, mango and banana slices and add a spritz of lime juice and a sprinkling of coconut flakes. For this nutrition analysis, we factored in a 60-calorie piece of fresh fruit. Nutrition Information Total For The Day: 1,253 Calories, Total Fat 60 g (sat 10.5g), Cholesterol 206mg, Carbohydrate 141 g, Fiber 23 g, Protein 56g Looking to start a diet to better manage your cholesterol? Changing lifelong eating ha Continue reading >>

Breakfast Choices For The Diabetic Diet

Breakfast Choices For The Diabetic Diet

ENJOYING MEALTIMES is desired by most individuals, even for those who might be on special diets prescribed by their medical doctor. Be that as it may, having knowledge of appropriate food choices, portion sizes, and nutrient content can be helpful, along with cooking skills to prepare tasty dishes. Evert et al (2014) documented in Diabetes Care, Vol 37, Supplement 1 that nutrition therapy is recommended for individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and should be a critical part of their overall treatment plan. Moreover, the nutrition therapy recommendations for the management of adults with diabetes emphasised that a healthful eating pattern, frequent participation in physical activity (walking, running, biking, etc), together with medications prescribed by the physician are considered essential components of diabetes management. But, knowing which foods to select and meal planning can present challenges for some people. Nutrition therapy goals for adults with diabetes include: promote and support healthy eating patterns with emphasis on nutrient dense foods, taking into consideration portion sizes for the purpose of improving overall health as it relates to the management of blood glucose (blood sugar), haemoglobin A1C levels, blood pressure, and lipid levels within acceptable parameters; achieve and maintain a healthy weight; and delay and/or prevent complications of diabetes; address individual nutrition needs based on personal and cultural preferences, access to healthy food choices, willingness to change behaviours, and barriers to change; communicate positive nutrition messages about food choices; and use practical tools to teach individuals about meal planning. This of course, will aid in promoting health and well-being. Todays article will focus on breakfast Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Diet

Diabetes And Your Diet

By NADINE WILSON All Woman writer [email protected] WHEN it comes to treating diabetes, food choices should be one of those things that factor prominently on your need-to-know radar. That's because what you eat definitely will affect your management of the disease. Diabetes develops when the body is unable to produce insulin the hormone that converts carbohydrates into energy. "In controlling diabetes, emphasis is first placed on lifestyle modification, which is simply changing some of your habits, especially those relating to eating," explained family physician and alternative medicine practitioner Dr Jacqueline Campbell in her book A Patient's Guide to the Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus. "Diet meaning what you eat is the cornerstone of diabetes care," she said. Here are some tips for improving your diabetes through diet: 1. Focus on healthy carbohydrates. Refined carbohydrates such as candies, biscuits and cakes can wreak havoc on your body as a diabetic. Carbohydrates will have the greatest impact on your blood glucose level because it has to be converted to insulin. Trade your rice and counter flour for healthier choices such as whole grains, vegetables and ground produce. 2. Include fish in your diet. Try to have fish at least twice weekly to help with the management of your diabetes. Having fish such as salmon, tuna, halibut, mackerel, and herring also helps to promote heart health since they have less cholesterol than meat. However, be sure to avoid fried fish and those with high levels of mercury. 3. Stick to good fats. Replace foods with unsaturated fats such as butter and mayonnaise with foods containing monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats such as avocados, almonds, pecans, walnuts, olives, and canola, olive and peanut oils. Be sure, however, t Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Healthy Caribbean Coalition

Diabetes - Healthy Caribbean Coalition

Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar 3. Hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, is a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes and over time leads to serious damage to many of the bodys systems, especially the nerves and blood vessels 3. In 2014, 8.5% of adults aged 18 years and older had diabetes. In 2012 diabetes was the direct cause of 1.5 million deaths and high blood glucose was the cause of another 2.2 million deaths 1. Type 1 diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent, juvenile or childhood-onset) is characterized by deficient insulin production and requires daily administration of insulin 3. The cause of type 1 diabetes is not known and it is not preventable with current knowledge. Symptoms include excessive excretion of urine (polyuria), thirst (polydipsia), constant hunger, weight loss, vision changes and fatigue. These symptoms may occur suddenly. Type 2 diabetes (formerly called non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset) results from the bodys ineffective use of insulin 3. Type 2 diabetes comprises the majority of people with diabetes around the world 3, and is largely the result of excess body weight and physical inactivity. Symptoms may be similar to those of Type 1 diabetes, but are often less marked. As a result, the disease may be diagnosed several years after onset, once complications have already arisen. Until recently, this type of diabetes was seen only in adults but it is now also occurring increasingly frequently in children. Gestational diabetes is hyperglycaemia with blood glucose values above normal but below those diagnostic of diabetes, occurring during pregnancy 4. Women w Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Diet | Food | Jamaica Gleaner

The Diabetic Diet | Food | Jamaica Gleaner

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO) diabetes affects nearly one in 11 adults, with cases having quadrupled to 422 million in 2014, up from 108 million in 1980. In recognition of this year's International World Health Day being observed today, Food has focused on diabetes, particularly on meals that are ideal for diabetics. According to Sharmaine Edwards, director of the Nutrition Unit at the Ministry of Health, when it comes to persons with diabetes, making the right food choices is crucial. "Generally, we advocate for a healthy diet. Our recommendations: 30 per cent total fat per day, less than 10 per cent of free sugars per day and for salt, less than one teaspoon per day." Consumption of fruits, vegetables and legumes, she said, is important because these provide fibre which helps you to eat less because they leave you feeling fuller. So, she suggested five portions, equivalent to 400 grammes per day, which basically amounts to three servings of vegetables and two fruits daily. Also, for simple sugars, 50 grammes or 12 teaspoons per day is the recommended amount. Fats, notably unsaturated fats, which include fish oil, avocado and nuts should make up 30 per cent or less of daily intake, while saturated fats, found in cheese, fatty meats and butter should be moderated, and trans fat, industrialised processed foods, salted snacks, cookies, fast foods, fried foods, and muffins should be avoided completely if possible. "Fat tastes good (and) we can't cut it out of our diet, as it is essential to our nervous system. So, we do need fat but we need to limit and select the healthier ones," said Edwards. She highlighted that cooking with coconut oil offers some benefits. "It is a saturated fat but because it has a medium chain, it is on the fence and isn't as ine Continue reading >>

Dinner Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Dinner Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Every 23 seconds, someone in the United States is diagnosed with diabetes. But although diabetes is widespread, public awareness and understanding of the disease can be limited. The Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC) report that 29 million Americans currently have diabetes, but a quarter of them do not know it. Another 86 million adults have prediabetes, with 90 percent of them being unaware. Diabetes is a serious disease that can, if uncontrolled, lead to loss of eyesight, cardiovascular problems, kidney damage, and even amputation of lower limbs. The good news is, it can be managed and these serious health problems can be avoided. Diet techniques for diabetes The even better news is that diabetes can be managed through a combination of exercise, health care, and diet. Despite popular belief, a diet can be varied, tasty, and fulfilling. The "diabetic plate" Maintaining a consistent, well-balanced diet can help people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels under control. Portion control is also important, which is where the "diabetic plate" comes in. Endorsed by several organizations, including the American Diabetes Association, the "diabetic plate" can be very helpful when planning dinners. Follow these simple steps: Draw an imaginary line down the center of your plate. Divide one half into two further sections, so that your plate is now divided into three. Fill the biggest section with non-starchy vegetables, such as spinach, green beans, salsa, mushrooms, broccoli, or others. Use proteins to fill one of the smaller sections. Good options are skinless chicken, salmon, shrimp, tempeh or tofu, eggs, and much more. Legumes can fit in either the protein or the starch section because they provide both protein and carbohydrate. Grains, legumes and starch Continue reading >>

The Caribbean Diet | Livestrong.com

The Caribbean Diet | Livestrong.com

Michelle Kerns writes for a variety of print and online publications and specializes in literature and science topics. She has served as a book columnist since 2008 and is a member of the National Book Critics Circle. Kerns studied English literature and neurology at UC Davis. A Caribbean stew with local seafood, vegetables and rice and beans.Photo Credit: russaquarius/iStock/Getty Images The traditional Caribbean diet fulfills many of the balanced nutrition guidelines recommended by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. It's rich in seafood, a variety of fruits and vegetables and lean protein while being low in refined grains, sugar and salt. Adopting a low-fat, low-calorie version of the Caribbean diet may help lower your risk of chronic medical problems like heart disease, high blood pressure and cancer. Pineapple, dark leafy greens like callaloo -- similar to kale or spinach -- sweet potatoes, okra, breadfruit, guava, papaya, coconuts, mangoes, cassava, plantains, tomatoes, corn and dasheen, also known as taro, feature frequently in the Caribbean diet. Aim to fill at least half of your plate at each meal with produce of different types and colors. Eat them fresh, stir them into soups and stews, or steam, roast or grill them with a small amount of added fat. A study published in 2004 in the "British Journal of Nutrition" reported that Caribbean staples like dasheen and cassava have a high glycemic index. The researchers advised eating more white yams instead since they have less of an impact on blood sugar and may help lower the risk of diabetes. Most of the protein in the Caribbean diet is supplied by beans and legumes like chickpeas, lentils, black-eyed peas, and kidney, lima, red and black beans. Although beans are an incomplete protein -- they don't contain all of Continue reading >>

Seven-day Type 2 Diabetes Meal Plan

Seven-day Type 2 Diabetes Meal Plan

Eating a diabetes-friendly diet can help keep your blood sugar levels under control. But it can be difficult to stick to a regular meal plan — unless you have a plan in place. Check out these 21 delicious, diabetes-friendly recipes to use for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Remember to stay within your carbohydrate allowance by noting the carb content and serving size of the recipes. Also, be sure to balance your meals with lean protein and healthy plant fats. Breakfast: Cream Cheese-Stuffed French Toast This may sound too decadent for breakfast, but paired with scrambled egg whites, it can fit into a diabetes-friendly meal plan. Whole grain toast will help ensure you get your daily fiber too. Lunch: Salmon Salad with White Beans Salmon is one of the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids, and is also a delicious topper to workday salad. Dinner: Cuban-Marinated Sirloin Kabobs with Grilled Asparagus Spice things up with this flavorful skewer. Dried herbs and spices are a great way to pack a punch of flavor without adding unnecessary calories and fat. Breakfast: Apple Pie Oatmeal with Greek Yogurt Who wouldn’t like a slice of pie for breakfast? This oatmeal will leave your kitchen smelling like the flavors of fall, and your stomach happy and satisfied. Add some extra plain Greek yogurt on top for more protein. Lunch: Turkey-Cranberry Wraps Turkey and cranberry sauce isn’t just for Thanksgiving! This is an easy grab-and-go lunch that even your kids will enjoy. Note: This recipe may not be appropriate for all people with type 2 diabetes, because it contains 60 grams of carbs per serving. You can adjust the amount of cranberry sauce to lower the carb count. Dinner: Cilantro-Lime Tilapia with Spinach and Tomatoes Take a trip to the tropics with this fast fish dish. Breakfast Continue reading >>

Eating Well With Diabetes: Caribbean And African Diets

Eating Well With Diabetes: Caribbean And African Diets

Eating well with Diabetes: Caribbean and African diets Many of the staple foods in Caribbean and African diets are good for your health. From leafy green vegetables to fresh mango to beans, there are lots of nutrient-rich choices. However, fried foods and sweets are also popular and should be limited. If you have diabetes, you can work with your healthcare team to develop a plan thats right for you. It will probably include exercise, a meal plan, blood glucose monitoring, and perhaps medication. This article will focus on the dietary changes that you can make. Diabetes is a disease where the pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body does not use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. When the body is working well, insulin helps carry sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells where it is used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body's cells do not receive enough glucose, so it stays in your blood. High blood glucose (or high blood sugar) can lead to heart, kidney, vision and blood vessel problems. Some ethnic groups in Canada have a higher risk of getting diabetes, including people of African descent. There are certain genes that affect insulin function. Having these genes increases your risk of diabetes. These genes are commonly found in high risk populations such as people with an African heritage. If you have diabetes, it is important to eat every 4 to 6 hours to keep your blood sugar levels stable. Try to have three daily meals at regular times and have healthy snacks when you are hungry. A balanced meal has foods from at least 3 of the 4 food groups: You can work with a Registered Dietitian to make a personal meal plan.An example of a healthy meal plan may look like this: of a cup of cooked hominy, oatmeal or porridge 1 cup of s Continue reading >>

The Changing Faces Of Diabetes, Hypertension And Arthritis In A Caribbean Population

The Changing Faces Of Diabetes, Hypertension And Arthritis In A Caribbean Population

The changing faces of diabetes, hypertension and arthritis in a Caribbean population Paul A. Bourne ,1 Samuel McDaniel ,2 Maxwell S. Williams ,2 Cynthia Francis ,1 Maureen D. Kerr-Campbell ,3 and Orville W. Beckford 4 1Department of Community Health and Psychiatry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston, Jamaica. 2Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston, Jamaica. 2Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston, Jamaica. 1Department of Community Health and Psychiatry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston, Jamaica. Find articles by Maureen D. Kerr-Campbell 4Department of Sociology, Psychology and Social Work, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston, Jamaica. 1Department of Community Health and Psychiatry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston, Jamaica. 2Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston, Jamaica. 3Systems Development Unit, Main Library, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston, Jamaica. 4Department of Sociology, Psychology and Social Work, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston, Jamaica. Correspondence to: Paul A. Bourne, Research Fellow and Biostatistician, Department of Community Health and Psychiatry, UWI, Mona, Jamaica. 876 457-6990 (mobile), [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright : North American Journal of Medical Sciences This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Continue reading >>

Tips For Using The Diabetes Food Hub Meal Planner And Grocery List By The Diabetes Food Hub Team

Tips For Using The Diabetes Food Hub Meal Planner And Grocery List By The Diabetes Food Hub Team

Tips for Using the Diabetes Food Hub Meal Planner and Grocery List by The Diabetes Food Hub Team The all-new interactive Meal Planner and Grocery List features on Diabetes Food Hub make planning meals, tracking nutrition, and shopping for groceries a breeze. To make sure youre getting the most out of these features, try these easy-to-follow tips. First things firstif you have not done so already, create your free account with Diabetes Food Hub. Not only will creating an account let you save recipes, create a profile, and enjoy a more personalized experience on the site, but access to the Meal Planner and Grocery List features requires an account. If you have ever donated to the ADA or volunteered for Step Out or Tour de Cure, you probably have an account with the ADA already and can use that user name and password. Simply log in to the site! If you do not have a username and password, setting up an account is easy. Click on the Menu button in the upper right corner and select Log In from the listed options. When the Log In box appears, click on register here at the bottom of the box. Follow the instructions and fill out the necessary informationyoure all set! The Meal Planner uses recipes youve saved to your Recipe Box for building and planning meals. So be sure to save plenty of recipes in order to have a good selection in the Meal Planner . You can save recipes by clicking the star icon on recipes. You can then view these recipes in your Recipe Box . Be sure to save different types of recipes, such as sides, breakfasts, lunches, and main dishes, so you can build complete meals that meet your nutrition needs. Now that youve saved some recipes, its time to start building! Your saved recipes will show up to the right of the interactive Meal Planner . (If want to use rec Continue reading >>

The Anti-diabetes Diet: A 2,000 Calorie-a-day Food Planner

The Anti-diabetes Diet: A 2,000 Calorie-a-day Food Planner

Have we forgotten what a healthy amount of food looks like? GP Ann Robinson thinks so. Writing in the Guardian, she responded to the warning by the charity Diabetes UK, that the rise in cases of the disease is threatening to bankrupt the NHS. Robinson pointed out that because the rise in cases seems to be due to the increase in the number of people living with Type 2 diabetes – which can be linked to obesity – tackling it will require a “massive change in the way we lead our lives”. With the UK becoming a “nation of grazers”, it was time schools taught pupils what 2,000 calories a day “looks and feels like”, said Robinson. So we asked Kelly McCabe of the British Dietetic Association to produce a working week’s approximate 2k-a-day plan. We hope you like lentils: Monday Breakfast: Yoghurt with berries, nuts and seeds (100g Total 0% yoghurt, handful mixed berries, 1 tbsp mixed seeds, 2 sliced brazil nuts). Lunch: Smoked salmon, low-fat cream cheese and spinach sandwich on soya and linseed bread, with a handful of cherry tomatoes. Dinner: Sweet potato, spinach and lentil dhal (made with 100g red lentils, and a large sweet potato: makes enough for lunch tomorrow). Tuesday Breakfast: Banana porridge (3 tbsp whole rolled porridge oats, semiskimmed milk, ½ sliced banana, 2 sliced brazil nuts). Lunch: Sweet potato, spinach and lentil dhal (leftovers). Dinner: Parma-ham-wrapped salmon (one small fillet, 2 slices ham) with asparagus and 4 tbsp pesto sauce, 80ml creme fraiche, handful new potatoes. Wednesday Breakfast: Scrambled eggs with smoked salmon and avocado on soya and linseed toast. Lunch: Shop-bought or homemade tomato soup (add a handful of lentils or black-eyed beans or a handful of spinach to boost nutritional value). Dinner: Wagamama Cha Han (made w Continue reading >>

Your Favourite Foods Made Healthy For Black History Month

Your Favourite Foods Made Healthy For Black History Month

Your favourite foods made healthy for Black History Month Your favourite foods made healthy for Black History Month People with diabetes can still enjoy their favourite African and African Caribbean foods with a few small changes, according to Diabetes UK. Diabetes affects every community, but African and African Caribbean people living in the UK are more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than White Europeans. This is why Diabetes UK is using Black History Month to promote the African and African Caribbean version of its Enjoy Food guide, providing nutritional advice and recipes as well as suggesting ways to make traditional dishes healthier. It also has practical tips on shopping for food, meal planning and healthy swaps. Douglas Twenefour, Clinical Advisor at Diabetes UK, said: Theres no such thing as a diabetic diet, just a healthy, balanced diet that anyone can enjoy. Some African and African Caribbean meals are high in fat, salt and sugar, which can make it difficult to manage blood glucose, cholesterol, blood pressure and weight if you have diabetes. But with small changes to recipes, and planning, people who are managing their diabetes can continue to enjoy their favourite foods. Our free 56-page guide includes practical tips on how you can make small swaps to traditional recipes which will still taste great. Jerk chicken cooked on a grill is likely to be lower in fat than fried chicken, and if you are serving it with rice and peas, use a bit less rice and add a few more peas. Why not experiment with food swaps in recipes switch salted codfish to an unsalted fish such as pollock, whiting or coley. Use an artificial sweetener in salsa sauces instead of sugar and add kidney beans to Jollof rice with chicken in place of some of the chicken to boost fibre content wh Continue reading >>

Caribbeanchoice: Cda Diabetes Menu Planning: Diabetic Recipes

Caribbeanchoice: Cda Diabetes Menu Planning: Diabetic Recipes

Topic: CDA Diabetes Menu Planning: Diabetic Recipes Diabetes is not a life sentence to a rigid and restrictive menu plan (and that the diabetic diet is mostly myth). Instead, nutritional management of diabetes is a lifestyle change balancing moderation and healthy food choices. A registered dietitian, preferably one who is also a certified diabetes educator (or CDE) and/or is experienced in diabetes care, is an essential resource for learning more about individualized menu planning and food choices with diabetes. While food is a factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes management, the rationale behind dietary adjustments in each is different. Those with type 1 diabetes base their insulin dosage in part on what they eat. Those with type 2 diabetes often use their dietary choices as a method (for some, the primary method) of controlling their blood glucose levels. Learning how to calculate carbohydrate grams and account for other important food factors, such as fiber intake, is essential to good blood glucose control for people with type 1 diabetes. If you are on standard insulin therapy (i.e., your insulin doses stay the same from day-to-day), you need to consume roughly the same number of carbohydrate grams daily to avoid blood sugar highs and lows. People on standard insulin therapy generally use simple carbohydrate counting, which sets a certain number of insulin units for every 15 grams of carbohydrates eaten (15 g=1 carb choice). Your healthcare team can help you determine the appropriate amount of daily carbohydrates for your particular insulin regimen. People who are overweight or obese have weight loss issues to take into account when developing an eating plan. A registered dietitian experienced in diabetes management can help determine the optimal daily amount Continue reading >>

7 Healthy Caribbean Foods

7 Healthy Caribbean Foods

The group of Caribbean Islands is synonymous to beautiful shores, diverse cultures, and lush vegetation.But do you know that they boast a wide array of exotic produce as well? The Caribbean fruits and vegetables,as well as the seafoodcaught from its seaarestriking departures from the standard western fare. They not only promise to satisfy your taste buds but are also bursting with nutrients and health benefits. However, some of them can lead to fatal consequences when eaten undercooked or savored at the wrong time. So let us help you make the smartest choices from the wide range of healthy Caribbean foods so that you reap maximum benefits without falling ill. Ackee: Honored as the national fruit of Jamaica, ackee can also be found in other Caribbean islands like the Bahamas and Haiti. The linoleic, stearic, and palmitic acid in ackee together form an ensemble of healthy fats in the Jamaican diet. Apart from keeping flabs away from the waistline, ackee also takes care of epilepsy, fever, severe diarrhea and keeps parasites at bay. But beware of unripe ackee! The hypoglycin A and B in unripe ackee is lethal and can even lead to death. Breadfruit: A native of Polynesia, breadfruit is now widespread in Jamaica and Barbados. Each cup of breadfruit boasts of 60 g of carbs, thus making it an ideal energy booster for people who lead an active life. Its fibers tame the blood sugar levels in diabetic patients, aid in digestion and proper bowel functioning, detoxify your body and fights against body cellulites all at once. So watch out for this ultimate multi-tasker! However, dont overindulge as large portions of breadfruitgenerate excess heat in your body and can prove troublesome especially among pregnant women. Jackfruit: The sweet, aromatic flavor is not the only good thing a Continue reading >>

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