diabetestalk.net

Canola Oil And Diabetes

The Benefits Of Canola Oil In Diabetes

The Benefits Of Canola Oil In Diabetes

Every day you turn on the news, a new sensational meal planning tip is highlighted for the American public. It goes something along the lines of "eat this, eliminate that." As a diabetes educator, I am asked by my patients all the time for that magic bullet, that one thing that can improve blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol. My role is to make people understand that one size does not fit all, and that meal planning for diabetes is individualized. Research can help educators fine-tune the needs of patients. An interesting article in the July issue of the American Diabetes Association's journal Diabetes Care highlighted the benefit of reducing the glycemic load of a meal plan with canola oil. (1) I had a chance to talk with the lead author and researcher, David Jenkins, about this study and its implications for medical providers. The intent of the study was to evaluate the effects of combining a low glycemic load diet with alpha linoleic acid and monounsaturated fats since they had never been evaluated in combination.To do this, the researchers recruited 141 individuals with type 2 diabetes on oral antihyperglycemic agents. They were divided into two groups: one group followed a low glycemic diet with canola oil-enriched whole-wheat bread and the other were told to avoid white-flour products and replace them with whole-wheat items instead. Each group followed this meal plan for three months. The study found that the canola oil group had a slight lowering of A1C, but it seemed to help those with high blood pressure the most. Dr. Jenkins mentioned that while there has always been interest in the low glycemic index/glycemic load (GI/GL) meal plan, this helps to pave the way to further illustrate that it can have some distinct advantages in people with diabetes. Continue reading >>

What’s The Best Cooking Oil For People With Diabetes?

What’s The Best Cooking Oil For People With Diabetes?

Today is World Diabetes day, a globally celebrated event to increase awareness about diabetes. Celebrated on the birthday of the man who co-discovered insulin, Frederick Banting, the theme of the day this year is ‘Healthy Living and Diabetes’. Earlier this year, scientists revealed that a rapeseed-enriched diet may benefit people with diabetes. According to the study by Professor Dr David Jenkins of St Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, cold pressed rapeseed oil proved to be particularly effective against Type 2 diabetes. Dr Jenkins created two special bread loaves for almost 150 patients – one loaf was high in rapeseed oil, the other high in whole wheat. The research found the rapeseed oil loaf reduced blood glucose and “significantly reduced” bad cholesterol in almost all patients. This discovery is one of many reasons why rapeseed oil is growing in popularity and is fast becoming a kitchen essential, particularly among the health-conscious. Olive oil and cold pressed rapeseed oil (or canola oil as it’s called in Canada) are both marketed as healthy oils for cooking and baking. However, cold pressed rapeseed oil is praised by nutritionists for being the one that is notably good for your heart. This is because it is high in omega-3 fatty acids and monounsaturated fats that help to promote healthy cardiovascular function. We’re forever hearing in the media how, as a nation we’re consuming too much saturated fat which can lead to symptoms such as obesity, high cholesterol, diabetes and heart disease. Rapeseed oil, which has been shown to help reduce such symptoms when it is combined into a balanced diet, is therefore the naturally better choice… Here are Borderfields’ top tips for cooking healthier meals: Use cold pressed rapeseed oil which is high in m Continue reading >>

Is Canola Oil Beneficial For Diabetes?

Is Canola Oil Beneficial For Diabetes?

Is Canola oil beneficial for diabetes and diabetic patients ? I don't think canola oil is good for anyone. I prefer coconut oil, olive oil or real butter. Last edited by jwags; 6/15/14 at 10:16 AM. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic, , Lisinopril, B-12, B-6, Tumeric, Magnesium, Calcium, Vit D, and Occuvite mostly vegan diet, low fat and around 125 carbs a day, walk 5-6 miles every other day and 1 hour of yoga and light weights. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control I am really not sure what you are looking for. Its no more beneficial that other things. This is an old topic but it came up while I was googling so I really want to shed some light here, for any health reasons oils like Canola, Vegetable or rapeseed is terrible terrible terrible for your health. I can talk about this topic for hours on here because we keep finding more and more reasons why canola is bad for you, including almost assured heart disease after years of repeated use, but I'm just going to link 2 or 3 articles that really helped my understanding. Again, I know this is an old topic but this is pretty important and I was shocked to realise how many people still use Canola when it aggravates so many harmful and potentially deadly diseases. I buy my meat from a local butcher in bulk, like a whole pig or hogget - slightly older lambs, and I get all of the main carcase, including the fat and bones - so I don't need to have any extra fat, though when making scrambled eggs and the like I use a little olive oil or butter. I have seen people carefully cutting away and binning the fat from their meat and then pouring oil over it to cook it - which seems cr Continue reading >>

Canola Oil Can Help Type-2 Diabetes Patients Manage Glucose Levels

Canola Oil Can Help Type-2 Diabetes Patients Manage Glucose Levels

Canola Oil can Help Type-2 Diabetes Patients Manage Glucose Levels Canola oil can help people with type-2 diabetes to control blood sugar levels and maintain heart health, a new study suggests. Canola oil has just seven percent saturated fat, which is about half the amount of fat found in olive oil. According to Dr. David Jenkins at the St. Michael's Hospital, eating a low-glycemic diet - which includes bread made with canola oil - is good for people trying to manage type-2 diabetes. The study was funded by the Canola Council of Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Loblaw Companies and the Canada Research Chairs Program. Researchers found that people eating bread that had canola oil in it not only had better sugar levels in their blood, but also had lower levels of LDL or "bad cholesterol" in their bodies. Canola bread diet even helped people with poor HbA1c test scores. HbA1c tests measuring blood glucose levels are a standard test to detect and manage diabetes, according to a news release . The study was based on data from 141 people. Researchers said that the reduction in cholesterol levels seen in the participants could translate into a seven percent reduction in heart-linked events. The concept of the glycemic index was developed in the early 1980s by Dr. Jenkins and his colleagues. Glycemic index measures how a carbohydrate-containing food affects blood sugar levels. Low glycemic foods are considered good for people with diabetes because they don't cause a sudden increase in blood sugar levels. Oatmeal (rolled or steel-cut), oat bran, muesli are some examples of food with low GI, whereas melons and pineapple have high GI. Independent studies have shown that low GI diet and canola oil keeps people healthy. According to Dr. Jenkins, this is the first time that Continue reading >>

Canola Oil-enriched Diet May Benefit People With Diabetes

Canola Oil-enriched Diet May Benefit People With Diabetes

Canola oil-enriched diet may benefit people with diabetes NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Switching to a diet low in simple sugars and high in healthy fats, like the types found in canola oil, could help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar, according to a new study. People with type 2 diabetes who were advised to follow a diet with a low glycemic index supplemented with extra canola oil had lower blood glucose levels and greater reductions in heart risk than those who ate a diet high in whole grains, researchers found. We know that olive oil has a good pedigree among clinicians but canola oil has a good pedigree too, lead author Dr. David Jenkins, from the University of Toronto, told Reuters Health. Canola oil is rich in alpha-linolenic acid, a type of omega-3 fatty acid also found in walnuts, as well as monounsaturated fatty acids, which are also in avocados and olives. A foods glycemic index refers to how quickly it causes blood sugar to rise. Starchy foods like white bread and potatoes are considered to be high glycemic index foods because they can cause blood sugar levels to spike. Low glycemic index foods, such as lentils, soybeans, yogurt and many high-fibergrains, create a more gradual increase in blood sugar. Sugar builds up in the blood of people with type 2 diabetes because it cant be absorbed by cells, ultimately increasing the risk of other health problems such as heart disease. We thought using canola oil might be a good way to hit the heart disease and the high glucose problem, said Jenkins. The researchers recruited 141 people with diabetes, all of whom were taking medication to help lower their blood sugar levels. None of the participants reported smoking, drinking excessively or having other illnesses such as heart disease, liver disease Continue reading >>

Canola Oil May Be An Oil Of Choice For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Canola Oil May Be An Oil Of Choice For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Canola oil may be an oil of choice for people with type 2 diabetes New research suggests canola oil may be one of the oils of choice for people with Type 2 diabetes. Researchers compared people with Type 2 diabetes who ate either a low glycemic index diet that included bread made with canola oil, or a whole wheat diet known to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. The research found that those on the canola bread diet experienced both a reduction in blood glucose levels and a significant reduction in LDL, or "bad," cholesterol. Canola* is Canada's oil and new research from St. Michael's Hospital suggests it should also be one of the oils of choice for people with Type 2 diabetes. Dr. David Jenkins, head of the hospital's Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, compared people with Type 2 diabetes who ate either a low glycemic index diet that included bread made with canola oil, or a whole wheat diet known to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. His study, published today (Saturday, June 14) in the journal Diabetes Care, found that those on the canola bread diet experienced both a reduction in blood glucose levels and a significant reduction in LDL, or "bad," cholesterol. Even more exciting, he said, was the finding that the canola bread diet seemed to have the most significant impact on people who needed help the most -- those whose HbA1c test measuring blood glucose over the previous two or three months was highest. Dr. Jenkins, who is a professor of both nutritional sciences and medicine at the University of Toronto, said the reduction in LDL cholesterol observed in his study of 141 people could translate into a 7 per cent reduction in cardiovascular events. He sa Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Oils For People With Diabetes

The Best And Worst Oils For People With Diabetes

The Best and Worst Oils for People With Diabetes Oils for cooking and for making salads contain some of the most important fats in our diets. If you have diabetes, you need to know which ones will help you and which can cause harm. Unfortunately, some of our most common oils are also among the unhealthiest.Save Studies indicate that inflammation can be the root cause of diabetes. But the oils that most Americans use the most often are high in pro-inflammatory omega-6 fats and low in anti-inflammatory omega-3 fats. Soybean oil, followed by corn oil, canola oil (manufactured from rapeseed), and cottonseed oil make up 96 percent of the vegetable oil sold in the United States. Macadamia nut oil has the best ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 of any cooking oil 1:1. It has even more healthful oleic acid than olive oil. Its smoke point is 390F so you can use it for cooking almost anything, aside from grilling and frying at the highest heat. It is shelf-stable and has a mild, pleasant, buttery flavor. This oil has only two drawbacks: its expensive and generally available only online. Olive oil has about 12 times as much omega-6 as omega-3. But studies indicate that a 2:1 ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 is what we need for heart health. So while olive oil isnt ideal, it is still anti-inflammatory because of its polyphenols. Avoid Italian olive oil, much of which is fraudulently produced and marketed . Use only extra virgin olive oil from other countries**,** because it hasnt been chemically treated. Its smoke point is 405F. Coconut oil is high in the saturated fat called lauric acid, which has antibacterial, antioxidant, and antiviral properties. While coconut oil doesnt have any omega-3 fats, it doesnt have much omega-6 fats either. Solid at room temperature, its smoke point is 350F. Co Continue reading >>

Cooking Oils

Cooking Oils

Fat plays many important roles in a healthful diet. It provides energy and essential fatty acids, which are necessary for good health. It helps to maintain healthy skin and to regulate cholesterol metabolism, and it contributes to substances in the body called prostaglandins, which regulate other body processes. Dietary fat aids in the absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K, and it helps to satisfy the appetite by making you feel full after eating. Despite all the important functions of fat, there is clear evidence that a diet that is too high in fat can contribute to many health problems, including some types of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. High intakes of saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol increase the risk of unhealthy blood fat levels. In general, a healthy amount of fat in the diet ranges between 20% and 35% of total calories. Consuming more than 35% of total calories as fat can lead to a high intake of saturated fat and can also make it difficult to keep calorie intake at a desirable level. Types of dietary fat Being selective about the types of fat you eat is important for your heart health. Saturated fat and trans fat raise low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or “bad”) cholesterol levels in the blood, which raises the risk of developing heart disease. Trans fat additionally decreases high-density lipoprotein (HDL, or “good”) cholesterol levels. The American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) latest nutrition recommendations advise getting less than 7% of calories from saturated fat and minimizing intake of trans fat. For a person who consumes 1500 calories per day, 7% of calories from saturated fat is less than 12 grams of saturated fat per day. (When converting grams of fat into calories, remember that each gram of fat conta Continue reading >>

Olive, Canola Oil Use Can Prevent Diabetes: Study

Olive, Canola Oil Use Can Prevent Diabetes: Study

Olive, canola oil use can prevent diabetes: Study Olive, canola oil use can prevent diabetes: Study Use of olive pomace or canola oil, instead of your commonly used refined cooking oils, can significantly decrease chances of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, a latest and first of its kind clinical study conducted on Indians showed. The results of the trial, conducted over six months, demonstrated multiple health benefits, along with the pos... Read More NEW DELHI: Use of olive pomace or canola oil , instead of your commonly used refined cooking oils, can significantly decrease chances of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, a latest and first of its kind clinical study conducted on Indians showed. The study was conducted by Diabetes Foundation of India (DFI) and National Diabetes, Obesity & Cholesterol Foundation (N-DOC) along with Fortis C-DOC Centre of Excellence for Diabetes, Metabolic Diseases and Endocrinology. Around 90 people with fatty liver were enrolled into the study. The results of the trial, conducted over six months, demonstrated multiple health benefits, along with the possibility of averting several chronic and often lethal diseases, just by replacing commonly used refined oils with canola or olive pomace oils. Estimates show that around one-third of the Indian urban population suffers from fatty liver, considered a major cause for multiple abnormalities such as clustering of abdominal obesity, high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes and inaction of insulin. Around 25-30% people in the national capital are found to be suffering from such syndromes. According to DFI director and chairman of N-DOC Dr Anoop Misra, who led the investigation, olive pomace oil and canola oil are high on mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), considered good fa Continue reading >>

6 Best Cooking Oils For People With Diabetes

6 Best Cooking Oils For People With Diabetes

There’s a lot of confusion when it comes to the type of cooking oil that you should use for daily use and especially if you are suffering from a lifestyle disease like heart trouble or diabetes where your diet plays a major role in managing the ailment. There are so many varieties and blends available in the supermarket that it is natural to feel overwhelmed. Here’s a way out. Wellness Expert Dr. Shikha Sharma tells us, “To ensure optimal fat quality the use of a combination of vegetable oils is important. You could juggle between butter, ghee, olive oil, mustard oil, soyabean, sesame or even groundnut oil for different meals. Depend more on unrefined (Kachi Ghani) or cold pressed oils versus refined oils.” When it comes to diabetes, it is very important to keep a check on your diet as your blood sugar levels are directly affected by what you eat. It helps to know that, in this case, a particular cooking oil may be better off than the other. Here are the healthiest cooking oils for diabetics as suggested by Dr. Sunali Sharma, Dietician & Nutritionist, Amandeep Hospitals. 1. Canola Oil: Canola oil is a plant-based oil derived from the rapeseed plant. It is rich in alpha-linolenic acid which is a type of omega-3 fatty acid that you will also find in walnuts. It also contains healthy monounsaturated fatty acids found in avocados and olives. “A study conducted by Dr. David Jenkins from the University of Toronto showed that canola oil helps in lowering blood sugar levels and bad cholesterol in people with type 2 diabetes.” Canola oil is a plant-based oil derived from the rapeseed plant​. Photo Credit: Istock 2. Olive Oil: Olive oil is a heart-friendly oil that is good for diabetics too. It contains an antioxidant called tyrosol that can act as a therapeutic age Continue reading >>

Ada: Canola Oil Reduces Heart Risk In Diabetes

Ada: Canola Oil Reduces Heart Risk In Diabetes

Home / Resources / Articles / ADA: Canola Oil Reduces Heart Risk in Diabetes ADA: Canola Oil Reduces Heart Risk in Diabetes Adding canola oil to the diet improved glycemic control and reduced cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetes. And in another study, an overall healthier diet reduced risk of developing diabetes. David J.A. Jenkins, MD, PhD, ScD, of the University of Toronto, and colleagues found in a randomized trial that, an extra ounce of the vegetable oil daily, incorporated into bread, cut hemoglobin A1c by 0.47% compared with a 0.31% decline on a control diet emphasizing whole grains (P=0.002), Framingham risk score for cardiovascular disease dropped across the 12-week trial in both groups, but by 0.6 percentage points more from the baseline 10% risk with the canola diet than with the control (P=0.008), they reported at the American Diabetes Association meeting and simultaneously online in Diabetes Care. In a second trial reported at the meeting, improving diet quality score by 10 points on a 110-point summary scale assessing fruit, vegetable, nuts, polyunsaturated fat, and other factors over 4 years was associated with a 9% lower risk of diabetes incidence over the next 4 years (95% CI 0.84-0.99). Sylvia Ley, PhD, RD, of the Harvard School of Public Health, and colleagues found in a pooled trial analysis that, the same degree of decrease in diet quality was associated with an 18% increase in risk (95% CI 1.08-1.30), independent of changes in weight, physical activity, and caloric intake and other factors, That study included the Nurses Health Study I and II and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, for a total of 148,479 participants without baseline diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or cancer. Notably, the relationship with diabetes incidence held across Continue reading >>

Canola Oil: Cooking With It Helps Type 2 Diabetes Patients Lower Blood Sugar

Canola Oil: Cooking With It Helps Type 2 Diabetes Patients Lower Blood Sugar

Canola Oil: Cooking With It Helps Type 2 Diabetes Patients Lower Blood Sugar What oil do you cook with? It makes a difference if you have type 2 diabetes. Canola oil is known to help reduce belly fat, along with many other health benefits. Now, new research credits canola oil with helping to lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes and to reduce bad cholesterol. Dr. David Jenkins, head of the St. Michaels Hospital Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre, compared the results of 141 participants, who he split up into two groups: One group ate bread made with canola oil as a part of a low glycemic diet, and the other group was on a whole-wheat diet.The findings are published in the journalDiabetes Care. Study resultsrevealed the group of people who ate the canola oil bread experienced lower blood glucose, especially those who had the highest measuring levels. What is it about canola oil that makes it such a gem? Well for one, it has lower saturated fat than olive oil. Canola oil only contains seven percent of saturated fat, less than half that of olive oil. Canola oil was originally grown in Canada and comes from rapeseed plant. In the study, Jenkins also found that participants who were on a whole wheat diet had a better blood flow after 12 weeks than those on the canola bread diet. Jenkins wasnt too sure about the significance of this discovery, but he believed this finding could help explain why whole wheat foods are good for cardiovascular health. Whether you cook with canola oil or stick to a whole wheat diet, they both prove to have their benefits. Overall, this study highlights the positive results of a lower glycemic diet for type 2 diabetes patients. Foods with a high glycemic index like starches, such as potatoes and white rice, can raise Continue reading >>

Canola Oil Is Not Type 2 Diabetic Health Food, Contrary To New Research

Canola Oil Is Not Type 2 Diabetic Health Food, Contrary To New Research

Canola oil is NOT type 2 diabetic health food, contrary to new research Time to get out your 10-foot pole. You know the one you wouldnt touch something awful with if your life depended on it. (And in this case it really might.) If youre type 2 diabetic or have any level of blood sugar issues, I have to warn you away from a diet study thats making headlines. It looks promising, but its a pure canola con job. Short range, the diet appears to be beneficial. Long range, I firmly believe its a Hindenburg level disaster. Imagine your heart crashing and bursting into flames. Im not kidding, its that bad. The details are pretty simple. In fact, theyre deceptively simple. Researchers at Torontos St. Michaels Hospital recruited about 140 people, split them into two groups, and assigned two diets: the whole wheat diet (WW) and the canola bread diet (CB). In the WW diet, volunteers followed an established diet proven to reduce heart disease risk. The CB diet calls for low glycemic foods, along with bread made with canola oil. Well, let me tell you compared to WW, the CB diet worked a small miracle. In just 12 weeks it reduced blood sugar and LDL cholesterol. And the blood sugar effect was most pronounced in those with the most serious blood sugar problems. So the next step is clear, right? Roll in a wheelbarrow full of canola bread, toss in some low glycemic dishes and youre on your way to blood sugar perfection. Wellhold on a second. Lets pull back and take another look. As you may know, low glycemic foods produce the least effect on blood sugar. That helps keep your insulin response in check a must for anyone whos prediabetic, and absolutely essential for type 2 diabetics. So if you followed a low glycemic diet you could expect the very same results in this study: better blood s Continue reading >>

Belly Fat May Be Reduced By Canola Oil

Belly Fat May Be Reduced By Canola Oil

Including canola oil as part of a healthy diet can help cut down on belly fat in just four weeks, according to new research from Penn State. Belly, or visceral, fat is known to increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and is linked with a heightened risk of conditions such as metabolic syndrome and Type 2 diabetes . Canola oil, made from the seeds of cultivated forms of the rapeseed plant , is high in monounsaturated fats, which have been shown to positively affect body composition. To determine the effects of a diet low in saturated fat and high in monounsaturated fat in people at high risk for metabolic syndrome (a cluster of related conditions that increases the risk for Type 2 diabetes), researchers randomly assigned 101 participants to regularly consume either conventional canola oil, high-oleic acid canola oil, high-oleic acid canola oil with DHA (a type of omega-3 fat ), corn and safflower oil, or flax and safflower oil as part their diet for four weeks. At the end of each four-week period, the subjects were given a four-week break before being assigned to a different diet group. All of the participants had abdominal obesity, or excess belly fat, and either had or were at risk of metabolic syndrome. They drank two smoothies each day that contained the treatment oil for their diet group. The amount of oil in each smoothie was based on each persons calorie needs, with those on a 3000-calorie-per-day diet receiving 60 grams (roughly four tablespoons) of the oil, constituting 18% of their energy needs, and others receiving 30 grams (roughly two tablespoons) of the oil. In addition to the treatment oil, each smoothie contained 100 grams of orange sherbet, 100 grams of non-fat milk, and 100 grams of frozen unsweetened strawberries. The researchers found that after Continue reading >>

A Canola Oil-supplemented Diet Prevents Type I Diabetes-caused Lipotoxicity And Renal Dysfunction In A Rat Model.

A Canola Oil-supplemented Diet Prevents Type I Diabetes-caused Lipotoxicity And Renal Dysfunction In A Rat Model.

A Canola Oil-Supplemented Diet Prevents Type I Diabetes-Caused Lipotoxicity and Renal Dysfunction in a Rat Model. 1 Laboratorio de Metabolismo, Departamento de Fisiologa, ENCB, Instituto Politcnico Nacional , Gustavo Madero, Mxico, Distrito Federal. 2 Laboratorio de Toxicologa Heptica y Renal, Departamento de Farmacia. ENCB, Instituto Politcnico Nacional , Gustavo Madero, Mxico, Distrito Federal. 3 Laboratorio de Mediciones del Instituto Tecnolgico de Veracruz, UNIDA , Veracruz, Mxico. We investigated the effect of a canola oil-supplemented diet on the metabolic state and diabetic renal function of a type I diabetes experimental model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: (1) normoglycemic+chow diet, (2) normoglycemic+a canola oil-supplemented chow diet, (3) diabetic+chow diet, and (4) diabetic+a canola oil-supplemented chow diet. For 15 weeks, animals were fed a diet of Purina rat chow alone or supplemented with 30% canola oil. Energetic intake, water intake, body weight, and adipose tissue fat pad were measured; renal function, electrolyte balance, glomerular filtration rate, and the plasmatic concentration of free fatty acids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and glucose were evaluated. The mesenteric, retroperitoneal, and epididymal fat pads were dissected and weighed. The kidneys were used for lipid peroxidation (LP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) quantifications. Diabetic rats fed with a canola oil-supplemented diet had higher body weights, were less hyperphagic, and their mesenteric, retroperitoneal, and epididymal fat pads weighed more than diabetic rats on an unsupplemented diet. The canola oil-supplemented diet decreased plasmatic concentrations of free fatty acids, triglycerides, and cholesterol; showed improved osmolarity, water cl Continue reading >>

More in diabetes