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Cannabis For Diabetes

Natural Remedies For Diabetes – Hemp Oil Cbd (cannabidiol)

Natural Remedies For Diabetes – Hemp Oil Cbd (cannabidiol)

As I was looking for Natural Remedies for Diabetes I couldn’t get past the Hemp oil and it’s abundant CBD (cannabidiol) content. Sections of Scientists talking about Natural Remedies for Diabetes and CBD as being their number 1 choice: But first… What is Diabetes? From TruthOnPot Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood glucose levels. The two most common forms of diabetes are known as Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes: Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in individuals under the age of 30 and involves an autoimmune attack on islet cells of the pancreas – cells that produce insulin. Approximately 10% of diabetics suffer from Type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is far more common and tends to affect individuals that are obese and over the age of 40. It is usually a result of a combination of defective insulin production and insulin resistance. In both types of diabetes, high blood sugar levels eventually lead to a variety of other metabolic and non-metabolic complications. The Role of Endocannabinoids Endocannabinoids are natural compounds found within all humans that happen to act in a similar way as plant-derived cannabinoids such as THC. Along with cannabinoid receptors, they make up what is known as the endocannabinoid system. Cannabinoid receptors have been identified in the pancreas, heart, blood vessels, nervous system and many other organs – all of which suggests a potential role for cannabinoids in treating diabetes. Interestingly, large-scale surveys have found lower prevalence rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus among marijuana users compared with non-users, suggesting the potential for cannabinoids to affect this disorder. Studies have also identified higher endocannabinoid levels (anandamide and 2-AG) in diabetic pat Continue reading >>

Can Cannabis Treat Diabetes Mellitus?

Can Cannabis Treat Diabetes Mellitus?

Home / Resources / Ailment Resources / Can Cannabis Treat Diabetes Mellitus? The term “ diabetes mellitus ” refers to what we simply call “diabetes.” It’s a general name that describes both type 1 and type 2 of the disease. Even though both kinds develop for different reasons and work in different ways, they have similar results. A lack of insulin activity causes high blood sugar levels, damaging the body and organs. When diabetes becomes severe, it can cause death. Typical diabetes treatments include insulin, lifestyle changes and medication. Medical approaches can have dangerous side effects like organ damage and low blood sugar. While medical marijuana can’t completely replace standard treatment, it has the potential to reduce your reliance on drugs. When you have diabetes, your body doesn’t produce or use insulin correctly. The pancreas creates insulin to transport glucose to your cells. When something goes wrong with that process, your cells don’t get the glucose they need to function. Instead, the glucose goes into your blood, making your blood sugar rise. Each type of diabetes causes different insulin problems. Type 1 diabetes involves low or nonexistent insulin production. Due to genetics or other factors, the pancreas doesn’t create enough insulin for proper glucose transportation. Meanwhile, type 2 diabetes happens when your cells build a resistance to insulin. Insulin-resistant cells don’t let glucose travel properly. Regardless of the type of diabetes the patient has, the extra glucose that can’t enter the cells goes into the bloodstream instead. The excess glucose causes high blood sugar, which can cause damage over a long time. Issues caused by high glucose include: Continue reading >>

Cannabis And Diabetes

Cannabis And Diabetes

By: Eloise Theisen, MSN, RN, AGPCNP-BC My experience has been that patients who are coming to cannabis for the first time have complex medical histories.  Some have tried everything under the sun, with little to no relief.  Others are taking a long list of medications, including over the counter and […] Why Nurses are Vital to the Medical Cannabis Community ST. PAUL, Minn. — A new survey shows many doctors in Minnesota are reluctant to accept medical marijuana as a treatment option. The survey was released Tuesday to the state’s Task Force on Medical Cannabis Therapeutic Research. It was conducted by task force member Dr. Charles Reznikoff, an addiction specialist […] Minnesota docs hesitant on medical marijuana program, survey shows Bearman began with a 45-minute lecture on the history of  drug consumption,  beginning with Zoroastrian rituals and ending with GW Pharmaceuticals’ 2014 medical trials of Epidiolex, a liquid form of Cannabidiol used to treat epilepsy.  Bearman said the history of cannabis use can help people understand modern policy and culture […] Dr. David Bearman Talks History, Uses of Cannabis PHOENIX — If some Arizona nurses get their way, medical marijuana will become available as early as next year to treat everything from arthritis and autism to Tourette’s syndrome and traumatic brain injury. Members of the Arizona Cannabis Nurses Association are petitioning the Department of Health Services to add those […] Nurses Seek to Expand Medical Marijuana Uses The Endocannabinoid System: Endocanabinoids and their receptors are found throughout the body in the brain, organs, connective tissue, glands and immune cells. In each tissue, the cannabinoid system performs different tasks, but the goal is always the same—homeostasis (main Continue reading >>

Cannabis Linked To Prevention Of Diabetes

Cannabis Linked To Prevention Of Diabetes

The UK latest figures show 2.3 million people used cannabis in the last year ( AP ) Cannabis linked to prevention of diabetes Regular users of the drug found to have lower levels of insulin after fasting, research shows Smoking cannabis may prevent the development of diabetes, one of the most rapidly rising chronic disorders in the world. If the link is proved, it could lead to the development of treatments based on the active ingredient of cannabis, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), without its intoxicating effects. Researchers have found that regular users of the drug had lower levels of the hormone insulin after fasting a signal that they are protected against diabetes. They also had reduced insulin resistance. Cannabis is widely smoked in the United States with over 17 million current users of whom more than four million smoke it on a daily basis. In the UK latest figures show 2.3 million people used cannabis in the last year, but the numbers have declined in the last decade. Sharing the full story, not just the headlines Two US states have recently legalised its recreational use and 19 others have legalised it for medical purposes by patients with one of several conditions including multiple sclerosis and cancer. THC has already been approved to treat the side effects of chemotherapy, nausea in cancer patients, anorexia associated with AIDS and other conditions. The study involved almost 5,000 patients who answered a questionnaire about their drug use and were part of the National Health and Nutrition Survey between 2005 and 2010. The results showed almost 2,000 had used cannabis at some point in their lives and more than one in 10 (579) were current users. Only those who had used cannabis within the past month showed evidence of protection against diabetes, suggesting Continue reading >>

Eating Chilli And Smoking Cannabis ‘could Help Cure Diabetes And Colitis – By Calming The Gut’

Eating Chilli And Smoking Cannabis ‘could Help Cure Diabetes And Colitis – By Calming The Gut’

WHAT do chilli spice and cannabis have in common? On the face of it, very little. But, scientists hope both could help develop new treatments for type 1 diabetes and the gut disease colitis. Getty Images When eaten, both interact with the same receptor in our stomachs, new findings suggest. And the result is they help calm the gut, scientists at the University of Connecticut found. Mice fed both chilli peppers and the class B drug showed less inflammation in their guts. And, the researchers even found they were able to reverse type 1 diabetes in some mice, by feeding them the fiery pepper. The chilli was found to bind itself to a receptor called TRPV1, which is found in the gut, oesophagus and pancreas. When it bound itself to the receptor it created a compound called anandamide, which is chemically similar to cannabinoids found in marijuana. It was this compound that caused the immune system of the mice to calm down, by reducing inflammation, and the same happened when they were fed anandamide directly. Reducing inflammation in the pancreas could help in the treatment of diabetes because the pancreas is responsible for maintaining insulin and glucose levels in the body. A person with diabetes has too much glucose in their system and the pancreas is unable to regulate it. The brain also creates anandamides when receptors in the brain react to people getting high, but scientists have not known why those receptors exist in the past. Pramod Srivastava, professor of immunology and medicine at the university, said: "This allows you to imagine ways the immune system and the brain might talk to each other. "They share a common language." Getty Images He said it opens up new questions about the relationship between the immune system, the gut and the brain. They are still carryi Continue reading >>

Can Marijuana Improve Blood Sugars In Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Marijuana Improve Blood Sugars In Type 2 Diabetes?

Doctors visits, blood tests and more medications. This is the norm when you’re living with type 2 diabetes. Life becomes a new routine of pricking your finger, worrying if the food you ate is going to spike your sugars and becoming nervous at every little tingle in your fingers and toes. You have to deal with conflicting advice about what you should and shouldn’t eat (hint: diabetic foods are definitely not a good choice). Is it any wonder that there is a higher risk of depression for type 2 diabetics. What if there was a natural solution that might help your mood and your blood sugar control? What are Cannabinoids? This plant goes by so many names, marijuana, maryjane, weed and is the most widely used illicit drug worldwide. What you might not know is that cannabis has a wide range of medicinal benefits. To understand the medicinal uses of cannabis we first need to look at how it works in the body. Our body has it’s own cannabinoid receptors, called the Endocannabinoid system. The system helps regulate a number of processes including appetite, memory, mood, pain, metabolism, blood flow and cell immunity. The active ingredients in cannabis are called cannabinoids, they can act on the endocannabinoid system which is where the medical benefits come from. Cannabis contains around 80 different cannabinoids most of which have not been widely researched as yet. The most well known cannabinoid contained in cannabis is THC. Cannabis: the old kid on the block Actually, humans have been cultivating and using hemp (the plant the cannabis comes from) for over 10,000 years. Evidence shows it is the first agricultural crop our ancestors farmed. Cannabis has also been used medicinally for nearly as long, with Queen Victoria using it regularly. It is the THC component of cannabis Continue reading >>

Medical Cannabis & Diabetes: A Review Of The Scientific Evidence

Medical Cannabis & Diabetes: A Review Of The Scientific Evidence

Medical Cannabis & Diabetes: a review of the scientific evidence With diabetes being one of the leading disease burdens in the Western world, it is important to understand whether cannabis may provide protection from the development of this disorder, or if it can ease symptoms, leading towards a cure altogether. Self-medicating patients have been known to relieve their diabetic ulcers with topical application of cannabis extracts (also commonly known as “Simpson Oil”). Interestingly, cannabis ingestion is suggested to allow for a safe reduction of prescription insulin, and in some cases it may be stopped entirely. Cannabis users in general are thought to show a lower risks of developing diabetes. Several epidemiological studies, observing large population cohorts have investigated a possible correlation between cannabis use and diabetic incidence. The results reported by researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, showed that from 10,896 US adults, past and present cannabis consumers possessed a lower prevalence of adult onset diabetes, even after authors adjusted for social variables (ethnicity, level of physical activity, age etc.), despite all groups possessing a similar family history of diabetes. The authors concluded, ʺOur analysis (NHANES, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2005 to 2010) showed that participants who used marijuana had a lower prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus and lower odds of Diabetes Mellitus relative to non‐marijuana users.ʺ [1] These studies were matched by results obtained from two independent trials run by Harvard Medical School and the Beth Israe l Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, investigating the consequences of cannabis consumption on fasting insulin, glucose and insulin resistance in a la Continue reading >>

Marijuana And Type 1 Diabetes

Marijuana And Type 1 Diabetes

Warning: Content within discusses drugs that are illegal in some jurisdictions. Beyond Type 1 in no way encourages illegal activity and would like to remind its readers that marijuana usage continues to be an offense under US federal law. From Cheech and Chong to Nancy Botwin on Weeds, marijuana has had its share of the spotlight over the years. Legislative consensus is “half baked” with 28 states having legalized medical marijuana (eight of which legalized it for recreational purposes, ages 21+). That means in more than half the states in the US, you can use pot medicinally. Legal or not, depending on where you live and what your ailment or aim is, it doesn’t mean “everybody must get stoned.” It does mean though, if you’re going to “puff the magic dragon,” you should know a few things first. Like dude…what about marijuana and Type 1 diabetes? These are the must-knows and things to consider when it comes to ganja. What’s the law? Find out where it’s legal in the US according to CNN. What are the side effects of marijuana? Like any other drug, marijuana is a mind-altering substance, which is to say, you act, think or feel differently on it. THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, is the chemical known to cause marijuana’s psychological effects. Some report feeling no effect, but this is uncommon. Different stains (types) of marijuana and different ways in which to consume it can also produce varying effects. While your reaction is individual, you should know the wide range of side effects that you could experience when under the influence of marijuana. You could feel… relaxed euphoric sleepy talkative anxious paranoid thirsty hungry What are the long-term effects of marijuana? Because marijuana is not legal under federal law in the US and in other parts o Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Medical Marijuana

Diabetes And Medical Marijuana

Diabetes mellitus is a group of autoimmune diseases characterized by defects in insulin secretion resulting in hyperglycemia (abnormally high concentration of glucose in the blood). There are two primary types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes (also known as juvenile diabetes) are incapable of producing pancreatic insulin and must rely on insulin medication for survival. Type 2 diabetes (also known as adult onset diabetes) produce inadequate amounts of insulin. Type 2 diabetes is a less serious condition that typically is controlled by diet. Over time, diabetes can lead to blindness, kidney failure nerve damage, hardening of the arteries and death. The disease is the third leading cause of death in the United States after heart disease and cancer. A search of the scientific literature reveals no clinical investigations of cannabis for the treatment of diabetes, but does identify a small number of preclinical studies indicating that cannabinoids may modify the disease’s progression and provide symptomatic relief to those suffering from the disease. 2006 Study—5 mg. per day injection of CBD significantly reduced the incidence of diabetes in mice. Also delayed the onset of diabetes in mice. March 2006 American Journal of Pathology—Study done at the Medical College of Virginia—Rats treated with CBD (from 1-4 weeks) experienced protection from diabetic retinopathy (condition characterized by retinal oxygen deprivation and a breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier, is the leading cause of blindness in working age adults). Studies reported in the journal of Neuroscience Letters in 2004—Mice given a cannabis receptor agonist experienced a reduction in diabetic related tactile allodynia (pain resulting from non-injurious stimulus to the skin) compared to non-treated controls Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus is a group of autoimmune diseases characterized by defects in insulin secretion resulting in hyperglycemia (an abnormally high concentration of glucose in the blood). There are two primary types of diabetes. Individuals diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (also known as juvenile diabetes) are incapable of producing pancreatic insulin and must rely on insulin medication for survival. Individuals diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (also known as adult onset diabetes) produce inadequate amounts of insulin. Type 2 diabetes is a less serious condition that typically is controlled by diet. Over time, diabetes can lead to blindness, kidney failure, nerve damage, hardening of the arteries and death. The disease is the third leading cause of death in the United States after heart disease and cancer. Preclinical and observational studies indicate that cannabinoids are inversely associated with diabetes,[1] may modify disease progression, and that they also may provide symptomatic relief to those suffering from the disease.[2-3] A 2006 study published in the journal Autoimmunity reported that injections of 5 mg per day of the non-psychoactive cannabinoid CBD significantly reduced the incidence of diabetes in mice. Investigators reported that 86 percent of untreated control mice in the study developed diabetes. By contrast, only 30 percent of CBD-treated mice developed the disease.[4] In a separate experiment by this same research team, investigators reported that control mice all developed diabetes at a median of 17 weeks (range 15-20 weeks), while a majority (60 percent) of CBD-treated mice remained diabetes-free at 26 weeks.[5] A 2013 study assessing the effect of THCV (tetrahydrocannabivarin) in genetically modified obese mice reported that the cannabinoid's administra Continue reading >>

Cannabis & Diabetes Seattle Hempfest

Cannabis & Diabetes Seattle Hempfest

AUTHORS: Wallace MS, Marcotte TD, Umlauf A, Gouaux B, Atkinson JH ABSTRACT: A randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled crossover study was conducted in 16 patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy to assess the short-term efficacy and tolerability of inhaled cannabis. In a crossover design, each participant was exposed to 4 single dosing sessions of placebo or to low (1% tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]), medium (4% THC), or high (7% THC) doses of cannabis. Baseline spontaneous pain, evoked pain, and cognitive testing were performed. Subjects were then administered aerosolized cannabis or placebo and the pain intensity and subjective highness score was measured at 5, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes and then every 30 minutes for an additional 3 hours. Cognitive testing was performed at 5 and 30 minutes and then every 30 minutes for an additional 3 hours. The primary analysis compared differences in spontaneous pain over time between doses using linear mixed effects models. There was a significant difference in spontaneous pain scores between doses (P < .001). Specific significant comparisons were placebo versus low, medium, and high doses (P = .031, .04, and <.001, respectively) and high versus low and medium doses (both P < .001). There was a significant effect of the high dose on foam brush and von Frey evoked pain (both P < .001). There was a significant negative effect (impaired performance) of the high dose on 2 of the 3 neuropsychological tests (Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test, Trail Making Test Part B. Continue reading >>

Treat Diabetes With Cannabis Oil

Treat Diabetes With Cannabis Oil

by JT-TheCannabisBlogger | Jan 16, 2018 | CBD , Diabetes | 5 comments When you treat diabetes with cannabis oil, you treat a myriad underlying dis-eases of the body. Cannabis oil is a natural medication which has been used for centuries to treat all kinds of ailments, from your common headache and stress to chronic diseases like cancer and arthritis. And when you have diabetes, you have unstable blood sugars, inflamed arteries and nerves, muscle cramps and intestinal issues, compromised circulation, high blood pressure and restless leg syndrome. The cannabis oil addresses all of these: it reduces restless leg syndrome and any tingling in the feet and hands, it eases neuropathic pain and improves breathing, it releases muscle cramps and disorders of the digestion, it stops inflammation and assists in balancing blood sugars. Treat diabetes with cannabis oil and you should feel fit as a fiddle. How does the Cannabis Oil Treat the Diabetes? Phytocannabinoids (found in the cannabis plant) interact with the body’s endogenous endocannabinoid system, which balances the immune system in a status of homeostasis. Everything functions well when the endocannabinoid system is in balance. In every part of the body, in every tissue, every organ and in every cell, endocannabinoids and their receptors work hard to keep this state of healthy balance. When you take cannabis oil, these cannabinoids interact with the endocannabinoids and fight any disease that may be lurking. Small, regular doses of cannabis oil have the ability to therefore heal the body on an ongoing basis. The main cannabinoids which are useful to people who are ill are tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). CBD is not psychoactive like THC and used to treat many illnesses on a daily basis. THC is a natural Continue reading >>

Cannabis, Insulin Sensitivity And Other Metabolic Effects

Cannabis, Insulin Sensitivity And Other Metabolic Effects

One of the key benefits of intermittent fasting is the lowered insulin resistance, or increased insulin sensitivity, that can be gained. Over 180 million people across the world use cannabis in some way, many of them doing so chronically.1A concern that chronic cannabis users may be curious about, is whether or not cannabis use affects insulin sensitivity. There is not a large amount of research on this, but some current research suggests that marijuana usage may be associated with lower insulin resistance and potentially lower body mass index. Given some of the potential benefits of cannabis, such as potential improvements in creativity, and changes in mood, it is important to take into account potential undesired effects when considering whether or not to use cannabis. Insulin Sensitivity Under Intermittent Fasting In general, there is a lot of scientific evidence suggesting that intermittent fasting can be beneficial for increasing insulin sensitivity. Studies have shown that in both animals and humans, intermittent fasting could lead to higher activation of insulin-like growth factor activity, which is positively correlated with insulin sensitivity.2,3Further, research has shown that intermittent fasting would significantly increase glucose uptake in the bloodstream.3Read more about the metabolic benefits of intermittent fasting here. Cannabis, Insulin Sensitivity, and Metabolism Marijuana for Increased Insulin Sensitivity The effects of marijuana consumption on insulin sensitivity have not been widely studied, but one recent study on 4657 subjects is of interest. In this study, 579 were current marijuana users, 1975 were past marijuana users, and the rest were controls. The subjects were followed over a time period of 5 years (2005-2010) via self report surveys and Continue reading >>

Medical Cannabis Treatment For Diabetes

Medical Cannabis Treatment For Diabetes

Before my grandma died of complications of Type 2 diabetes, I saw her one last time and she was bathed in a brilliant, white light sort of like sunrise those broadcast feelings of peace and rest. It was the end of a hard-scrabble immigrant life in the sugar cane and pineapple fields of Kauai, Hawaii, that afforded my grandparents a small farm filled with cows, pigs, chickens, cats and many, many vegetables. I write this because diabetes took away my favorite grandma. It pisses me off because there are cannabis strategies now available that werent then available. My grandma wouldnt have smoked but she would certainly have tried edibles, were they available. Research has revealed the great medicinal qualities cannabis possesses in relation to diabetes. What is Diabetes?Lets start by saying that almost ten percent of the U.S. population has diabetes. That is 29 million sufferers. And two out of three will die of complications of the disease. So, it certainly takes its societal toll. There are two types of diabetes. Type 1, also known as Juvenile diabetes, is a disorder where the pancreas doesnt produce enough insulin. This destruction of pancreas cells happens when certain cells in the body immune cells attack and destroy pancreas cells called Beta Cells. These are the cells that make insulin. Broken beta cells send out wrong amounts of insulin which cause the bodys blood sugar to deviate from the norm. So, you can see how disruptive Type 1 diabetes is for People with Diabetes (PWD). This condition is chronic and patients often require multiple shots of insulin throughout the day. Blood monitoring is crucial. Type 2 diabetes affects 27 million Americans and it is estimated that there are 86 million people who are Type 2 prediabetic. The cause of Type 2 diabetes is insulin Continue reading >>

Treating Diabetes With Cannabis?

Treating Diabetes With Cannabis?

I am still grinning. Can you see me? Over 10 years back in 2005, we published a brief post here at the ‘Mine about how cannabis (yep: pot, grass, weed, ganja...) can be used to treat diabetes. Really, completely legit! And people have been flocking here ever since to learn more. Now, at the kickoff of 2016, we’re updating that post with a bunch more detail. Seriously, there is a growing body of research (OK, much of it in animals) showing that cannabis can have a number of positive effects on diabetes. It begins with that original 2005 research paper that we highlighted from the American Alliance for Medical Cannabis (AAMC), which purported that cannabis can have the following benefits for PWDs (people with diabetes): stabilizing blood sugars (confirmed via "a large body of anecdotal evidence building among diabetes sufferers") anti-inflammatory action that may help quell some of the arterial inflammation common in diabetes "neuroprotective" effects that help thwart inflammation of nerves and reduce the pain of neuropathy by activating receptors in the body and brain "anti-spasmodic agents" help relieve muscle cramps and the pain of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders acts as a "vasodilator" to help keep blood vessels open and improve circulation contributes to lower blood pressure over time, which is vital for diabetics substituting cannabis butter and oil in foods "benefits cardiac and arterial health in general" it can also be used to make topical creams to relieve neuropathic pain and tingling in hands and feet helps calm diabetic "restless leg syndrome" (RLS), so the patient can sleep better: "it is recommended that patients use a vaporizer or smoked cannabis to aid in falling asleep" Evidence for all of this still stands, and has in fact been corroborated and buil Continue reading >>

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