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Canine Diabetes Support And Information

Advice, Information And Support

Advice, Information And Support

Whatever disability or medical condition your dog has, you should be able to find useful advice and support online. Some of the websites are from medical/veterinary experts which, although they contain a lot of useful information, may be a bit technical for the average pet owners requirements. However, more and more websites are being created by other pet owners who speak from years of experience of living with, and caring for these wonderful and inspiring pets. The websites below are the best Ive found from both the expert sources as well as from fellow disabled pet owners: For owners of dogs and cats with diabetes Successful management of diabetes is achievable with insulin therapy, attention to diet and exercise. Owners of a diabetic cat or dog can restore their pets quality of life through effective management of diabetes mellitus. Information for owners of Canines with Diabetes Mellitus The information within these pages is intended to be a starting point for owners of newly diagnosed dogs. You will find a lot of great information about Canine Diabetes on the net these days but not enough. Canine Diabetes is very similar to that of cats, and even humans. Nothing is sweeter than a pet with diabetes!Educate yourself. You are responsible for the daily care of your pet. Diabetes in Pets is NOT a Death Sentence! Eventually, you must have a thorough enough understanding of diabetes so that you can be confident in managing this disease instead of fearing it. If your regular vet is unavailable when a minor question arises, you must have the confidence to make a decision based on your understanding of diabetes and how it affects your pet. This Pet Diabetes website is designed to give you quick reference to URL links that may answer many of your questions Facebook Community Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Learn To Manage Your Dog's Diabetes - Insulin, Food, Monitoring, Testing - Forum

Diabetes In Dogs: Learn To Manage Your Dog's Diabetes - Insulin, Food, Monitoring, Testing - Forum

Has your dog just been diagnosed with diabetes? Take a deep breath. Diabetes in dogs is almost always manageable and, with good care and monitoring, your diabetic dog can live a normal, healthy lifespan. This site was inspired by our dog Chris, who was diagnosed with diabetes in September 2003. Chris never did anything by "the book" so he was one of the challenging cases . But through home testing his blood sugar and learning as much as we could about how insulin and food interact, we found a system that worked for him. Interested in how Chris traveled 2,400 miles round trip while blind and diabetic? Look here . Chris passed way in August 2008 at 14, an advanced age for a dog his size and especially for a dog with a severe prediabetes heart condition and eventually cancer. Diabetes never held Chris back and did not shorten his lifespan. It truly was the least of his problems. It can take a few months to get to "cruise control" so don't worry if your dog isn't instantly regulated. At the same time, good regulation is invaluable to your dog's health and well-being so it's worth pursuing. The main adjustment you will need to make is to get into a routine of feeding your dog at the same time very day, usually two meals and insulin injections a day 12 hours apart. Every dog is different. The trick is to find out what works best for your dog. You and your vet can vary the kind of insulin, diet, and timing of meals and injections to find the right combination. And remember, diabetes is something people manage every day for themselves. It's actually easier with a dog in that you have a lot of control over what they eat! So managing your dog's diabetes does not have to be a mystery. You can learn to manage your dog's treatment and monitoring. Handheld meters like the OneTouch U Continue reading >>

Canine Diabetes: You Need To Know How To Prevent This!

Canine Diabetes: You Need To Know How To Prevent This!

Diabetes usually occurs when a dog is seven to nine years old. Ive only seen a few cases of juvenile diabetes in the past 37 years with most cases being in older dogs. Female dogs are more at risk than males because of the changes in their reproductive hormones every time they go through a season. Breeds that are prone to developing this disease include Miniature Pinschers, Cairn Terriers, Dachshunds, Poodles, Beagles, Miniature Schnauzers and Keeshonds. The genetic makeup of these dogs makes them more prone to developing diabetes than other breeds. The incidence of canine diabetes is one out of every ten dogs worldwide. The sad story is that it is slowly increasing over time, just as it is in the human population. It is interesting to note that over the past 37 years of practice, Ive also seen the rate of cancer increase from 5% to 55% in both dogs and cats as well as an exponential increase in autoimmune disease in general. Throughout the years, Ive noted an increase in better diets on the market. I also notice that people are being more careful with chemicals for themselves and their pets. In spite of their efforts, their pets are still suffering this increase in chronic and autoimmune disease. I believe the common denominator in all of these chronic diseases is vaccines as we know them today. Vaccines have been medically proven to have the potential to trigger autoimmune disease in all animals. What every vet and owner should know about vaccines! Click here! I advise all of my clients not to vaccinate their animals, especially if they have any chronic issues, including but not limited to dermatitis, ear infections, urinary tract infections, irritable bowel disease, arthritis of any kind, liver, pancreas or kidney disease of any kind, allergies, food allergies, eye Continue reading >>

Canine Diabetes Support - Home | Facebook

Canine Diabetes Support - Home | Facebook

Hello friends... Happy Father's Day to all the father's and grandfather's! I hope you all have a wonderful day that celebrates the special men you are. Thank you to all of my new friends who also have canines with diabetes; for the new "likes" on my Canine Diabetes Support page. I would also like to STRONGLY recommend the community group CANINE DIABETES SUPPORT AND INFORMATION. The group is amazing and full of information, excellent advice, support and really caring members. ...Please add them as a group that you would like to follow. If you have a dog that is suffering from Diabetes joining the above group, is almost as vital as the insulin we give our dogs. Again, thanks for the add and likes, I believe the support that we can all offer one another will be priceless. But please consider adding Canine Diabetes Support and Information it will provide additional support that we all need and want. Again, Happy Father's and I wish everyone a happy and blessed day. Our 3 year old Rottweiler Sadie was diagnosed with diabetes a year ago. It has been a rocky road for her but we finally have her stabilized on the amount of insulin she should be on. She was diagnosed at a year old with a thyroid problem, she had been on her medication for a year and she was doing well. We woke up July 5, 2013 to her whimpering on the floor and barely being able to move. We rushed her to the vet, and her liver was shutting down and her blood sugar levels wer...e in the lower 800's. They kept her in the hospital for over a week trying to stabilize her. We luckily were able to bring home our girl, and she has been getting better ever since. Due to her diabetes she also developed cataracts in both of her eyes and became completely blind within 3 months of her diagnosis. We are hoping to take her up Continue reading >>

Pet Diabetes Easy Reference List

Pet Diabetes Easy Reference List

This Pet Diabetes website is designed to give you quick reference to URL links that may answer many of your questions. Beginner's Overview: ultimate beginner's page just learned your pet has diabetes is Diabetes? by Peter A. Graham BVMS, PhD, CertVR, MRCVS Diabetes Information from the College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University Diabetes manual for veterinarians published by Vetsulin General Information Diabetes General Information about Diabetes Canine Diabetes: Lots of information on canine diabetes and support groups to join. the webpages from the former www.petdiabetes.org *Backup copy of the former www.petdiabetes.org and the above url petdiabetes.com (in case you are looking for a link ) * FAQ by Vetsulin Cost of having a diabetic pet: Diabetes Dictionary *An explanation of diabetic and medical terms you will hear *Glossary and abbreviations Diabetic Health Issues/Questions: Hypoglycemia and when to use Karo syrup *Hypoglycemia Ketoacidosis - DKA on ENCYCLOPEDIA, then DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS Somogyi Phenomenon *Somogyi Phenomenon Phenomenon Vetsulin users Diet/Nutrition: meals and treats by different owners for home cooking and boughten foods fed by owners of diabetic pets page of recipes fed by owners of diabetic pets and tips from petdiabetes.org database containing nutrition analysis *Not all carbs are created equal. The best carbs are low-glycemic. and Naturopathic Herbs for dogs – Chinaroad Lowchens of Australia *Great calorie calculators *More diabetic cat food choices of treats by sugar content files on Cat food by Michael Smith files on Dog food by Michael Smith on most commercial dog foods comparison of Hill's W/D, Purina DCO, Royal Canin Vet Diet E-mail lists and Message Boards for diabetic pets: Join the pet diabetes email group today! * Continue reading >>

Canine Diabetes And Its Causes

Canine Diabetes And Its Causes

Diabetes mellitus occurs when the pancreas doesnt produce enough insulin. Insulin is required for the body to efficiently use sugars, fats and proteins. Diabetes most commonly occurs in middle age to older dogs and cats, but occasionally occurs in young animals.Certain conditions predispose a dog to developing diabetes. According to the Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Animals that are overweight or those with inflammation of the pancreas are predisposed to developing diabetes. Some drugs can interfere with insulin, leading to diabetes. Glucocorticoids, which are cortisone-type drugs, and hormones used for heat control are drugs that are most likely to cause diabetes. These are commonly used drugs and only a small percentage of animals receiving these drugs develop diabetes after long term use. The conventional treatment of choice for diabetes is insulin. Most dogs are also prescribed a veterinary formula processed food. Your veterinarian will recommend a specific diet and feeding regimen that will enhance the effectiveness of insulin. If your pet is overweight,s(he) will be placed on a weight-reducing diet. As the pet loses weight, less insulin will be needed.Only feed the recommended diet..NO table scraps or treats that are not part of the recommended diet. These veterinary formulas for diabetes are low in protein and high in carbohydrates. Here is the ingredient list for one of the more popular veterinary prescription foods for diabetes: Whole Grain Corn, Powdered Cellulose, Chicken by-product Meal, Corn Gluten Meal, Chicken Liver Flavor, Soybean Mill Run, Soybean Oil, Dried Beet Pulp, Lactic Acid, Soybean Meal, Caramel Color, Potassium Chloride, Calcium Sulfate, Flaxseed, L-Lysine, Vitamin E Supplement, Choline Chloride, Calcium Carbonate Continue reading >>

"diabetic Dog": Pet Health Community - Support Group

These message boards are closed to posting. Please head onover to our new WebMD Message Boards to check out and participate in the greatconversations taking place: Your new WebMD Message Boards are now open! 1. Head over to this page: 2. Choose the tag from the drop-down menu thatclicks most with you (and add it to any posts you create so others can easilyfind and sort through posts) Hi all! My 10 year old 17 pound Schnoodle is diabetic and his blood sugar tends to crash 6-7 hours after his meal and insulin shot. His meal (7:30 am and pm) is 1/3 cup vegetables, 3/8 cup chicken and 1/4 cup cooked lentils. I've tried adjusting insulin and food portions with little success. I've recently started giving him a snack of 2 tablespoons crushed peanuts (no salt/blanched) 3 hours after his meals. I haven't done a full curve yet but he's definitely not crashing like he was. I chose peanuts because they are digested much slower than many other foods however I'm concerned that this may be too much fat in the long term. I am trying to avoid changing insulin due to the significantly higher cost. Currently on 5 units twice daily of Novolin N. Any recommendations? Your reply violates WebMD's rules. The issue ishighlighted in red. Please correct the issue, then click Submit. Post my content anonymously (without my username) Put this on my watchlist and alert me by email to new posts Have you worked with your vet to develop your dog's current meal plan? If not, I think that's a great place to start to determine how many calories and what kinds of foods are best for your dog. This article has some suggestions on tips to manage your dog's diet when he has diabetes and may be helpful for you. You may consider timing his meals differently or breaking them into 3 feeding times as opposed to 2 Continue reading >>

10 Common Concerns From Owners Of Diabetic Dogs (sponsored By Intervet/schering-plough Animal Health)

10 Common Concerns From Owners Of Diabetic Dogs (sponsored By Intervet/schering-plough Animal Health)

"My dog has diabetes? What do I do?" For the last 24 years, I've heard dog owners ask these questions, often with great anxiety. As veterinarians, we're well trained in diagnosing and treating disease but not so in handling anxiousand at times overly concernedclients. In the case of a chronic disease such as canine diabetes, we have to do an excellent job of handling clients' concerns, or it may be the owners' misperceptions about canine diabetes rather than the diabetes itself that results in the loss of a patient. Anything we can do to decrease owners' anxieties about the diagnosis of diabetes will likely contribute more to the long-term management of their dogs' disease than any discussion of the disease itself. I've developed a trouble-shooting top 10 list to help us assure owners of newly diagnosed dogs that it's going to be OK. 10. "But according to Uncle Billy Bob's Diabetic Pet website...." The Internet should be like cable TV, but instead of parental controls, you should turn on veterinary controls. Not all websites are the best sources of information. Assemble a list of websites that you and your staff approve of and provide that to clients. A good website explains diabetes, discusses its clinical signs, explains how it's diagnosed and monitored, and reviews injection techniques. Many good websites originate from owners of diabetic dogs. See Helpful websites for my recommendations. 9. "I can't give my dog an injection! Isn't a pill easier?" In general, no, it's not easier. While some owners are great at giving oral medications, most aren't and struggle with compliance. Many owners, after attempting to give pills at home, ask to switch to injections. There's also no question that insulin is the preferred treatment for diabetes in conjunction with dietary manag Continue reading >>

Preventing And Treating Canine Diabetes

Preventing And Treating Canine Diabetes

The growing diabetes epidemic is not limited to people—diabetes mellitus is increasing among dogs as well. Researchers estimate that one in 200 dogs will develop the disease. Fortunately, treatment has made huge strides in recent years, and as a result, dogs with diabetes are living longer, healthier lives. The mechanism of diabetes is relatively simple to describe. Just as cars use gas for fuel, body cells run on a sugar called glucose. The body obtains glucose by breaking down carbohydrates in the diet. Cells then extract glucose from the blood with the help of insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas in specialized cells called beta cells. (The pancreas, an organ situated behind the stomach, produces several hormones.) In diabetes mellitus, cells don’t take in enough glucose, which then builds up in the blood. As a result, cells starve and organs bathed in sugary blood are damaged. Diabetes is not curable, but it is treatable; a dog with diabetes may live many happy years after diagnosis. Kinds of Diabetes Humans are subject to essentially three kinds of diabetes. By far the most common is Type 2, followed by Type 1 and gestational diabetes. Type 2 diabetes has typically been a disease of middle and old age (though it is being seen increasingly in young people), and has two causes: The beta cells don’t make enough insulin, or muscle cells resist insulin’s help and don’t take in enough glucose (or both). As a result, blood glucose levels climb. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs when the immune system attacks and destroys the beta cells, cutting off insulin production; the reason for this attack is thought to be a combination of genetic predisposition plus exposure to a trigger (research into possible triggers is ongoing). Glucose then stays in the blood and, aga Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs - Canine Diabetes

Diabetes In Dogs - Canine Diabetes

Up to 70% of dogs with diabetes are female Diabetes is one of the most common hormonal diseases in dogs . Diabetes in dogs can occur as young as 18 months of age. Most dogs are between seven and ten when canine diabetes diagnosis is made. Approximately 70% of dogs with diabetes are female. Any breed can be affected, but dachshunds, poodles, miniature schnauzers, cairn terriers, and springer spaniels are at increased risk. Interestingly, diabetes is seen very infrequently in Cocker Spaniels, shepherds, collies, and boxers. What signs might your dog be exhibiting if he/she is diabetic? Diabetic patients usually show a marked increase in their water intake, along with an accompanying increase in urination. They frequently have excellent appetites, yet are losing weight. Finally, the sudden appearance of cataracts in the eyes suggests the possibility of underlying diabetes. As with most conditions, it is important to diagnose diabetes early in the disease. If you observe any of the above signs in your dog, don't hesitate to get her to your family veterinarian. Left undiagnosed and untreated, diabetic dogs can develop life-threatening secondary complications due to the metabolic derangements in their body. The diagnosis of diabetes is generally fairly simple. The presence of a high blood sugar level ( hyperglycemia ) and sugar in the urine (glucosuria) along with the appropriate clinical signs confirms the diagnosis. In dogs, normal blood sugar levels are 80 to 120, I have seen diabetic patients with values as high as 600. Although diagnosing diabetes is not demanding, treating it certainly is. That said, it is a treatable disease in dogs and most diabetic dogs can lead very high-quality lives. Virtually all dogs with diabetes require insulin therapy. Just as in humans, the Continue reading >>

Focus: Comparative Medicine: The Diabetic Dog As A Translational Model For Human Islet Transplantation

Focus: Comparative Medicine: The Diabetic Dog As A Translational Model For Human Islet Transplantation

The Diabetic Dog as a Translational Model for Human Islet Transplantation Christopher A. Adin , DVM, DACVSa,* and Chen Gilor , DVM, PhD, DAVCIMb aDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC bDepartment of Medicine and Epidemiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA *To whom all correspondence should be addressed: Christopher A. Adin, DVM, DACVS, Associate Professor, Soft Tissue and Oncologic Surgery, Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 1060 William Moore Dr., Raleigh, NC 27606, Phone: 919-513-6050, Email: [email protected] . Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2017, Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License, which permits for noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any digital medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not altered in any way. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The dog model has served as the primary method for early development of many diabetes therapies, including pancreatic islet transplantation techniques and immunosuppressive protocols. Recent trends towards the use of monoclonal antibody therapies for immunosuppression in human islet transplantation have led to the increasing use of primate models with induced diabetes. In addition to induced-disease models in large animals, scientists in many fields are considering the use of naturally-occurring disease models in client-owned pets. This article will review the applicability of naturally-occurring diabetes in dogs as a translatio Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Everything You Need To Know To Keep Them Healthy

Diabetes In Dogs: Everything You Need To Know To Keep Them Healthy

Emotional Support Animal Letters Blog Diabetes in Dogs: Everything You Need to Know to Keep Them Healthy Diabetes in Dogs: Everything You Need to Know to Keep Them Healthy The key to managing diabetes in dogs is early detection, proper care, and a better understanding of this illness and how it works. While no pet owner ever wants their pet to get sick, unfortunately, dogs and cats do get ill from time-to-time. One of the many illnesses that impact dogs today is diabetes. Much like diabetes in humans, the earlier you can catch this condition, the better, and while it may change lives it is possible for your canine companion to live comfortably with this disease, under proper management. With the Correct Monitoring and Management, Your Doggo Can Live a Long and Happy Life! If your dog gets diagnosed with diabetes, chances are you will have a number of questions swirling around in your head. The most important thing to understand first is exactly whatdiabetes is and what it means in dogs. Diabetes is actually a rather complex disease that is caused by either a lack of insulin (which is an important hormone) or the bodies inability to respond properly to insulin in the body. Type 1 Diabetes-Means a lack of insulin production. This is the most common form of diabetes in dogs and cats. Type II Diabetes-Means an inability to respond to the insulin production. Insulin production is also impaired in dogs with this condition. When insulin isnt doing its job in the body, a dogs blood sugar will level which results in hyperglycemia, and if left unattended, a number of other serious health complications, especially with the pancreas. Here is a List of the Symptoms of Diabetes in Dogs: Spotting diabetes in dogs early is essential for your doggos quality of life and overall well-bei Continue reading >>

Canine Diabetes: 3 Nutritional Support Tips

Canine Diabetes: 3 Nutritional Support Tips

Canine Diabetes: 3 Nutritional Support Tips Canine Diabetes: 3 Nutritional Support Tips Diabetes in dogs is a somewhat common disease that can effect all canine breeds. For the owner of a diabetic dog,or ahypoglycemic dog, it will be crucial they follow the vets directions on a daily regimen for insulin and a diabetic diet for treatment. Having said that, there are some additional steps that could be taken nutritionally to deal with the condition of diabetesand by the way, these tips are good for diabetes prevention as well! Canine diabetes is not a death sentence. The same steps that help treat the diabetic dog are also recommended for prevention of the disease.Canine diabetes results from inadequate production of insulin by the islet cells in the dog's pancreas. This is typically due to genetic predisposition or in some cases,canine pancreatitis. Insulin enables glucose to pass into cells, where it is metabolized to produce energy. Insulin deficiency in dogs results in hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and glycosuria (high urine sugar). Approximately 1 in 160 dogs (0.67%) will have diabetes. As stated before all breeds can be affected. Breeds with the highest incidence ofcanine diabetes are known to be Golden Retrievers, German Shepherd Dogs, Miniature Schnauzers, Keeshonden, and Poodles. Females with the disease outnumber males by three to one. The average age of the onset of diabetes in dogs is 6 to 9 years. High glucose levels in the blood and urine Generally speaking your vet will direct you in a way to safely deal with diabetes via a daily regimen. The diabetic dogwill have to adhere to a daily plan, which likely will include: Calorie guidelines based on weight and activity level Interestingly, it is thought that dogs only get type I diabetes, where the pancreas Continue reading >>

Canine Diabetes Symptoms Explained

Canine Diabetes Symptoms Explained

If You Love Your Dog And Are WorriedCanine Diabetes Might Shorten His Or We can help if you have a problem feeding your diabetic dog, need accurate information, When your dog is first diagnosed, Vets will often offer good advice on the initial treatment but be aware that much of this advice is quoted from textbooks and very few Vets have experience of treating a diabetic dog in a home environment. Whilst there is no outright cure to diabetes in dogs, it can be controlled and our helpful guide give lots of useful information to help you and your pet to lead a near normal life. There are three forms of canine diabetes, all of which display very similar symptoms, the most noticeable being: Your dog drinks frequently / excessively. Your dog is often tired, lethargic or sleeps more often. Note that these symptoms are not exclusive to diabetes, but they are often the earliest signs detectable by owners. The increased urination is due to excess glucose which the animal is unable to process normally and so tries to get rid of by urinating. This frequent urination causes greater thirst, thus the animal must drink more frequently to replace the lost fluids. If the body cannot gain sufficient energy from the food consumed, it will burn stored fat resulting in a loss of body weight and ketones to become present. Weight loss in a diabetic dog which eats normally or even one with an increased appetite is not uncommon. Ketones levels in the bloodstream can be tested and treatment, usually dietary, administered. If left untreated this can lead to ketoacidosis which in serious cases can become an emergency condition leading to coma and even death. Normally active dogs which suddenly show signs of tiredness, no energy and take to sleeping a lot require urgent attention. An appointment s Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes is a chronic disease that can affect dogs and cats and other animals (including apes, pigs, and horses) as well as humans. Although diabetes cant be cured, it can be managed very successfully. Diabetes mellitus , or sugar diabetes, is the type of diabetes seen most often in dogs. It is a metabolism disorder. Metabolism refers to how the body converts food to energy. To understand what diabetes is, it helps to understand some of this process. The conversion of food nutrients into energy to power the bodys cells involves an ongoing interplay of two things: Glucose: essential fuel for the bodys cells. When food is digested, the body breaks down some of the nutrients into glucose, a type of sugar that is a vital source of energy for certain body cells and organs. The glucose is absorbed from the intestines into the blood, which then transports the glucose throughout the body. Insulin: in charge of fuel delivery. Meanwhile, an important organ next to the stomach called the pancreas releases the hormone insulin into the body. Insulin acts as a gatekeeper that tells cells to grab glucose and other nutrients out of the bloodstream and use them as fuel. With diabetes, the glucose-insulin connection isnt working as it should. Diabetes occurs in dogs in two forms: Insulin-deficiency diabetesThis is when the dogs body isnt producing enough insulin. This happens when the pancreas is damaged or otherwise not functioning properly. Dogs with this type of diabetes need daily shots to replace the missing insulin. This is the most common type of diabetes in dogs. Insulin-resistance diabetesThis is when the pancreas is producing some insulin, but the dogs body isnt utilizing the insulin as it should. The cells arent responding to the insulins message, so glucose isnt being pulled Continue reading >>

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