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Canine Diabetes Life Expectancy

The Introduction Of Successful Treatment Of Diabetes Mellitus With Insulin

The Introduction Of Successful Treatment Of Diabetes Mellitus With Insulin

Go to: The introduction of pancreatic extracts While Naunyn, Mering and Minkowski had focused on the pancreas as the seat of diabetes, Eugene Opie (1873–1971), a pathologist at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, made a further important advance by establishing the association between diabetes and destruction of the islets of Langerhans,10,11 and this observation stimulated research into the effects of administering pancreatic extracts. During the early 1900s in Aberdeen, Scotland, John Rennie and Thomas Fraser studied the effects in five patients with diabetes of giving an extract of “principal islets” (large islets forming separate globular aggregates made up mostly of endocrine pancreatic tissue present in some fishes (and snakes), but no convincing benefit was detected.12 At around the same time, in Belgium, J De Meyer (1878–1934) discovered an internal secretion produced by the islets,13,14 but his attempt to extract it from pancreatic tissue also failed. In Berlin, Georg Ludwig Zuelzer extracted animal pancreas with alcohol and saline, and, after first experimenting on rabbits, he gave injections of the extract to a dying diabetic patient. Although there seemed to be an initial improvement (no biochemical measurements were made), the extract was used up within a few days and the patient relapsed and died. He carried out further experiments,15 injecting five diabetic patients with pancreatic extract, but impurities caused fever. He spent a further three years trying to purify his extract. Zuelzer's method of extraction was subsequently developed by the pharmaceutical firm Hoechst and Zuelzer can justly be regarded as the first person to have achieved even partial success in finding a pancreatic extract with potential therapeutic value.16 Meanwhile, in Chic Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy For Dogs With Cushings Disease

Life Expectancy For Dogs With Cushings Disease

I'm a vet tech and have been for ten years so here goes... Careful monitoring of your pet at home during this treatment is of utmost importance as well as frequent communication with your veterinarian. Recheck appointments and repeat blood testing are necessary to make sure your pet is receiving the proper dose of medication and ensure s/he stays healthy. PLEASE CALL your VETERINARIAN IMMEDIATELY if your pet should develop anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea or lethargy while on Lysodren. If any of these symptoms are present, do NOT give any more Lysodren until you talk with the doctor. You may give prednisone as directed to help combat the anorexia and lethargy. but to answer your original question... The average life expectancy for dogs with adrenal dependent Hyperadrenocorticism (HAC) is 36 months. The average life expectancy for dogs with pituitary dependent HAC is approximately 30 months with younger dogs living longer Hope this helps samantha over a year ago We chose not to treat either. Our dog was also 11 at the time of diagnosis. He is now 12 1/2. I don't know how much longer he will be with us. The vet said he would have been gone a long time ago if we had not given him the "excellent nursing care" we have been giving him. These are the vet's words. In order to treat his constant diarrhea we boil chicken and brown rice. He eats almost a pint or more of brown rice a day and goes through a chicken about every two days. Also, I give him vitamins and try to monitor his salt and other electrolytes. He recently started on a bronchodialator called Theophylline to help with his breathing trouble. I can tell he is slowing down, but as long as he is still being silly and pesty, we just hang in there. We take it one day at a time. Marion over a year ago I read "two years from d Continue reading >>

Dogs With Diabetes

Dogs With Diabetes

Tweet Diabetes is one of the most common hormonal diseases in dogs. Diabetes in dogs can occur as young as 18 months of age. Most dogs are between seven and ten when canine diabetes diagnosis is made. Approximately 70% of dogs with diabetes are female. Any breed can be affected, but dachshunds, poodles, miniature schnauzers, cairn terriers, and springer spaniels are at increased risk. Interestingly, diabetes is seen very infrequently in Cocker Spaniels, shepherds, collies, and boxers. Canine Diabetes Signs What signs might your dog be exhibiting if he/she is diabetic? There are 3 clinical signs to look for: Diabetic patients usually show a marked increase in their water intake, along with an accompanying increase in urination. They frequently have excellent appetites, yet are losing weight. Finally, the sudden appearance of cataracts in the eyes suggests the possibility of underlying diabetes. As with most conditions, it is important to diagnose diabetes early in the disease. If you observe any of the above signs in your dog, don't hesitate to get her to your family veterinarian. Left undiagnosed and untreated, diabetic dogs can develop life-threatening secondary complications due to the metabolic derangements in their body. The diagnosis of diabetes is generally fairly simple. The presence of a high blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) and sugar in the urine (glucosuria) along with the appropriate clinical signs confirms the diagnosis. In dogs, normal blood sugar levels are 80 to 120, I have seen diabetic patients with values as high as 600. Treatment Although diagnosing diabetes is not demanding, treating it certainly is. That said, it is a treatable disease in dogs and most diabetic dogs can lead very high-quality lives. Virtually all dogs with diabetes require insulin Continue reading >>

Canine Diabetes Mellitus

Canine Diabetes Mellitus

Health Articles by Vickie Halstead RN, CVNS, CCRN, CEN, LNC The BFCA Health Committee is concerned that diabetes may be on the rise in Bichons, due to the gradual increase in reports in the last few years. Diabetes may be inherited but may also be an acquired or autoimmune disease. We are searching for a canine diabetes research project that may help answer this question. In the interim, at least we can inform you about the disease. Diabetes involves a deficiency in insulin that is produced in the pancreas, which impairs the ability of the tissues to use glucose, fats, and proteins. The prevalence in dogs is 1/400-500 and Bichons are currently not included in the breeds predisposed to this disease. The causes include genetic susceptibility, pancreatitis, immune-mediated destruction of the pancreas (due to the use of preventive medications for fleas and ticks and excessive vaccinations), Cushing’s disease, viral diseases, obesity, and some drugs can damage the pancreas such as Steroids. The most common clinical signs are increased water intake and accidents in the house due to excess urine volume. The disease seems to be more severe if it occurs at a younger age. Diabetes can be diagnosed by testing the blood glucose level, which will be high due to the lack of Insulin. Excess glucose will spill into the urine from the kidneys, which can also be tested via a urine sample. Diagnosis also involves ruling out another disease that presents with similar clinical signs, Fanconi Syndrome. The kidneys, due to a malfunction, spill glucose into the urine, but the blood glucose is not elevated. The BFCA health committee has received only one report of this syndrome, but be advised to ask your veterinarian about this disease if symptoms persist despite Insulin therapy. At this tim Continue reading >>

To Treat Or Not To Treat Cushing's Disease

To Treat Or Not To Treat Cushing's Disease

Over at Wellsphere, I had a heart-breaking question on one of my Cushing's Disease posts that I thought worth sharing here. The answer is from our esteemed veterinary consultant, Dr. Heather Carleton. Question: I have a minature schnauzer, Kizzie. She turned 11 in Feb. She was diagnosed with epilepsy at 3 and enlarged heart. She has been on 3 meds 2 times a day since. She has been to the vet hospital 3 times with pancreatitis and has cost me about $5,000 in medical bills. A couple of months ago she was diagnosed with Cushings. I love her very much, but am at the breaking point financially with her. She is a member of the family, but for now I have chosen not to treat her with the additional expensive meds that the vet wants to put her on. Do you know the life expectancy of a dog with cushings...with no treatment? She has just started loosing her fur in the past 2 weeks. She seems tired a lot and a bit weak, but other than that she is in good spirits and is not wimpering or anything like she is in any pain. From what I've read, the best to expect is 20-30 months...with meds...can't find anything out about without meds...If you know, I'd appreciate it! Answer: In general, a dog with untreated Cushing's can actually live as long as a treated dog, but will likely have more side effects (over time) from the disease if not treated. Usually treatment for Cushing's is not even recommended unless the dog has clinical signs because treatment does not necessarily change their overall life span - it just keeps them from being polyuric (urinating a lot), polydypsic (drinking a lot), losing their hair, etc. However, in this case, if the dog is showing signs of weakness, the Cushing's may be having a negative impact on the dog's heart condition, which would be a reason to treat her if Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus (water Diabetes) In Cats And Dogs

Diabetes Insipidus (water Diabetes) In Cats And Dogs

Overview of diabetes insipidus Most everyone is familiar with the term “diabetes;” it is a common human disease. But our four-legged friends can get diabetes, too. There are different types of diabetes, one being diabetes insipidus—an uncommon disorder that affects our pet’s ability to conserve water. Because of this disease, your dog or cat urinates and drinks water excessively in an attempt to keep up with the loss of water through the urine. There are two types of diabetes insipidus. One is due to the insufficient production of a hormone called antidiuretic hormone (ADH) that regulates the body’s ability to absorb water from the kidneys. The other form of diabetes insipidus is caused by the kidneys’ inability to respond to ADH. The kidneys are responsible for regulating the water in your pet’s body. So, without this hormone or the kidney’s response to it, your dog or cat can’t conserve water. Access to water is critical for pets with diabetes insipidus—without it, a dog or cat can become dehydrated in as little as 4–6 hours. Generally, diabetes insipidus is considered idiopathic, which means the ultimate cause is unknown. Possible causes include congenital issues, trauma, metabolic conditions, kidney disease, adverse reactions to certain medications, or tumors of the pituitary gland. Despite the underlying cause of diabetes insipidus, the symptoms are the same. They include: Diagnosis of diabetes insipidus Your veterinarian will perform a thorough physical exam and take a detailed history of your pet’s health. The symptoms of diabetes insipidus are very similar to other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus (“sugar diabetes”), Cushing’s syndrome, liver or kidney disease, Addison’s disease, and hypo-/hyperthyroidism. Your veterinarian may Continue reading >>

Hour 13: A Dog With Diabetes – Not A Tragic Tale

Hour 13: A Dog With Diabetes – Not A Tragic Tale

Blogathon 2010 donation badge and info is in the sidebar!→ I am so thankful for my guest bloggers and sponsors. Yay! This post addresses a very common problem: canine diabetes. It is not always fun, but it is manageable. Learn more from Natalie who writes at K9diabetes.com A Dog with Diabetes – Not a Tragic Tale My first diabetic pet wasn’t a dog. It was my cat, the cat I adopted a few years after dropping out of a microbiology major because I didn’t want to stick furry critters with sharp things. To say that I blanched at the idea of sticking a needle in her would be a huge understatement. I got the supplies, I practiced on an orange, I tried to think of any way at all that I could avoid giving her insulin injections because the thought of it made me want to pass out and throw up simultaneously. But I lived alone and she needed me so I finally did it. She… didn’t notice. So when our dog was diagnosed seven years later, I was over my needle phobia and worry about how our dog would react, common concerns when a dog gets a diabetes diagnosis. Six years ago I started participating in online forums for people with diabetic dogs and discovered that the vast majority of dogs have the same nonreaction. Another common worry is that dogs will suffer from organ failure, amputations, and heart attacks and strokes—the severe complications that human diabetics may experience as time goes on. People who have seen loved ones go through these heartwrenching side effects of diabetes especially worry that their pets will do the same. In what seems to be partly a function of their lifespan and partly species differences, dogs do not tend to suffer many complications as long as their diabetes is managed well. So take good care of your dog’s diabetes and she can live a norma Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dogs' Life Span

Diabetic Dogs' Life Span

Diabetic dogs have a deficiency of insulin or an excess of glucose in the blood flow, and they require treatment with insulin. The lifespan of a dog with diabetes will depend on several factors. However, if the condition is controlled and the dog is under constant monitoring, he may live a full life. Diabetes is a life threatening disease only if it is not identified and controlled. Dog Diabetes Dog diabetes is a disease that can be of two main types. The dog's body may have an excess amount of glucose which needs to be metabolized or the body doesn't produce sufficient amounts of insulin, which is responsible for metabolizing the glucose. Either way, the dog requires a supplementation of insulin to be able to lead a normal life. Injections should be administered as soon as the condition is detected. Detection of Diabetes and Prognosis The diabetes should be detected as early as possible and in this case, the dog can have a normal life. In some cases, an early detection of diabetes, accompanied by weight loss and a change in lifestyle, may reverse the diabetes and the dog can live a healthy life. If the condition advances, it can cause blindness and other severe complications, so watch out for symptoms such as bad breath, increased appetite and thirst accompanied by weight loss, and increased frequency of urination. Diabetic Dogs' Life Span The life span of a diabetic dog may depend on a few factors: The severity of the disease The early detection The treatment and whether the insulin dosage is suitable Diet and lifestyle Severity of Disease The disease can be genetic, and it can also be caused by obesity or a poor diet. The diabetes can be milder or more severe, depending on how great the insulin deficiency is. If the diabetes is more severe, the life span of the dog m Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs : Life Expectancy

Diabetes In Dogs : Life Expectancy

Not only common in human beings, diabetes in dogs is also on the increase. About one out of 500 canines have diabetic disease, according to research conducted on life expectancy of our pets. Regardless of the breed or age, any type of dog can be affected with this disease. In addition to the physiological effects of diabetes discussed below, the life expectancy of a diabetic dog would also be reduced due to related illness. Understanding the disease and knowing the symptoms can make a difference in the long run dogs diabetes treatment outcomes. Specifically, there are two types of diabetic disease in canines. The first type is diabetes insipidus, which is actually caused by a sudden lack of a specific hormone that controls sugar absorption in the kidneys. The other one is diabetes mellitus, which is caused by a sudden lack of insulin and is similar to what humans would experience. Both diseases are caused by a lack of a certain kind of hormone. What causes diabetes in dogs The main causative factor for the dog’s diabetes is a high level of carbohydrates in food. High levels of carbohydrates can cause diabetes and lead to other complications for canines. Many generic brands of pet food products are loaded with additives full of carbs. Such products are not only loaded with too many carbohydrates but also with addictive sugar sub-products. This unhealthy diet shortens the life cycle of your dog. Of course, the only way to prevent this from happening is to feed your pet healthy foods. Aside from carbohydrates in the diet, another causative factor for canine diabetes is genetics. Certain breeds tend to have diabetes because their parents have it. Genetic coding not only passes down the physical aspects of adults but also any known sicknesses to their infants. So, in the c Continue reading >>

Cataracts, Blindness, And Diabetic Dogs

Cataracts, Blindness, And Diabetic Dogs

Diabetic dogs can live healthy lives. Unfortunately, a common complication of diabetes in dogs is cataracts (cloudy lenses). In fact, 75% of dogs develop cataracts and blindness in both eyes within 9 months of being diagnosed with diabetes. The cataracts develop very quickly—sometimes overnight! If untreated, the cataracts cause intraocular inflammation called Lens-Induced Uveitis (LIU) that harms the eyes by causing glaucoma (increased intraocular pressure). If the LIU is uncontrolled and glaucoma develops, cataract surgery might not be possible. Glaucoma causes a chronic headache (similar to a migraine). In worst case scenarios, cataracts form rapidly in both eyes, the lens capsules split/rupture, severe LIU occurs resulting in glaucoma and severe painful intraocular inflammation (phacoclastic uveitis), and both eyes need to be surgically removed. This is a tragic outcome, and one to be avoided if possible. Thus, DO NOT WAIT until your dog’s diabetes is controlled, before seeing an ophthalmologist!! Another very important recommendation is that if your diabetic dog is started on a special canine antioxidant vision supplement BEFORE they develop cataracts, blindness can be prevented in many of these dogs. A 2012 clinical study in Great Britain found that diabetic dogs supplemented daily with this vision supplement did not develop blinding cataracts over a one-year period. This has also been Dr. McCalla’s clinical experience in diabetic dogs, as long as the diabetes remains well-controlled. If cataracts are developing in your diabetic dog, this is an ophthalmic emergency; you must have your pet examined by a veterinary ophthalmologist as soon as possible. To locate a veterinary ophthalmologist near you, please ask your family veterinarian or visit the ACVO website Continue reading >>

November Is Pet Diabetes Month

November Is Pet Diabetes Month

Merck Animal Health, a global research company dedicated to creating the best in pet pharmaceuticals, is hoping their latest “A Healthy Pet = A Happy Family” campaign will help make pet owners more aware of one of the most prevalent diseases in pets today: diabetes mellitus. This November, Merck is urging pet owners to join them in recognizing Pet Diabetes Month by educating themselves about this serious condition. “Pet owners should be aware of the possible warning signs of pet diabetes and see their veterinarians for a definitive diagnosis,” veterinarian Dr. Madeleine Stahl tells MarketWatch.com. “Considering the fact that pet diabetes can be effectively managed, lack of owner awareness may be the biggest risk factor associated with this condition.” Signs of the disease can be difficult to spot, and can even be mistaken as symptoms of other conditions, such as hypothyroidism or kidney disease. But as long as pet owners are educated and vigilant, early diagnosis is possible. Dogs and cats with diabetes usually sleep more, and are more lethargic during the day. Dogs with diabetes can have cloudy eyes, while cats may have thinning hair and weak hind legs. Pets with canine or feline diabetes also exhibit three additional symptoms — polydipsia, or increased water intake; polyuria, or increased urination; and polyphagia, or increased appetite. Sudden weight loss can sometimes be a good indicator that a dog or cat may have diabetes. Animals exhibiting these signs should see a veterinarian immediately; failure to treat diabetes in pets can lead to some devastating and life-threatening health issues. Risk factors for diabetes in dogs and cats include advanced age, genetic predisposition, breed, and obesity. That last factor — pet obesity — is on the rise here Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes In Dogs

Illustration of a dog's pancreas. Cell-islet in the illustration refers to a pancreatic cell in the Islets of Langerhans, which contain insulin-producing beta cells and other endocrine related cells. Permanent damage to these beta cells results in Type 1, or insulin-dependent diabetes, for which exogenous insulin replacement therapy is the only answer. Diabetes mellitus is a disease in which the beta cells of the endocrine pancreas either stop producing insulin or can no longer produce it in enough quantity for the body's needs. The condition is commonly divided into two types, depending on the origin of the condition: Type 1 diabetes, sometimes called "juvenile diabetes", is caused by destruction of the beta cells of the pancreas. The condition is also referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes, meaning exogenous insulin injections must replace the insulin the pancreas is no longer capable of producing for the body's needs. Dogs can have insulin-dependent, or Type 1, diabetes; research finds no Type 2 diabetes in dogs.[1][2][3] Because of this, there is no possibility the permanently damaged pancreatic beta cells could re-activate to engender a remission as may be possible with some feline diabetes cases, where the primary type of diabetes is Type 2.[2][4][5] There is another less common form of diabetes, diabetes insipidus, which is a condition of insufficient antidiuretic hormone or resistance to it.[6][7] This most common form of diabetes affects approximately 0.34% of dogs.[8] The condition is treatable and need not shorten the animal's life span or interfere with quality of life.[9] If left untreated, the condition can lead to cataracts, increasing weakness in the legs (neuropathy), malnutrition, ketoacidosis, dehydration, and death.[10] Diabetes mainly affects mid Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Labrador Dogs

Diabetes In Labrador Dogs

Labrador retrievers are one of the most popular dog breeds in the United States due to their reputation as loyal and friendly family dogs. Unfortunately, Labrador retrievers can also suffer from diabetes mellitus. This occurs due to the absence of, or insensitivity to, insulin. Diabetic Labrador retrievers must receive treatment when symptoms occur. Definition Diabetic Labrador retrievers are unable to produce enough insulin to prevent glucose production. This causes glucose concentration in the blood to rise and eventually allows the kidneys to leak glucose into the urine, according to Peter A. Graham BVMS, Ph.D. If high glucose levels continue, Labrador retrievers may suffer damage to the eyes, heart and blood vessels. Symptoms The most apparent clinical symptoms of diabetes are excessive urination due to the kidneys inability to dispose of excess glucose in the Labrador retriever's urine. The increase in urination will also cause an increase in water consumption, according to Graham. Other common signs include weight loss, cataracts, exercise intolerance and recurrent infections. Causes Diabetes can develop in Labrador retrievers due to predisposed genetics and environmental factors. Chronic pancreatitis is the cause of diabetes in 28 percent of diabetic dogs, according to Rebecca Price, M.D. The damage to the pancreas affects its ability to produce insulin. Pancreatitis is common in dogs that are fed a high-fat diet and are overweight, states Price. A pet owner can help prevent the onset of middle-aged diabetes in their Labrador retriever by ensuring it receives a healthy diet and regular exercise. Treatment Stabilization Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy Of A Dog With Diabetes

Life Expectancy Of A Dog With Diabetes

If your dog's been diagnosed with diabetes, don't assume he won't be around much longer. The life expectancy of a dog with diabetes depends on various factors, including his age at diagnosis. Your willingness to treat him by giving daily insulin injections and his response to them are major considerations in your pet's prognosis. Without treatment, dogs might develop diabetes-related conditions, including blindness, and likely will die from the disease. Canine diabetes mellitus occurs when a dog's pancreas no longer produces sufficient insulin, a hormone necessary for glucose regulation, or his body no longer uses it effectively. The result is a soaring level of blood sugar. Diabetes symptoms include excessive drinking and urination, with increased appetite but subsequent weight loss. Your dog's breath might smell unusually sweet, and he may develop skin infections. Eye issues, especially cataracts, could indicate diabetes. The disease most often appears in middle-aged and older canines, with overweight animals at a higher risk. Fortunately, insulin injections and dietary changes can allow your pet to live a relatively normal life. Proper treatment of a dog with diabetes is a big commitment. Your commitment to your dog affects his prognosis. It's not so much giving him the once or twice daily insulin injections along with his food, but maintaining a consistent schedule. If work or other obligations means you can't always give your dog his injection and food at approximately the same times each day, you'll have to find someone who can do it for you. That means vacations and business trips require extra planning for dog care. Your vet might know of a reputable pet sitter who can give your dog insulin injections. You must bring your dog to the vet for regular monitoring, e Continue reading >>

Canine Diabetes

Canine Diabetes

I am going to write about Canine Diabetes a very important issue that touched me and the life of my lovely poodle Gingy. Symptoms and Diagnosis She was always very happy and active doggy until one day when I started to notice that something is going wrong with her. I saw her drinking more water than usual, she started to urinate more frequently and not only outside the house, she started to pee all over the house including one day in my own bed. That day she was very upset and sad and I started to realize why on the last few days she was sleeping so much, she was lethargic, and in general I saw her very weak. Dr. Carlos Canino our Miami Veterinarian with our Gingy She was 7 years only.....I felt that something wrong was going on with her. I rushed with her to my Vet.Dr.Canino almost crying thinking that she had something very bad in her kidneys. Immediately he started with a complete physical examination and lab tests in order to diagnose the problem. Those are the words I heard him saying: Aliza, Your doggy thanks God has nothing wrong with her kidneys. But maybe it will be heartbreaking for you to hear that Gingy has Canine Diabetes Mellitus. We are very lucky that it was detected early and it is definitely treatable. Diabetes Mellitus is characterized by a deficiency of insulin, the hormone that plays a critical role in sugar metabolism, and this is the most common type also known as IDDM. There is no cure for diabetes, but it can be managed, especially if detected early and you keep attention to the symptoms. The treatment will be daily injections of insulin and a proper diet; there are no oral medications available for animals. The Veterinary will show you the proper way to administer the treatment and provide you with a time schedule and instructions for you to fo Continue reading >>

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