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Canine Diabetes Life Expectancy

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Studies show that female dogs (particularly non-spayed) are more prone to DKA, as are older canines. Diabetic ketoacidosis is best classified through the presence of ketones that exist in the liver, which are directly correlated to the lack of insulin being produced in the body. This is a very serious complication, requiring immediate veterinary intervention. Although a number of dogs can be affected mildly, the majority are very ill. Some dogs will not recover despite treatment, and concurrent disease has been documented in 70% of canines diagnosed with DKA. Diabetes with ketone bodies is also described in veterinary terms as diabetic ketoacidosis or DKA. It is a severe complication of diabetes mellitus. Excess ketone bodies result in acidosis and electrolyte abnormalities, which can lead to a crisis situation for your dog. If left in an untreated state, this condition can and will be fatal. Some dogs who are suffering from diabetic ketoacidosis may present as systemically well. Others will show severe illness. Symptoms may be seen as listed below: Change in appetite (either increase or decrease) Increased thirst Frequent urination Vomiting Abdominal pain Mental dullness Coughing Fatigue or weakness Weight loss Sometimes sweet smelling breath is evident Slow, deep respiration. There may also be other symptoms present that accompany diseases that can trigger DKA, such as hypothyroidism or Cushing’s disease. While some dogs may live fairly normal lives with this condition before it is diagnosed, most canines who become sick will do so within a week of the start of the illness. There are four influences that can bring on DKA: Fasting Insulin deficiency as a result of unknown and untreated diabetes, or insulin deficiency due to an underlying disease that in turn exacerba Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dogs' Life Span

Diabetic Dogs' Life Span

Diabetic dogs have a deficiency of insulin or an excess of glucose in the blood flow, and they require treatment with insulin. The lifespan of a dog with diabetes will depend on several factors. However, if the condition is controlled and the dog is under constant monitoring, he may live a full life. Diabetes is a life threatening disease only if it is not identified and controlled. Dog Diabetes Dog diabetes is a disease that can be of two main types. The dog's body may have an excess amount of glucose which needs to be metabolized or the body doesn't produce sufficient amounts of insulin, which is responsible for metabolizing the glucose. Either way, the dog requires a supplementation of insulin to be able to lead a normal life. Injections should be administered as soon as the condition is detected. Detection of Diabetes and Prognosis The diabetes should be detected as early as possible and in this case, the dog can have a normal life. In some cases, an early detection of diabetes, accompanied by weight loss and a change in lifestyle, may reverse the diabetes and the dog can live a healthy life. If the condition advances, it can cause blindness and other severe complications, so watch out for symptoms such as bad breath, increased appetite and thirst accompanied by weight loss, and increased frequency of urination. Diabetic Dogs' Life Span The life span of a diabetic dog may depend on a few factors: The severity of the disease The early detection The treatment and whether the insulin dosage is suitable Diet and lifestyle Severity of Disease The disease can be genetic, and it can also be caused by obesity or a poor diet. The diabetes can be milder or more severe, depending on how great the insulin deficiency is. If the diabetes is more severe, the life span of the dog m Continue reading >>

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Diabetes Life Expectancy

We work to develop and evaluate new ways to help people with single and multiple long-term conditions improve their health through better self-management. Diabetes Life Expectancy 3 JUNE 2009 169 A Wireless-Implantable Microsystem for Continuous Blood Glucose Monitoring and high blood sugar is so strong that doctors are now calling it the third type of diabetes. Diagnosing canine pancreatitis mationas in the case of neoplasia for examplecan cause pancreatic duct Dogs and cats can have different clinical what is symptoms of herpes jaw pain. Texas Diabetes Institute in San Antonio recommend and talk about what’s great and not so great in San Antonio and beyond. How can a person save money on diabetes medications and medical supplies? People should talk with their health care providers if they have problems paying for diabetes medications. Does anyone recommend a particular meter over others? I cannot go by “how I feel” that just won’t work. Case Study on social Security Numbers asap. Deadline: 5 January 2017 University of New York Type 2 diabetes tends to occur in older people above 40 years of age especially those who are obese. A diabetic lipid panel ranges for diabetics foot is a foot that exhibits any risk for diabetic foot ulceration; and patient education in order to promote foot self-examination and foot care Gestational Diabetes Diet Guidelines Journal Of Diabetes And Its Complications :: When you have diabetes High levels of baking soda soft pretzels blood sugar pull fluid from your tissues Palaas clave: Dao neuronal diabetes mellitus estrs oxidativo hipoglucemia muerte enceflica muerte Delicious warm little pumpkin spice pudding bundt cakes.mmmmm.. The initial score correlates with the severity of ain injury and prognosis. Diabetic Gastroparesis informat Continue reading >>

Genetic Welfare Problems Of Companion Animals

Genetic Welfare Problems Of Companion Animals

Diabetes Mellitus Related terms: Canine diabetes mellitus, DM, Diabetic Ketoacidosis VeNom term: Diabetes mellitus (VeNom code: 658). Related conditions: Cataract, Pancreatitis, Hyperadrenocorticism Outline: Diabetes mellitus is a hormonal disorder that occurs when there is a failure to adequately control blood sugar levels. Dogs that have the condition are unable to use blood sugar as an energy source for the cells in their body as they would normally, and therefore the level of sugar in the blood increases. The most common signs of diabetes mellitus are excessive thirst and urination with weight loss. The onset of diabetes mellitus occurs most commonly in middle aged or older dogs. Left untreated, diabetes mellitus can lead to complications including a severe illness called diabetic ketoacidosis where the body begins to break down body tissue, such as fats and muscle, to use as a source of energy in place of blood sugars. This process produces toxins that can cause dehydration, nausea and vomiting and can be life-threatening if left untreated. Diabetic dogs are generally reliant on dietary management and daily injections of the hormone insulin for the rest of their lives. There is evidence of a genetic basis for the development of diabetes mellitus, and the Yorkshire terrier dog breed has been shown to be at increased risk of the condition compared with the general dog population. Summary of Information (for more information click on the links below) 1. Brief description Diabetes mellitus is a hormonal disorder which results in high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Glucose is an important source of energy in the body. In animals that are diabetic, the cells in the body are unable to absorb glucose properly, and this leads to an increase in the blood. In dogs, t Continue reading >>

November Is Pet Diabetes Month

November Is Pet Diabetes Month

Merck Animal Health, a global research company dedicated to creating the best in pet pharmaceuticals, is hoping their latest “A Healthy Pet = A Happy Family” campaign will help make pet owners more aware of one of the most prevalent diseases in pets today: diabetes mellitus. This November, Merck is urging pet owners to join them in recognizing Pet Diabetes Month by educating themselves about this serious condition. “Pet owners should be aware of the possible warning signs of pet diabetes and see their veterinarians for a definitive diagnosis,” veterinarian Dr. Madeleine Stahl tells MarketWatch.com. “Considering the fact that pet diabetes can be effectively managed, lack of owner awareness may be the biggest risk factor associated with this condition.” Signs of the disease can be difficult to spot, and can even be mistaken as symptoms of other conditions, such as hypothyroidism or kidney disease. But as long as pet owners are educated and vigilant, early diagnosis is possible. Dogs and cats with diabetes usually sleep more, and are more lethargic during the day. Dogs with diabetes can have cloudy eyes, while cats may have thinning hair and weak hind legs. Pets with canine or feline diabetes also exhibit three additional symptoms — polydipsia, or increased water intake; polyuria, or increased urination; and polyphagia, or increased appetite. Sudden weight loss can sometimes be a good indicator that a dog or cat may have diabetes. Animals exhibiting these signs should see a veterinarian immediately; failure to treat diabetes in pets can lead to some devastating and life-threatening health issues. Risk factors for diabetes in dogs and cats include advanced age, genetic predisposition, breed, and obesity. That last factor — pet obesity — is on the rise here Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus (water Diabetes) In Cats And Dogs

Diabetes Insipidus (water Diabetes) In Cats And Dogs

Overview of diabetes insipidus Most everyone is familiar with the term “diabetes;” it is a common human disease. But our four-legged friends can get diabetes, too. There are different types of diabetes, one being diabetes insipidus—an uncommon disorder that affects our pet’s ability to conserve water. Because of this disease, your dog or cat urinates and drinks water excessively in an attempt to keep up with the loss of water through the urine. There are two types of diabetes insipidus. One is due to the insufficient production of a hormone called antidiuretic hormone (ADH) that regulates the body’s ability to absorb water from the kidneys. The other form of diabetes insipidus is caused by the kidneys’ inability to respond to ADH. The kidneys are responsible for regulating the water in your pet’s body. So, without this hormone or the kidney’s response to it, your dog or cat can’t conserve water. Access to water is critical for pets with diabetes insipidus—without it, a dog or cat can become dehydrated in as little as 4–6 hours. Generally, diabetes insipidus is considered idiopathic, which means the ultimate cause is unknown. Possible causes include congenital issues, trauma, metabolic conditions, kidney disease, adverse reactions to certain medications, or tumors of the pituitary gland. Despite the underlying cause of diabetes insipidus, the symptoms are the same. They include: Diagnosis of diabetes insipidus Your veterinarian will perform a thorough physical exam and take a detailed history of your pet’s health. The symptoms of diabetes insipidus are very similar to other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus (“sugar diabetes”), Cushing’s syndrome, liver or kidney disease, Addison’s disease, and hypo-/hyperthyroidism. Your veterinarian may Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Labrador Dogs

Diabetes In Labrador Dogs

Labrador retrievers are one of the most popular dog breeds in the United States due to their reputation as loyal and friendly family dogs. Unfortunately, Labrador retrievers can also suffer from diabetes mellitus. This occurs due to the absence of, or insensitivity to, insulin. Diabetic Labrador retrievers must receive treatment when symptoms occur. Definition Diabetic Labrador retrievers are unable to produce enough insulin to prevent glucose production. This causes glucose concentration in the blood to rise and eventually allows the kidneys to leak glucose into the urine, according to Peter A. Graham BVMS, Ph.D. If high glucose levels continue, Labrador retrievers may suffer damage to the eyes, heart and blood vessels. Symptoms The most apparent clinical symptoms of diabetes are excessive urination due to the kidneys inability to dispose of excess glucose in the Labrador retriever's urine. The increase in urination will also cause an increase in water consumption, according to Graham. Other common signs include weight loss, cataracts, exercise intolerance and recurrent infections. Causes Diabetes can develop in Labrador retrievers due to predisposed genetics and environmental factors. Chronic pancreatitis is the cause of diabetes in 28 percent of diabetic dogs, according to Rebecca Price, M.D. The damage to the pancreas affects its ability to produce insulin. Pancreatitis is common in dogs that are fed a high-fat diet and are overweight, states Price. A pet owner can help prevent the onset of middle-aged diabetes in their Labrador retriever by ensuring it receives a healthy diet and regular exercise. Treatment Stabilization Continue reading >>

What Is The Life Expectancy Of A Dog With Diabetes?

What Is The Life Expectancy Of A Dog With Diabetes?

Canine diabetes is similar to human diabetes, says Petalk. Diabetic dogs often require the same diagnosis, medications and monitoring as humans such as frequent injections and glucose monitoring. If left untreated, canine diabetes can be fatal, warns Petalk. Complications from untreated canine diabetes can also include blindness, liver problems, cataracts and kidney disease. Excessive urination, infections, cataracts, weight loss or gain, and exercise intolerance are all symptoms of canine diabetes, according to Petalk. Learn more about Veterinary Health Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms And Treatment

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms And Treatment

Diabetes in dogs is a complex disease caused by either a lack of the hormone insulin or an inadequate response to insulin. After a dog eats, his digestive system breaks food into various components, including glucose-which is carried into his cells by insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas. When a dog does not produce insulin or cannot utilize it normally, his blood sugar levels elevate. The result is hyperglycemia, which, if left untreated, can cause many complicated health problems for a dog. It is important to understand, however, that diabetes is considered a manageable disorder-and many diabetic dogs can lead happy, healthy lives. Diabetes can be classified as either Type 1 (lack of insulin production) or Type II (impaired insulin production along with an inadequate response to the hormone.) The most common form of the disease in dogs is Type 1, insulin-dependent diabetes, which occurs when the pancreas is incapable of producing or secreting adequate levels of insulin. Dogs who have Type I require insulin therapy to survive. Type II diabetes is found in cats and is a lack of normal response to insulin. The following symptoms should be investigated as they could be indicators that your dog has diabetes: Change in appetite Excessive thirst/increase in water consumption Weight loss Increased urination Unusually sweet-smelling or fruity breath Lethargy Dehydration Urinary tract infections Vomiting Cataract formation, blindness The exact cause of diabetes is unknown. However, autoimmune disease, genetics, obesity, chronic pancreatitis, certain medications and abnormal protein deposits in the pancreas can play a major role in the development of the disease. It is thought that obese dogs and female dogs may run a greater risk of developing diabetes later in life (6-9 Continue reading >>

Dogs With Diabetes

Dogs With Diabetes

Tweet Diabetes is one of the most common hormonal diseases in dogs. Diabetes in dogs can occur as young as 18 months of age. Most dogs are between seven and ten when canine diabetes diagnosis is made. Approximately 70% of dogs with diabetes are female. Any breed can be affected, but dachshunds, poodles, miniature schnauzers, cairn terriers, and springer spaniels are at increased risk. Interestingly, diabetes is seen very infrequently in Cocker Spaniels, shepherds, collies, and boxers. Canine Diabetes Signs What signs might your dog be exhibiting if he/she is diabetic? There are 3 clinical signs to look for: Diabetic patients usually show a marked increase in their water intake, along with an accompanying increase in urination. They frequently have excellent appetites, yet are losing weight. Finally, the sudden appearance of cataracts in the eyes suggests the possibility of underlying diabetes. As with most conditions, it is important to diagnose diabetes early in the disease. If you observe any of the above signs in your dog, don't hesitate to get her to your family veterinarian. Left undiagnosed and untreated, diabetic dogs can develop life-threatening secondary complications due to the metabolic derangements in their body. The diagnosis of diabetes is generally fairly simple. The presence of a high blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) and sugar in the urine (glucosuria) along with the appropriate clinical signs confirms the diagnosis. In dogs, normal blood sugar levels are 80 to 120, I have seen diabetic patients with values as high as 600. Treatment Although diagnosing diabetes is not demanding, treating it certainly is. That said, it is a treatable disease in dogs and most diabetic dogs can lead very high-quality lives. Virtually all dogs with diabetes require insulin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus In Dogs

Diabetes Insipidus In Dogs

Overview of Diabetes Insipidus in Dogs Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a metabolic disorder characterized by excessive, extreme urination, and accompanied by undue thirst. It is either caused by impaired production of a hormone called ADH (anti-diuretic hormone) from the brain (central DI), or an impaired ability of the kidney to respond properly to the ADH (nephrogenic DI). Central DI can occur if there is damage to the part of the brain that makes the ADH. Trauma or cancer would be potential causes of this kind of damage. Most cases are “idiopathic”; in other words, there is no known cause. Nephrogenic (originating from the kidneys) DI is a very rare congenital disorder that also occurs for no known reason. There is no apparent age, gender, or breed predilection for DI. Most cases occur in dogs; cats are rarely affected. As long as dogs with DI have unlimited access to water and are in an environment where excessive urination is not a problem, most dogs do fine and have an excellent life expectancy. What to Watch For Symptoms of Diabetes Insipidus in Dogs may include: Severe, excessive urination Insatiable desire to drink water Stupor, disorientation, lack of coordination, or seizures if a brain tumor is the primary cause Diagnosis of Diabetes Insipidus in Dogs Diagnostic tests are needed to rule out other common causes of excessive thirst and urination, including: Complete medical history and physical examination Complete blood count Serum biochemistry panel Urinalysis X-rays or ultrasound Bile acid test Urine culture Tests of the adrenal gland Thyroid hormone test Modified water deprivation test is the most important test for confirming a diagnosis of diabetes insipidus Treatment of Diabetes Insipidus in Dogs If therapy is necessary, treatment for diabetes insipidus Continue reading >>

Managing Canine Diabetes

Managing Canine Diabetes

What do I need? A refrigerator to store your insulin. A suitable balanced diet for your dog. See Diabetes diets . Home monitoring equipment, if advised by your veterinarian. See Monitoring. Good communication with your veterinarian. Commitment to the long-term treatment of your pet Living with a diabetic dog Once a dog with diabetes has been stabilised on insulin treatment, it is usually able to lead a happy, healthy life. The life expectancy of your diabetic dog stabilised on insulin is similar to that of other healthy pets of the same breed. Good communication between you and your veterinarian, and adherence to the treatment regimen, will help keep your pet healthy. Both of you can continue to enjoy life together for many years. Continue reading >>

Endocrinology: Diabetes In Dogs

Endocrinology: Diabetes In Dogs

YVCipedia ENDOCRINE (HORMONES) DIABETES IN DOGS THE PROBLEM AND CAUSES Insulin is a hormone that is produced in the pancreas; it is responsible for regulating blood sugar. Without enough insulin blood sugar levels become abnormally high. This medical problem is diabetes. In dogs, the cause of diabetes is almost always insufficient insulin production by the pancreas. For any individual dog there almost certainly are multiple causes occuring simultaneously that lead to diabetes. Among the possible causes are: genetics - certain breeds are predisposed infection - urinary tract infections and periodontal disease in particular predispose to diabetes drugs - corticosteroids and other drugs can predispose to diabetes obesity - possibly the greatest risk factor and complicating factor for diabetes pancreatitis - inflammation in the pancreas can lead to decreased insulin production immune-mediated disease - various diseases resulting from severe over-activity of a patient's immune system SIGNS AND DIAGNOSIS Most dogs are between 7 and 9 years old when diabetes is diagnosed. The most common signs are increased thirst and urination, increased appetite, and weight loss. We diagnose diabetes by the patient's history and physical exam, and documenting simultaneous high blood and urine glucose (sugar). Once the diagnosis is made we must then thoroughly screen the patient for co-existing and complicating illness. The tests we usually perform in order to do this include: blood tests - a general blood profile and pancreatic testing urine tests - a general urine profile and bacterial culture for urinary tract infection abdominal x-rays and ultrasound - to screen for liver, pancreatic and urinary tract diseases in particular other tests may be indicated based on the health status of the in Continue reading >>

Canine Diabetes

Canine Diabetes

I am going to write about Canine Diabetes a very important issue that touched me and the life of my lovely poodle Gingy. Symptoms and Diagnosis She was always very happy and active doggy until one day when I started to notice that something is going wrong with her. I saw her drinking more water than usual, she started to urinate more frequently and not only outside the house, she started to pee all over the house including one day in my own bed. That day she was very upset and sad and I started to realize why on the last few days she was sleeping so much, she was lethargic, and in general I saw her very weak. Dr. Carlos Canino our Miami Veterinarian with our Gingy She was 7 years only.....I felt that something wrong was going on with her. I rushed with her to my Vet.Dr.Canino almost crying thinking that she had something very bad in her kidneys. Immediately he started with a complete physical examination and lab tests in order to diagnose the problem. Those are the words I heard him saying: Aliza, Your doggy thanks God has nothing wrong with her kidneys. But maybe it will be heartbreaking for you to hear that Gingy has Canine Diabetes Mellitus. We are very lucky that it was detected early and it is definitely treatable. Diabetes Mellitus is characterized by a deficiency of insulin, the hormone that plays a critical role in sugar metabolism, and this is the most common type also known as IDDM. There is no cure for diabetes, but it can be managed, especially if detected early and you keep attention to the symptoms. The treatment will be daily injections of insulin and a proper diet; there are no oral medications available for animals. The Veterinary will show you the proper way to administer the treatment and provide you with a time schedule and instructions for you to fo Continue reading >>

To Treat Or Not To Treat Cushing's Disease

To Treat Or Not To Treat Cushing's Disease

Over at Wellsphere, I had a heart-breaking question on one of my Cushing's Disease posts that I thought worth sharing here. The answer is from our esteemed veterinary consultant, Dr. Heather Carleton. Question: I have a minature schnauzer, Kizzie. She turned 11 in Feb. She was diagnosed with epilepsy at 3 and enlarged heart. She has been on 3 meds 2 times a day since. She has been to the vet hospital 3 times with pancreatitis and has cost me about $5,000 in medical bills. A couple of months ago she was diagnosed with Cushings. I love her very much, but am at the breaking point financially with her. She is a member of the family, but for now I have chosen not to treat her with the additional expensive meds that the vet wants to put her on. Do you know the life expectancy of a dog with cushings...with no treatment? She has just started loosing her fur in the past 2 weeks. She seems tired a lot and a bit weak, but other than that she is in good spirits and is not wimpering or anything like she is in any pain. From what I've read, the best to expect is 20-30 months...with meds...can't find anything out about without meds...If you know, I'd appreciate it! Answer: In general, a dog with untreated Cushing's can actually live as long as a treated dog, but will likely have more side effects (over time) from the disease if not treated. Usually treatment for Cushing's is not even recommended unless the dog has clinical signs because treatment does not necessarily change their overall life span - it just keeps them from being polyuric (urinating a lot), polydypsic (drinking a lot), losing their hair, etc. However, in this case, if the dog is showing signs of weakness, the Cushing's may be having a negative impact on the dog's heart condition, which would be a reason to treat her if Continue reading >>

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