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Candy That Diabetics Can Have

Diabetes And Candy, Oh My! A Diabetics Guide To Sweets On Valentines Day

Diabetes And Candy, Oh My! A Diabetics Guide To Sweets On Valentines Day

When you have diabetes, special events like Valentine’s Day can leave you feeling a bit like an outsider. It just seems like everywhere you go people are exchanging chocolate and candy gifts. And if you take an outing to the store, you’re confronted by…you guessed it, more candy and chocolate treats! As a diabetic you likely know that sugar and carbs are the thing that influences your blood sugar levels the most. If you’re motivated to keep your blood sugar levels under control, you’ll also know that eating too much sugar is not going to end well for you overall. So what are you to do? Are you destined to feel like an outsider on occasions such as these? Or, are there ways you can still eat candy, sweets and treats guilt free? Well, I’ve got some good news for you. You can still enjoy special events and keep your health on track too. Here are a few tips to help you do that. The surest way to avoid eating too much sugar is to make sure you read food labels. Check the ingredients and try choosing items with the healthiest ingredients possible. Also, check the carbohydrate amount and calculate this into your daily or per meal intake to ensure you maintain good control. Though sugar and carbs do influence blood sugar levels the most, this doesn’t mean you have to avoid sugar all the time. You’re not suddenly going to keel over and die if you eat sugar in small portions. Eating one of your all time favorite candies, or indulging in a few mouthfuls of cake or dessert can sometimes help you enjoy social events without feeling like an outsider. Just don’t overdo it! Make it small portions and savor every delicious mouthful. Many diabetics (and loved ones) think it’s just white sugar that causes an issue with blood sugar, but this isn’t the case. Be aware Continue reading >>

Eat This, Not That: A Diabetics’ Guide To Halloween Candy

Eat This, Not That: A Diabetics’ Guide To Halloween Candy

This Halloween, treat yourself, instead of tricking your waistline and blood sugar levels. Don’t let trick-or-treating with the kids become a ghoulish afterthought come November 1. Thanks to Diabetic Living, here is a guide to the most popular Halloween candy that won’t spike your blood sugar into nightmarish values. So the question is–‘is that candy a…..TRICK? OR A TREAT?‘ _________________________________________________________ Winner–Kit Kat Bar Generally speaking, ‘Fun Size’ candy bars are always the better option when it comes to enjoying candy. Kit Kats are wafer-based chocolate bar and as we all know from the jingle, they are breakable into pieces. TRICK Reese’s Peanut Butter cup: 1 piece (0.74 ounce)=105 calories, 6.5 g fat, 12 g carbs, 10.5 g sugar TREAT Kit Kat: 1 snack-size bar (0.53 ounce)=70 calories, 4 g fat, 9 g carbs, 7 g sugar _________________________________________________________ Winner–Almond M&Ms Regular milk chocolate are sugar-and carb- dense. With almonds added into the chocolately goodness, 3 grams of carbs & sugar are saved with each bite. You can’t go wrong with almonds either. Added heart-healthy fats into the great taste of chocolate, it’s almost like you’d be doing your body a dishonor if you didn’t indulge! TRICK Milk Chocolate M&Ms: 1 snack-size bag (21 g)=104 calories, 4.3 g fat, 3 g saturated fat, 15 g carb, 13 g sugar TREAT Almond M&Ms: 1 snack-size bag (21 g)=110 calories, 6 g far, 2 g saturated far, 12 g carb, 10 g sugar Winner–Hershey’s Dark Chocolate with Almonds Heart-healthy antioxidants can be found in dark chocolate, making the delicious treat that much more tantalizing. Though it may not seem like brands make a difference if the treat is labeled ‘dark chocolate’, however, Dove chocolate Continue reading >>

Desserts And Sweets For Diabetics

Desserts And Sweets For Diabetics

Get our comprehensive list of the best desserts and sweets for people with diabetes. Having diabetes doesn't mean you can never have dessert again. With some simple swaps and diabetic-friendly dessert recipes, you can satisfy your sweet tooth without sending your blood sugar soaring. Desserts may seem off-limits since many are high in sugar, but remember that for people with diabetes the total number of carbohydrates of a meal or snack matters more than the total sugar. That means dessert can still fit into your diet—with a few adjustments. Before you head to the kitchen, here are a few dessert guidelines and some of our favorite sweets that fit into a diabetic diet. If you opt for something sweet after dinner, you might want to skip the starch at your meal to keep your total carbs in check. But remember that, while exchanging your sweet potato for cheesecake can keep your carb intake steady, you'll lose the fiber, vitamins and other good-for-you nutrients that the sweet potato would provide. It's not a good idea to indulge in dessert every night; instead, enjoy desserts in moderation. The American Diabetes Association recommends that most people with diabetes aim for 45-60 grams of carbohydrates per meal. Unfortunately, a bakery-sized cookie can contain 60 grams of carbs alone. Choose a smaller portion, and you can still enjoy something sweet without using up your allotted carbohydrates for the meal. One of these Almond Cookies has only 9 grams of carbohydrates. While making desserts with artificial sweeteners can help you cut down on calories and carbs, it's a better idea to try to reduce your total sweetener consumption (from both sugar and noncaloric sources). Because artificial sweeteners are much sweeter than sugar, they may enhance your craving for sweets. They Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Candy Not only do high-sugar foods like candy, cookies, syrup, and soda lack nutritional value, but these low-quality carbohydrates also cause a dramatic spike in blood sugar levels and can contribute to weight gain, both of which can worsen diabetes complications. Learn to satisfy your sweet tooth by snacking on high-quality carbohydrates such as fresh fruit. Apples, berries, pears, grapes, and oranges all have sweet, juicy flavors and are packed with fiber to help slow the absorption of glucose, making them a much better choice for blood sugar control. When snacking on fruit, pair it with a protein food, such as a string cheese, nonfat yogurt, or handful of nuts, to further reduce the impact on your blood sugar. (For more sweet ideas, see my list of 20 Low-Sugar Snack ideas). Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dessert

Diabetes And Dessert

Eating desserts with diabetes A popular misconception about diabetes is that it is caused by eating too many sugary foods. While sweets can and do affect your blood sugar, they do not cause you to develop diabetes. However, when you have diabetes, you must carefully monitor your carbohydrate intake. This is because carbohydrates are responsible for raising your blood sugar levels. While you can enjoy sugary foods when you have diabetes, it is important to do so in moderation and with some understanding of how it could impact your blood sugar. This includes sugars found in desserts. 10 Diabetes Diet Myths » When you have diabetes, your body is either not able to use insulin correctly or not able to make any or enough insulin. Some people with diabetes experience both of these issues. Problems with insulin can cause sugar to build up in your blood since insulin is responsible for helping sugar move from the blood and into the body’s cells. Foods that contain carbohydrates raise blood sugar. Carbohydrates need to be regulated when you have diabetes to help you manage your blood sugar. On nutrition labels, the term “carbohydrates” includes sugars, complex carbohydrates, and fiber. In desserts, a number of sweet-tasting ingredients can be added to enhance sweetness. While some foods, such as fruits, naturally contain sugars, most desserts have some type of sugar added to them. Many dessert labels will not list “sugar” as a key ingredient. Instead, they will list the ingredient as one or more of the following: dextrose fructose high-fructose corn syrup lactose malt syrup sucrose white granulated sugar honey agave nectar glucose maltodextrin These sugar sources are carbohydrates and will raise your blood sugar. They can be found in cookies, cakes, pies, puddings, ca Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes Can Eat Candy

Children With Diabetes Can Eat Candy

Halloween is just around the corner, and every year at this time I think of the unfortunate situation the parents of young children find themselves in as they face a giant candy celebration. It’s pretty much a nutritional nightmare. If you’re like me, you work hard to keep your children’s candy consumption to a minimum. You avoid having candy at home so the temptation isn’t there, but then comes Halloween and suddenly a plastic pumpkin filled with enough candy for the entire year gets dumped onto the kitchen table. What’s a parent to do? The candy situation is even more complicated for parents of children with diabetes. Not only are they faced with all of the candy, they have to figure out how to bolus for it. Factor in the candy they saw their child eat. Factor in the candy they think their child ate when no one was looking. Factor in how much their child walked (or ran) while trick-or-treating. Factor in the candy their child is about to eat. What parents face is a bolus nightmare hand-in-hand with the nutritional one. I had the opportunity to talk to about this with an expert, Dr. William Tamborlane, Professor and Chief of Pediatric Endocrinology at Yale School of Medicine. When I asked Dr. Tamborlane how he thinks parents of children with diabetes should handle Halloween, his answer was definitely not “no candy.” “Things have changed a lot since I started caring for children with type 1 diabetes more than 35 years ago,” Dr. Tamborlane said. “Then our kids weren’t allowed to eat sweets. The idea was that simple sugars pushed the blood sugar levels up too quickly for the old fashioned insulins to cover it. Kids were only supposed to eat starches because it took longer for these carbohydrates to be digested and absorbed. Much later we found out th Continue reading >>

The Best (and Worst) Halloween Candies For Diabetics

The Best (and Worst) Halloween Candies For Diabetics

Peanut butter cups. Chocolate bars. Fruity, gummy…things. Halloween and the days surrounding this sugar-infested holiday are chock full of an enormous assortment of antagonizing morsels of sweet, delicious candy. Now, if you can resist all of it—from the Snickers bars to the Skittles—you’re my hero, and you deserve a medal. But if you’re like the rest of us, there comes a time when all your will power has been depleted, and you just want a little taste of one of those fun-sized snacks. A tiny bite or two never hurt anyone, right? Depends on what you’re biting into. Believe it or not, some candies are better for those with diabetes than others. To help you make the best candy decisions this year, we’ve put together an infographic that ranks the Halloween favorites, taking into account the number of carbs and the number of calories you’ll be sacrificing for one tantalizing taste. To make it easy to find what you like best, we have a top 10 chocolate candies list as well as a top 10 non-chocolate candies list. And, we’ve even thrown in a few of our personal recommendations for what you should have on hand instead of the usual Halloween fare. Before you go crazy with the candy, it’s important to note that a low carb count isn’t everything. For example, a small Tootsie Roll only has two carbs … but it’s, you know, small. Something a bit bigger, with a few more carbs, might be more your style. Like, say, a Hershey’s milk chocolate bar—fun size of course—with 7.6 carbs. Whatever your style of Halloween snack, we’re sure you’ll find something to savor on our list, and we hope the carb counts help you make the best choices this year. But did we leave your favorite indulgence out? Let us know in the comments! Check out The Best (and Worst) Hall Continue reading >>

Is Sugar-free Candy The Best Choice If You Have Diabetes?

Is Sugar-free Candy The Best Choice If You Have Diabetes?

If you have  diabetes  you may feel like sugar is your enemy. But when you have a hankering for something sweet, is sugar-free candy a healthy option? Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy In this Q and A, registered dietitian Anna Taylor, MS, RD, LD, CDE , answers our questions and discusses what you need to know about sugary treats and other foods that use sugar substitutes. Q: Should people with diabetes eat candy with or without sugar? A: About 90 percent of your diet should focus on healthy foods like fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains, poultry and fish. There is wiggle room in a healthful diet for treats like sweets whether you have diabetes or not. That is where candy would fit. You should enjoy your food — and food also has social, emotional and physical health benefits. Built into the recommended dietary guidelines is room for getting up to 10 percent of your calories from sugar every day. Treats affect your blood sugar. So if you have  diabetes , it’s important to focus on portion control and moderation when you select these foods. In other words, you can eat treats even if you have diabetes. But you need to account for the carbohydrate and calorie content they provide in your diet whether they are sugar-free or not. Q: How much sugar should you allow in your daily diet? A: Everyone with diabetes is different, but here’s what the American Heart Association recommends: No more than 25 grams of added sugar (about six teaspoons or 100 calories) daily for women No more than 36 grams (about nine teaspoons or 150 calories) of added sugar per day for men Q: How does sugar-free candy affect your body? A: Some sugar Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Sugar Free Candy?

Can Diabetics Eat Sugar Free Candy?

One of the most persistent myths is that sugar is off limits to people with diabetes. In reality, if you have diabetes, you can enjoy foods like desserts provided you keep within an overall healthy eating plan. But be wary of claims about sugar-free products like candy. They may have a few less carbohydrates, but often they have just as many calories and fat. In addition, they may contain sources of carbohydrates other than sugar. Sugar-free candies can also cause stomach upset. To safely enjoy sugar-free candy, you need to plan ahead and ensure you stay within the guidelines set by your health care provider or dietitian. Video of the Day Sugar Free Is Not Carb Free You may think sugar-free candy is a healthier alternative. You may need to think again, and you definitely need to read the label. All sugar-free foods are not created equal. Some sugar-free candy is not lower in carbs than the regular version. In addition, sugar isn’t the only kind of carbohydrate. Sugar-free candy may contain starch, fiber, and mostly likely a sugar alcohol. Harvard’s Joslin Diabetes Center says sugar alcohols aren’t technically “sugar” but can be high in carbohydrates. Bottom line -- there’s no substitute for being fully educated on everything that’s in the food you’re eating. The American Diabetes Association says you don’t have to rule out candy, provided you work it into your meal plan. For example, you could have candy as a substitute for another carbohydrate-containing food. This will help keep your blood sugar steady and prevent you from feeling deprived. Remember, candy has little nutritional value. The idea is indulge once in a while, in moderation and so as not to exceed your total calories and carbohydrate goals. The association’s website for children with di Continue reading >>

What Kind Of Candy Can You Eat With Diabetes?

What Kind Of Candy Can You Eat With Diabetes?

home / what kind of candy can a diabetic eat article What Kind of Candy Can You Eat With Diabetes? Medical Author: Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) is an Attending Physician with the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and Associate Director of Clinical Research, Recruitment and Phenotyping with the Center for Androgen Related Disorders, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stppler, MD Melissa Conrad Stppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology. I have diabetes. If I want to eat a candy bar, for example, is there a way to calculate how much insulin I could take to knock out the sugar in the candy bar? Well, the correct answer is that a person with diabetes really is not restricted to eating certain foods, so while a candy bar may not be the best choice nutritionally, an occasional indulgence is understandable. A candy bar usually has about 220-250 calories and somewhere between 25-30 grams of carbohydrates. On average, most patients with diabetes require one unit of insulin for every 10-15 grams of carbohydrates they eat. So you could try two units of a short acting insulin and see how you do. However, it is really important that you meet with a diabetes educator/nutritionist to see what your insulin ratios are, and what your sensitivity is.You sho Continue reading >>

What Candy Can People With Diabetes Eat And How Much Is Safe?

What Candy Can People With Diabetes Eat And How Much Is Safe?

Think candy is off-limits simply because you have diabetes? Not a chance! “I encourage people with diabetes to remember that a diabetes diet is really just a healthier diet,” says Rainie Carter, RD, CDE, who is in private practice in Birmingham, Alabama. She suggests thinking of candy as a dessert, versus a snack. “Changing that mentality allows people to think about eating candy in smaller portions. We are typically fuller from the meal and therefore eat less candy or sweets than we would have before.” And you don’t necessarily need to reach for a sugar-free version, which can contain tummy-upsetting sugar alcohols. “Our bodies need carbohydrates throughout the day — and candy can be a delicious, festive, enjoyable source of it on occasion,” says Meg Salvia, RDN, CDE, the owner of Meg Salvia Nutrition in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Just eat the candy in moderation: The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend limiting added sugars, the type of sugar present in candy bars, to less than 10 percent of daily calories. So if you’re having 2,000 calories a day, that would be no more than 200 calories from added sugar (about two fun-size packs of peanut M&M’s). And people with diabetes have other considerations, too — more on those next. Next time you come across fun-size candy — whether it’s because you bought it yourself, you’re digging through your child’s trick-or-treat bag, you’re hosting a birthday party with a piñata, or you’re rummaging through the office candy bowl — here’s what you need to know about making the best candy choices if you have diabetes. Learning How Carbs in Candy Affect Blood Sugar Is Key First off, how does the sugar in candy affect you? It’s actually pretty cool. “Sugar begins to be digested as Continue reading >>

The Truth About Sweets And Diabetes

The Truth About Sweets And Diabetes

1. Sweets like candy and cake are off-limits if you have diabetes. FALSE Sweet treats -- like candies, pies, cakes -- were once off-limits for people with diabetes. Not anymore. In fact, research has shown that starches like potatoes and white bread affect blood glucose levels much like sugar -- causing sometimes dangerous spikes in blood sugar. Carbohydrates found in most vegetables or whole grains don't affect blood sugar as much. Counting carbs and choosing the healthiest of them is more important than eliminating sugar altogether. A little sweet treat is OK. If you're at a wedding, for instance, you can have a small slice of cake -- very small. Just substitute it for another starchy carb you might eat, like a small potato or a piece of bread. If you really have a sweet tooth, choose desserts, candy, and sodas made with sugar substitutes. Many artificial sweeteners have no carbs or calories, so you don't need to count them in your meal plan. Others have carbohydrates that are absorbed into the blood more slowly than table sugar, so they don't pose a threat to your blood sugar levels. But once you come off sugar and sweeteners for a few weeks, your body and taste buds will adapt, and you won’t need or crave as much sweetness. Fruits and other natural foods will taste sweeter and more satisfying. 2. A glass of wine with dinner is fine for people with diabetes. TRUE ADVERTISINGinRead invented by Teads Within limits, alcohol is OK. But there are exceptions. You shouldn't drink if your blood sugar levels aren't under control or if you have nerve damage from diabetes. If you do drink, keep portions modest: up to one drink a day for women, or up to two drinks a day for men. Remember, one serving is: Five ounces of wine, or 12 ounces of beer, or 1.5 ounces of hard liquor 3 Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating with Diabetes: Desserts and Sweets By Amy Poetker, Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator 11/22/2010 Id be willing to bet that most everyone has been toldand therefore believesthat people with diabetes cannot have any sugar and are resigned to living without dessert for the rest of their lives. Well, as a Certified Diabetes Educator, I'm here to tell you that this is a myth. People with diabetes can eat sugar, desserts, and almost any food that contains caloric sweeteners (molasses, honey, maple syrup, and more). Why? Because people with diabetes can eat foods that contain carbohydrates, whether those carbohydrates come from starchy foods like potatoes or sugary foods such as candy. Its best to save sweets and desserts for special occasions so you dont miss out on the more nutritious foods your body needs. However, when you do decide to include a sweet treat, make sure you keep portions small and use your carbohydrate counting plan . The idea that people with diabetes should avoid sugar is decades old. Logically, it makes sense. Diabetes is a condition that causes high blood sugar. Sugary foods cause blood sugar levels to increase. Therefore people with diabetes should avoid sugary foods in order to prevent hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and keep their diabetes under control. However, simply avoiding sugary foods does not go very far in terms of controlling blood sugar. Here's why. After you eat, your blood sugar level (aka postprandial blood glucose level) is largely determined by the total amount of carbohydrate you ate, not the source of the carbohydrates eaten. There are two types of carbohydrates that elevate your blood sugar levels: sugar and starch. Both will elevate your blood glucose to roughly the same level (assuming you ate the same a Continue reading >>

Sugar Free Belgian Chocolate Blog - Diabetic Candy - Type 2 Diabetes Candy

Sugar Free Belgian Chocolate Blog - Diabetic Candy - Type 2 Diabetes Candy

22.03.2018 Comments Posted By Amber Lyn For those with type 2 diabetes candy might come with a love/hate relationship. Even if you prefer savory foods to sweet, everyone has a sweet tooth every once in a while. And what happens to someone with type 2 diabetes when they get a craving for candy? Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and happens when the body is unable to use the insulin produced as well as it should. Doctors call this insulin resistance. When this happens the pancreas makes more insulin to help get glucose into the cells. Unfortunately, it’s unable to keep up with this and the sugar builds up in the blood instead. When you eat candy, it spikes your blood sugar even higher. Glucose acts as fuel for the cells in your body however, too much glucose can start behaving like a slow-acting poison. When blood sugar levels are high it begins to slowly erode the cells ability to make insulin. The pancreas tries to overcompensate by producing too much insulin, which causes permanent damage. What happens to those with type 2 diabetes that love candy? Spiking blood sugar levels isn’t ideal. So grab candy that type 2 diabetics can eat without worry. Amber Lyn has a full line of sugar free and no sugar added candy that won’t spike your blood sugar. Amber Lyn’s sugar free candy includes a full line of chocolates from bars to bites, and truffles to chocolate covered almonds. Not only is Amber Lyn famous for their sugar free chocolate, but their newest introductions to their diabetic friendly candy includes sugar free caramels and five different sugar free gummi options. We truly believe that those with type 2 diabetes can still enjoy the best quality and best tasting candy. Just because your candy is sugar free doesn’t mean it has to taste bland o Continue reading >>

Candy Day: Life With Type 1 Diabetes

Candy Day: Life With Type 1 Diabetes

My favorite kinds of candy are Butterfinger bars, jawbreakers, candy corn, and Tootsie Rolls — the vanilla kind. Our house is a goldmine of candy. With three kids under 15, we have candy year-round, between Halloween, Christmas, Valentine’s Day, Easter, and end-of-the-school-year parties. Of course I don’t eat the candy because I have Type 1 diabetes (except when my hands are shaking and my eyes are blurry and I’m out of glucose tabs, and then I’ll chew and swallow candy without tasting). I didn’t grow up in a house full of candy. When I tell my kids stories about “Candy Day,” they laugh and think I’m exaggerating, but I’m not. I grew up in a small town, a village really, in Brownsville, Vermont. It was the seventies and my parents were vegetarian hippies who did not allow sugar in the house. We had one store in the village, a general store, that was owned by a man named Rodney. The post office was inside the store, and every Friday after school, Mom took my sister and me to Rodney’s to get the mail and to buy each of us one piece of candy. Rodney had one of those triangle shaped, freestanding displays that had shelves of candy on both sides, and my sister and I would stand on either side and stare at the brightly colored candy. Would it be a Charleston Chew or a bag of Skittles? A pack of baseball cards with the gum inside or a Butterfinger? I rarely tried anything new because I was worried that I wouldn’t like it, and then I’d have to wait a whole week for another chance. Once, in a desperate search for candy when my parents weren’t home, I discovered a bar of chocolate in the kitchen, tucked behind bags of whole wheat flour and granola. I looked around furtively to make sure my sister wouldn’t see me, and then I peeled the wrapper carefu Continue reading >>

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