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Canadian Diabetes Clothesline Drop-off

Diabetes Association Runs Donation Station In Abbotsford

Diabetes Association Runs Donation Station In Abbotsford

Diabetes Association runs donation station in Abbotsford Public can drop off donated items to location on Sumas Way The Canadian Diabetes Association has a donation drop-off spot located at 1255 Sumas Way in Abbotsford. The Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) has announced that it has a new attended Clothesline station in Abbotsford. The station is located at 1255 Sumas Way and is open to accept donations seven days a week from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., with a box on site for the after-hours donation of clothing. The site accepts reusable clothing, shoes, handbags, towels, linens and small household items. Proceeds raised from Clothesline help the CDA send more than 2,400 children and youths with type 1 diabetes to the CDAS D-Camps. These summer and family camps are offered across Canada, including at Camp Kakhamela in Gibsons, B.C., where kids meet and are inspired by each other to manage their diabetes well in a medically supervised setting. As well, funds raised have helped the CDA fund more than $130 million over the last 40 years in world-leading innovative Canadian research to improve the quality of life of people living with diabetes and to find a cure. For more information, visit diabetes.ca/clothesline, diabetes.ca/dropbox or call 1-800-505-5525. Continue reading >>

Where Do My Clothing Donations Really End Up?

Where Do My Clothing Donations Really End Up?

Where do my clothing donations really end up? That old hoodie or worn blouse you donated to a second-hand shop could end up undercutting the local clothing industry in Africa. Q: Where do my clothing donations really end up? A: You're putting together a bag of clothes to give away, and as you stuff it, wonder for a brief moment: will anyone really want my old college hoodie or the hideous T-shirt my boyfriend insisted on wearing until I snuck it out of his closet this morning? Well, yes, actually, if Canadians don't buy your stuff at local thrift stores, chances are someone in Africa, Indonesia or maybe South Asia will end up sporting them. In truth, all the established companies like Value Village as well as trusted charities like Salvation Army will tell you that Canadians don't want your stuff (especially the torn stained, threadbare half) and so, about 50 per cent of donations are sold to overseas dealers, or on rare occasions, rag-makers. Abroad, it's much more likely that someone will bring unwanted garments back to life by patching your jacket's elbows or sewing on missing buttons. Enviros would say it's better than all of it going to the dump, no doubt, but organizations like Oxfam have expressed concern that our second-hand exports are undercutting local economies and cultures in Africa by offering Western discards way cheaper than locally made clothes. (Ironically enough, in the UK, Oxfam is one of the very organizaions dumping castoffs in sub-Saharan Africa.) In Ghana, for instance, 60 per cent of clothes purchased are now second-hand imports. Oxfam noted in its 2005 report on the topic that agencies concerned about the local clothing and textile sector in Africa should really advocate for beefed-up trade protection there to put a stop to flooding the market Continue reading >>

Drop Your Pants, Knock Your Socks Off, And Give A Shirt For The 10 Million Canadians With Diabetes Or Prediabetes

Drop Your Pants, Knock Your Socks Off, And Give A Shirt For The 10 Million Canadians With Diabetes Or Prediabetes

Drop your pants, knock your socks off, and give a shirt for the 10 million Canadians with diabetes or prediabetes TORONTO, Ont. The Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) is asking Canadians to drop their pants, knock their socks off, and give a shirt for diabetes by donating gently used clothing to help fund a cure. Today, the CDA launches the 3-Pound Challenge, encouraging Canadians to clean out their closets and drop at least three pounds of clothing into the CDAs shiny red Clothesline drop boxes . A new mobile app available through the Apple App Store now, and coming soon for Android device users will help people locate Clothesline drop box locations, track their donations, and challenge their friends. Diabetes is a growing epidemic in Canada that currently costs the health-care system $14 billion per year. The number of Canadians living with diabetes or prediabetes is expected to rise from more than 10 million today to 13 million by 2025. We know Canadians can spare a shirt to support kids and adults living with diabetes, and thats what has made our Clothesline boxes so popular for thirty years, said Janelle Robertson, General Manager of Strategic Initiatives at the Clothesline program. With the diabetes epidemic growing, we ask Canadians to consider dropping their pants and knocking their socks off too, to bring us even closer to a cure. Its the easiest three pounds youll ever lose! For Canadians living with diabetes, a little clothing off generous backs goes a long way. Last year alone, the CDAs Clothesline program raised close to $10 million, all of which was invested in programs and services to help people live well with diabetes, to fund groundbreaking Canadian research, and more. Taking the 3-Pound Challenge will help raise even more money, which is a win-win f Continue reading >>

Clothesline Is Opening A Retail Location In Peterborough

Clothesline Is Opening A Retail Location In Peterborough

The Canadian Diabetes Association operates the Clothesline campaign which asksCanadians to consider donating gently used clothing, electronics and small household items to them that they're getting rid of. "One hundred percent of net proceeds raised by Clothesline directly support the Canadian Diabetes Association and world-leading diabetes research, education and advocacy." There are currently 13 red donation bins around the city to collect used clothing, but sometimes people use them as a dumping ground for everything they are trying to part with. Instead of dropping large article items at the bins (which isn't their purpose), you will now be able to take them to theretail location at 638BThe Kingsway (just West of the Parkway), where they will sell mostly large article items and other goods. The Grand Opening will be at 10 a.m. on Friday, August 7th, and to kick off the retail location, they are having a themed sale "Christmas in August" where you can purchase an artificial Christmas tree for $5. Clothesline will be openMonday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5:30 pm. andSaturdays 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. It is cash-only during the initial opening until a debit machine is installed. Clothesline will hold items if prepaid, and will charge a $50 flat rate to deliver items within city limits. You can drop off itemswhich must be in good condition and sellableor call Clothesline for pickup (see what Clothesline will pick up here ). For futher info, call them at 705.741.2155. You can follow Clothesline on Facebook and Twitter . Learn more about the program here . Continue reading >>

Community Events | Mission Zero

Community Events | Mission Zero

Every year, about 20 to 50 million tons of e-waste are generated globally. It is the most rapidly growing segment of the municipal solid waste and contributes to more than 5% of all municipal solid waste. As part of Sheridans Zero Waste Initiative, an on-going e-waste collection system has been established for the college. As a community initiative, Sheridan hosted a Community E-Waste Collection Day in all campuses last April. As a result, 352 kg of waste has been recycled properly. Hope you can support our initiative by dropping off your household e-waste at the next Community E-Waste Collection Day. Please check back for the dates. Last April, a Clothesline dropbox was set up at two sites in Oakville to collect clothes from students who were moving out from Residence or from lockers. Approximately 550 kg of clothing were collected. Clothing was donated to Value Village for funding Canadian Diabetes Association. Hope you will support this initiative when the drop boxes become available again. Please check back for the dates. Continue reading >>

Contact Us And Faqs | Diabetes Canada

Contact Us And Faqs | Diabetes Canada

How You Can Help > Declutter > Contact Us and FAQs We are always happy to hear from you! You can call us toll-free from anywhere at 1-800-505-5525. What is Diabetes Canada's reusable goods donation program? Diabetes Canadas reusable goods donation program has been in operation since 1985. We ask Canadians to keep us in mind when theyre cleaning and getting rid of gently used clothing, electronics and small household items. When you donate with Diabetes Canada, everyone wins. Proceeds raised by the program support world-leading diabetes research, education, programs, services and advocacy. Donors feel good knowing their used items are going towards a worthwhile cause and that reusable items are recycled, which has a positive effect on the environment. How do your donations help the environment? When you donate your reusable items to Diabetes Canada, you help the environment by responsibly processing your donations through the Think Recycle program. Each year, the program diverts more than 100 million lbs. of clothing and household items from landfill sites across Canada. This translates into savings of 942 million kWh of energy - equivalent to driving a compact car more than 46,000 times around the globe - and reduces our carbon footprint by 130 million kilograms. What type of donations will Diabetes Canada ACCEPT for pickup? General cloth items - bedding and bath items To help us serve you better, please keep the following in mind when booking a donation: All items must be small enough for one person to pick up and carry. No single item, bag, or box should weigh more than 40 lbs. Sorry, no large furniture or appliances. We do not accept any organic or hazardous materials. When packing up your items, please place textile items in standard 67L capacity garbage bags and h Continue reading >>

Clothesline: Canadian Diabetes Associations Winning Partnership With Value Village

Clothesline: Canadian Diabetes Associations Winning Partnership With Value Village

Spring cleaning came early for my family when I was young. Like many Canadians in sunny Vancouver, my parents usually started sorting out unused belongings and amassing their boxes of household donations long before the winter snow melted from the ground. My mother called it paring down, but anyone who watched her burrow through closets and cupboards setting aside this, saving that could see that it wasnt the tidiness of her closets that mattered, but the good the items would eventually bring to others in need. When the Canadian Diabetes Association began collecting donated household goods for charity in the 1980s, that late-winter ritual (which, incidentally, went on at least twice more throughout the year), took on a special, personal significance. By the time I was in my 30s, at least a third of my immediate family members had been diagnosed with diabetes. In the years to come, our family would become a reflection of rising statistics in Canadian society. Today, says Janelle Robertson of the Canadian Diabetes Association, more than 11 million Canadians live with diabetes and pre-diabetes (an early stage in which 50 percent of those affected are later diagnosed with the disease). Robertson is the vice president and general manager of CDAs Clothesline program, which coordinates the collection of donated goods. In the last decade alone, the number of Canadians impacted by the disease has doubled, increasing the demand for CDAs services. The Clothesline program has become an essential component of what makes CDA such an effective nonprofit. We do about 2 million home pickups across the country every year, Robertson told TriplePundit. The donations of used clothing, shoes, bedding, small appliances, electronics and other household goods are picked up by CDA drivers and t Continue reading >>

Canadian Diabetes Association

Canadian Diabetes Association

The Canadian Diabetes Clothesline accepts clothing of all kinds, as well as reusable household items such as: linen, towels, toys, draperies, shoes, dishes, furniture, knick-knacks, tools, and jewelry. All proceeds go towards promoting the health of Canadians through diabetes research, education, service, and advocacy. Call for a free pick up, or to find out the nearest Drop Box location for your area. Fully Accessible ; ***Note that accessibility is self-reported. Please contact the organization before arrival*** The Human Development Council is committed to providing a database that is accurate, up-to-date and comprehensive. However, we are unable to assume any liability resulting from errors or omissions. Inclusion or omission of a program or service is not a comment on its quality. Please contact The Human Development Council to report concerns or to make suggestions. Records in this database contain links to MapQuest and Google Maps which are provided as a convenience to the user. We cannot be held responsible for the accuracy of the maps provided by MapQuest or Google Maps and the user is urged to confirm the location independently. Continue reading >>

General Inquiries | Diabetes Canada

General Inquiries | Diabetes Canada

Have a question about diabetes or Diabetes Canada? Let us know! Are you looking for information on diabetes, Diabetes Canada programs and services, membership or donations? Call 1-800-BANTING (226-8464) or email [email protected] . Learn more about our information and support services or request a free diabetes information package . Please note that Diabetes Canada can provide general information about diabetes and its management but cannot provide medical service or advice. Information, messages or articles on this site cannot replace consultations with qualified health-care professionals to meet your individual medical needs. Diabetes Canada reusable goods donation program Call 1-800-505-5525 or visit the Diabetes Canada resusable goods donation program section to schedule a FREE pick-up of your small household items and gently used clothing. Call 519-673-1752 or email [email protected] . You are welcome to mail us at our national office in Toronto: To connect with a member of Diabetes Canada's Executive Leadership Team, please email [email protected] Sara has lived with diabetes since she was ten and in 2016, her worst nightmare came true: her daughter Sophie was diagnosed with diabetes. This meant endless needles, blood sugar checks and constant worry. More than anything, Sara wants to End Diabetes so that Sophie can live to see a cure. Alone, we wont accomplish much. But together, we could give Sophie and millions of others a cure. Your support today can help fund a cure and END DIABETES NOW. Continue reading >>

Clothesline Lends A Hand To Help Goodwill Toronto

Clothesline Lends A Hand To Help Goodwill Toronto

Newsroom > Search News > Clothesline lends a hand to help Goodwill Toronto Clothesline lends a hand to help Goodwill Toronto In light of the Goodwills closure of 26 office and drop-off locations in Toronto and some surrounding areas on January 17, the Clothesline program is lending a helping hand. With the approval of Goodwill, Clothesline trucks started collecting donations left outside Goodwill collection centres and stores as of January 18 and will continue as long as necessary. This ensures that Torontos streets remain clean and that items that could have ended up in landfills are reused whenever possible. Anyone who has lightly used clothing, footwear and household items they were planning to donate to Goodwill and still wants to donate can do so through Clothesline through our: Free home pickup that can be arranged by calling 1-800-505-5525 or scheduling a pickup online at diabetes.ca/clothesline Bright red Clothesline boxes that can be located by calling 1-800-505-5525 or by visiting diabetes.ca/dropbox Clothesline collects gently used clothing, footwear, electronics and small household items. The sale of these items helps fund the Canadian Diabetes Association's activities, including our world-leading research and D-Camps for children and youth with type 1 diabetes and their families. For more information, visit the CDA at diabetes.ca . Continue reading >>

How To Get To Canadian Diabetes Association Clothesline Drop-off In Regina By Bus

How To Get To Canadian Diabetes Association Clothesline Drop-off In Regina By Bus

How to get to Canadian Diabetes Association Clothesline Drop-Off in Regina by Bus Get directions from your current location Directions to Canadian Diabetes Association Clothesline Drop-Off from the top locations in Regina using Bus Click on a route to get updated schedules, live arrivals and step-by-step directions. Click on a route to get updated schedules How to get to Canadian Diabetes Association Clothesline Drop-Off by Bus Click on a route and see step by step directions on a map, line arrival times and updated line schedules. What are the closest stations to Canadian Diabetes Association Clothesline Drop-Off? The closest stations to Canadian Diabetes Association Clothesline Drop-Off are: Rochdale Blvd @ Arnason St (Eb) is 249 meters away, 4 min walk Rochdale Blvd @ Cedar Meadow Dr (Eb) is 294 meters away, 4 min walk Rochdale Blvd @ Kenderdine Dr (Eb) is 344 meters away, 5 min walk Rochdale Blvd @ Devonshire Dr (Eb) is 384 meters away, 6 min walk Dalgliesh Dr @ Swainson St (Wb) is 726 meters away, 10 min walk Which Bus lines stop near Canadian Diabetes Association Clothesline Drop-Off? Supports over 1500 cities in 79+ countries worldwide! Add this badge to your website. Click to copy HTML Copy and paste the code below to your website (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'moovit-jsw')); (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'moovit-jsw')); Traveling to Canadian Diabetes Association Clothesline Drop-Off in Regina has never been so easy. Use Moovit to get detailed step by step directions as you travel Continue reading >>

Clothesline Program Supports Research, Outreach Activities And More

Clothesline Program Supports Research, Outreach Activities And More

Newsroom > Search News > Clothesline program supports research, outreach activities and more Clothesline program supports research, outreach activities and more Lani Hyde and her family have been donating for years to Clothesline, the Canadian Diabetes Associations (CDAs) program that raises money for diabetes research, programs and education by selling gently used clothes, electronics and small household items to the thrift retailer Value Village. This year, Ms. Hyde added a little something extra to her donation bags. Prompted by the instructions for a Clothesline contest that was giving away free D-Camps sessions to donors, she taped a piece of paper on each bag that said D-Camps the name of the national camping program that the CDA operates for children and youth with type 1 diabetes. Ms. Hydes sons, Ben, 14, and Michael, 12, were already signed up for D-Camps at Camp Kakhamela in Gibsons, B.C. So she was thrilled when she learned that her family had won one of the free sessions from Clothesline. This meant Bens two-week D-Camps session was covered by the CDA and the family had to pay only for Michaels one-week session. We have a lot of medical expenses, so it really helped financially, says Ms. Hyde, whose sons both have type 1 diabetes. But even more importantly, D-Camps has been really great for my kids. Launched in 1985, Clothesline raised $10.1-million last year through donations of used clothing and household items from 1.7 million homes across Canada. All of the net proceeds from Clothesline directly support the CDA and world-class diabetes research, education, advocacy and support programs such as the CDAs D-Camps program, which includes D-Tour retreats for young adults, and family camps. The benefits from Clothesline also extend to the environment: each ye Continue reading >>

Flawed Clothing Drop-box Bylaw Is Important, Charity Says

Flawed Clothing Drop-box Bylaw Is Important, Charity Says

The subject who is truly loyal to the Chief Magistrate will neither advise nor submit to arbitrary measures. Flawed clothing drop-box bylaw is important, charity says Councillor Howard Moscoe wants to revisit a city bylaw meant to crack down on private firms that mislead the public into believing they're donating clothes to charity through those big drop-off boxes scattered in parking lots throughout the city. As I reported today , only one person has been licensed - for one bin - in the 2 years since the bylaw was enacted. Mr. Moscoe, never one for understatement, said it's "the most useless bylaw the City of Toronto has ever adopted." Many people don't care what happens to their used clothes after the bags have been dropped off. They're just happy to know the clothing will be diverted from landfills and recycled. But others mistakenly assume their donations will solely benefit the charity named on the box, when in reality, many charities just lend their names to private operators in exchange for a cut of the proceeds or a flat fee. Anything above that goes into the pockets of the firms. That's where the bylaw was supposed to help. It requires private companies to get licensed, even if they're operating on behalf of a charity, and to clearly indicate on the box in large lettering who they are and how much they give to charity. A handful of charities, like the Canadian Diabetes Association, run and manage their own drop-off programs and are exempt from the bylaw. Clearly, the bylaw isn't working as intended. But Janelle Robertson of the CDA said it's important and should be revisited. Here's the full text of an e-mail she sent me last night. Thank you for the opportunity to be included in the Globe and Mail article regarding the drop box bylaw in Toronto. It is importa Continue reading >>

Diabetes Canada, Newmarket - Bayview Avenue, Clothing, Household Item And Used Vehicle Donations

Diabetes Canada, Newmarket - Bayview Avenue, Clothing, Household Item And Used Vehicle Donations

Fundraising and Resource Development Support ~ Diabetes PLEASE READ THIS IMPORTANT INFORMATION . . . The partners of the York Info Community Information & Volunteer Database are committed to provide a database that is accurate, up-to-date and comprehensive. However, we are unable to assume any liability resulting from errors or omissions. Inclusion or omission of a program or service is not a comment on its quality, nor does it mean we endorse or do not endorse the program or service. Please read the Inclusion Policy for further details. Please contact York Info Community Information & Volunteer Database to report concerns or to make suggestions. York Info Community Information & Volunteer Database focuses on records located in and serving the northern portion of York Region, but also maintains select resources beyond our borders which also support the residents of our respective municipalities. The partners of the York Info Community Information & Volunteer Database hold the intellectual property rights for the information on this site. You may display it on your computer and print or download this information for non-commercial, personal or educational purposes only. You must credit the York Info Community Information & Volunteer Database as the source on each copy of any information that originates from this site. The York Info Community Information & Volunteer Centre forbids any bulk downloading, or use of the database for any mass mailings, or other such usage. Please contact us for permission to use the information for any purpose other than those outlined here. Continue reading >>

Whistleblower Policy

Whistleblower Policy

National Diabetes Trustee Corp. (NDTC) is committed to the highest ethical standards. We do this by conducting our business with maximum integrity and by achieving full compliance with all applicable laws, rules, and regulations. In line with this commitment, NDTC provides an avenue for NDTC employees, volunteers and other stakeholders to raise any concerns they may have about the subjects covered by this policy and to be assured that in making complaints they will be protected from reprisal or victimization for raising their concerns in good faith. This policy covers instances where an employee, volunteer or other stakeholder has evidence of activity (Reportable Activity) by any NDTC officer, employee, volunteer or retained consultant (including external auditors) that to his/her knowledge constitutes: Accounting, auditing, or other financial reporting fraud or misrepresentation; Violations of federal or provincial laws that could result in fines or civil damages payable by NDTC, or that could otherwise significantly harm NDTCs reputation or public image; Unethical business conduct in violation of any NDTC corporate policy, including, but not limited to the Code of Conduct; Danger to the health, safety, or well being of employees, volunteers and/or the general public (including any real or perceived threat of workplace violence or harassment). Complaints that are not made in good faith will be viewed as a serious offence and may be subject to discipline up to and including discharge in the case of employees, and/or the severing of the relationship with volunteers, suppliers, or other stakeholders. NDTC will not permit any employees or volunteers to harass, retaliate or discriminate against those other employees, volunteers and stakeholders (the Complainant) who, in go Continue reading >>

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