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Canadian Diabetes Association Travel Insurance

Tips For Travelling With Diabetes

Tips For Travelling With Diabetes

Whether its a winter escape to an exotic resort or a summer getaway near home, planning before you travel can help keep your diabetes under control. If you have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, that means making sure you take your medication at the right times and being diligent about monitoring your blood sugar wherever you go. Whether you're newly diagnosed or have lived with diabetes for decades, here are some helpful tips to make your journey from point A to point B a breeze: Planning is already a way of life for people with diabetes, but it's realistic to anticipate some changes when travelling. Doing some research ahead of time can help navigate the unfamiliar and deal with the unexpected. To start, look into the area you're going with these questions in mind: Where are the closest restaurants and hospitals? Are any vaccinations required before your trip? Are there medical professionals onsite or nearby? A pre-departure visit to your doctor to check your overall health is also a good idea. If you're travelling by air, your doctor can provide a letter explaining your condition and your need for carrying life-sustaining medical supplies, to avoid any difficulties at the airport. Wearing a medical bracelet or carrying an identification card that tells others about your condition and how to treat it is also recommended, as well as educating your travel companions. If you're visiting an area where English isn't the native language, it may be helpful to learn these phrases: I have diabetes or I need sugar in the local language. Having the appropriate travel insurance is also essential in the event of an emergency. As a general rule, pack your diabetes supplies as if you were staying twice as long as you plan to. If you're heading away for an extended period and you re Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Traveling With Diabetes

Everything You Need To Know About Traveling With Diabetes

Having diabetes does not mean you should be within the confines of your home. By doing some smart planning and thorough preparation, you can go anywhere whether it is a camping excursion, a cross-country train adventure, a relaxing cruise, or a trip to various countries. Although vacations can be fun and rewarding, you have to be aware that traveling can be stressful to your body as you stray away from your daily routine and diet plan. At the same time, foreign surrounding may also put your psychological well-being into an anxious state. All these changes can contribute to a fluctuation in your blood glucose level. To help you prepare for your upcoming trip, whether by car, air or boat, we have compiled an ultimate guide of useful information to educate you better on various topics concerning traveling with diabetes: Is it Safe to Travel as a Person with Diabetes? “Is it safe to travel?” is the first question you should ask yourself and your doctor before you start to think of planning a trip. To avoid unexpected health issues that could possibly arise during your journey, you should consider going for a medical examination to ensure your diabetes is in stable condition and you are physically well to travel. It is important for you to ask your doctor whether you are fit to travel in your current condition as it can play a crucial role when purchasing your itinerary as well as your travel and health insurance. You should always request that your doctor put his professional opinion in writing so that if you need to cancel your trip as a result of sudden health emergency situation, you have the doctor’s letter as a proof of evidence and get compensation for any incurred loss from your insurance company. For more diabetes related information: Aside from the profession Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Charter For Canada

A Diabetes Charter For Canada

Your browser is not supported by our website. Some features of the site are not available or will not work correctly. See the procedure to update your browser. Diabetes is an urgent public health issue of epidemic proportions. Three million Canadians are currently living with diabetes and six million more are prediabetic. The Diabetes Charter for Canada released by the Canadian Diabetes Associate on April 7 is a response to these facts. The Charter was created to empower Canadians with diabetes and their caregivers and to provide governments with a standard of care so they can ensure that Canadians living with diabetes enjoy the same level of support wherever they live in Canada. Diabetes is a chronic and incurable disease that occurs when the body doesnt produce enough insulin or cant use it properly, leading to an excess of sugar in the blood. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps the cells of the body use the glucose (sugar) in food to get the energy they need. Insufficient insulin or insulin that cant be used means that glucose (sugar) cannot be used by cells as fuel. This sugar then builds up in the bloodstream (hyperglycemia or high blood sugar) and is excreted in the urine. This excessive sugar in the blood leads to a variety of complications affecting the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart and blood vessels. The cause of diabetes is still unknown. We do know however that certain factors can trigger its onset, such as heredity, obesity, pregnancy and some viruses and medications. Prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among individuals aged one year and older, by age group and sex, Canada, 2008/09 Source: Public Health Agency of Canada (July 2011); using 2008/09 data from the Canadian Chronic Disease Surveillance System (Public Health Agency of Canada). T Continue reading >>

Travelling With Diabetes ...

Travelling With Diabetes ...

General Tips for Travelling with Diabetes 1. Have a list of all of your prescription items. This can be obtained from your pharmacist before you leave. 2. Make sure you have prescription labels on all of your supplies. The name on prescription medicine must match the name on the passenger's ticket. 3. Contact your doctor ahead of time and ask he/she to write you a letter of medical necessity stating that you must carry all of your diabetes supplies and/or insulin pump Security staff who may not be familiar with an insulin pump, the note should explain why it cannot be removed. The name on the doctor's note must match the name on the passenger's ticket 4. Wear Medic Alert or other medical awareness jewelry. If you do not subscribe to MedicAlert, you may wish to contact the Canadian Diabetes Association and ask for an information card which will detail the type of diabetes you have and your treatment regimen. 5. Check that your travel medical insurance covers existing conditions. If not, travel insurance can be purchased through the Canadian Diabetes Association. 6. Never pack all of your supplies in the same place. Things can be lost, stolen or somehow destroyed so make sure that you spread your supplies out in various suitcases or bags. 7. ***Carry extra glucose, water, and food in case you are not able to locate a store or restaurant when an emergency strikes. 8. Check carry-on regulations with individual airlines before travelling. At this time liquids or gels (including water and juices) are not permitted to be carried on board aircraft leaving Canada, so passengers must carry an alternative form of fast-acting glucose. Some airlines have additional requirements depending on the destination. As of August 14, 2006 9. Bring a container of some sort for disposal of shar Continue reading >>

Ingle International - Wikipedia

Ingle International - Wikipedia

Ingle International is a Canadian insurance group of companies based in Toronto , with offices around the world. Ingle International provides travel health insurance products to various types travellers, including international students, snowbirds, expatriates, and high risk travellers. [1] Ingle International was established in 1946 under the name John Ingle Insurance by John and Muriel Ingle, as a health insurance provider for newcomers and immigrants to Canada. The company first began to offer student insurance in 1950. International student insurance was introduced in 1960, with the first travel insurance for snowbirds introduced in 1988. [2] John Ingle Insurance was rebranded as Ingle International several years after Robin Ingle , son of John and Muriel, first took over the company in 1985. In 1991, the Ontario provincial government ended its US health coverage for Canadian travellers. [3] As a result, Ingle International developed the first formal Snowbird Insurance plan for the province of Ontario, by the direct request of the Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP). [4] In 1998, Ingle International, known as Ingle Health at the time, was sold to the investment arm of a Canadian financial institution. In 2001, the former president of Ingle Insurance, Robin Ingle, founded Imagine Financial, which operates as a Canadian managing general agent (MGA). [5] In 2002, after a private settlement between Robin Ingle and the institution that purchased the company, Ingle Health resumed operations in Canada as Ingle, now functioning as a managing general insurance underwriter (MGU) and managing general insurance agent (MGA). In 2006, the Ingle Group of Companies was created, which included Ingle International, and the newly founded Novus Health, a health navigation and wellnes Continue reading >>

5 Tips: Cheaper Life Insurance For Diabetics

5 Tips: Cheaper Life Insurance For Diabetics

5 Tips: Cheaper Life Insurance For Diabetics 5 Tips: Cheaper Life Insurance For Diabetics When you have a chronic illness, youre in a real dilemma when it comes to life insurance. You may need it more than others. However, insurance companies make you pay if you have a condition, particularly if its a serious, progressive one such as Type 2 diabetes. A Lack Of Coverage Where Its Most Needed According to a 2012 survey, roughly half of Americans with a chronic condition dont have life insurance at all. Why? Because theyre afraid theyll be rejected or the cost will outweigh the benefits. While Canadians are arguably better off day to day in this regard due to our universal health care coverage, diabetics still face steeper life insurance costs. Some good news in recent years, insurance companies have be reassessing mortality rates from common chronic illnesses and have discovered that people with conditions including diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma and some cancers, are living longer than ever before. With that, they have adjusted their life policies to give people with chronic conditions better rates particularly if their disease is under control. Here are a few ways to score cheaper life insurance for diabetics. How Diabetics Can Get Lower Insurance Rates Apply early: The less your disease has progressed, the better. Newly diagnosed, very healthy diabetics will get a more desirable rate than those who have had the condition longer and are experiencing side effects. Ace the test: You will be asked to take a medical exam, so be prepared. Be sure youre well rested, have taken all your medication, have eaten well over the previous 24 hours. Quit smoking: Smoking massively impacts your insurance rates, quitting is good for your health and your pocketbook. Shop around: Continue reading >>

Are You Really Covered?

Are You Really Covered?

Travel health insurance should never be a last-minute purchase. Making assumptions about a policy could end up costing you a small fortune. When Suzanne Simpson envisioned her honeymoon in Paris, lazy strolls along the Seine and Bordeaux-tippling evenings were to be the main events. Instead, she was the victim of a reckless driver and wound up spending three weeks in a critical-care hospital ward with a traumatic brain injury. More than a decade later, Simpson still suffers symptoms and has no memory of the accident. She can only go by her husbands recollection of the incident: It was pretty scary Pretty scary expensive. Compounding the couples misfortune was the discovery that their travel health insurance coverage had not been filed properly. What ensued next for Simpson, who lives in Whitby, Ont., was a legal nightmare that took five years to resolve. After an estimated $100,000 in lawyers fees, a portion of her extensive foreign medical costs were finally repaid. The fact is, when it comes to purchasing travel health insurance (or using existing coverage through a credit card or work plan), the onus is largely on consumers to make sure they meet the requirements of policies. Consider the following tips carefully before your next trip because a bad health insurance purchase could cost you your life savings. Most travel health insurance policies cover virtually all hospital and medical costsbut only if you meet the medical eligibility requirements of the plan. Its the first thing applicants should look for, says Milan Korcok, editor and publisher of the consumer advisory website, travelinsurancefile.com. Too many look for cheap insurance and then try to shoehorn themselves into the eligibility requirements by forgetting about a certain medication, or a symptom or a h Continue reading >>

First Time Travelling With Diabetes?

First Time Travelling With Diabetes?

Written with information from IAMATs new pocket guide for senior travellers by Claire Westmacott. Managing diabetes during travel may seem daunting, but there are many resources to help you plan a healthy trip. Diabetes management (especially insulin dosage) is highly individual, so its essential that you consult your health practitioner before you travel. Here are some things to consider when planning your next trip. Book an appointment with your health practitioner to discuss managing your diabetes during your trip. Plan to bring enough insulin, medication, and supplies for the full duration of your trip, including extra in case they get stolen or lost. If you use insulin, your health practitioner will help you determine the best way to adjust your insulin regimen across time zones. If you are travelling eastward, you will lose time and may require less intermediate or long-acting insulin. If you are travelling westward, you will gain time and may require extra short-acting insulin and food. If you are taking oral diabetes medication and you will experience a 3 hour time change or less, you can adjust the time you take the tablets by 1.5 hours. For time changes over 3 hours, consult your health practitioner to adjust your medication schedule. Get a letter from your health practitioner detailing the type of diabetes you have, the generic and brand names of your medications, dosages, and a list of your medical supplies. This can facilitate border crossings and makes it easier to find appropriate medical care abroad (just in case). Dont forget about vaccinations! This is a good time to make sure your routine immunizations are up to date and get any travel vaccinations recommended for your destination. Get vaccinated 4-6 weeks before departure. This gives you time to get Continue reading >>

Can I Get Help To Pay For My Diabetes Medications And Supplies?

Can I Get Help To Pay For My Diabetes Medications And Supplies?

Government of Canada activities and initiatives Funding: Call for Concepts to Increase awareness and take-up of the Canada Learning Bond. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Travel Guides

Diabetes Travel Guides

Diabetes doesn't stop you from travelling abroad It's not a problem travelling the globe when you have diabetes - all that is required is a little caution. Flying, for example, can present a challenge for people with type 1 diabetes as a doctor's note is often required for people to be allowed to take sharps with them. When travelling, you should consider how time zones and time differences could affect your management. If you are unsure as to how to manage your medication then you should discuss a plan with your diabetic team. Diabetes is generally not automatically covered on a travel insurance policy, unless explicitly stated. Regardless of how well controlled your diabetes is, you should state your diabetes to an insurer and confirm that cover is included. Once you have travelled, you wont be able to get cover so getting travel insurance beforehand is essential in case your holiday is interrupted by a medical emergency. Travel insurance will also ensure you are covered in the event of your holiday being cancelled or the loss of any personal belongings. Booking your travel insurance early will give you enough time for the hard copies of policy documentation to arrive. People with diabetes can take their insulin , injections, needles and other medications abroad, although you may be asked about the materials by border security. Diabetics should collect a doctors letter prior to arriving at the airport to explain the need to carry syringes, injections and insulin. The doctors letter should be presented to the airline staff if requested, while if any problems are encountered then you should ask to speak to a senior member of staff. If you are in any doubt about which documentation will be required, contact the airport you are travelling from or the relevant border secu Continue reading >>

Canadian Diabetes Association | Diabetes Service Directory | Winnipeg Health Region

Canadian Diabetes Association | Diabetes Service Directory | Winnipeg Health Region

Diabetes Canada (DC) offers a tollfree information line that provides access to knowledgeable staff who can help with support, information and referrals related to Type 1, Type 2 and gestational diabetes. It also offers an award-winning website with numerous resources on diabetes prevention and management. Printed resources and information packages can be picked up or mailed out on request. Join my DC today to keep up to date with the latest events, webinars and news in your community! Its as easy as 1-2-3! Go to www.diabetes.ca/mycdasignup and click on Sign Up. Diabetes Care, Education and Self-Management Support Services: Screening (very basic screening is offered at health fairs and corporate wellness events) Learning Series Presentations consists of a suite of PowerPoint modules that can be delivered by trainedvolunteers or employees on topics relating to diagnosed, undiagnosed and those at risk for developing diabetes. PowerPoint and educational material are also available in versions tailored to Aboriginal peoples or low literacy levels. Online resources, including online video series and other information on diabetes management and prevention Diabetes education events; public awareness displays Diabetes Canada also offers: travel health insurance and credit life insurance; publications such as Diabetes Dialogue; cookbooks for sale Continue reading >>

Affordable Life Insurance For People With Diabetes

Affordable Life Insurance For People With Diabetes

Advisor Voice , Life Insurance for Diabetics Affordable Life Insurance for People with Diabetes An estimated 2.3 million Canadians have diabetes and many more do not know they have it according to the latest figures from Canadian Diabetes Society. Many more have pre-diabetes, which increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association estimates that 65 percent of people with diabetes die of a heart attack or stroke. The key to buying affordable life insurance if you have diabetes is this: Control. If you are controlling your diabetes by visiting your doctor regularly, taking your medications and responding well to your treatments, you may still be able to get an affordable life insurance policy. Insurers look primarily at your blood-sugar levels and your hemoglobin A1C count to determine how well you are responding to your treatment over time. According to Genworth Life Insurance and Annuities, A1C levels are normal for non-diabetics when they are under 6. If A1C levels are between 6 and 7, this generally means a diabetic has good control of his condition and may be offered a policy with standard rates. But if A1C levels peak into the double digits, this shows that the diabetic has poor control of his/her condition and will likely be offered a more expensive policy. If an insurer finds that the person applying for a life insurance policy has A1C levels that are more than 12, it will likely postpone offering a policy until the applicant gets the condition under control, or the application could be declined. Your best strategy is to show a history of effective treatment, including yearly eye exams, and that your other risk factors such as weight and blood pressure are in normal ranges. So how much will life insurance cost for someone with Di Continue reading >>

Insurance & Your Rights

Insurance & Your Rights

What is Diabetes Canadas position on insurance for people living with diabetes? Diabetes Canada believes that people with diabetes should be able to obtain insurance coverage of all types at a reasonable cost. Read the Diabetes Canada's full position statement on insurance , including background and rationale. Do I have to tell my insurance company that I have diabetes? Yes. The insurance act of every province and territory specifically requires an applicant for insurance to disclose every fact within the persons knowledge that is relevant to an application for insurance. A failure to disclose your diabetes could render the contract voidable by the insurer. Once life or disability insurance has been issued, you do not need to report any subsequent changes in health unless you apply for increased policy benefits. How will my applications for insurance be affected? Most people with diabetes find it more difficult to obtain or renew at an affordable cost insurance of all types: vehicle, mortgage, term/life and travel. Most insurers take into account the type and severity of diabetes when considering applications. The insurance company attaches a medical rating to the policy based on the type of diabetes, the length of time since diagnoses, how well the disease is managed and the presence or absence of complications. This rating then determines the price of the policy offered. In some cases, an insurer may determine the risk is too high to offer insurance coverage. What is a pre-existing medical condition? It is any medical condition that you had before applying for insurance. Most insurance policies will not cover any claims related to the pre-existing condition. How does diabetes as a pre-existing condition affect my insurance? When applying for life or health insurance, Continue reading >>

Air Travel & Your Rights

Air Travel & Your Rights

What are some general things to keep in mind when travelling by air? Remember that most airlines are more than happy to assist passengers with special needs – if you need help, speak to an airline staff representative. To avoid any unexpected delays, you can also make arrangements with the airline ahead of time, if you know in advance that you will require additional assistance at any point during your journey. Always be sure to give yourself plenty of time. The Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) recommends that you go through pre-boarding security well in advance of your flight, especially during peak travel periods, in case any additional screening is required. Always carry appropriate snacks with you in case your flight or in-flight meal is delayed, or the meal provided does not have enough carbohydrates (for those using insulin or other medications that may cause hypoglycemia). For more information about security screening procedures, please see additional questions and answers below. Be aware of time zone changes and schedule your meals and medications accordingly. Meet with your healthcare team in advance of your trip to work out timing of meals and medications, if needed. Also discuss with your healthcare team what to do in case you get sick during your flight or while you’re on holiday. If you choose to sleep while travelling by air, set the alarm on your watch or cell phone to wake you at meal or medication time. Try to do some form of activity during your journey: walk around in the terminal prior to boarding, consider doing simple stretch exercises in your seat or move your ankles in circles and raise your legs occasionally, or move around periodically in the aisles to help stretch your legs. For more information on travelling with diabetes Continue reading >>

Before You Go Waltzing The Dragon

Before You Go Waltzing The Dragon

The good news is that with a little advance planning and preparation, a trip away from home can be enjoyable and relatively stress-free. I (Michelle) have travelled with my son (who has diabetes) on more than one occasion, and have had great experiences with minimal diabetes-related issues. Planning is key. Here are some tips to smooth your path when travelling with the Diabetes Dragon: Travelling can be stressful for anyone. Travelling with a child with diabetes can add additional pressure: If my child has a low blood sugar, will we have access to a suitable low treatment? What if we run out of diabetes supplies? What if we run into problems at the airport? Will they let me bring juice on board the plane? Can I bring syringes on board? What if my child gets sick while we are away and blood sugars are out of control? Tasks that you may worry about at home seem more daunting when your routine is altered and youre in an unfamiliar place. Even tasks that are second-nature at home may seem intimidating away from home. Plan ahead. Anticipate what you and your child may need by imagining a typical day of travel, as well as a typical day at your destination. Visit your childs doctor well in advance of your trip. Discuss your vacation plans with your health care team to work out a plan that is individualized for your family. Blood glucose levels can be affected by the change in activity levels, as well as by the increased level of excitement/stress that your child may experience, so you may want to consult your doctor for advice on adjusting insulin doses. If you are traveling across more than 4 times zones, provide your diabetes nurse educator with your travel itinerary so that your childs insulin dose can be adjusted for travel. Send this information at least 2 weeks before Continue reading >>

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