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Can Zoloft Make Your Blood Sugar Drop

Antidepressants May Lower Blood Sugar

Antidepressants May Lower Blood Sugar

In a new twist on the expression: the best of both worlds, it turns out that treating depression can help diabetics get their blood sugar levels under control. Researchers made this surprising discovery during a study of diabetic minorities living under the poverty line who have trouble keeping their sugar levels within normal range. High Risk It seems that diabetics have a much higher risk for depression than that of the general population. The rates go up even higher when the diabetics are minorities. This group has the most trouble controlling their blood sugar levels. They also tend to have more complications from diabetes and severer depression, say the researchers. Be that as it may, there have been few studies with an aim toward discovering the effects of depression treatment in minorities with out-of-control diabetes. In an effort to rectify this dearth of information, Dr. Mayer B. Davidson along with his colleagues at Los Angeles' Charles Drew University evaluated low-income diabetes patients for depression at a diabetes clinic. 89 patients with both diabetes and depression were chosen as participants in the trial. 45 of these patients were chosen at random to receive Zoloft (sertraline), an antidepressant medication, while 44 participants were given a placebo. All of the study participants attended an educational program for diabetics. Meetings for the education group were held once a month. There were 39 Hispanic patients in each of the two groups; five participants were African American; while one of the participants in the Zoloft group was listed as "other." Significant Drop The investigators found that after 6 months, those in the Zoloft group had experienced a significant drop in their blood sugar levels. Hemoglobin A1C levels, which is a standard measure Continue reading >>

Sertraline (oral Route)

Sertraline (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your or your child's progress at regular visits. This is to allow for changes in your dose and to help reduce any side effects. Do not take sertraline with a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor (eg, isocarboxazid [Marplan®], phenelzine [Nardil®], selegiline [Eldepryl®], tranylcypromine [Parnate®]). Do not start taking sertraline during the 2 weeks after you stop a MAO inhibitor and wait 2 weeks after stopping sertraline before you start taking a MAO inhibitor. If you take them together or do not wait 2 weeks, you may develop confusion, agitation, restlessness, stomach or intestinal symptoms, a sudden high body temperature, an extremely high blood pressure, or severe convulsions. Do not use pimozide (Orap®) while you are taking this medicine. Do not use the oral liquid form of sertraline if you are also using disulfiram (Antabuse®). Using these medicines together can cause serious problems. Sertraline may cause a serious condition called serotonin syndrome if taken together with some medicines. Do not use sertraline with buspirone (Buspar®), fentanyl (Abstral®, Duragesic®), linezolid (Zyvox®), lithium (Eskalith®, Lithobid®), methylene blue injection, tryptophan, St. John's wort, or some pain or migraine medicines (eg, rizatriptan, sumatriptan, tramadol, Frova®, Imitrex®, Maxalt®, Relpax®, Ultram®, Zomig®). Check with your doctor first before taking any other medicines with sertraline. For some children, teenagers, and young adults, this medicine can increase thoughts of suicide. Tell your doctor right away if you or your child start to feel more depressed and have thoughts about hurting yourselves. Report any unusual thoughts or behaviors that trouble you or y Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Sertraline On Blood Lipids, Glucose, Insulin And Hba1c Levels: A Prospective Clinical Trial On Depressive Patients.

The Effects Of Sertraline On Blood Lipids, Glucose, Insulin And Hba1c Levels: A Prospective Clinical Trial On Depressive Patients.

Abstract BACKGROUND: In this study, we aimed to investigate the possible effects of sertraline on blood glucose and lipid levels as risk factors for cardiovascular disease in depressive patients. METHODS: Eight male and twelve female depressive patients, diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria, were included in this study. The subjects aged 19-50 years, did not smoke, and had normal body mass index (BMI), homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) values, blood pressure, blood glucose, insulin and lipid levels. Sertraline therapy (50 mg/day) was started. Patients with diabetes mellitus, heart disease, pregnancy, and those taking other drugs were excluded from the study. Blood glucose, insulin, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglyceride values were measured in patients before, and at the 4(th), 8(th) and 12(th) weeks after treatment with sertraline. Moreover, HbA1C levels were measured at the beginning and at the end of the treatment (at 12(th) weeks). RESULTS: There were no significant differences in physical examination (blood pressure, BMI, body weight, height, waist circumference) and laboratory findings (glucose, HDL-C, LDL-C, HOMA-IR and HbA1C levels) at the 12(th) week after of treatment with sertraline compared to pretreatment values. However, insulin levels at the 4(th), 8(th) and 12(th) weeks significantly increased compared with pretreatment values. Likewise, triglyceride levels at the 8(th) and 12(th) weeks significantly increased compared with pretreatment values. CONCLUSIONS: Sertraline-treated patients have to be followed up for blood insulin and triglyceride levels. In addition, their treatment plan needs to be adjusted as necessary to prevent possible metabolic chang Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Sertraline On Blood Lipids, Glucose, Insulin And Hba1c Levels: A Prospective Clinical Trial On Depressive Patients

The Effects Of Sertraline On Blood Lipids, Glucose, Insulin And Hba1c Levels: A Prospective Clinical Trial On Depressive Patients

Go to: Abstract In this study, we aimed to investigate the possible effects of sertraline on blood glucose and lipid levels as risk factors for cardiovascular disease in depressive patients. METHODS: Eight male and twelve female depressive patients, diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria, were included in this study. The subjects aged 19-50 years, did not smoke, and had normal body mass index (BMI), homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) values, blood pressure, blood glucose, insulin and lipid levels. Sertraline therapy (50 mg/day) was started. Patients with diabetes mellitus, heart disease, pregnancy, and those taking other drugs were excluded from the study. Blood glucose, insulin, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglyceride values were measured in patients before, and at the 4th, 8th and 12th weeks after treatment with sertraline. Moreover, HbA1C levels were measured at the beginning and at the end of the treatment (at 12th weeks). There were no significant differences in physical examination (blood pressure, BMI, body weight, height, waist circumference) and laboratory findings (glucose, HDL-C, LDL-C, HOMA-IR and HbA1C levels) at the 12th week after of treatment with sertraline compared to pretreatment values. However, insulin levels at the 4th, 8th and 12th weeks significantly increased compared with pretreatment values. Likewise, triglyceride levels at the 8th and 12th weeks significantly increased compared with pretreatment values. Sertraline-treated patients have to be followed up for blood insulin and triglyceride levels. In addition, their treatment plan needs to be adjusted as necessary to prevent possible metabolic changes. KEYWORDS: Sertraline, Insulin, Glucose, Lip Continue reading >>

Zoloft Side Effects By Likelihood And Severity

Zoloft Side Effects By Likelihood And Severity

COMMON side effects If experienced, these tend to have a Severe expression Altered Interest In Having Sexual Intercourse Inability To Have An Erection Sexual Problems If experienced, these tend to have a Less Severe expression Chronic Trouble Sleeping Diarrhea Dizzy Drowsiness Dry Mouth Excessive Sweating Feel Like Throwing Up Feeling Weak Gas Head Pain Intense Abdominal Pain Involuntary Quivering Loss Of Appetite Low Energy Problem With Ejaculation Weight Loss INFREQUENT side effects If experienced, these tend to have a Less Severe expression Abnormal Increase In Muscle Tone Acne Backache Chest Pain Constipation Easily Angered Or Annoyed Feeling Agitated Hair Loss Heart Throbbing Or Pounding Increased Hunger Indigestion Inflammation Of The Nose Muscle Pain Nervous Pain Problems With Eyesight Temporary Redness Of Face And Neck Throwing Up Weight Gain Yawning RARE side effects If experienced, these tend to have a Severe expression A Feeling Of Restlessness With Inability To Sit Still Abnormal Liver Function Tests Acute Renal Failure Atrioventricular Heart Block Behaving With Excessive Cheerfulness And Activity Bleeding Bleeding Of The Stomach Or Intestines Cataracts Decreased Blood Platelets Deficiency Of Granulocytes A Type Of White Blood Cell Diabetes Discharge Of Milk In Men Or Women When Not Breastfeeding Extrapyramidal Reaction Feeling Anger Toward Something Fever Giant Hives Having Thoughts Of Suicide Hepatitis Caused By Drugs High Blood Pressure High Blood Sugar Hives Hypothyroidism Inflammation Of Skin Caused By An Allergy Itching Life Threatening Allergic Reaction Liver Failure Low Amount Of Sodium In The Blood Low Blood Counts Due To Bone Marrow Failure Lupus-Like Syndrome Mild Degree Of Mania Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Nosebleed Pancreatitis Prolonged QT I Continue reading >>

Sertraline-induced Hypoglycemia.

Sertraline-induced Hypoglycemia.

Abstract OBJECTIVE: To report a case of hypoglycemia that occurred in a patient treated with the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor, sertraline. CASE SUMMARY: An 82-year-old white woman with mild cardiovascular disease and no history of glucose intolerance was seen in the emergency department for a presyncopal episode associated with a blood glucose of 32 mg/dL as measured by the ambulance attendant. She had similar symptoms the day before. Despite repeated administration of oral and intravenous glucose, the patient had recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia and was hospitalized for four days. She had started taking sertraline 50 mg once daily for mild depression 25 days prior to presentation. Other medications included furosemide 20 mg/d, ramipril 5 mg/d, clopidogrel 75 mg/d, nitroglycerin patch 0.4 mg/h, and lorazepam 1 mg taken occasionally for agitation. She had never been prescribed any oral hypoglycemic agents. Serum sertraline and desmethylsertraline concentrations measured two, three, and four days after discontinuing sertraline were within the expected range, but the rate of decline was consistent with a moderately prolonged half-life. DISCUSSION: Sertraline has been shown to blunt postprandial hyperglycemia in rats and to potentiate the hypoglycemic effects of sulfonylurea agents in humans. It has not been reported to cause hypoglycemia independently, but in this case, a nondiabetic patient experienced multiple episodes of hypoglycemia that resolved after discontinuation of sertraline. CONCLUSIONS: This report and another implicating fluoxetine in a case of hypoglycemia suggest that healthcare professionals should consider these medications among the possible causes of hypoglycemia occurring in patients receiving selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. Continue reading >>

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