diabetestalk.net

Can Your Stomach Hurt If You Have Diabetes?

Listen To Your Body: Diabetic Stomach Pains

Listen To Your Body: Diabetic Stomach Pains

Stomach aches and other gastrointestinal pains can be signs of a bigger problem. One such problem for diabetics is gastroparesis, or delayed stomach emptying, a digestive problem in which the the stomach cannot empty itself of food normally. It is most commonly found in people with type 1 diabetes but can also occur in those with type 2 diabetes. This condition is caused by damage to the vagus nerve, which helps regulate the digestive system. If the vagus nerve is damaged, the muscles of the stomach and intestine are not able to work properly and food is not processed and pumped through the intestines. Symptoms of Gastroparesis Heartburn or reflux Nausea Vomiting undigested food Poor control of blood sugar Feeling full quickly when eating Abdominal bloating Poor appetite and weight loss Health Risks When food is not processed, it may stay in the stomach for a long time and spoil, which can lead to bacteria growth. Food in the stomach can also harden and turn into a lump. These lumps can cause blockage and keep food from moving down into the small intestine. When living with diabetes, it is important to regulate blood sugar levels, but gastroparesis can make it difficult. This is because when food finally leaves the stomach and enters the small intestine it causes a rise in blood sugar levels, which can make it difficult to control blood sugar levels consistently. In more severe cases of gastroparesis, daily vomiting has been known to occur. Prevention When trying to minimize the risk of gastroparesis, people with diabetes should try to control their blood sugar levels by making small changes to their routine. For instance, you may want to change when and how often you use insulin and check your blood sugar levels more often. Furthermore, some medications like antidepres Continue reading >>

When Diabetes Leads To A Lazy Stomach: The Goods On Gastroparesis

When Diabetes Leads To A Lazy Stomach: The Goods On Gastroparesis

Gastroparesis doesn’t sound good, and it isn’t. Literally “stomach paralysis,” it is a form of diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage, that is a common complication of diabetes. The damaged nerve in question is the vagus nerve, named for its vagabond-like wandering nature. The vagus nerve meanders all the way from the brainstem to the colon, controlling heart rate, sweating, gastrointestinal contractions, and various other involuntary, automatic functions on its way. In the case of gastroparesis, it’s the vagus nerve’s control of stomach contractions that’s damaged. The stomach is basically a hollow ball made of muscle that serves as a storage container and mixing bowl for food. It’s about the size of a small melon, but it can stretch to hold nearly a gallon if you really press the issue. In healthy people, wave-like contractions of the stomach, prompted by the vagus nerve, crush and churn your food into small particles and mix it up with enzymes and acids produced by the stomach’s inner lining. Then the stomach contractions, coming along in waves at about three per minute, slowly and evenly propel the pulverized food out through the pyloric valve, which opens just enough to release an eighth of an ounce of food at a time. From there it’s down the small intestine, where the real nutrient absorption occurs. It can take four hours to empty your stomach into your small intestine, especially if you’ve eaten fat, which slows the process down. If the vagus nerve has been damaged by years of high blood sugars, the process hits a snag. The walls of the stomach, paralyzed by the lack of vagus nerve stimulation, don’t make their muscular wave-like contractions. As a result, food just sticks around in the stomach, unpulverized and going nowhere. It may sit an Continue reading >>

Abdominal Pain Warning: What Your Stomach Ache Really Means

Abdominal Pain Warning: What Your Stomach Ache Really Means

Stomach aches are a common complaint and can have a variety of causes. They usually don't last long, and aren't often triggered by anything serious. According to the NHS, they are most often due to trapped wind, discomfort after eating known as indigestion, or constipation - being unable to poo. The pain should pass on its own. Sudden, abdominal pain can be caused by a number of conditions, such as appendicitis or a stomach ulcer. However, if your stomach pain is accompanied by other symptoms, you may need to see your doctor. This includes if the pain gets worse in a short space of time, if it won't go away, you have unexpected weight loss, you have unusual vaginal discharge, you bleed from your bottom, or you have a persistent change in toilet habits. If you start experiencing severe stomach pain, pain when you touch your stomach, are vomiting blood, have bloody or black stools, aren't able to urinate, have collapsed, or are diabetic and vomiting, you should call an ambulance or go to your nearest A&E. Such sudden, abdominal pain can be caused by a number of conditions. Tue, August 8, 2017 Pain relief: 9 ways to help relieve pain naturally. These include appendicitis - which can prove fatal - a stomach ulcer, acute cholecystitis caused by gallstones, kidney stones, a type of inflammation of the bowel called diverticulitis, or a pulled muscle in your abdomen. Sometimes stomach pain can be long-term or recurring. In this case it may be irritable bowel syndrome - a problem with the digestive system that affects one in five people at some point in their lives. It could also be inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Other reasons why stomach pain may reappear or last for a long time include a urinary tract infection, constipation, period Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Guide

Type 1 Diabetes Guide

Over time, diabetes can affect many parts of your body. One of those is the vagus nerve, which controls how quickly your stomach empties. When it's damaged, your digestion slows down and food stays in your body longer than it should. This is a condition called gastroparesis. It can make you feel queasy and vomit. It's also bad for your blood sugar levels. Although it's more common in people with type 1 diabetes, people with type 2 can also get it. Most people with gastroparesis have had diabetes for at least 10 years and also have other complications related to the disease. You may have: Heartburn or reflux (backup of stomach contents into the esophagus) Vomiting (in severe cases, this may happen daily) Feeling full quickly when eating Food that stays in your stomach too long can spoil and lead to the growth of bacteria. Undigested food can harden and form a lump called a bezoar. It can block your stomach and keep what you eat from moving into the small intestine. Gastroparesis can make it hard to control diabetes. When food finally does leave your stomach and enters the small intestine, your blood sugar goes up, too. Throwing up can also leave you dehydrated. Your doctor will ask about your symptoms. He’ll also do a physical exam, and he may check your blood sugar. He might also suggest other tests. Barium X-ray: You drink a liquid (barium), which coats your esophagus, stomach, and small intestine and shows up on X-rays. This test is also known as an upper GI (gastrointestinal) series or a barium swallow. Barium beefsteak meal: You eat a meal with barium in it, and the doctor uses an X-ray to watch how long it takes you to digest the food. That tells your doctor how quickly your stomach empties. Radioisotope gastric-emptying scan: You eat food that has a radioactive Continue reading >>

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Managing diabetes often brings changes in what we eat and the medications we take. You may also notice some changes in how your gut, or gastrointestinal (GI) tract, feels, sounds, and responds. Changes in eating You are likely making changes in eating habits, including more foods rich in fiber, such as fruits, vegetables, and beans. Fiber can be filling without adding unwanted calories, and it can help improve abnormal cholesterol levels. But there may be a few uh-ohs if you rapidly increase the amount you eat. "Gas and bloating are a side effect of fiber," says Judith Wylie-Rosett, Ed.D., R.D., professor of health promotion and nutrition research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York. "Increasing your intake gradually may help." She suggests adding legumes, such as beans and lentils, to increase dietary fiber. "Throwing out the water you soak them in and giving them an extra rinse before cooking may also help decrease the gas and bloating," she says. Glucose-lowering meds Several prescription medications used to lower blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes can stir up your gut. Experts tend to suggest that you start with a low dose and slowly increase it based on your provider's instructions. Metformin Metformin, the typical starting medication in type 2 diabetes to bring blood glucose levels in range, can lead to heartburn, nausea, or diarrhea. Ralph DeFronzo, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the diabetes division at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, says, "I try to use metformin in all of my patients who have type 2 diabetes. When there is a problem, it is diarrhea and abdominal discomfort. There are 5-10 percent of people who just can't tolerate it." Typically, metformin is started at a low dose and increased Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes

Symptoms Of Diabetes

It is possible to have diabetes with only very mild symptoms or without developing any symptoms at all. Such cases can leave some people with diabetes unaware of the condition and undiagnosed. This happens in around half of people with type 2 diabetes.1,2 A condition known as prediabetes that often leads to type 2 diabetes also produces no symptoms. Type 2 diabetes and its symptoms develop slowly.3 Type 1 diabetes can go unnoticed but is less likely to do so. Some of its symptoms listed below can come on abruptly and be accompanied by nausea, vomiting or stomach pains.2-4 It is important to see a doctor if there is any suspicion of diabetes or if any of the below signs and symptoms are present - prompt diagnosis and management lowers the likelihood of serious complications.5 The most common symptoms are related to hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels), especially the classic symptoms of diabetes: frequent urination and thirst. Fatigue related to dehydration and eating problems can also be related to high blood sugars.5,6 The International Diabetes Foundation highlight four symptoms that should prompt someone to get checked for diabetes as soon as possible:1 Common symptoms of diabetes The most common signs and symptoms of diabetes are: Frequent urination Have you been going to the bathroom to urinate more often recently? Do you notice that you spend most of the day going to the toilet? When there is too much glucose (sugar) in your blood you will urinate more often. If your insulin is ineffective, or not there at all, your kidneys cannot filter the glucose back into the blood. The kidneys will take water from your blood in order to dilute the glucose - which in turn fills up your bladder. Disproportionate thirst If you are urinating more than usual, you will need to r Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Gastrointestinal Tract

Diabetes And The Gastrointestinal Tract

Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders are common among all people, including those affected by diabetes. At some point in any patient's life, the chances that he or she will develop a GI tract problem, be it peptic ulcer disease, gallstones, irritable bowel syndrome, food poisoning, or some other malady, are extremely high. As many as 75% of patients visiting diabetes clinics will report significant GI symptoms. The entire GI tract can be affected by diabetes from the oral cavity and esophagus to the large bowel and anorectal region. Thus, the symptom complex that may be experienced can vary widely. Common complaints may include dysphagia, early satiety, reflux, constipation, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Many patients go undiagnosed and under-treated because the GI tract has not been traditionally associated with diabetes and its complications. Both acute and chronic hyperglycemia can lead to specific GI complications. Diabetes is a systemic disease that may affect many organ systems, and the GI tract is no exception. As with other complications of diabetes, the duration of the disorder and poor glycemic control seem to be associated with more severe GI problems. Patients with a history of retinopathy, nephropathy, or neuropathy should be presumed to have GI abnormalities until proven otherwise, and this is best determined by asking a few simple questions. (See "Patient Information".) Many GI complications of diabetes seem to be related to dysfunction of the neurons supplying the enteric nervous system. Just as the nerves in the feet may be affected in peripheral neuropathy, involvement of the intestinal nerves may lead to enteric neuropathy. This is a type of autonomic or "involuntary" neuropathy and may lead to abnormalities in intestinal motility, sensat Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cancer Symptoms & Signs

Pancreatic Cancer Symptoms & Signs

Pancreatic cancer is often referred to as a “silent cancer” because it is thought that the early symptoms can be vague and unrecognised. Pancreatic cancer symptoms however can present themselves early in many cases. Here are some of the most common symptoms to look out for: Classic pancreatic cancer symptoms can include: Painless jaundice (yellow skin/eyes, dark urine, itching). Weight loss which is significant and unexplained Abdominal pain or discomfort which is new-onset and significant Other possible symptoms of pancreatic cancer: Pain or discomfort in the upper abdomen which is new, that tends to radiate to the back. This is significant and can be persistent but also intermittent, this pain or discomfort can vary between patients. Back pain Diabetes which is new-onset and not associated with weight gain Vague indigestion (dyspepsia) or abdominal discomfort (not responding to prescribed medication) Loss of appetite Nausea and vomiting Pain when eating Steatorrhea (fatty stools that are often pale and smell foul) Not everyone will have all of these symptoms. For example, those who have a tumour in the body or tail of the pancreas are unlikely to have painless jaundice. All of these symptoms can have other causes, and there is not yet a reliable and easy test for pancreatic cancer. Explanation of the symptoms: Pain or discomfort in the abdomen and upper back Approximately 70 per cent of patients with pancreatic cancer go to the doctor initially due to pain. This pain is often described as beginning in the stomach area and radiating around to the upper back (just above where a woman’s bra strap would be). Generally the reason for the pain is because of the tumour pressing against your abdomen and spine. Jaundice 30% of patients will have yellowing of the skin and Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What Is It? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially fatal complication of diabetes that occurs when you have much less insulin than your body needs. This problem causes the blood to become acidic and the body to become dangerously dehydrated. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur when diabetes is not treated adequately, or it can occur during times of serious sickness. To understand this illness, you need to understand the way your body powers itself with sugar and other fuels. Foods we eat are broken down by the body, and much of what we eat becomes glucose (a type of sugar), which enters the bloodstream. Insulin helps glucose to pass from the bloodstream into body cells, where it is used for energy. Insulin normally is made by the pancreas, but people with type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes) don't produce enough insulin and must inject it daily. Your body needs a constant source of energy. When you have plenty of insulin, your body cells can get all the energy they need from glucose. If you don't have enough insulin in your blood, your liver is programmed to manufacture emergency fuels. These fuels, made from fat, are called ketones (or keto acids). In a pinch, ketones can give you energy. However, if your body stays dependent on ketones for energy for too long, you soon will become ill. Ketones are acidic chemicals that are toxic at high concentrations. In diabetic ketoacidosis, ketones build up in the blood, seriously altering the normal chemistry of the blood and interfering with the function of multiple organs. They make the blood acidic, which causes vomiting and abdominal pain. If the acid level of the blood becomes extreme, ketoacidosis can cause falling blood pressure, coma and death. Ketoacidosis is always accompanied by dehydration, which is caused by high Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Causing My Nausea?

Is Diabetes Causing My Nausea?

Nausea comes in many forms. Sometimes it can be mild and short-lived. Other times, it can be severe and last for a long time. For people with diabetes, nausea is a common complaint. It can even be a sign of a life-threatening condition that requires swift medical attention. 5 common causes of nausea Factors related to your diabetes may cause you to feel nausea. Medication Metformin (Glucophage) is one of the more common medications used to treat diabetes. Nausea is a potential side effect for people taking this medication. Taking metformin on an empty stomach may make nausea worse. Injectable medications used to treat diabetes, such as exenatide (Byetta), liraglutide (Victoza), and pramlintide (Symlin), may also cause nausea. The nausea may go away after extended use. Your doctor may also start you on a lower dosage to try to reduce or eliminate nausea. Hypo- and hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia (elevated blood sugar levels) or hypoglycemia (blood sugar levels that are too low) may cause nausea. Check your blood sugar and respond appropriately if you suspect abnormal blood sugar levels. To avoid hypo- and hyperglycemia, stick to your diabetes meal plan, monitor your blood sugar, and take your medication as prescribed. You should also avoid exercising in extreme temperatures and keep cool by drinking cold liquids during outside activities, advises Sheri Colberg, PhD, author, exercise physiologist, and expert on diabetes management. Diabetic ketoacidosis Severe nausea may be a sign of diabetic ketoacidosis. This is a dangerous medical condition that must be treated to avoid coma or even death. Symptoms include: nausea excessive thirst frequent urination abdominal pain weakness or fatigue shortness of breath confusion fruity-scented breath If you suspect diabetic ketoacidosis, Continue reading >>

Abdominal Pain In An Adult With Type 2 Diabetes: A Case Report

Abdominal Pain In An Adult With Type 2 Diabetes: A Case Report

Go to: Case presentation A 57-year-old Caucasian male, heavy smoker patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosed 15 years ago and treated with insulin during the last 4 years, was admitted to the hospital because of mild constant abdominal pain, which was exaggerated after eating and drinking water. The pain started some 5 years ago, gradually worsened, and was accompanied by reluctance to eat, weight loss, nausea, vomiting and changes in bowel habits. On admission, the patient was cachectic and vital signs were in the lower normal values. On physical examination, diffuse abdominal pain in both superficial and deep palpation was noticed. The patient had background diabetic retinopathy, proteinuria due to diabetic nephropathy and peripheral neuropathy. He has been treated with isophane insulin 15 IU in the morning and 12 IU in the evening, pentoxifylline 300 mg bid and ramipril 5 mg once a day. His HbA1c was 7.1%. The patient did not have diabetic ketoacidosis or hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state during his hospitalisation, and thus pseudoperitonitis diabeticorum, a complication which may accompany these metabolic disturbances, was ruled out. Spinal mono- or polyradiculopathy was excluded by detailed history, clinical examination and paraspinal electromyography. The patient underwent endoscopy of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract to exclude oesophageal, stomach or large bowel disease, but the examination was unremarkable. Helicobacter Pylori was not detected on biopsies obtained from the stomach. Abdominal ultrasound examination, imaging with computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pancreas were normal. Immunological studies for vasculitis were negative. Other causes of abdominal pain, such as aortic aneurysm, h Continue reading >>

Diabetes Can Affect Your Stomach

Diabetes Can Affect Your Stomach

Diabetes can affect the way your gastrointestinal (GI) tract works. Your GI tract is the group of organs responsible for the ingestion, digestion, and absorption of food as well as the elimination of unwanted waste products. Your GI tract includes your mouth and throat, stomach, and intestines (the long tube connecting the stomach with the rectum). Your liver and pancreas are also considered part of your GI tract and can be affected by diabetes. Because diabetes can affect many parts of your GI tract in many different ways, symptoms may vary greatly, which often leads to difficulty in diagnosing and treating the specific problem(s). The symptoms that you may experience when diabetes affects your GI tract include pain on swallowing, soar throat, heartburn, fullness, bloating, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation. In addition to these symptoms, GI problems can definitely cause your blood glucose levels to fluctuate even when your diet, exercise, and therapeutic regimens are followed consistently. Although there are many different types of therapies for treating GI-related problems, it is extremely important to get your blood glucose under good control. Poor blood glucose control can worsen all of the problems associated with diabetes and make your GI symptoms worse. If you answer "yes" to any of the following questions, you should discuss possible GI problems with your health care provider. 1. Do you have persistent problems with constipation or diarrhea? 2. Have you lost weight unexpectedly? 3. Do you feel full when you have not eaten very much or soon after you start eating a meal? 4. Do you frequently feel bloated after eating? 5. Do you frequently have heartburn pains? 6. Is it painful to swallow food at any time? 7. Do you have unusual pain in your throat and Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

Gastroparesis: A Complication Of Diabetes

Gastroparesis: A Complication Of Diabetes

"Gastro" means stomach and "paresis" means impairment or paralysis. Diabetic gastropathy is a term for the spectrum of neuromuscular abnormalities of the stomach caused by diabetes. The abnormalities include gastric-dysrhythmias, antral hypomotility, incoordination of antroduodenal contractions and gastroparesis. Quick Stomach Anatomy Lesson The stomach is a neuromusclar organ that receives the food we ingest, mixes the food with acid and pepsin, and empties the nutriment suspension into the small intestine for absorption. The proximal stomach or fundus relaxes in order to receive the swallowed food (that's called receptive relaxation). The body and antrum mix and empty the food via recurrent gastric peristalic waves. The peristaltic contractions are paced by neoelectrical events called pacesetter potentials or slow waves. When gastric motility is normal, the postprandial (after eating) period is associated with pleasant epigastric sensations. Gastric motility disorders or gastroparesis presents with unpleasant, but non-specific postprandial symptoms: upper abdominal bloating, distention, discomfort, early satiety, nausea, and vomiting. If the vomitus contains undigested food, then gastroparesis is very likely to be present. Fluctuating, difficult-to-predict glucose levels may also reflect the presence of gastroparesis. Diabetes and the GI Tract The motility of your GI tract, which we were just speaking of, is controlled by an outer sleeve of muscles that surrounds your GI tract. They are controlled by a complex nervous system. Diabetes can damage these nerves, and it is this neurological long-term complication of diabetes that can lead to gastrointestinal disorders. How do we know this is the case? First, many of the people with gastroparesis have long-standing diabete Continue reading >>

More in diabetes