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Can Your Pancreas Start Working Again

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis is acute or chronic inflammation of the pancreas. It may be caused by infection, or irritation from the pancreas' own production of digestive enzymes. Pancreatitis, whether chronic or acute, usually requires a lowering of dietary fat levels[1][2], which can be tricky to combine with the low-carb diet required by diabetics. This condition plus diabetes usually requires a custom-designed medium-carb diet. While both dogs and cats can suffer from chronic pancreatitis, the species differ when it comes to signs of it. Dogs tend to have repeated acute episodes while cats appear to have gradual inflammation with difficult to pinpoint signs of illness[3]. Some research indicates that male cats are more prone to be sufferers of chronic pancreatitis than females[4]. Having diabetes puts dogs at a greater risk of acute pancreatitis[5]. There is evidence to suggest that chronic, subclinical (unable to be ascertained through present testing methods) pancreatitis is common in canines with diabetes[6]. A study conducted by Drs. Fleeman and Rand puts the estimate of canine diabetics with pancreatitis--either acute[7] or chronic[8]--at about 40%[9]. Dr. Fleeman also states that it is chronic pancreatitis and the damage it causes to the organ that is responsible for 1/3 of canine diabetes cases[10]; Dr. Greco echoes this thought[11]. This 2000 lecture given at the District of Columbia Academy of Veterinary Medicine regarding managing acute pancreatitis in dogs and cats refers to an (uncited) study suggesting that cats with pancreatitis are quite sensitive to insulin[12]. A 1989 study of persons with pancreatitis-caused diabetes also seems to point to the same effect in humans[13], noting that those in the study had low glucagon levels which did not respond normally. The lack Continue reading >>

Pancreas Transplant

Pancreas Transplant

Overview A pancreas transplant is an operation to treat diabetes by replacing the need for insulin with a healthy insulin-producing pancreas from a donor who has recently died. The pancreas is an organ in the abdomen that produces both digestive juices and hormones, such as insulin, that help the body break down food and turn it into energy. A pancreas transplant is sometimes recommended as a treatment for people with insulin-treated diabetes, such as type 1 diabetes, who are unable to produce their own insulin. Why pancreas transplants are carried out A pancreas transplant allows people with type 1 diabetes to produce insulin again. It is not a routine treatment because it carries significant risks, and treatment with insulin injections is often effective. A pancreas transplant is usually only considered if: you also have severe kidney disease – a pancreas transplant may be carried out at the same time as a kidney transplant in these cases you have severe episodes of dangerously low blood sugar levels (hypoglycaemia) that occur without warning and aren't controlled with insulin If your doctor thinks you might benefit from a pancreas transplant, you'll need to have a detailed assessment to check whether you're healthy enough to have one, before being placed on a waiting list. Read more about who can have a pancreas transplant and being on the pancreas transplant waiting list. What happens during a pancreas transplant A pancreas transplant needs to be carried out as soon as possible after a donor pancreas becomes available. The procedure is performed under general anaesthetic, where you're asleep. A cut (incision) is made along your tummy. The donor pancreas – and donor kidney, if you're having a kidney transplant at the same time – is then placed inside, and attac Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cells Made To Produce Insulin Using Fda-approved Drug

Pancreatic Cells Made To Produce Insulin Using Fda-approved Drug

In a remarkable feat, scientists have managed to convert pancreatic tissue into insulin-producing cells, all without the need for genetic modification. And that’s not even the best part: The researchers achieved this outcome, a first for science, using a drug that’s already FDA-approved for use. This raises the possibility that one day, patients with type 1 diabetes might be able to ditch the daily jabs and start producing their own insulin again. The study has been published in Diabetes. In patients with type 1 diabetes, the immune system mistakenly sees insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, called beta-cells, as a foreign threat and destroys them. Patients must therefore regularly take insulin injections in order to control blood sugar, but even with proper management there is a risk of glucose levels entering the dangerous extremes. While much research has focused on improving insulin-delivery or monitoring systems, others are exploring the possibility of replacing this lost pancreatic tissue as a form of treatment. Transplants of insulin-producing cells have actually shown success, but with a shortage of donor tissue worldwide this isn’t a viable option for the masses. Another option scientists are looking into involves giving cells of the pancreas an identity swap. Most of the cells in this organ are actually not specialized for insulin production, and scientists have shown it’s possible to change their gene expression patterns so that they assume the identity of beta-cells. The problem with this approach is that studies involved genetic manipulation of cells, sometimes using viruses, which carries with it risks to the patient. But there could be an alternative. Researchers behind the present study previously discovered that the pancreas harbors a pool o Continue reading >>

Can You Ever Stop Insulin?

Can You Ever Stop Insulin?

Once you begin using insulin to treat type 2 diabetes, can you ever get off it and go back to medications? — Anne, Minnesota For someone to go back to oral diabetes medicines after starting insulin, the pancreas must be able to produce enough insulin to maintain normal sugar levels. That being said, there are several instances in which insulin injections may be stopped. Here are a few: 1. In some individuals who have had untreated or poorly controlled diabetes for several weeks to months, glucose levels are high enough to be directly toxic to the pancreas. This means that the pancreas has not completely lost its ability to produce the critical level of insulin, but it does not work properly as a result of high glucose levels. In this instance, injected insulin can be used for several days or weeks to reduce glucose and help the pancreas to revert back to its usual level of functioning — a level that can control glucose supported by oral medicines. Once this occurs, insulin can be stopped. Remember, oral diabetes medicines work well only if the pancreas can still produce and release insulin. 2. Sometimes insulin is given during an acute illness such as an infection, when glucose levels can be high and the demand for insulin is greater than the pancreas can handle. After the illness is treated adequately, oral medicines can be started again. 3. Many obese individuals with diabetes who require insulin can reduce their dose or control their diabetes by taking oral medicines if they lose weight. However, the choice of insulin to manage diabetes does not always come after exhausting all oral or non-insulin options. Insulin has several advantages and is now more frequently introduced early in the management of type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Can Beta Cells Be Healed?

Can Beta Cells Be Healed?

Can Type 2 or Type 1 diabetes be not only reversed, but cured? Can beta cells start producing enough insulin? Can the liver store glucose better, and can body cells learn to handle glucose more efficiently? We always hear that diabetes is incurable, and so far it has been. But people are trying. Diabetes affects so many organs; we’ll have to investigate them one at a time. This week we’ll look at beta cells in the pancreas. If you have Type 1 or 2 diabetes or prediabetes, you have damaged beta cells. So you don’t have enough insulin, and what you have may not be released when it’s needed. If the cells were healed, diabetes would pretty much go away. But is this possible, and how could it be done? In Type 1 diabetes, cells from the immune system attack and destroy beta cells. Type 1.5 diabetes or LADA (latent autoimmune diabetes of adults) probably involves a similar process. So restoring beta cells in Type 1 or 1.5 will probably require changing the immune system. Reducing the need for insulin by eating a healthy diet helps, but I don’t know of any Type 1s or people with LADA who recovered normal beta cell function by diet alone. Many are looking at surgically replacing beta cells. Hundreds of experimental “islet cell transplants” have been done. But the results aren’t great. This approach will only work if we could also “turn off” whatever process is killing beta cells in the first place. But there’s a lot of money in it, so I’m sure the research will continue. Research is going on into drugs that might stop the immune system’s attack. A drug called teplizumab is being studied and shows promise. But as a person with an immune disease of my own, I’m pretty sure this progress will be slow. The immune system is not well understood yet. Beta cel Continue reading >>

Help For Symptoms Of Pancreas Problems And Promoting Pancreas Health

Help For Symptoms Of Pancreas Problems And Promoting Pancreas Health

Select a Topic What is the Pancreas? The pancreas is a large organ approximately six inches long and is a key part of the digestive and endocrine systems. It is located deep within the upper abdomen, surrounded by the stomach, small intestine, liver and spleen. This organ is shaped like a pear, broad at one end and narrow at the other end. It is divided in three sections – the broad end of the pancreas is called the head, the midsection is called the body and the narrow end is called the tail. If pancreas health is compromised a number of serious disorders can occur within the body. Functions of the Pancreas The first function belongs to the exocrine pancreas. The pancreas produces digestive juices and enzymes to help digest fats and proteins. When food has been partially digested by the stomach, it is pushed into the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). Secreting its enzymes into the duodenum helps to prevent the protein-digesting enzyme known as trypsin from eating the protein-based pancreas or its duct. Pancreatic digestive juices and enzymes are released through a small duct attached to the duodenum to mix with the food. The exocrine pancreas also produces enzymes that break down carbohydrates (amylase) and fats (lipase) as well as sodium bicarbonate which helps to neutralize the stomach acids in food. The second function belongs to the endocrine pancreas. The pancreas produces the hormone insulin together with a variety of other hormones. Insulin helps to control the body’s blood sugar (glucose) levels. It is produced by small groups of pancreatic cells called the Islets of Langerhans, which are also known as the "islet cells" Insulin is secreted when your blood sugar is raised and it causes the muscles and other bodily tissues to take up glucose f Continue reading >>

1 In 3 With Type 1 Diabetes Produce Insulin: Study

1 In 3 With Type 1 Diabetes Produce Insulin: Study

HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Dec. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Although it's widely accepted that people with type 1 diabetes produce no insulin, a new study suggests otherwise: Roughly one-third produce the hormone long after they are diagnosed. Residual insulin production can last for more than four decades, researchers reported recently in the journal Diabetes Care. Their findings could help avoid the misdiagnosis of type 1 diabetes as the more common type 2 diabetes and improve treatments for blood sugar control, they suggested. "Other studies have shown that some type 1 diabetes patients who have lived with the disease for many years continue to secrete insulin, and the assumption has been that these patients are exceptional," said study senior author Dr. Carla Greenbaum, director of T1D Exchange Biobank Operations Center, a repository of type 1 diabetes biological samples, in Seattle. "For the first time, we can definitively say that these patients are a true subset of the type 1 diabetes population, which has major clinical and health policy implications," she said in a journal news release. Worldwide, about 35 million people have type 1 diabetes, the researchers said. The autoimmune disease causes the destruction of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, which means patients must take insulin injections or use an insulin pump. The researchers examined type 1 diabetes samples from more than 900 people ranging in age from 5 to 88, and found that C-peptide, a byproduct of insulin production, was present in patients of all ages. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and safety inf Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Organ'

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Organ'

The pancreas can be triggered to regenerate itself through a type of fasting diet, say US researchers. Restoring the function of the organ - which helps control blood sugar levels - reversed symptoms of diabetes in animal experiments. The study, published in the journal Cell, says the diet reboots the body. Experts said the findings were "potentially very exciting" as they could become a new treatment for the disease. People are advised not to try this without medical advice. In the experiments, mice were put on a modified form of the "fasting-mimicking diet". It is like the human form of the diet when people spend five days on a low-calorie, low-protein, low-carbohydrate but high unsaturated-fat diet. It resembles a vegan diet with nuts and soups, but with around 800 to 1,100 calories a day. Then they have 25 days eating what they want - so overall it mimics periods of feast and famine. Previous research has suggested it can slow the pace of ageing. Diabetes therapy? But animal experiments showed the diet regenerated a special type of cell in the pancreas called a beta cell. These are the cells that detect sugar in the blood and release the hormone insulin if it gets too high. Dr Valter Longo, from the University of Southern California, said: "Our conclusion is that by pushing the mice into an extreme state and then bringing them back - by starving them and then feeding them again - the cells in the pancreas are triggered to use some kind of developmental reprogramming that rebuilds the part of the organ that's no longer functioning." There were benefits in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the mouse experiments. Type 1 is caused by the immune system destroying beta cells and type 2 is largely caused by lifestyle and the body no longer responding to insulin. Further t Continue reading >>

Pancreas And Diabetes: Why Does Pancreas Stop Producing Insulin?

Pancreas And Diabetes: Why Does Pancreas Stop Producing Insulin?

Every part of an individual’s body has its own mechanisms. It is the constant production of hormones that leads to bodily as well as mental changes. This task of generating enzymes and hormones which are required for breaking food down lies with Pancreas. Being an important part of the body, its responsibility is also about producing enough insulin in the body so that the sugar level remains intact. In fact, imbalance in the production of insulin can lead to the health problem called Diabetes. Once the problem starts developing, it can be only controlled by taking suitable diet and by avoiding eating sweets. Let us see what the function of Pancreas is and its contribution towards the development of Diabetes. What is Pancreas and What is it’s Role? Pancreas is an important part of the body, which is positioned behind the lower stomach. It has the ability to produce insulin and glucagon that tends to regulate sugar level in the blood. Carrying out the double functionality of stowing hormones into the blood as well as discharging enzymes through ducts, Pancreas have always held a significant position in controlling hormonal secretion and regulation. A slightest of imbalance in the production of insulin can lead to the problem of diabetes that requires immense care in dealing with dietary management. Playing an essential part in the endocrine as well as exocrine systems, pancreas has exceptional functional system. Basically, the endocrine system is aimed at the production of chemicals as well as hormones in the body. On the other hand, exocrine system constitutes of glands in the body that tends to release saliva, sweat and digestive enzymes. As known to all, the role of Pancreas is to produce adequate amount of insulin for regulating the level of sugar in the body. The Continue reading >>

Research Corner: Helping The Pancreas Help Itself

Research Corner: Helping The Pancreas Help Itself

Dr. Claresa Levetan explains how activating a regenerative gene may be the key for T1s to start producing insulin again. It is an exciting time for research into how to treat Type 1 diabetes. I and my fellow researchers at Perle Bioscience, as well as many other researchers, now understand that combining immunotherapy with new therapies discovered by using the Human Genome Project show great hopes of getting the T1 pancreas working again. But before we talk about where we’re going with T1 therapy, it might be helpful to review where we’ve been: On the evening of October 31, 1920, when Dr. Frederick Banting scribbles on a piece of paper that clamping the pancreatic ducts in dogs may lead to a secretion that would help patients with diabetes. Banting had just completed reading an article by Dr. Moses Barron on Islets of Langerhansas in patients who suffered from pancreatic stones that block enzyme secretion. Banting was struck by how the pancreas attempted to heal in reaction to injury. After reading the article, he hypothesized that collecting internal secretions of the pancreas, obtained by tying off the pancreatic ducts of dogs, would lead to a substance that might help patients with diabetes. It may have been a eureka moment, but it wasn’t an easy path from thought to reality. Banting endured many failures in trying to prove this idea, and even had to sell his beat-up Ford to afford his last dogs for study. At last, he was able to prove that the secretions improved glucose levels in dogs. Soon he used his discovery to restore 14-year old Leonard Thompson, who had been on the brink of death from diabetes, back to health. Of course, Banting’s secretions later became known as insulin. In many ways, this was the last great leap forward in diabetes treatments. Sinc Continue reading >>

How To Help Your Body Reverse Diabetes

How To Help Your Body Reverse Diabetes

Diabetes rates are rising, in fact it is now considered an “epidemic” in the medical community. The American Diabetes Association reports that: 23.6 million Americans have diabetes 57 million Americans are pre-diabetic 1.6 new cases of diabetes are reported each year For those over age 60, almost 1 in 4 have diabetes Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death Diabetes increases heart attack risk and 68% of diabetes related death certificates report heart related problems 75% of adults with diabetes will develop high blood pressure Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness, kidney failure and nervous system disorders Diabetes costs $174 billion annually Diabetes is a well-established problem and a multi-billion dollar industry. It is medically characterized by Fasting Blood Glucose higher than 126 mg/dL , which ranges between 100-125 mg/dL are considered pre-diabetic and ranges below 99 mg/dL are considered normal. Studies are finding that a fasting blood glucose below 83 mg/dL is actually a better benchmark, as risk of heart disease begins to increase at anything above that. IMPORTANT: There is a difference between Type 1 diabetes (an autoimmune condition) and Type 2 diabetes (lifestyle related). This article refers specifically to Type 2 diabetes. Some medical professionals use an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) to test for diabetes. If you’ve ever been pregnant and had to drink the sickeningly sweet sugar cocktail and then have blood drawn, you are familiar with this one. Basically, a patient is given 50-75 grams of glucose in concentrated solution and his blood sugar response is measured. I’m not a fan of this test because no one should be ingesting that much concentrated glucose, and the test is not a completely accurate measure. (Just a side note: if yo Continue reading >>

Breaking News – Your Pancreas Can Regenerate Itself!

Breaking News – Your Pancreas Can Regenerate Itself!

Diabetes is beatable. But don’t wait around for doctors to tell you how. The bottom line is that current medical treatments for diabetes do not reverse or control the disease. To do that, you have to approach it naturally. In diabetes, it’s the beta cells of the pancreas that are in low numbers. The beta cells are important because they make insulin. Degeneration of the beta cells is the main cause of type I diabetes. Exclusive Bonus: Download the 3-point checklist which shows you EXACTLY how to regenerate your beta cells naturally using this scientifically-proven method. Over 2000 medical studies have reported on the topic of pancreas regeneration. Yet you probably haven’t heard about them on television or radio. This may be for several reasons. But the main reason could be that pancreas regeneration is most effectively achieved by herbs, not medical procedures. Much stem cell research has focused on the transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells to diabetic animals to see what happens. These studies all show the same thing: a significant reduction in blood glucose level, plus regeneration of the pancreas cells. The regeneration is determined by seeing an increase in the total number of islet cells and insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. That’s all well and good. But finding donors of pancreas cells is still quite difficult. Everyone needs their pancreas for their own health and no one wants to donate it. Embryonic stem cells, a potential source of new pancreatic cells, are big in the news right now with the latest Planned Parenthood scam of selling aborted baby parts for research. So their source is quite ethically questionable. Delta-cells in the Pancreas Researchers at the University of Geneva in Switzerland revealed a mechanism by which other cells in t Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cells Could Regenerate And Produce Insulin Again In Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Pancreatic Cells Could Regenerate And Produce Insulin Again In Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

In type 1 diabetes, the body’s own immune system attacks cells in the pancreas, known as beta-cells, which produce the hormone insulin. Insulin is needed for moving glucose out of the blood stream and into muscles and other tissues. The condition is usually diagnosed after around 70 per cent of the beta-cells cease to function and type 1 diabetics need to inject a synthetic form of insulin to replace the missing hormone. In type 2 diabetes, too, insulin production tends to decline, with the beta-cells dying off faster than normal. Several different factors appear to be involved in this, including high blood sugar and blood fat levels, inflammatory compounds and high levels of the hormone leptin. More people with type 2 diabetes now inject insulin than those with type 1. At one time, it was thought that losing the ability to produce insulin was permanent and irreversible. But as I wrote here, scientists have discovered recently that beta-cell function can come back – in animal models of diabetes, at least. Now, a study published in the journal Nature on 20 August has shown just how remarkable this capacity for regeneration could be. The pancreas looks to be even more adaptable and to possess a greater potential for self-healing than was previously assumed. The researchers, at the University of Geneva in Switzerland, are the first to reveal a mechanism by which other cells in the pancreas called delta-cells, (which produce somatostatin, another pancreatic hormone) revert to a precursor-like cell state before being ‘reborn’ as beta-cells in diabetic mice.1 Although this only appears to happen in young mice with type 1 diabetes, it provides further evidence that loss of beta-cell function might not be the end of the story. Science is moving ahead fast in this area. Continue reading >>

Artificial Pancreas Could Be Ready In 2017 For Diabetics

Artificial Pancreas Could Be Ready In 2017 For Diabetics

For people with type 1 diabetes, life is a perpetual tightrope act. They must carefully monitor the dosage and timing of insulin injections that allow them to teeter on the high wire that is optimum glucose control. Too little insulin, and their glucose levels rise, leaving them at risk over time for complications such as blindness and kidney failure; too much insulin and hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) results, making them vulnerable to coma or, in extreme circumstances, even death. Now researchers studying type 1 diabetes believe they have found a way to help patients avoid the tightrope walk altogether. Several academic and commercial groups are conducting clinical trials for the latest generation of what's known as the artificial pancreas. Contrary to what the name might suggest, artificial pancreas systems involve no transfer of tissue. Rather, the term refers to a complex technology that uses computer algorithms to automatically and continuously sense a person's unique blood glucose balance and then substitute the endocrine function of a healthy pancreas. The new technology is a part of what the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology refer to as personalized medicine — which the organization defines as "the tailoring of medical treatment to the individual characteristics of each patient." One company at the forefront of this approach is Dublin-based Medtronic, which estimates that its advanced version of an artificial pancreas system could be in the marketplace by next year. Meanwhile, a team of researchers led by Dr. Boris Kovatchev, director of the University of Virginia Center for Diabetes Technology, has announced that the group will begin final clinical trials this summer on another artificial pancreas system developed by the University Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Does Not Mean Your Pancreas Is Dead! We’re Closer To A Cure With Bcg Vaccine

Type 1 Diabetes Does Not Mean Your Pancreas Is Dead! We’re Closer To A Cure With Bcg Vaccine

Send to Kindle My husband has Type 1 Diabetes, and we pay $400 out of pocket every month just for his insulin! I often hear sad stories of diabetics who have lost their limbs or gone blind. I also hear about young kids being diagnosed with the disease, and it makes me sick to my stomach. But, what if my husband, along with the other 1 million type 1 diabetics in the US could get a simple and inexpensive injection to jump start their pancreas? Dr. Denise L. Faustman, Director of the Immunobiology Laboratory of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), has been independently investigating using an 80 year old Tuberculosis vaccination, or BCG, known formally as bacillus Calmette-Guerin, to reverse type 1 diabetes. At first this sounded too good to be true and I hesitated because this potential cure would mean my husband would have to get vaccinations. If you read other articles I’ve written about the dangers of vaccination and the nasty ingredients they are made with, you may understand my hesitation. So, I decided to write to Faustman to ask her about this. I asked if there was a way she could recreate the vaccine to only use the ingredients necessary for the cure. She responded, Remarkably this is such an old vaccine, not much is added, unlike new vaccines. The other ingredients are sodium glutamate, magnesium sulphate, dipotassium phosphate, L-asparagine, ferric citrate, glycerol, citric acid, and water. This is basically salts with a little sugar, so no worries – no mercury, adjuvants, etc. The additives look like what is on the side of an energy drink. Right then I became more interested in the whole idea! Faustman has come a long way and has more than 20 years of research on autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes under her belt. She is very confident and enthusiastic that Continue reading >>

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