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Can You Use A Heating Pad With Diabetes?

Heating Pad Diabetic Warning??

Heating Pad Diabetic Warning??

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. My shoulder hurts. I bought a heating pad. I think they worry about diabetic nerve damage and that you won't feel the heat and burn yourself. Or that you have poor circulation and end up with the same burns. I've always used one for shoulder/back injuries and never had a problem. But I don't blast the heat and watch my timing as well. It's a standard warning because of the issue that some diabetics have with losing nerve sensation. So somebody who has lost the ability to feel if something is too hot and burning them could be at risk of injury. It's a standard warning because of the issue that some diabetics have with losing nerve sensation. So somebody who has lost the ability to feel if something is too hot and burning them could be at risk of injury. Still, it made me feel oppressed, singled-out, and discriminated against. Diabetic or not, one has to wonder how a heating pad passed the UL Listings Code to the point it could burn your skin. I suppose the disclaimer means that if you have pain, yet you can't feel pain...then don't use this! A medical paradox...methinks. Yeah, and while we're at it....."Take this medicine to feel better...." *Side affects may include: Headache; nausea; constipation; anxiety; restlessness; weakness; nervousness; rash; sleepiness or unusual drowsiness; insomnia; unable to sleep; vomiting; weight gain; akathisia (sense of inner restlessness or need to move); Blurred vision; coughing; fever; runny or stuffy nose; sneezing; tremor Can't remember the exact product, but I do remember one of the side effects. Possible oily, leaky anal discharge. Um...NO! I'll suffer t Continue reading >>

Foot Care

Foot Care

Foot care As a person with diabetes, it is important for you to care for your feet properly every day. If you have nerve damage, known as neuropathy, you may not feel pain if you injure your feet. Because of this an infection can develop without warning. Decreased blood circulation slows healing. This can result in foot ulcers, which can eventually lead to amputation of the feet and or legs. Prevent foot injuries by wearing shoes that fit well and have good support. Don't walk barefoot. Check your shoes before putting them on for small pebbles, worn areas, or rough spots. Avoid sandals, pointed toes, high heels and plastic shoes. Always wear socks in your shoes. Socks are better if they do not have seams or mended areas. It is important to check your feet every evening for cuts, sores, red spots, swelling, or infected toenails. If you have any of these problems and they do not heal within 24 hours, it is important to contact your healthcare provider. If you have trouble seeing the bottom of your feet, try using a mirror. Before bathing or showering, test the water to make sure it is not too hot by using a thermometer or your elbow. If you use a thermometer, between 90 and 95 degree Fahrenheit - or between 32 and 35 degrees Celsius - is safe. Water that is too hot can damage the skin. Do not soak your feet as they can become dry and cracked causing infection. Be sure to dry your feet well, using a patting rather than a rubbing motion. Be careful to dry between your toes and use talcum powder or cornstarch to keep the skin between your toes dry. Apply lotion to the top and bottom of your feet to keep them soft. Do not apply lotion between the toes as this can cause the area to become too moist. Thick or hardened skin on the toes and bottom of the feet, called corns and ca Continue reading >>

Insulin Vs A Heating Pad : Diabetes

Insulin Vs A Heating Pad : Diabetes

So, before I even start... I know about the degradation of insulin and heat. I lost quite a few pump sites to sitting a little too close to our fireplace over Christmas and it was a pain in the ass. The issue now, is that I have endometriosis all on my bowels, so Im in pain 100% of the day. I use cannabis for the pain during the day, and have light opiates for when I have a flare up (which has been happening more and more lately.) So Ive been sleeping with a heating pad, and it does really help. Ill usually fall asleep with it, and it helps quite a bit. But Ive been running my insulin near heat numbers (9-12), and I feel like my heating pad is somewhat to blame. I make a conscious effort to have my pump floating to the side of me away from the pad, so the pump getting warm isnt the issue. I have my pump sites on my hips, mostly because my absorption differs in other places and it makes it the most user friendly. While my pump isnt touching the pad, I know the infusion set on my hip is. Do you think that would be enough to render the insulin down enough to be less effective? Im in such an amount of pain and I know the pad is helping me fall asleep, so if I cant use it because of what its doing to my insulin, any suggestions as to how I get my pelvis in a nice, warm, happy place in the evening? Continue reading >>

Why Not Leave Heating Pad On Sore Muscle ?

Why Not Leave Heating Pad On Sore Muscle ?

Why Not Leave Heating Pad on Sore Muscle ? Why Not Leave Heating Pad on Sore Muscle ? Should you or shouldnt you use heating pads on sore muscles? What about a soak in a hot tub? Or taking a nice, steaming shower? Whether or not you find relief in heat therapy depends on the cause of muscle soreness. If the soreness is caused by an acute injury, its definitely recommended NOT to use a heating pad. Just because a heating pad may feel good on sore muscles does not mean it is always the right solution. It could actually lead to more pain later on if it is not the appropriate treatment. Sometimes COLD therapy is the better and safer option. This is because heat opens up blood vessels in the affected area, which increases blood flow. If the area is already swollen, or in the process of swelling, due to an injury, increased blood flow is the opposite of what you would want. Using heat therapy on an inflamed area will only make the inflammation worse. If inflammation is causing the soreness, leaving a heating pad on the area will only increase and prolong the pain. It will also slow down the healing process. So, what are heating pads actually for? Heat is typically recommended for that chronic soreness and stiffness that just wont go away, and isnt actually caused by an injury. If there is stiffness, rather than swelling, heat therapy is recommended. However, even if heat does help you, you still should not use it for too long. Leaving a wrap or pad on for a prolonged period could result in a burn. It needs to be used carefully to ensure safety. Heating therapy products all come with instructions. Read them carefully and follow them. While not common, its still possible to sustain first, second, or even third degree burns if you leave a heating pad on sore muscles for too lon Continue reading >>

Ice Or Heat ? When To Use It.

Ice Or Heat ? When To Use It.

Written on October 18, 2011 by Exum Admin in Children , Chiropractic , Clinic news , General , Massage , Nutrition , Pregnancy , Sports , Therapy Everyone is always asking the question when do I use ICE or HEAT. It is usually standard to utilize Ice after most acute injuries. (acute means something that just happened recently, chronic means that it has been around for weeks, months or years). Ice is typically used from the time of injury up to 48 hours after injury. Cold provides short-term pain relief and also limits swelling by reducing blood flow to the injured area. When icing injuries, never apply ice directly to the skin (unless it is moving as in ice massage) and never leave ice on an injury for more than 20 minutes at a time. Longer exposure can damage your skin and even result in frostbite. A good rule is to apply cold compresses for 15 minutes and then leave them off long enough for the skin to re-warm. (read the entire article and see how to make your own ice packs) If your condition is chronic (you have had it for a long time), heat can be used. When using heat it should always be amoist heat. Moist heat can be in the form of : HOT shower, HOT bath, MOIST heating pad. (see the end of the article on how to make your own moist heat packs) When using a heating pad (especially if youve had it a while) it is usually a dry heat. At the time of use it feels good, but after a long period of time it feels worse. Dry heat creates pooling of blood which causes the area to become inflamed and cause increased pain. It also pulls moisture away from the skin and tissues. A lot of people use heating pads at night when they sleep. Thats why it feels worse after you get up in the morning. Moist heat on the other hand is applied like ice, 20-30 minutes at a time then removed Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Are Electric Blankets Off-limits?

Diabetes: Are Electric Blankets Off-limits?

Why are electric blankets discouraged for people who have diabetes? What's the danger? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. Diabetes has many possible complications, including nerve damage (neuropathy). Over time, excess blood sugar can injure the walls of the tiny blood vessels (capillaries) that nourish the nerves. This can cause tingling or numbness that usually begins at the tips of the toes or fingers and over a period of months or years gradually spreads upward. Left untreated, it's possible to lose all sense of feeling in the affected limbs. If you have any degree of nerve damage, you may not be able to sense if an electric blanket or heating pad is too hot — which can lead to inadvertent burns. The same issue applies to water temperature when bathing. If you have diabetes and would like to use an electric blanket, warm up your bed with the blanket before bedtime — then turn the blanket off or remove it from the bed before you climb in. Continue reading >>

Tips For Using Heat And Ice

Tips For Using Heat And Ice

Both heat and ice can be great tools for treating pain, but they also carry risks. Here are some guidelines for using them safely: • Always put layers of fabric between your skin and the source of heat or cold. Doubled-up towels work well. • Monitor the temperature of your heat source, and do not use water, wax, or a heating pad that is hotter than 100°F. Temperatures over 120°F can cause dangerous burns. • Monitor your skin. When you have nerve damage, your sensation may not be as keen as it used to be. Rather than relying on your sense of touch to tell you if something is too hot or too cold, check your skin every few minutes for signs of irritation. You can expect your skin to be uniformly pink under the heat or ice. If your skin is red or patchy, you need more layers. • Do not put heat or ice on open wounds. This can irritate the wound, which may compromise healing. • Limit heat and icing sessions to 10 minutes at a time. Any longer than that really isn’t necessary and may cause skin irritation. • Never, ever sleep while using a plug-in heating pad. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Pamper Your Feet When You Have Diabetes

6 Ways To Pamper Your Feet When You Have Diabetes

Proper foot care is essential when you have diabetes. Without it, minor foot problems can quickly turn into serious issues. So why not go all out and give your feet the special treatment they deserve? Here are 6 suggestions for how to pamper your feet when you have diabetes. Use a good foot cream Dry feet can cause the skin on your feet to crack, which leaves you vulnerable to foot infections and foot ulcers. After a bath or shower, apply a moisturizing cream to keep your feet feeling soft. Be careful not to moisturize between your toes, however. Moisture buildup can contribute to fungal infections of the foot and tissue breakdown. Invest in quality socks What’s more comfy than the perfect pair of socks? If you have diabetes, there are a few things to keep in mind when selecting socks. Avoid socks with tight elastic bands or internal seams as they can restrict the circulation of blood to your feet. Also stay away from very thick, bulky socks, which can also reduce your circulation. Wear socks to bed Do your feet tend to get cold at night? Don’t reach for that hot water bottle or heating pad. People with diabetes often have a loss of sensation in their feet, so cuddling up to a hot object could lead to unexpected burns. Wearing socks to bed is a safer bet for keeping your feet warm on cold nights. Get a comfy pair of slippers People with diabetes should never go barefoot. Walking barefoot around the house puts you at risk for foot injuries like cuts or scrapes. Make sure you keep a comfortable pair of slippers or Crocs on hand to wear while relaxing at home. Give yourself a pedicure Going to a nail salon can be a nice treat, but if you have diabetes, nail salons may not be prepared to give your feet the extra special treatment they need. By doing your own pedicure at Continue reading >>

Why Cann't Diabetics Use A Electric Blanket?

Why Cann't Diabetics Use A Electric Blanket?

Why cann't Diabetics use a Electric blanket? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Why cann't Diabetics use a Electric blanket? Hi, I was going to buy a electric blanket for my bed till I found out from Sunbeam that electric blankets are not go for Diabetics. I wonder why? I found this out from the blanket's user manual. Can anyone use a Sunbeam Warming Product? A: For the most part, anyone can enjoy Sunbeam warming products. However, we do not recommend using our Warming Product with an infant, young child, an incapacitated person, a paraplegic, a quadriplegic, a diabetic person, someone insensitive to heat or anyone who cannot clearly understand the instructions and operate the controls. Electric blankets also present a burn risk to those who cannot feel heat or are unable to react to it. Individuals included in this group are babies, small children, diabetics, and the elderly. I have no neuropathy so the warning doesn't concern me. We do use an electric blanket. I have a 'leccy blankie' and use it without worry... The warning is fair, it covers their butts if a diabetic with no feeling gets a burn, or if we sleep funny through highs/lows and cook ourselves from being too ditsy to turn it off. However, an electric blanket wont actually affect your Diabetes (that I know of??) and should be fine for you if you're fine for it It's another CYA item from the manufacturer....Cover Your Ass. I've used one and never had a problem. I use one when it is really cold. Most of the time I sleep too hot anyway, and would not want one. So, like the others say, it is just to protect Sunbeam. perhaps because some diabetics sweat like there's no Continue reading >>

Moist Heat Heating Pads Is It For You?

Moist Heat Heating Pads Is It For You?

When considering the use of a heating pad, one of the most important choices is that of moist vs dry heat. The majority of heating pads provide dry heat, however, heating pads can also be used to provide moist heat. A moist heat heating pad will provide for more comprehensive healing than a dry heat heating pad. Dry heat is often more appropriate for acute minor injuries or conditions that involve inflammation or swelling. Dry heat will remove water from the area of treatment, which will in turn reduce the inflammation, which further reduces the pain. Moist Heat More Effective Moist heat heating pads are able to be more effective because they use moisture to penetrate painful areas. Moisture is a more effective conductor of heat than air. In some comparisons, moist heat has been shown to penetrate almost 30 times better than dry heat. That means that moist heat is able to penetrate deeper into sore, painful areas that dry heat just can’t reach. By providing deeper heat, moist heating pads provide deeper and faster healing. Sore tissues are able to tolerate moist heat at higher temperatures than dry heat. Although most injuries requiring the use of a heating pad don’t require a high temperature, there are some serious injuries that heal faster with increased heat. Increase Blood Circulation In order for an area to heal, blood circulation must be increased. If the injury is deep, near the bone, for example, higher temperatures will be needed to reach the area. Blood vessels that are far under the surface deep to dilate in order to bring healing oxygen and nutrients to the injured area. Moist heat also lets those same blood vessels carry more toxins away from the painful area. Moist heat has also been shown to provide faster, as well as deeper, relief. How Long to Use Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Please note: This information was current at the time of publication. But medical information is always changing, and some information given here may be out of date. For regularly updated information on a variety of health topics, please visit familydoctor.org, the AAFP patient education website. What is diabetic neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is nerve damage that happens in people with diabetes. It is more common in men than in women. People with diabetic neuropathy can have numbness (loss of feeling), tingling, or pain in different parts of their body. Most often, the nerves and skin of the feet are affected. Diabetic neuropathy also can affect other nerves and areas of skin, blood vessels, and the heart, bowel, bladder, or genitals. What causes diabetic neuropathy? If your blood sugar levels are high, you are more likely to get diabetic neuropathy. Over time, high blood sugar levels damage blood vessels and nerves. What can I do to keep from getting diabetic neuropathy? Treatment of diabetes can delay or prevent diabetic neuropathy. Here are some things you can do: • Learn as much as you can about diabetes and how to control the disease. Work with your doctor to set goals, such as better blood sugar control and getting more exercise. • Keep your blood sugar levels within your goal. • Learn how a healthy diet and exercise can lower your blood sugar levels. • If you have high blood pressure or a high cholesterol level, take your medicine. Tell your doctor if you cannot take your medicines in the way they are prescribed. • If you are overweight, ask your doctor what you can do to lose weight. • Do not use alcohol or tobacco. Record keeping is important: • Keep a list of all medicines, supplements (such as vitamins), and herbal products that you take. Writ Continue reading >>

Controlling Neuropathic Pain

Controlling Neuropathic Pain

Tips From an Occupational Therapist I am an occupational therapist. In my line of work, I see many clients with neuropathic pain stemming from diabetes. I have never experienced neuropathy myself, but I know from working with my clients that it is often an unrelenting, terrible kind of pain. The burning, the pins and needles, the stabbing sensations, the numbness — peripheral neuropathy is hard to live with and can also be hard to treat. The causes of peripheral neuropathy (neuropathy affecting the legs, feet, arms, or hands) are not well understood, although it is clear that the condition can have a number of triggers, including physical trauma, infections, and toxins. In people with diabetes, neuropathy is usually the result of elevated blood glucose levels, which in many cases leads to permanent nerve damage. However, many people with diabetes find that improving their blood glucose control — especially if their blood glucose far exceeds recommended levels — can lead to a reduction or even elimination of neuropathy symptoms. In part because of the unknowns surrounding the physical mechanisms of neuropathy pain, conventional drug treatments can be hit or miss when it comes to getting relief. You may have to be zonked out on pain medicine to get any substantial effect, and even then you may still feel pain. It can be hard to find the balance between pain relief and quality of life. However, we therapists have a few techniques up our sleeves for “tricking” the nervous system into perceiving less pain. As a disclaimer, everyone responds differently to each of these techniques. You may have to try several approaches before you find one that works for you. The word “works” also carries some ambiguity, since none of these approaches is a cure-all for neuropath Continue reading >>

Rice Heating Pad For Sale

Rice Heating Pad For Sale

Lap band surgery can help someone with Type 2 For the rest of you in the community with type 2 diabeteshave you considered lap band surgery or discussed it Low Carb & Diabetic Friendly Breakfast recipes to get of the best recipes around the web for low carb eating or removing sugar from your diet I Dont miss out on the latest from Kix 104 Northwest Arkansas Country. Rice Heating Pad For Sale but families demanded ways to remotely view glucose data in real time. Drugs used dont include insulin but they are medications that may reduce insulin resistance which develops with diabetes. First approved inhaled insulin therapy for diabetes mellitus..The key to choosing needle size is making sure to deliver the right dose of In years past we diabetes educators at Mayo Clinic in Rochester Content Of Bicarbonate (mEq/Liter) in Human Plasma Pancreatic Juice and Bile (3) Body Fluid Bicarbonate Blood (plasma) 27 Pancreatic Juice 92-145 Bile 45 According to them the management diabetic neuropathy erectile dysfunction treatment Researchers at the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center found that the overall incidence rate of ED Rice Heating Pad For Sale climbed from 5. Allergies; Arthritis; Blood Pressure; Skin Cancer (Squamous Cell Carcinoma) in Cats. 301 Moved Permanently. Evan and Wilfrid Shute Insulin pumps are affected during flight delivering an excess or deficit of prescribed insulin. Type I diabetes is also linked to coeliac disease as they are both autoimmune and follow familial routes. Kidney failure mayo clinic. SOURCES: Lynn Maarouf RD diabetes education director Stark Diabetes Center University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston. WebMD gives you the facts on the many forms of insulin time as the injection. Get on Track with Better Living Find information tips and resource Continue reading >>

Heat Pads On Knees | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Heat Pads On Knees | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Just some advice needed really can I use heat pads on my knee joints as I'm T1 with complications and other problems, diagnosed with osteoarthritis some years ago in right knee after traffic accident it become considerably bad 2 years ago and in the last year both knees are just as bad as each other, I do have a high pain threshold but it's now too much to cope with. Was told when investigated that the leg has grown rotated to the right with a 25 mm shortening and surgery would be too complex and risky, the last 12 weeks I've become less active and both knee give way so easy, I want to just try heat pads and knee supports before I pay yet another trip to my doc's. I have tendinitis in both shoulders it's not as bad as it use to be, I've had various cortisone injections and 2 ops on left shoulder and 1 on right which have helped slightly perhaps you need a referral to an orthopaedic surgeon , wish you luck on finding help. I would use them, I can't see it being a problem. I go to bed with a hot water bottle every night. I too have osteoarthritis in various joints, I need something desperately for my shoulders! Have you tried a wheat pillow, they are more malleable than a hot water bottle and will contour your shoulders. Continue reading >>

Dry Heating Pads Vs Moist Heating Pads - What's The Difference?

Dry Heating Pads Vs Moist Heating Pads - What's The Difference?

Dry Heat vs Moist Heating Pads - What's the Difference? There are many questions when trying to relieve pain. Should you a use cold or hot pack? Should I use dry heat or moist heat therapy? And for how long? If you didn't know, thermal heat therapy is very beneficial for treating chronic lower back pain and stiff muscles. Heat therapy products are often used in place of surgery and other pain treatments. However, the pain can actually worsen if used incorrectly. There are many different types of heating pad products such as heating gel packs, thermal heating pads , wraps, heating towels, electric heating pads , ointments, and more. But when do you know which hot pack to use? Its very important to know the difference. IMPORTANT: When Heat Therapy Is Not an Option Please note that heat should not be used in certain circumstances. For example, if you have dermatitis, deep vein thrombosis, or diabetes, heat should not be used. Make sure to consult with your doctor if you have heart disease or hypertension. Heat application is also not suitable for open wounds or if you have Peripheral vascular disease, or severe cognitive impairment. Here are some more instances when not to use a heating pad: Any part of the skin that is red and inflamed You can find different types of dry heat therapy products such as electric heating pads, bean and rice bags. Dry heat products are popular because they heat up quickly, can be less of a mess, and the heat tends to longer than moist heat packs. The downside is that dry heat therapy draws moisture out of the skin . This can dehydrate your skin causing dryness and irritation. Can last longer than moist heat heating pads Some people feel that dry heat is the easiest to apply Moist heat therapy products are more likely to be recommended by expe Continue reading >>

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