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Can You Test For Diabetes With A Urine Sample?

Type 2 Diabetes - Getting Diagnosed - Nhs.uk

Type 2 Diabetes - Getting Diagnosed - Nhs.uk

Type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed following blood or urine tests for something else. However, you should see your GP straight away if you have any symptoms of diabetes . To find out if you have type 2 diabetes, you usually have to go through the following steps: Your GP will check your urine and arrange a blood test to check your blood sugar levels. It usually takes about 1 to 2 days for the results to come back. If you have diabetes, your GP will ask you to come in again so they can explain the test results and what will happen next. What your GP will discuss with you during your appointment depends on the diagnosis and the treatment they recommend. what high blood sugar means for your health your lifestyle for example, alcohol and smoking Your GP will do their best to discuss the diagnosis with you, but this first appointment might only be 10 to 15 minutes. If you have questions about your diagnosis It's usually difficult to take in everything the GP tells you during the appointment. Talk to family and friends about what the GP told you, and write down any questions you have. Then make another GP appointment and take your list of questions with you. There's also a lot of information on diabetes available. Usually, the following things happen after your diagnosis: Your GP will prescribe medication . It might take time for you to get used to the medication and to find the right doses for you. Continue reading >>

What About Urine Tests?

What About Urine Tests?

Since I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) over 20 years ago, I’ve been a self-care maniac. I think about it, write about it, and talk about it all the time. So when I started having to urinate every 90 minutes or so, I decided to investigate for myself. Frequent urination is an MS symptom, but it can also be a sign of a urinary tract infection (UTI). Diabetes Self-Management readers can probably relate. If your blood glucose is high enough, some glucose will spill into your urine. High blood glucose can make you urinate more often (“urinary frequency”). Glucose in the urine can also put you at risk for a UTI, because the bacteria feed on the sugar. With MS, it’s nerve damage, not sugar, that causes the urinary frequency. The nerve damage can also predispose you to infection, because the bladder doesn’t empty very well. It’s best to check it out, because in both MS and diabetes, those infections can spread to your kidneys and cause serious damage. I could have gone to my doctor, but I figured, why waste the time and money? I can check this myself. I’m a nurse, so I knew about the dipsticks they use in doctor’s offices to check urine. I went online to see about buying some. Meanwhile, I started drinking lots of cranberry juice, in case there was an infection. It turns out there are dozens of different strips. Some check for glucose and some for ketones (to check for diabetic ketoacidosis). Glucose strips are how we used to check the glucose levels of people with diabetes before they invented the finger-stick glucose meters. Glucose starts to spill into the urine when your blood glucose level goes over roughly 160–180 mg/dl. (If there are kidney problems, the spilling can start at lower levels.) So if you only want to keep your glucose below 180 Continue reading >>

How Useful Is A Urine Test In The Diagnosis Of Diabetes?

How Useful Is A Urine Test In The Diagnosis Of Diabetes?

Question: How useful is a urine test in the diagnosis of diabetes? Answer: Urine tests, that was the way we measured glucose in the past, and, you know, urine tests may be the only thing available in some populations, but most people now use blood glucose testing, because it tells you what's happening that minute. So if you have diabetes, you want to know what's happening now. Urine collects overtime, so lets say for example, you tested in the morning and you tested your urine, well you might have sugar in your urine, but that might be sugar in your urine from midnight, because you held your urine in your bladder all night long. The blood test tells you exactly what's happening when you test at 8 o'clock in the morning. Urine glucose doesn't show up until blood glucose is about, we call it the renal threshold or the 'spilling point,' is up to about 180. Now that number's a little different in everyone, but you don't spill sugar in your urine until your blood glucose is pretty high, so it's not really a good gauge of how well you're doing. Next: What Are The Most Important Nutritional Principles For Someone With Type 1 Diabetes? Previous: What Is A Hemoglobin A1c Test And When Is It Done? Continue reading >>

Glucose (urine)

Glucose (urine)

Does this test have other names? Urine glucose What is this test? A urine glucose test is used to indirectly determine whether your levels of glucose, or blood sugar, are within a healthy range. It's used to monitor both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. If your blood glucose rises above normal, your kidneys get rid of the extra glucose in your urine. That's why a urine glucose test may be able to determine whether your blood glucose is too high. Although easier to perform than a blood test, a urine test for glucose is not as accurate as a blood test. Urine tests are usually used only when blood testing for glucose is difficult or impossible. Why do I need this test? You may need this test if you have signs of diabetes. These include increased thirst, unexplained weight loss, increased urination, tiredness, blurred vision, and sores that don't heal. Sometimes people with prediabetes or diabetes don't have any symptoms. Your healthcare provider may check your glucose levels if you have risk factors for diabetes, including being overweight or obese, being physically inactive, having high blood pressure, having high cholesterol, or having a family history of diabetes. If you do not have these risk factors, but are age 45 or older, you should also be checked for diabetes at least every three years as long as your results are normal. If you are pregnant and are at risk of developing gestational diabetes, you may be screened frequently during and after your pregnancy. What other tests might I have along with this test? A urine glucose test may be done along with more sensitive and accurate blood tests. A urine test alone is not typically used to screen for or diagnose diabetes. Other tests that are used to screen for or diagnose diabetes or monitor blood glucose include blood gluco Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Measuring Sugar Levels In Blood And Urine Yourself

Type 1 Diabetes: Measuring Sugar Levels In Blood And Urine Yourself

Many people with diabetes measure their blood sugar levels on their own. For those who inject insulin several times a day, checking their sugar levels with a blood glucose meter is an important part of their daily treatment. The amount of insulin that is injected at mealtimes depends on various factors, including the measured blood sugar level. Sugar levels in blood or urine can be measured in various ways. Sugar levels can also be measured in body tissue. Measuring blood sugar levels yourself You can measure your blood sugar levels yourself using an electronic device called a blood glucose meter. To do this, you prick your fingertip with a small needle, and place a drop of blood on a test strip. The strip is inserted into the blood glucose meter. The digital display shows your blood sugar level shortly afterwards. This is how the blood glucose meter is used: Wash your hands before measuring your blood sugar because dirt and other residues can mix with the blood and distort the results. One small drop of blood is enough for the test. It should just fill the test field. If you prick the side of your finger rather than your fingertip, you feel it less. You can get the right amount of blood by gently squeezing the tip of your finger. After a short while your blood sugar level will be displayed on the meter. Modern devices can save the measurements along with the date and time, and transfer this information to a computer or smartphone. If this is not possible, you could write the measurements down in a special diary. If you measure your blood sugar levels frequently, pricking yourself is less uncomfortable if you use a different finger, or a different place on your finger, each time. It can be helpful to read up about the different available glucose meters and how to use th Continue reading >>

Urine Test For Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Urine Test For Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Urine tests can check for a range of things, including blood in the urine, infection, and other systemic conditions. They are frequently used for diagnosing and monitoring diabetes. In this article, we look at types of urine tests for diabetes and how to understand the results. Contents of this article: What is a urine test for diabetes? Urine tests are important for both the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. Urine testing is less accurate than blood testing but is useful as a screening test for people who already know they have diabetes. Urine tests can also be used to check for glucose in the urine of people who are undiagnosed. A urine test will be looking for three things: glucose, ketones, and protein. Glucose Having glucose in the urine may indicate diabetes, although it can also be caused by other conditions. For example, pregnant women who do not have diabetes may have glucose in their urine. Glucose is not normally found in urine, but it can pass from the kidneys into the urine in people who have diabetes. Ketones Ketone is a chemical that the body produces when there is a shortage of insulin in the blood. It is a by-product produced when the body starts to break down body fat for energy. The presence of ketones in a person with diabetes may indicate a high blood glucose level, usually because a person with diabetes cannot use glucose as energy and has to use fat instead. Ketones in the blood can then spill into the urine. Ketones in the urine are more common in people who have type 1 diabetes but can occur in those with type 2 diabetes as well. Protein A doctor will check for the presence of protein in the urine of people with diabetes, as this can indicate kidney problems or a urinary tract infection. Types of tests If someone is concerned that they may h Continue reading >>

Testing

Testing

There are a range of tests which will need to be done to monitor your health and your diabetes. Some of these, such as your blood glucose levels, you will be able to do yourself. Others will be done by healthcare professionals. Self-monitoring of blood glucose can be a beneficial part of diabetes management. As part of the day-to-day routine it can help with necessary lifestyle and treatment choices as well as help to monitor for symptoms of hypo- or hyperglycaemia. Monitoring can also help you and your healthcare team to alter treatment which in turn can help prevent any long-term complications from developing. Some people with diabetes (but not all) will test their blood glucose levels at home. Home blood glucose testing gives an accurate picture of your blood glucose level at the time of the test. It involves pricking the side of your finger (as opposed to the pad) with a finger-pricking device and putting a drop of blood on a testing strip. Some people can't see the point of testing as they think they know by the way they feel, but the way you feel is not always a good or accurate guide to what is happening. Blood glucose targets It is important that the blood glucose levels being aimed for are as near normal as possible (that is in the range of those of a person who does not have diabetes). These are: 3.5–5.5mmol/l* before meals less than 8mmol/l, two hours after meals. There are many different opinions about the ideal range to aim for. As this is so individual to each person, the target levels must be agreed between the person and their diabetes team. The target blood glucose ranges below are indicated as a guide. Children with Type 1 diabetes (NICE 2015) on waking and before meals: 4–7mmol/l after meals: 5–9mmol/l.after meals: 5–9mmol/l. Adults with Type Continue reading >>

5 Important Tests For Type 2 Diabetes

5 Important Tests For Type 2 Diabetes

It takes more than just one abnormal blood test to diagnose diabetes.Istockphoto For centuries, diabetes testing mostly consisted of a physician dipping his pinkie into a urine sample and tasting it to pick up on abnormally high sugar. Thankfully, testing for type 2 diabetes is lot easier now—at least for doctors. Urine tests can still pick up diabetes. However, sugar levels need to be quite high (and diabetes more advanced) to be detected on a urine test, so this is not the test of choice for type 2 diabetes. Blood tests Almost all diabetes tests are now conducted on blood samples, which are collected in a visit to your physician or obstetrician (if you're pregnant). More about type 2 diabetes If you have an abnormal resultmeaning blood sugar is too high—on any of these tests, you'll need to have more testing. Many things can affect blood sugar (such as certain medications, illness, or stress). A diabetes diagnosis requires more than just one abnormal blood sugar result. The main types of diabetes blood tests include: Oral glucose-tolerance test. This test is most commonly performed during pregnancy. You typically have your blood drawn once, then drink a syrupy glucose solution and have your blood drawn at 30 to 60 minute intervals for up to three hours to see how your body is handling the glut of sugar. Normal result: Depends on how many grams of glucose are in the solution, which can vary. Fasting blood sugar. This is a common test because it's easy to perform. After fasting overnight, you have your blood drawn at an early morning doctor's visit and tested to see if your blood sugar is in the normal range. Normal result: 70-99 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) or less than 5.5 mmol/L Two-hour postprandial test. This blood test is done two hours after you have eate Continue reading >>

What Do Urine Tests Say About Diabetes?

What Do Urine Tests Say About Diabetes?

When you have diabetes, you’re no stranger to tests that keep track of your disease. Most look at your blood, but there are others. Two simple ones that check your urine can help you and your doctor watch for kidney disease and severe high blood sugar. About one-third of people with diabetes have problems with their kidneys. But early and tight control of your blood sugar and blood pressure, plus help from certain medications, can keep these organs working like they should To check for problems, your doctor can do a test that measures the amount of protein in your urine, called microalbuminuria. It shows up when small amounts of albumin (the main protein in your blood) seep into your pee. Without treatment to slow the leak, your kidneys could be damaged and eventually fail. You should get this test every year starting as soon as you’re diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. That’s because high blood sugar is usually present many years before you find out you have the disease. If you have type 1 diabetes, you probably won’t get the test until you’ve been diagnosed for 5 years. If the test is positive, it means your kidneys can no longer filter the blood as well as they should. It also shows you have blood vessel disease that could lead to heart problems. Your doctor will probably suggest medications or lifestyle changes to help prevent these conditions: Kidney damage. You may start specific medicines to prevent further harm. If your microalbumin level is high, your doctor may suggest another type of test that requires you to collect samples for 24 hours. This can better tell the extent of damage to the organs and see how well they’re working. High blood sugar. Studies show tight control of your blood sugar can lower kidney damage, so your doctor may put you on more Continue reading >>

Urine Glucose Test

Urine Glucose Test

What Is a Urine Glucose Test? A urine glucose test is a quick and simple way to check for abnormally high levels of glucose in the urine. Glucose is a type of sugar that your body requires and uses for energy. Your body converts the carbohydrates you eat into glucose. Having too much glucose in your body can be a sign of a health problem. If you don’t receive treatment and your glucose levels remain high, you can develop serious complications. The test involves taking a sample of urine. Once you provide your sample, a small cardboard device known as a dipstick will measure your glucose levels. The dipstick will change color depending on the amount of glucose in your urine. If you have a moderate or high amount of glucose in your urine, your doctor will perform further testing to determine the underlying cause. The most common cause of elevated glucose levels is diabetes, a condition that affects the body’s ability to manage glucose levels. It’s important to monitor your glucose levels if you have already been diagnosed with diabetes, or if you show symptoms of prediabetes. These symptoms include excessive thirst, blurred vision, and fatigue. When left untreated, diabetes can lead to long-term complications, including kidney failure and nerve damage. A urine glucose test is often performed to check for diabetes. In addition, known diabetics can use the urine glucose test as a way of monitoring the degree of sugar control, or efficacy of treatments. Urine tests were once the main type of testing used to measure glucose levels in people who may have diabetes. However, they are far less common now that blood tests have become more accurate and easier to use. In some cases, a urine glucose test may also be done to check for kidney problems or a urinary tract infection. Continue reading >>

Urine Testing For Diabetic Analysis

Urine Testing For Diabetic Analysis

Urine testing is relatively cheap and easy to do. Urine testing can be used to check for blood in the urine, to check for infection (by detecting the presence of white blood cells or protein) and can show up other systemic problems such as liver problems (by showing abnormal bilirubin levels). Urine testing can also detect ketones in the urine. Ketones are by-products of metabolism which form in the presence of severe high blood glucose. The presence of ketones in the urine therefore indicates that patients' blood glucose level is likely to be very high and that they may have ketoacidosis, which is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes and needs urgent treatment. Early signs of ketoacidosis include passing large amounts of urine, severe thirst, feeling nauseous, tiredness, abdominal pain and shortness of breath. Advanced signs include rapid breathing, rapid heartbeat, vomiting, dizziness, confusion and drowsiness; patients may even lose consciousness. Urgently refer patients with any of the above signs. Although not as accurate as a blood glucose test, urine testing can be used as a screening tool in patients known to have diabetes. Even in patients with no ketoacidosis, high glucose levels may be an indication that their diabetes is poorly controlled. These patients can be referred for counselling, patient education, and-as soon as possible -for an eye examination to look for signs of diabetic retinopathy. Urine testing can also be used to detect glucose in the urine in undiagnosed patients; they will need to be referred for further tests and perhaps a diagnosis of diabetes. All patients with diabetes should have an eye examination once a year. Go to: What you need Personal protective equipment: gloves, eyewear (plus apron if available) Reagent strips Continue reading >>

Glucose In Urine Test

Glucose In Urine Test

What is a Glucose in Urine Test? A glucose in urine test measures the amount of glucose in your urine. Glucose is a type of sugar. It is your body's main source of energy. A hormone called insulin helps move glucose from your bloodstream into your cells. If too much glucose gets into the blood, the extra glucose will be eliminated through your urine. A urine glucose test can be used to help determine if blood glucose levels are too high, which may be a sign of diabetes. Other names: urine sugar test; urine glucose test; glucosuria test What is it used for? A glucose in urine test may be part of a urinalysis, a test that measures different cells, chemicals, and other substances in your urine. Urinalysis is often included as part of a routine exam. A glucose in urine test may also be used to screen for diabetes. However, a urine glucose test is not as accurate as a blood glucose test. It may be ordered if blood glucose testing is difficult or not possible. Some people can't get blood drawn because their veins are too small or too scarred from repeated punctures. Other people avoid blood tests due to extreme anxiety or fear of needles. Why do I need a glucose in urine test? You may get a glucose in urine test as part of your regular checkup or if you have symptoms of diabetes and cannot take a blood glucose test. Symptoms of diabetes include: You may also need a urinalysis, which includes a glucose in urine test, if you are pregnant. If high levels of glucose in urine are found, it may indicate gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is form of diabetes that happens only during pregnancy. Blood glucose testing can be used to confirm a diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Most pregnant women are tested for gestational diabetes with a blood glucose test, between their 24th Continue reading >>

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

What Are Urine Tests for Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition that is characterized by high blood sugar levels. This is due to the body’s inability to make any or enough insulin, use insulin effectively, or both. Insulin is a hormone that helps the cells of your body absorb blood sugar to make energy. Insulin is produced by the pancreas after you eat food. There are two major classifications of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body’s immune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. This type is usually diagnosed in childhood and develops quickly. Symptoms include quick weight loss, excessive thirst, excessive urination, and fatigue. Type 1 makes up just 5 percent of diabetes cases in the United States. Type 2 diabetes is when cells aren’t able to use insulin effectively anymore. This is called insulin resistance. If the cells can’t take in and store glucose, the glucose remains in the blood. Eventually the pancreas is unable to produce enough insulin to keep blood sugar levels within normal ranges, and diabetes develops. This type of diabetes develops gradually and is associated with being overweight and having a sedentary lifestyle. Diabetes causes blood glucose (blood sugar) to rise to abnormally high levels. In type 1 diabetes, the body may also begin to burn fat for energy because the cells aren’t getting the glucose they need. When this happens, the body produces chemicals called ketones. When ketones build up in the blood, they make the blood more acidic. A buildup of ketones can poison the body and result in coma or even death. Urine tests aren’t ever used to diagnose diabetes, but they may be used to monitor a person’s levels of urine ketones and urine glucose and sometimes to make sure their diabetes is being manag Continue reading >>

Urine Tests

Urine Tests

Urine glucose Having glucose in your urine suggests that you have diabetes, but this is not always the case. For example, glucose in the urine is often seen in pregnancy, and although further testing - for example, blood glucose testing - is warranted, this does not always mean that the woman has diabetes.[1] Urine 'dipstick' tests are often used. The best time to check the urine for glucose is one to two hours after eating - unlike blood tests, which are best done following an overnight fast. Having glucose in the urine should always prompt blood testing for glucose.[1] More about urine testing. Ketones Ketones are acidic compounds that are produced when fat is broken down. The presence of ketones in the urine may suggest that a person has diabetes, but it does not always mean that this is so. For example, ketones may also be present if you have been fasting or have just undergone strenuous exercise, or if you have a diet high in fat and low in carbohydrates.[2] Protein It is important to check the urine for protein in people who have been diagnosed with diabetes, as this can identify kidney problems or a urinary tract infection.[2] References Different strategies for screening and prevention of type 2 diabetes in adults: cost effectiveness analysis. Gillies CL, Lambert PC, Abrams KR et al. BMJ. 2008;336:1180-5. Boon NA, Colledge NR and Walker BR. Davidson's Principles and Practice of Medicine Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. 2006; 20th edition. Continue reading >>

Can This Be Diabetes?

Can This Be Diabetes?

So since September I had off days where I would pee a lot. When I say a lot, I mean a lot like I had the urge to go every one hour and it was clear. The amount I urinated did not match with how much I drank. By late November and December it started to become a daily thing. The amount I urinated was not on par with how much I urinated in earlier months but I ended up having the urge every 2 hours and could only hold my pee up to 4 hours. I ended up going to my doctors because of this last week. Before I touch upon that date, I would like to also say that I have been experiencing excessive hunger (or what I think is excessive - I get hungery right after I eat meals - which may be normal really since I tend to not eat until the afternoon or even as late as evenings) and also an increase of pins and needles feeling in my legs and arms. Anyways, back to the doctor visit. During that visit I told them about what I have been experiencing and they ended up making me do a urine sample. My doctor said he couldn't find any traces of sugar (but will send it to the lab to make sure - I didn't get a call back so I assume it was negative) but they did find a trace of a uti. They prescribed me the medication that starts with a N (made me pee more than what was normal- I even had to wake up in the middle of the night which never happened). Now though I still experience hunger, and pins and needles (I cannot really say about my urination problems because I am still taking the medication). So I was wondering if I should go find another doctor and force them to do more tests on me? or is this all in my head? Continue reading >>

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