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Can You Take Steroids If You Have Diabetes?

Prednisone & Blood Glucose

Prednisone & Blood Glucose

Prednisone is an corticosteroid drug prescribed to treat a wide variety of conditions including adrenocortical deficiency, inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis and allergies. Prednisone has many side effects, the most common of which are increased appetite, nervousness, trouble sleeping and elevated blood glucose levels. Diabetics must adjust their diabetes medications while taking prednisone to account for increasing blood glucose levels. Always talk to your doctor before any adjustment to your medication regime. Video of the Day Amy Campbell, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, explains that prednisone raises blood glucose by inducing insulin resistance, causing insulin, either that produced by your body or injected insulin, to become less effective. This results in glucose building up in the blood. Prednisone also triggers your liver to release extra glucose, which when combined with insulin resistance, can lead to very high blood glucose levels, especially in diabetics who have a weakened ability to handle blood glucose fluctuation. The effect of prednisone on blood glucose is much milder in people without diabetes. Oral versus Injection According to Drugs.com, prednisone reaches its peak effectiveness in 1 to 2 hours when ingested orally and is immediately effective when administered via injection. This means your blood glucose will start to climb to high levels in a few hours after ingesting prednisone and probably much sooner after a steroid shot. It may take several weeks for prednisone to clear from your system. Frequent blood glucose checking is key for you to find out how your body is responding to prednisone therapy. Dealing with Elevated Blood Glucose For nondiabetics, acute hyperglycemi Continue reading >>

Steroid-induced Diabetes

Steroid-induced Diabetes

by Christopher D. Saudek, M.D., Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, President, American Diabetes Association (July 2001). Steroids are commonly used in medicine, and their effects on blood sugar are often seriously underestimated. To give the bottom line first, steroids seriously increase the blood sugar level of people who have diabetes, and they cause or uncover diabetes in many people who don’t yet have it. While there are several kinds of steroids, such as the ones used in muscle building (“anabolic or androgenic steroids”), in this discussion we are talking about the group called corticosteroids or glucocorticoids, exemplified by the medications hydrocortisone, prednisone or dexamethasone. For people who don’t think every day about steroids, blood sugar, insulin, diabetes or steroids, a few basic comments may help: Corticosteroids are essential hormones, made in the adrenal glands, and part of the “fight or flight” response that also includes adrenalin. Like many hormones, they must be present in the right amount: lack of corticosteroids (“Addisons disease”) and excessive corticosteroids (“Cushings disease”) are each fatal if left untreated. Corticosteroids are also used quite often medically, not only as a replacement drug in the setting of Addisons disease but to take advantage of their strong effect in suppressing inflammation and suppressing various immune problems. So they are taken to treat many illnesses, from poison ivy to severe asthma to pemphigus. Doctors always want to use them in the lowest dose possible and for the shortest time possible, because the corticosteroids have significant side effects, collectively known as “Cushings syndrome.” One strong effect of corticosteroids is that they countera Continue reading >>

How Prednisone Affects Blood Sugar

How Prednisone Affects Blood Sugar

It isn’t unusual for people with diabetes to sometimes require corticosteroid treatment. Corticosteroids, or steroids for short, are used to reduce inflammation and suppress the immune system. They are often a last resort for a wide variety of conditions, in everything from asthma to allergy attacks to arthritis and ulcerative colitis. Steroids are also prescribed to prevent the immune system from seeing donated organs as foreign bodies and rejecting them after an organ transplant. One of the most commonly used steroids is prednisone. “Among all medications available to treat different medical conditions, prednisone and similar steroids have the most profound effect on glucose metabolism. Medications such as prednisone can significantly increase glucose levels in patients with diabetes as well as individuals with impaired glucose tolerance or pre-diabetes,” says William Sullivan, M.D., a senior staff physician at Joslin Clinic in Boston and the Medical Director at the Joslin Clinic at Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital, Needham. Prednisone is amazingly effective at calming inflamed tissue and reducing pain, but that comfort sometimes comes at a high price. Prednisone’s list of side effects is long and scary. The longer you are on the drug and the higher the dose, the more likely it is that you will experience side effects. When you have diabetes, even a short course of prednisone at a low dose is likely to wreak havoc with your blood glucose levels. In fact, another name for corticosteroids is glucocorticoids in honor of the powerful effect they have on glucose metabolism. Prednisone induces elevated glucose levels by stimulating glucose secretion by the liver as well as reducing glucose transport into adipose and muscle cells. The overall effect is a reduction in g Continue reading >>

Steroids And Diabetes: The Effect On Your Glucose Levels

Steroids And Diabetes: The Effect On Your Glucose Levels

Autumn is approaching with its beautiful fall foliage, hayrides at the pumpkin patch, and harvest festivals, as well as its sniffles and running noses. Cold and flu season is a drab for everyone, but can be particularly worrisome for people with diabetes. In addition to worrying about how being sick will affect their glucose levels and whether or not cold and flu medications are sugar free, being prescribed corticosteroid (steroids) adds a whole other layer of concern. Medtronic Diabetes Clinical Manager, Beth Spencer Kline, MSN, RN, NP-C, CD is back to discuss an important aspect of diabetes management, steroid effects on blood glucose. What are steroids? Steroids are medications used to reduce inflammation and suppress the immune system. Steroid treatment is commonly prescribed for short periods of time to treat conditions such as rashes, musculoskeletal pain, injury, and respiratory ailments. However, steroids can also be prescribed for longer periods of time to treat certain inflammatory disorders, autoimmune disorders, and organ transplants. While steroids can help reduce inflammation and reduce pain, they can also significantly increase blood glucose levels in people with diabetes, as well as individuals with impaired glucose tolerance or pre-diabetes. Why is this? Steroids increase the liver’s release of glucose, and cause insulin resistance, which leads to insulin (either injected or made by one’s own pancreas) working less efficiently. What if I’m prescribed steroids and have diabetes? First, let your prescribing doctor know you have diabetes, because they may be able to prescribe an alternative medication that will not affect your glucose levels. If alternative medication is not an option, inform your diabetes healthcare team immediately so they can dete Continue reading >>

Steroid Use For Type 1 Diabetics??? Help

Steroid Use For Type 1 Diabetics??? Help

Just wondering if someone can relate to steroid usage? Is this a bad way to go or can it be okay as long as you monitor your blood sugar levels frequently? I hav only been type 1 now for 2 years and I cannot gain anymore weight. I wok out hard and am constantly active thorughout each and everyday. I was considering using a steroid called SUSTENNON, but I really need more advise and understanding beofre i do anything of the sort. Please help .... D.D. Family T1 since 1977 - using Novolog in an Animas pump. Steroids will increase your blood sugar and make control more difficult. So using them is especially not good for diabetics. If you want to build muscle, a better approach is to use more insulin during workouts. Insulin is after all the anabolic hormone. Be sure to consume enough carbs so that you don't go low, though. This is important. I have also had difficulty building muscle. I found that increasing insulin levels during and after workouts (that 60 minute window) sorted it out. Mark is right, I was given steroids for an allergic reaction and my BG was 350 constant until the drug was out of my system. I agree also. I think that roids will make your BGs much more difficult to control. If you look at the bodybuilding and diabetes forum on the exercise section, you will find that a number of us here are using insulin instead to build muscle. The bottom line is that insulin is one of the most powerful anabolic hormones out there. So, what many of us do is to take some insulin (with food of course) right after a workout. So, for example, after a workout, I'll take enough insulin to cover 30 g of carbs but will eat 45 g of carbs (since the insulin will work harder right after a workout). I can understand the appeal of roids, but I'd avoid them, especially because of you Continue reading >>

Corticosteroids And Diabetes

Corticosteroids And Diabetes

Tweet Use of corticosteroids to treat inflammation can lead to higher than normal blood glucose levels and, in longer term usage may lead to type 2 diabetes developing. What are corticosteroids? Corticosteroids are medications that contain synthetic versions of cortisol, the hormone produced by our adrenal glands and responsible for the body’s stress response. Corticosteroids may be taken orally in tablet form, via inhalers, via injections or within lotions, gels and creams. Examples of steroid medications include: Prednisolone Hydrocortisone Dexamethesone Fludrocortisone Deflazacort Corticosteroids are not to be confused with anabolic steroids, a type of steroid and class C drug which some body builders use, illegally, to build muscle. When are corticosteroids used or prescribed? Corticosteroids may be used to control inflammation as a result of conditions including: Rhuematoid arthritis Asthma Ulcerative colitis Chron’s disease Lupus Addison’s disease Can steroids lead to diabetes? One of the side effects of oral corticosteroids is that they can increase blood glucose levels and increase insulin resistance, which can lead to type 2 diabetes. Typically, blood glucose levels will return to normal after you finish taking the steroids but in some cases, particularly if you have pre-existing risk factors for type 2 diabetes, you may be diagnosed with this form of diabetes. Being on steroids for a longer period of time, over 3 months, may also increase your risk of type 2 diabetes. Treating diabetes when on steroids If you have diabetes prior to starting on oral corticosteroids, you need to be aware that your blood glucose levels may rise whilst you are taking steroids. This is more likely to be the case if you are taking steroids orally. If you do not currently monit Continue reading >>

Asthma And Diabetes: What’s The Link?

Asthma And Diabetes: What’s The Link?

So, what’s it like to have diabetes and asthma? Well, diabetes is a condition where the blood has high levels of sugar in it. It is normally caused by the body producing insufficient insulin. Symptoms of diabetes include excessive thirst, increased urination and blurred vision. Asthma is a condition that causes patients to have trouble breathing, because of the swelling of the lungs airways. Symptoms of asthma include shortness of breath, tightening of the chest, wheezing and coughing. So, mix these two together and that is what it’s like to have both diabetes and asthma. However, there is some good news if you have one of them, because there is some light at the end of this tunnel. Is There a Link Between Asthma and Diabetes? When it comes to asthma and diabetes, is there a link between the two? Well, we discussed what the two are and their symptoms above, so now let’s look in to the connection between the two. The answer is that people who have diabetes do have higher rates of having asthma. These patients do tend to have a hard time maintaining their blood glucose levels and keeping their asthma under control. Further reading: Throughout the years, various studies have shown that people who have diabetes that is not under control or is poorly maintained, are the ones who are at a higher risk of developing asthma, because their lung functioning seems to be weaker than those that have diabetes that is properly controlled or maintained. On the reverse side, these studies also concluded that people who suffer from asthma are at a higher risk of developing diabetes and need to be careful. Reasons Steroids and Diabetes Don’t Mix Steroids are used in asthma patients to reduce the inflammation and swelling of the airways of the lungs. The most common steroids are cor Continue reading >>

Prednisone And Diabetes: What Is The Connection?

Prednisone And Diabetes: What Is The Connection?

Prednisone is a steroid that works in a similar way to cortisol, which is the hormone normally made by the body's adrenal glands. Steroids are used to treat a wide range of conditions from autoimmune disorders to problems related to inflammation, such as arthritis. They work by reducing the activity of the body's immune system and reducing inflammation and so are useful in preventing tissue damage. However, steroids may also affect how the body reacts to insulin, a hormone that controls the level of sugar in the blood. Contents of this article: How do steroids affect blood sugar levels? Steroids can cause blood sugar levels to rise by making the liver resistant to the insulin produced by the pancreas. When blood sugar levels are high, insulin is secreted from the pancreas and delivered to the liver. When insulin is delivered to the liver, it signals it to reduce the amount of sugar it normally releases to fuel cells. Instead, sugar is transported straight from the bloodstream to the cells. This process reduces the overall blood sugar concentration. Steroids can make the liver less sensitive to insulin. They can make the liver carry on releasing sugar even if the pancreas is releasing insulin, signalling it to stop. If this continues, it causes insulin resistance, where the cells no longer respond to the insulin produced by the body or injected to control diabetes. This condition is called steroid-induced diabetes. Steroid-induced diabetes Diabetes is a condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes: in which the pancreas fails to produce any insulin. Type 2 diabetes: in which the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin, or the body's cells fail to react to the insulin produced. Steroid-induce Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Prednisone

What You Need To Know About Prednisone

What is prednisone? Prednisone is a prescription drug. This means your healthcare provider has given it to you as part of a treatment plan. Prednisone is part of a group of drugs called corticosteroids (often called "steroids"). Other steroid drugs include prednisolone, hydrocortisone, and methylprednisolone. Prednisone can be given in different ways, including pill, injection, and inhaled. It is usually given as a pill when used after a kidney transplant, or for certain kidney disorders. How does it work? Steroid drugs, such as prednisone, work by lowering the activity of the immune system. The immune system is your body’s defense system. Steroids work by slowing your body’s response to disease or injury. Prednisone can help lower certain immune-related symptoms, including inflammation and swelling. What is prednisone used for? Prednisone is used to treat many different diseases like: Prednisone can also help avoid organ rejection after a kidney transplant, because of its ability to lower your immune system’s response to the new kidney. The body recognizes a transplanted organ as a foreign mass. This triggers a response by the body’s immune system to attack it. Prednisone can also be used to manage other kidney disorders, including: These conditions can lead to nephrotic syndrome. As a result, large amounts of protein leaks into the urine. This in turn reduces the amount of protein in your blood, known as proteinuria. Prednisone is used to help lower proteinuria in these disorders. What are the side effects of prednisone? However, prednisone also has possible side effects. These may include: Headaches Changes in mood Slowed healing of cuts and bruises Acne Fatigue Dizziness Changes in appetite Weight gain Swelling (face, arms, hands, lower legs, or feet) Can pr Continue reading >>

Expert Answers: Do Asthma Steroids Cause Diabetes?

Expert Answers: Do Asthma Steroids Cause Diabetes?

Community Question: I’ve read a lot of people say that they got diabetes because they used asthma steroids. Is this true? I am so worried as I need to use steroids for my asthma. Response from Leon Lebowitz, RRT: The medical treatment of asthma focuses on a step-wise approach, as recommended by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Medications can include rescue inhalers, inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), long acting beta agonists (LABAs), and oral corticosteroids, to name a few. The medical literature reports that ICS are the most effective medications for the reliable control of long-term asthma. Inhaled corticosteroids are the very backbone of asthma treatment for most adults and children with persistent asthma. Oral corticosteroids tend be used in the treatment of severe acute asthma and may be used at the beginning or end of an attack, usually on a short-term basis. They are only used on a long-term basis to treat patients with the most severe asthma. Corticosteroids carry a risk of side effects, some of which can cause serious health problems. Because oral corticosteroids affect the entire body (instead of just a particular area, as with aerosols), this route of administration is the most likely to cause serious side effects. When these are used over a long period of time, you may experience high blood sugar. High blood sugar can trigger or worsen diabetes, which is the main concern you expressed. In order to get the most benefit from corticosteroid medications with the least amount of risk, I would suggest trying lower doses or intermittent dosing, with your physician directing treatment. If it is at all possible, perhaps you can switch to inhaled corticosteroids, again with your physician’s approval. As well, you can make healthy choices during therapy Continue reading >>

Steroids (prednisone) And Diabetes?

Steroids (prednisone) And Diabetes?

I've heard repeatedly on this and another diabetes forum that steroids can raise your blood sugar. Well I'm finding that out now for myself. My ENT prescribed prednisone to get the swelling down in my nose (as well as an antibiotic) from my sugeries on Aug 23rd. My first dose of steroids was about 6 hours ago and I just checked my bg and it was 180. I'm rarely at 180 as I'm pre-diabetic. I only get to 180 if I've eaten sugar or sugar-derived ingredients such as gummy candy or drink a lot of a regular soda. What if anything can I do to help lower my bg?? I can't exercise due to back problems or I'd try that. I'll be on these meds for 5 days. I hope 5 days isn't going to seriously hurt me in any way. I'm a bit scared. I usually try to keep my bg under 140 for after meals and around 120 or lower for fasting and in between meals. Oh boy. 180... D.D. Family diabetic since 1997, on insulin 2000 Cut out all carbs till you stop the predisone. Fish, meat, eggs, brocolli, cauliflower, green beans, peppers, egg and nuts and cheese. Nothing else. Oh I hadn't thought to do that. (This is all so new to me :P) Thank you. I'll do that. YUP, for me it was 350 constant until the drug was out of my system. My dad was on prednisone for many years to reduce swelling in his retinas. He developed diabetes because of it. I think you just have to ride it out for a few days until you stop taking it. Eating a no carb diet for a few days may help but I'm not sure. It didn't matter what I did for two weeks while I was on steroids my bs was high, you just have to ride it out and short term shouldn't leave you with any complications. We the willing, following the unknowing are doing the impossible. We have done so much for so long with so little that we are now able to do anything with nothing. A co Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: Managing Blood Sugars On Steroids, Considering Whether To Stick With Your Meds

Ask D'mine: Managing Blood Sugars On Steroids, Considering Whether To Stick With Your Meds

Meds, meds, meds. What's a PWD to do? They can be confusing and scary, and leave you wondering if the benefits outweigh the risks. We're no doctors, but we can talk about known side effects and the trade-off's many patients have to make. Join us this week for a pill-popping edition of our diabetes advice column, Ask D'Mine, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and community educator Wil Dubois. {Need help navigating life with diabetes? Email us at [email protected]} Joanne from Texas, type 2, writes: I have bronchitis really bad so my doctor put me on prednisone and my sugars have been running outrageously high! Do you have any suggestions for handling blood sugars while on steroid medications like this? [email protected] D'Mine answers: Prednisone is a steroid, well, technically a corticosteroid, that's notorious for kicking blood sugar through the roof. It's used to treat all kinds of different ailments ranging from arthritis, to allergic reactions, to lupus, to some cancers, and even for muscle spasms—which is how I came to experience it for myself a bit over a year ago. The ER doc told me, "Too bad you're diabetic." OK, so there's not really any good way to respond to that, now is there? So I just said, "Because?..." Where upon he told me that if I weren't diabetic he'd just use prednisone to fix me right up. Where upon I assured him that I wasn't really a diabetic so much as a superbetic with a pump and a CGM and extraordinary knowledge of all things diabetes and he should just whip out his prescription pad and let me worry about the silly blood sugar. My mother has a saying that pride cometh before a banana peel. I took my first prednisone pill at a blood sugar of 96 mg/dL. An hour later I was at 552 mg/dL. I ran my insulin pump dry fighting the blood sugar. Continue reading >>

Steroid Diabetes

Steroid Diabetes

Steroid diabetes (also "steroid-induced diabetes") is a medical term referring to prolonged hyperglycemia due to glucocorticoid therapy for another medical condition. It is usually, but not always, a transient condition. Medical conditions[edit] The most common glucocorticoids which cause steroid diabetes are prednisolone and dexamethasone given systemically in "pharmacologic doses" for days or weeks. Typical medical conditions in which steroid diabetes arises during high-dose glucocorticoid treatment include severe asthma, organ transplantation, cystic fibrosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and induction chemotherapy for leukemia or other cancers. Insulin[edit] Glucocorticoids oppose insulin action and stimulate gluconeogenesis, especially in the liver, resulting in a net increase in hepatic glucose output. Most people can produce enough extra insulin to compensate for this effect and maintain normal glucose levels, but those who cannot develop steroid diabetes. Criteria[edit] The diagnostic criteria for steroid diabetes are those of diabetes (fasting glucoses persistently above 125 mg/dl (7 mM) or random levels above 200 mg/dl (11 mM)) occurring in the context of high-dose glucocorticoid therapy. Insulin levels are usually detectable, and sometimes elevated, but inadequate to control the glucose. In extreme cases the hyperglycemia may be severe enough to cause nonketotic hyperosmolar coma. Treatment[edit] Treatment depends on the severity of the hyperglycemia and the estimated duration of the steroid treatment. Mild hyperglycemia in an immunocompetent patient may not require treatment if the steroids will be discontinued in a week or two. Moderate hyperglycemia carries an increased risk of infection, especially fungal, and especially in people with other risk factors s Continue reading >>

How Does Taking Prednisone Affect My Diabetes?

How Does Taking Prednisone Affect My Diabetes?

Prednisone may complicate your diabetes treatment by raising your blood glucose levels. You may have to adjust your diabetes treatment plan if you start taking prednisone, which is a corticosteroid medication used to treat inflammatory conditions in the body. When you stop prednisone therapy, your blood glucose levels should drop to where they were previously. If you need to take prednisone, be sure to talk to your doctor about the best ways to keep your diabetes under control while you're on the medication. Prednisone and other steroid medications tend to increase blood glucose levels. Most people find that they need more medication or insulin when taking prednisone (or a similar type of medication). It's important to be aware of this and have a game plan from your healthcare provider as to how to manage higher blood glucose. Your provider may ask you to call him or her for a medication adjustment, for example. Some people may even temporarily need to start taking insulin while they are on prednisone. Also, it may take several days to a week or so after stopping the prednisone before blood glucose levels go back to "normal." Prednisone is used for a variety of conditions such as asthma and other lung problems. It acts like a hormone that your body makes called "cortisol." Cortisol and prednisone both cause the body to make glucose when you're not eating (like during the night). They can worsen diabetes control. Cortisol is called a "stress hormone" because the body releases it to deal with stresses like accidents, infections, or burns. That's part of the reason why it takes more insulin to keep blood glucose near normal during an infection. If you have had prednisone prescribed for any reason and you have diabetes, you will need to take more diabetes medication. Predni Continue reading >>

The Ups And Downs Of Meds And Diabetes (part 1): Steroids

The Ups And Downs Of Meds And Diabetes (part 1): Steroids

If you take any kind of medication for your diabetes management, whether that be metformin, sulfonylureas, exenatide (brand name Byetta), or insulin, for example, hopefully you’re familiar with how that drug works and what the effect is on your blood glucose control. But, just like people who don’t have diabetes, you’re going to come down with a cold or the flu every now and then. You may need to take steroids for a while. Maybe you take medicine for controlling your blood pressure or your cholesterol. How familiar are you with these drugs, particularly in terms of your blood glucose levels? Most of us are prescribed medicines for various reasons at one time or another. Unfortunately, we aren’t always told by our physician or pharmacist how they work and how they might interact with other medicines. And in the case of diabetes, chances are you’re not always given information on how a drug may affect your blood glucose level or how a it may interact with your diabetes medication—and many of them do. Your pharmacist should be your number one source for any questions you have about any drug that you take. But we can scratch the surface and take a look at this important area of diabetes management. We’ll look at steroids this week. Steroids Steroids (corticosteroids, glucocorticoids) are a potent class of medications (meds for short) that are known to raise blood glucose levels, often quite significantly. Steroids are given to help reduce inflammation that may occur with arthritis or asthma. People with certain immune disorders, such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, or sarcoidosis, usually need to take steroids as well. While steroids are very effective at doing what they’re supposed to do, one of the side effects is an increase in blood glucose levels. In fa Continue reading >>

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