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Can You Take Pre Workout If Your Diabetic?

Know Before You Go: A Pre-workout Diabetes Checklist

Know Before You Go: A Pre-workout Diabetes Checklist

Know Before You Go: A Pre-workout Diabetes Checklist When the weather gets warm, many people with diabetes may be interested in starting a new exercise routine, or increasing the intensity of a physical fitness plan theyve already started. Either way, its important to keep in mind that if you have diabetes, you always need to be prepared before exercising. Always speak with your diabetes care team prior to starting a new fitness routine. Once you've been given the all-clear for your workout regimen, ask yourself these questions prior to each workout. Before exercising, it's very important that you check your blood glucose to determine if it is low, high, or in a normal range. If it is low, have a snack with 15 grams of carbohydrate, and wait 15 minutes for your glucose to return to normal. Check your glucose again in fifteen minutes to make sure youre glucose is rising. If it isnt, continue to follow the "15/15" rule (15 grams of carbohydrate for hypoglycemia, and check glucose again in fifteen minutes) until it is in a normal range. If your glucose is high, check for ketones ; if ketones are present, dont exercise. Do I have fast-acting snacks in case of hypoglycemia (low glucose)? Always be prepared for these situations when youre about to work out. Many drugstores carry fast-acting glucose snacks that rapidly increase your glucose, and many of them are small enough to take to the gym, or outside (depending on where you work out). Bring your glucose meter, since youll want to check your glucose after every 30 minutes of exercise. Is there something I am wearing that identifies me as a person with diabetes? Wear a necklace, bracelet, or carry something that identifies you as a person with diabetes. Also, indicate whether or not you take insulin and list an emergency c Continue reading >>

Supplements For Diabetics

Supplements For Diabetics

Diabetes is a condition people face when the body goes throughan abnormally high blood glucose levels. This is caused by a person having a difficult time producing or making use of insulin. The American Diabetes Association shows that you should keep the amount of sugar and saturated fat rather low in you diet. If you are diabetic and also weight lifting, you need to choose the right supplements that fit your dietary needs. Many people take pre-workouts before a workout in order toincreaseenergy and strength. For diabetics, you should choose a pre-workout that is caffeine free. Caffeine may interfere with glucose levels in the body and makes it hard for people to control their blood sugar.You can Build Your Own Stim-Free Pre-Workout on Campusprotein.com to take your workouts to the next level, minusthe added caffeine and stimulants. There are many more benefits for diabetics when it comes to adding protein powder to your diet. Although protein is a great wayto build and maintain muscle, it can also help lower blood glucose levels.Choosing the right protein powder is very important, you want to stay away from oneswith added sugars or fat. Whey isolates will be your best choice, they contain minimal fats and easily digestible protein.Wheyhas theability to boost metabolic rate, improve insulin and blood sugar metabolism, and help maintain appetite that maybenefit many people. Here are some of the best protein options: Continue reading >>

What Pre Work Out Supplement Do You Diabetics Take?

What Pre Work Out Supplement Do You Diabetics Take?

What pre work out supplement do you Diabetics take? What pre work out supplement do you Diabetics take? I would like to know what pre work out supp you diabetics take. My friend here is diabetic, and he generally takes stim-free stuff or lightly stimmed products. High doses of caffeine really seemed to mess with his blood sugar I had to resubscribe to my own thread. Is there a way to make this function automatically. inb4 steven. he will have the best insight, probably. Survived the BOZZ neg, and back to green in under two months! look at the diabetic thread on here, should have some good answers on there. As a diabetic I would suggest taking Xtend. It will give you pumps as you work out and its stimulant free. look at the diabetic thread on here, should have some good answers on there. As a diabetic I would suggest taking Xtend. It will give you pumps as you work out and its stimulant free. Isn't Xtend a BCAA? Does it come in a pill form or is it only a powder? If the goal is a stim free pwo, I'd go for hemavol or body octane hv. Ultima + 3-5g Primaforce Citrulline Malate Ultima + Pumpbol (Seems to be the best non-stim pre workout for most.) Stim Free Ragnarok (Looking forward to order this in the future.) Ultima + BO + Hemavol (Use this when cycling off stims, love it.) Best pre workout creatines to stack with these -SAN CM2 Caps(Creatine Nitrate) Green Magnitude(Magnesium Creatine Chelate) MAN Clout(Tricreatine orotate) Own both SAN CM2 and Green Magnitude, have yet to try Man Clout, but I hear it gives a nice focus during your workout. Continue reading >>

Exercising With Diabetes: Is It Better To Eat Before Or After Your Workout?

Exercising With Diabetes: Is It Better To Eat Before Or After Your Workout?

Whether it’s best to eat before or after a workout has been debated for decades, and the decision becomes even more complicated if you have diabetes. “For someone with diabetes, they not only have to think about fuel for exercise, but they also have to think about glycemic control,” says Monet S. Bland, a clinical exercise physiologist and diabetes educator with Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. Exercise impacts your blood sugar, so you need to make sure your levels aren’t too high when you start exercising, but also not so low that they’ll plummet during your workout. So while a study published in November 2010 in the Journal of Physiology found that not eating before exercise helped people burn fat, people with diabetes need to maintain blood sugar levels, and should plan to eat before, after, and sometimes even during exercise, Bland says. That’s the general recommendation, but it’s not a one-size-fits-all approach. You need to keep an eye on how your body responds, since “some people are more sensitive to the effects of exercise versus others,” Bland says. Not sure where to start? Bland recommends working with an endocrinologist or an exercise physiologist to establish blood glucose targets and an exercise plan that’s safe for you. No matter what, you’ll want to check your blood sugar before working out so you know how to fuel up. Your goal is a level greater than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) — but always skip the workout if your blood sugar is at or higher than 250 mg/dL and ketosis is present, or greater than 300 mg/dL without ketosis. Be sure to talk to your doctor about your blood glucose targets before and after exercise. The Best Pre-Workout Snacks Your best bet is eating a balanced meal an hour to an hour and a half before your Continue reading >>

10 Pre-workout Snack Ideas For Diabetics

10 Pre-workout Snack Ideas For Diabetics

If you have diabetes, regular exercise will provide you with a whole host of health benefits. It will not only improve your fitness levels, but it will also enhance the sensitivity of insulin, the hormone that regulates your blood sugar levels.[1] To eliminate your risk of suffering from low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia)[2] during a workout, you may need to consume a pre-workout snack 30 to 60 minutes before you begin exercising. In addition to preventing hypoglycemia, your pre-workout snack should provide you with sufficient energy and ward off hunger pangs. The carbohydrate food group is the main food group you will need to consume before exercise. However, you may find it difficult to consume the right amount of carbohydrate at the right time[3]. If you consume an excessive amount of carbohydrate before your workout, you may put yourself at a greater risk of suffering from high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia)[4]. If, on the other hand, you consume an insufficient amount of carbohydrate, you may put yourself at a greater risk of suffering from hypoglycemia. You may need to experiment to determine the best pre-workout snack for your needs. However, you should always choose a snack that contains a moderate amount of protein and carbohydrate and a small amount of fat. The following 10 pre-workout snack ideas should provide you with some food for thought: 10 Pre-Workout Snack Ideas 1. Bananas Bananas contain complex carbohydrates, which will provide your body with the energy that it needs to power through a workout. Bananas are also rich in potassium, which will support your muscle and nerve function. 2. Oats Oats are rich in fiber, which means that they will gradually release carbohydrates into your bloodstream. This steady release of sugar will keep your energy l Continue reading >>

Recommended Weight Lifting Supplements For Diabetics

Recommended Weight Lifting Supplements For Diabetics

Diabetes is a medical condition in which you experience abnormally high blood glucose levels because your body has trouble producing or using insulin. The American Diabetes Association explains that you should limit saturated fat intake and keep sugar intake low, as that can rapidly increase your blood sugar levels. Because many weight lifting supplements contain both of these nutrients, you need to choose supplements carefully and consult a doctor before using any. Many protein bars are high in saturated fat and sugar to overcome the taste of healthy ingredients. However, there are some low-fat, low-sugar protein bars available that may not significantly impact your blood glucose levels. Protein bars such as Doctor's CarbRite Diet bars and Allmax Isofemme bars, which have 6 g or less of fat and 1 g or less of sugar per bar, may support weight lifting because they are high in protein. Both bars use sugar alcohols, which provide fewer calories than sugar and don't cause quick increases in your blood sugar levels. Weight gainers are high-calorie, high-protein supplements that come in powdered form. Unfortunately, many of these weight gainers use sugar and fat to increase the calorie content. Try to find weight gainers that provide fiber and have low sugar and low fat content, such as Cytosport Cytogainer. This supplement contains only 7 g of sugar, 6 g of fat and 4 g of fiber in each 570-calorie serving. Protein powders tend to contain between 100 and 200 calories per serving, and offer primarily protein and much fewer grams of fat and carbohydrates than weight gainers. However, these powder still may contain added sugars and saturated fat. For this reason, you may want to choose a whey protein isolate, a type of protein powder with very little fat and at least 90 percent Continue reading >>

Pre Workout Supplement

Pre Workout Supplement

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. does anyone know about this pre workout stuff called jacked and the intra workout supplement called xtend,im a type 1 and i was wondering if they were safe because both claim to have no sugar Yeah, how could a product called "jacked" be all bad! As an aside...methamphetamine has no sugar in it, either. i was asking for some useful feedback not a smart remark Details: Ultra-Intense Muscle-Gorging Strength, Energy, Power and Endurance. Proprietary Blend: Arginine Alpha-Ketoglutarate, Creatine Monohydrate, Beta Alanine, Caffeine, 1,3-Dimethylamylamine (Geranium [stem]), Shizandrol A). Directions: Stir 1-3 Ultra-Concentrated scoops with 4-8 ounces of cold water and consume 30-45 minutes before beginning activity. Due to extreme potency, it's highly recommended to assess tolerance by using a 1 or 1.5 scoop serving before consuming full dose, especially if you are sensitive to stimulants. Some individuals may find 1, 1.5 or 2 scoops per serving is the ideal dose for workout domination. DO NOT EXCEED 3 SCOOPS IN ANY 24 HOUR PERIOD. Well, that sounds safe to me...I mean, it doesn't mention sugar. I'd throw down like a full glass and go out and rip trees out by their trunks. I'd bench press a Volkswagen Beetle, if I could. Does it have anything to do with diabetes? I think I'd have to ask a doctor about that...but you're welcome to poll the rest of the iron-pumpers, here. I used Jacked a while back for a period of about 3 months. I'm a Type-1 who lifts weights and swims 3-4 days per week. I can't say that I noticed any real benefits outside of the mild stimulant effect of the caffeine. I can however, Continue reading >>

5 Tips For Exercise With Type 1

5 Tips For Exercise With Type 1

A diabetes life coach shares her secrets for good blood glucose control while working out. Throughout July, we’re featuring excerpts from Ginger Vieira’s new book, Dealing with Diabetes Burnout. In this final edited excerpt from the book, the longtime life coach and diabetes advocate shares the lessons she’s learned from years of exercise with Type 1 diabetes. There is no doubt that exercising with diabetes is about one million times more challenging than exercising without diabetes, particularly if you take insulin. Low blood sugars and high blood sugars are major party-poopers in the middle of a walk, yoga, spinning class, tai chi, or strength-training. I’m here to tell you that it can be done and you can enjoy exercise, but it takes a little work, a little more effort, and a bunch of self-study. sponsor When I personally started to become really active and committed to exercising regularly, I was working really hard to balance my blood sugar during things like Ashtanga yoga, strength-training, and various forms of cardio like power-walking and the stairmaster. And it wasn’t easy, but at the very same time I was learning with the help of my trainer, Andrew, about what was literally going on in my body during different types of exercise. Learning about this basic science, taking a deep breath, and viewing my body as a science experiment is the only reason I am able to exercise happily and confidently today. Read “25 Facts to Know About Exercise and Type 1 Diabetes.” Here are five lessons I’ve learned on balancing blood sugars during exercise: 1. Understand What Type of Exercise You’re Doing Jogging and strength-training will both have very different impacts on your blood sugar, even though your heart rate may rise during both. Cardiovascular or aerobi Continue reading >>

Pre-workout? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Pre-workout? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hey guys, I'm been trying to get my butt to the gym early in the morning. I want to get it out of the way right away so I don't have to worry about it after work, because it cuts right into my nap time. So I was wondering if you guys take any pre-workout at all? I'm thinking about just caffeine pills because of how cheap they are from this article I was reading. This was the article btw. Plus, I like the fact that I don't have to worry about the other stuff that comes in it. I think caffeine pills will wreak havoc with your naptime. a good cup of morning coffee normal kind will be good... nothing else is required ... some times i eat before doing my 4 hours fitness sometimes I dont... well but the healthier to a diabetic is I guess to eat some before... but if one wants to use ketosis it is better not to eat untill after... like not having eaten since the dinner the night before... then there is ketosis if not eating breakfast before.. and eating low carb in general With respect, and with great experience of trying (and variously failing) to inject more exercise into my life for about 30 years - your post raises a few red flags. You are struggling to get up in the morning You want your gym out of the way so it doesn't interfere with the rest of your life You are considering drugs (if you count caffeine a drug, which I do) to 'motivate' and 'enable' you I think all of those suggest that no matter how many caffiene pills you pop, your gym career is unlikely to flourish. No matter how enthusiastic, dedicated and motivated, those early starts plus full time work, can be brutal - and I'm thinking that your motivation is at a lower level than you hope. You Continue reading >>

Pre-workout Snack Options For Athletes With Diabetes

Pre-workout Snack Options For Athletes With Diabetes

The incidence of diabetes keeps increasing in the population as more and more people are diagnosed with the disease. There are two types: Type 1, in which the body cannot produce the hormone insulin and the person must inject it; and Type 2, in which the body is resistant to insulin, or fails to absorb it properly, and the person can treat the disease with diet and exercise to an extent where insulin injections may not be necessary. Type 1 diabetes can be debilitating and even life threatening. However, this doesn't always have to be the case. With proper nutrition, athletes with diabetes can manage their symptoms, control the disease and have the energy they need for hard workouts and intense competition. People with diabetes regularly test their blood to measure their glucose level. If their blood glucose is high, they take insulin via injections or an insulin pump. They must calculate their insulin dosage based on several factors, including the amount of carbohydrate they have consumed and their level of physical activity. If the calculation is incorrect, the person will experience hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) or hypoglycemia (low blood glucose). Either extreme can cause performance to suffer dramatically, and affected athletes are usually unable to continue their workout until they bring their blood glucose level into the normal range (generally 70 to 120 mg, but can vary from person to person)—either with insulin (to counter hyperglycemia) or with a fast acting sugar, like cranberry juice (to counter hypoglycemia). The good news is that you can avoid the highs and lows with a few quick steps before exercise. To safely get the most out of your workouts, make them part of your routine 30 to 60 minutes before activity. 1. Check your blood glucose levels one ho Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

You will find supplements for anything and everything these days. Even when you do not suffer from an ailment, supplements are suggested to keep you healthy and ailment-free. According to CDC, use of supplements is common among US adult population – over 50% adults used supplements during 2003-2006, with multivitamins/multiminerals being the most commonly used. So when you are a diabetic, especially if you have prediabetes and type-2 diabetes, you may find yourself confronting a large number of options for supplements that claim to support, reduce and even cure your diabetes. Diabetes is quite a frustrating disorder and you may find yourself tempted to try out these supplements one after another. But is it really safe to take supplements when you are a diabetic? Let us find out. But before that you need to understand what exactly supplements are. Defining Supplements As the name suggests, a supplement is anything that adds on to something. A dietary supplement is therefore something that one takes in addition to one’s diet to get proper nutrition. US Congress in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act defines dietary supplements as having the following characteristics: It is a product that is intended to supplement the diet; It contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and other substances) or their constituents; It is intended to be taken by mouth as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid; It is not represented for use as a conventional food or as sole item of a mean or a diet; and, It is labeled on the front panel as being a dietary supplement. Now let us look at some general benefits and risks of taking supplements. We will discuss these in context of diabetes later in the article. Benefit Continue reading >>

Using Caffeine And Creatine In Your Workout

Using Caffeine And Creatine In Your Workout

As a physically active individual in today’s world, you are likely to be bombarded with all sorts of claims about nutritional supplements that will enhance your athletic performance. In reality, very few have been scientifically proven to have any effect on athletic performance. Here are two known to work and special concerns about their use by diabetic athletes: Caffeine Caffeine is a central nervous system stimulant found naturally in many foods and drinks such as coffee, tea, cocoa and chocolate. Caffeine directly stimulates the nervous system and increases arousal. At the same time, it increases levels of circulating free fatty acids (blood fats) and provides an alternate fuel source for your exercising muscles. Improves Training Performance Caffeine also stimulates the release of calcium in contracting muscle, allowing for greater force production and muscular strength. Research studies have found increases in performance in events primarily using the immediate, short-term, and aerobic energy systems. Doses of caffeine in legal limits may actually improve running times in various length events from one mile up to marathons. A legal amount, according to the International Olympic Committee, is an intake of less than 800 mg, depending on your body size and weight. For comparison, a five oz. cup of coffee contains 100 to150 mg, a cup of tea 50 mg, a can of cola 40 mg, a cup of cocoa five mg, a No Doz tablet 100 mg and a Vivarin tablet 200 mg. Abstaining from caffeine intake for two to three days prior to using it for sports usually increases its effectiveness, as you will be less habituated to its effects. The down side of its use is its diuretic effect, which causes you to lose more water through your urine. High blood sugar can increase your water losses as well. Y Continue reading >>

How Do I Fuel For Exercise?

How Do I Fuel For Exercise?

I have type 2 diabetes, and I am a runner. Every day I run for 1 hour. What food can I eat, and what should I drink before I run? Miguel ngel Sosa Alfonso, Colombia, South America It is not usually necessary to eat extra for activities lasting an hour or less, but depending on the intensity of exercise you do, how long you work out, and the type of medications youre on, you may need to fuel up before, during, or after a workout. To best determine if you need to eat, consider the intensity of the run and check your blood glucose at the start and end of your workout. For example, if your blood glucose typically drops 50 mg/dl during a run and your target blood glucose is 120 mg/dl, you would want to eat a snack when your pre-run blood glucose readings are less than 170 mg/dl. If your pre-run blood glucose is 200 mg/dl, however, you probably dont need a snack. If you take insulin or certain oral medications such as glyburide, glimepiride, or glipizideyou may be at a higher risk for exercise-induced hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) . In that case, eat a snack with 10 to 20 grams of carbohydrate for every 30 minutes of moderate exercise (when you can hold a conversation while working out, but cant sing). Five to 10 grams of carbohydrate should be adequate for a low-intensity run (when you can comfortably sing a tune while you exercise). Still, you may need extra carbs during or after your workout to keep your blood glucose from dipping too low. Good choices for a pre-run snack include slowly absorbed carbohydrate sources, such as whole grain snack bars, apples, peaches, dates, figs, milk, and yogurt. If you use sports drinks, which raise blood glucose quickly, consider those with 6 to 8 grams of carbohydrate per 100 milliliters of fluid. Water is generally enough to keep yo Continue reading >>

Fuel Up: What To Eat When You Work Out

Fuel Up: What To Eat When You Work Out

When you have type 2 diabetes, you want to get the most bang for your exercise buck. You’ll need to fuel up the right way before, during, and after you work out. If you can manage your diabetes with diet and exercise alone, you don’t need a pre-workout snack any more than someone without the disease. But if you take insulin or a drug that pushes your pancreas to make it, you might have to think before you snack. What to eat depends on a few things: How high your blood sugar is before you work out How long you’ll be at it What time of day you plan to do it How your body reacts to exercise Check your blood sugar. If your reading is between 200 and 300 mg/dl and you’ve already eaten at least once that day, you probably don’t need to eat anything. But you do need to check for ketones if it’s over 250. Your body makes them when it burns fat for fuel instead of sugar. Don’t exercise if you have them. If your reading is over 300, ask your doctor if exercise is OK. Otherwise, grab a snack with 15-30 grams of carbs. The lower your blood sugar is before you start and the longer you plan to work out, the larger your snack should be, up to 30 grams of carbs. You’ll probably have to try a few options and amounts to see what works best. These snacks offer 15 grams of carbs with little prep time: 1 small piece of fresh fruit (4 ounces) 1 slice of bread (1 ounce) or 1 (6-inch) tortilla 1/2 cup of oatmeal 2/3 cup of plain fat-free yogurt or sweetened with sugar substitutes These have 30 grams of carbs: 1/2 peanut butter sandwich (1 slice whole wheat bread with 1 tablespoon peanut butter) and 1 cup milk 1 English muffin and 1 teaspoon low-fat margarine 3/4 cup whole grain, ready-to-eat cereal and 1/2 cup fat-free milk Continue reading >>

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

Should I take supplements? From cinnamon and magnesium to herbal formulas claiming to smack down high blood sugar, “diabetes-friendly” supplements are popping up in health food stores and drugstores and in the medicine cabinets of more and more people with diabetes. More than 50 percent of people with diabetes say they’ve used dietary supplements, according to one 2011 study—and at least one in four has given herbal remedies a try. The big question: Should you? “People with diabetes may be looking for something that seems less potent than a medication or something that will treat other health issues beyond blood sugar control, such as high cholesterol,” notes Laura Shane-McWhorter, PharmD, a University of Utah professor of pharmacotherapy and author of The American Diabetes Association Guide to Herbs & Nutritional Supplements: What You Need to Know from Aloe to Zinc. But experts are reluctant to recommend supplements to people with diabetes for two important health reasons. First, there’s virtually no research on long-term safety. Second, no supplement controls blood sugar as effectively as diabetes drugs (in combination with a healthy lifestyle). “There are no miracle treatments for diabetes,” Shane-McWhorter says. “The most important thing to know if you have diabetes is that no supplement will take care of it for you. Diabetes is a condition that can be well-controlled with a healthy lifestyle plus medication if needed. A supplement can’t replace those.” And new science is changing the supplement landscape. In consulting the latest research as well as supplement experts for this report on the best-studied and most widely used supplements, we found that some popular pills—chromium, we’re talking about you—aren’t living up to their reput Continue reading >>

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