diabetestalk.net

Can You Take Metformin If You Don T Have A Gallbladder

Side Conversations: Metformin

Side Conversations: Metformin

Even though it has been over a year since I ceased taking metformin , I still question my decision to do so. With news reports touting the benefits of this inexpensive and trusted prescription medication, I ask myself the same questions almost every day. Did I try hard enough? Did I try long enough? Am I doing harm by sticking to diet and exercise? While at the Roche Diabetes Social Media Summit last week, my inability to tolerate metformin came up in a couple of side conversations. The first came soon after Christel introduced me to Andreas Stuhr, M.D., medical director of Roche Diabetes Care North America (and someone living with type 1 diabetes). As I told my story, he did not judge or encourage me to try again, even agreeing that it is not the best option for someone with prior irritable bowel issues. I also mentioned how I experienced the best blood glucose readings of my short type 2 diabetes life almost immediately after stopping metformin. This did not seem to come as a surprise to Dr. Stuhr, as he seemed to indicate that the positive effects on blood glucose can sometimes outlast the medication. Christel politely interrupted and asked me if being involved in online message boards and in the diabetes blogging community had any impact on how long I stayed on the drug that was causing so much gastrointestinal distress. I explained that I would have quit a lot sooner had I not had the support of people who suggested extended release metformin (still got sick), fiber supplements (still got sick), and changing the timing of medicating myself (still got sick). The second conversation happened on the way from the hotel (paid for by Roche) to the airport (flight paid by Roche) in the town car (also paid for by Roche). The evening before, I had been impressed as Wil tal Continue reading >>

Diarrhea After Gallbladder Removal??

Diarrhea After Gallbladder Removal??

How many of you who have had your gallbladders out have this problem? I've had some "issues" on and off for a few months that I'm still not sure if it is lactose intolerance or gallbladder problems. Definitely having gallbladder type pain and my doctor thinks that I have gallstones. I'm having an US on the 2nd. Anyway, on reading about this I'm finding that an awful lot of people have chronic diarrhea after having their gallbladder removed. My mom has this problem because she takes metformin and I've seen her quality of life having to live with this. Not a lot of fun, yk? So, the potential of having this side effect really scares me. I just don't think I could deal with having the runs for the rest of my life. Not to mention that it doesn't sound healthy at all to have that. yep, welcome to the world of bowel problems. It will get better after a year...no kidding, a year. If you take some acidopholus, it will help because your body is getting used to all the bile being dumped in, and also the new way you are earting.I have a bile duct blockage now that I have to have surgery for, and also adhesions and internal hernias, so I have to go in and have a hole put into my old stomach and then a scope put into the bile duct, and deal with all that.You will be fine, but go to Whole Foods or some health food store and get some acidopholus, you have to take it for a while before it kicks in...about 1 month.Take care, you will be better off without a non working gallbladder now! Yikes! Ok, so with this diarrhea you get...sorry for the TMI but is it just loose or is it like you have to live by the bathroom for a year? Is it only right after eating or is it random? And did any of you have bowel problems on and off after your gallbladder went bad? Because I do sometimes now and I'm Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Be Taken Before Or After A Gallbladder Removed?

Can Metformin Be Taken Before Or After A Gallbladder Removed?

Gallbladder Removed and Pain Metformin and PCOS Gallbladder Removed and Gallstones Metformin and Diabetes Gallbladder Removed and Weight Loss Metformin and Clomid Gallbladder Removed and Feeling Sick Metformin and Weight Loss Gallbladder Removed and Nausea Metformin and Pregnancy Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any malfunctioning or misapplication of these algorithms. We cannot guarantee results and occasional interruptions in updating may occur. Please continue to check the site for updated information. Continue reading >>

No Gall Bladder And Diabetes

No Gall Bladder And Diabetes

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community There must be quite a few people who, like myself, have had their gall bladder removed. This was nearly 4 years ago. Then last October I was diagnosed T2 diabetic. Now before I was diagnosed there were certain foods I could not eat as they sent me scurrying to the loo within half an hour, and if I didn't eat within an hour of getting up it was the same scenario. Since diagnosis I can once again eat certain food without doing the Boston quick step, however the metformin in the morning would make me qualify for the Olympic 100 yard dash. So I have to time when I eat to when I want to go out as I can't go anywhere for about an hour. I don't know if this is purely down to the metformin or a combination of that and minus a gall bladder, and would the absence of said gall bladder have any effect on my bs readings? Just a thought as my liver is now dripping bile constantly into my digestive system. Hi @killerkaz , This article should help. When the gallbladder is removed, bile made by the liver can no longer be stored between meals. Instead, the bile flows directly into the intestine anytime the liver produces it. Thus, there still is bile in the intestine to mix with food and fat. It is true that there is not as much bile, but there is enough to allow the digestion and transfer of fat. People who have had their gallbladders removed do not need to limit the fat in their diet. The only clear side effect of removal of the gallbladder is diarrhea . This occurs in about 10% of patients. The diarrhea occurs because of the change in the way bile is delivered to the intestine once the gallbladder has been removed. Bile and the way it is delivered to the intestine a Continue reading >>

My Endo's

My Endo's "take" On Metformin

I had a long chat with my endocrinologist yesterday about metformin. The bottom line for this forum is that, in her experience, metformin reduces fbg by 15-30 mg/dl which translates to an A1c reduction of 0.5%-1.0%. That is the first time I ever heard a doctor assign a numerical value to metformin treatment. I thought you might be interested. I stopped metformin XR a year ago because of chronic diarrhea. She said that different people have trouble with metformin from different manufacturers. In my case, I wanted to try the Bristol-Myers brand (Glucophage XR) so she wrote me a script for that. It is not covered by my health insurance (so I sent the script to Canada) but if it works better for me than generic metformin XR, she will write a letter to get my insurance company to cover it as "medically necessary". In the past, metformin XR reduced my fbg by about 15 mg/dl, which is consistent with her experience. Although I stopped taking metformin because of chronic diarrhea, the diarrhea never stopped. I tried many things including berberine, metamucil, very expensive probiotics, everything. I still have chronic diarrhea. She suggested that I try the diet that is being recommended for irritable bowel syndrome patients. It's called the FODMAP diet and it has something to do with eliminating non-digestible short-chain polysaccharides from your diet. FODMAP has helped several of her patients who experience chronic diarrhea and it has been gaining support among IBS doctors because of recent positive clinical trials. I hope some of you find this information useful. "My fitness trajectory in my senior years does not have to be a continuous downward slope-- I do have some control over that." --Chrysalis Dx T2; 2005-2014: A1c 6.5-7.0% (ave 6.7) with 2000 mg/day metformin + 40 U/d Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Metformin Use Correlates With Reduced Risk Of Gallstones In Diabetic Patients: A 12-year Follow-up Study

Metformin Use Correlates With Reduced Risk Of Gallstones In Diabetic Patients: A 12-year Follow-up Study

Metformin Use Correlates with Reduced Risk of Gallstones in Diabetic Patients: A 12-Year Follow-up Study We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Metformin Use Correlates with Reduced Risk of Gallstones in Diabetic Patients: A 12-Year Follow-up Study Kuan-Fu Liao, Hsun-Yang Chuang, and Shih-Wei Lai Objective: Few studies are available on the association between gallstones and metformin use. The objective of the study was to determine whether metformin use is associated with gallstones. Methods: A population-based retrospective cohort study was conducted using the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. Subjects of newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus were included from 2002 to 2013. The metformin-exposure group was defined as 29 cumulative defined daily dose (DDD) of metformin use. The un-exposure group was defined as <29 cumulative DDD of metformin use. The major endpoint was a new diagnosis of gallstones during the follow-up period. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to evaluate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of gallstones associated with metformin use. Results: After controlling for potential confounders, the adjusted HRs of gallstones were 1.11 (95%CI: 0.841.46) for subjects with metformin dosage of 29180 cumulative DDD, and 0.57 (95%CI: 0.420.78) for subjects with metformin dosage >180 cumulative DDD, compared with the un-exposure group. Conclusio Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Class Linked To Bile Duct And Gallbladder Disease

Diabetes Drug Class Linked To Bile Duct And Gallbladder Disease

A popular class of drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes may increase the risk of bile duct and gallbladder disease. The class, GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide 1) receptor agonists, is given via an injection and includes Byetta (exenatide), Victoza (liraglutide) and Trulicity (dulaglutide). Health records of more than 1.5 million patients with type 2 diabetes in the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada who were taking an antidiabetic medication were examined in the study, which was published in JAMA Internal Medicine. GLP-1s were shown to cause a 79% increased risk of developing symptoms associated with bile duct and gallbladder disease compared to those not on any diabetes drug. Put another way, about 3 more patients per 1,000 exhibited symptoms compared to those not taking the medication. The most common adverse effect seen in this population were gallstones. Another class of diabetes drugs, DPP-4 (dipeptidyl peptidase 4) inhibitors, which are given as a pill and act in a similar way as GLP-1s, did not have the increased risk of bile duct and gallbladder disease. DPP-4s on the market include Januvia (sitagliptin), Onglyza (saxagliptin) and Tradjenta (linagliptin). However, both GLP-1s and DPP-4s were not associated with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis. “It’s important that clinicians and patients alike be well informed about possible adverse effects,” Laurent Azoulay, PhD, a senior investigator at the Lady Davis Institute at the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal and the study’s lead author, said in a statement. “As a result of the gallbladder finding, it would be prudent for doctors to warn their patients to seek treatment if they experience symptoms, such as pain in their right side.” Jonathan Block is MedShadow’s content editor. He has pre Continue reading >>

I Take Metformin, I Have No Gall Bladder, I Am A 59 Year Old

I Take Metformin, I Have No Gall Bladder, I Am A 59 Year Old

A new question is answered every 9 seconds Ask an ExpertExperts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm. Get a Professional AnswerVia email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site. Ask follow up questions if you need to. 100% Satisfaction GuaranteeRate the answer you receive. Ask-a-doc Web sites: If you've got a quick question, you can try to get an answer from sites that say they have various specialists on hand to give quick answers... Justanswer.com. JustAnswer.com...has seen a spike since October in legal questions from readers about layoffs, unemployment and severance. Traffic on JustAnswer rose 14 percent...and had nearly 400,000 page views in 30 days...inquiries related to stress, high blood pressure, drinking and heart pain jumped 33 percent. Tory Johnson, GMA Workplace Contributor, discusses work-from-home jobs, such as JustAnswer in which verified Experts answer peoples questions. I will tell you that...the things you have to go through to be an Expert are quite rigorous. I feel so much better today, and upon further investigation believe that there is a chance that the responses I got saved me from a serious, even life threatening situation. I am very grateful to the experts who answered me. I can go as far as to say it could have resulted in saving my sons life and our entire family now knows what bipolar is and how to assist and understand my most wonderful son, brother and friend to all who loves him dearly.Thank you very much I thank-you so much! It really helped to have this information andconfirmation. We will watch her carefully and get her in for theexamination and US right away if things do not improve. God bless you aswell! Outstanding response t Continue reading >>

For Pcos, 13 Side Effects Of Metformin You Should Know About

For Pcos, 13 Side Effects Of Metformin You Should Know About

Did you know that 10%- 25% of women who take Glucophage just don't feel well? They experience a general malaise, fatigue and occasional achiness that lasts for varying lengths of time. Malaise a warning signal for your doctor to closely monitor your body systems, including liver, kidneys, and GI tract. About one third of women on metformin experience gastrointestinal disturbances, including nausea, occasional vomiting and loose, more frequent bowel movements, or diarrhea. This problem occurs more often after meals rich in fats or sugars, so eating a healthier diet will help. The symptoms lessen over time, so if you can tolerate the GI upset for a few weeks, it may go away. Some women have found it helps to start with a very low dose and gradually increase it. Most people think that aside from possible gastrointestinal upset, there are no side effects from taking metformin, and thus you can take it for a very long time. This is not true! The sneakiest side effect of all is a vitamin B12 insufficiency. A substance formed in the stomach called "intrinsic factor" combines with B12 so that it can be transferred into the blood. Metformin interferes with the ability of your cells to absorb this intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 complex.(12) Over the long term, vitamin B12 insufficiency is a significant health risk. B12 is essential to the proper growth and function of every cell in your body. It's required for synthesis of DNA and for many crucial biochemical functions. There is also a link between B12 insufficiency and cardiovascular disease. According to some research, 10%-30% of patients show evidence of reduced vitamin B12 absorption. The Hospital de Clnicas de Porto Alegre in Brazil has shown that one of every three diabetics who takes metformin for at least a year have evide Continue reading >>

Metformin And Gallbladder Problems

Metformin And Gallbladder Problems

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. I just want this out there to maybe help others avoid surgery. I had a lot of stomach problems with met from day one (such as diarhea, stomach spasms, extreme admoninal pain and cold sweats in middle of night followed by explosions (use your imagination). I tolerated this all for the overwhelming desire to conceive. About 8 weeks into taking this I experienced terrible pain in my chest, neck, throat and back. I went to pcp and told him I suspected the met but he said no and ordered, bloodwork, xrays and ultrasound. (about $5000 plus in tests) I was told I had sludge in my gallbladder and immediately sent to a surgeon to have it removed. He also said that the ultrasound revealed I had complex cysts in my left ovary and needed a MRI (another $4000 ) I told him that it was normal for me to have cysts due to PCOS but he isisted on the test. He had nurse call me back in a week to reveal that OMG, I have PCOS!!!. I told him before he did this 2 hour MRI that I had PCOS. Now to the surgeon, The week before I saw him, I stopped taking the Met because I figured if I really had to have surgery, I didnt want to get pregnant yet anyway and for my own peace of mind, I wanted to rule out the Met as cause of the intense pain. The pain went away 3 days after I stopped the met and has remained gone since. The surgeon scheduled another ultrasound and a hapabilary scan (spelling stinks) (another $3000. in tests) that revealed that sludge was gone and my gallbladder function was fine. My advise is that if you have terrible chest Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Diabetes, Gallstones And Kidney Stones

What You Need To Know About Diabetes, Gallstones And Kidney Stones

Kidney stones and gallstones both occur more frequently in people with diabetes and metabolic syndrome, which causes insulin resistance. Kidney Stones and Type 2 Diabetes Kidney stones or nephrolithiasis are small pebble-like pieces of material that form in one or both of your kidneys from minerals in the urine. While most kidney stones exit the body without the help of a doctor, some stones get caught in the urinary tract where they can block the flow of urine and cause great pain. Kidney stones come in several types. The most common are uric acid stones, calcium oxalate stones, and infectious stones. People with diabetes or metabolic syndrome are particularly susceptible to developing uric acid kidney stones. Causes & Symptoms One reason why people with diabetes have a higher chance of having a kidney stone is that they often have highly-acidic urine, which puts them at risk for developing uric acid stones. Behind this acidic urine is poorly controlled diabetes. “When the body doesn’t have enough sugar for metabolism because either it isn’t producing insulin or not responding to insulin it’s forced to metabolize fat and that can make your urine acidotic,” says Phillip Mucksavage, MD, director of endourology and stone disease at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia. “This condition, called ketoacidosis, can change levels of the pH in urine.” Diabetes patients also have more calcium oxalate stones than the general population. Once again, uncontrolled diabetes is the culprit. “Uncontrolled diabetes can cause dehydration which is a prime risk factor for calcium oxalate stones,” says Dr. Mucksavage. Other diseases such as high blood pressure and obesity may also increase the risk of developing kidney stones. About 10% of people with kidney stones never k Continue reading >>

A Diabetic Diet After Gallbladder Removal

A Diabetic Diet After Gallbladder Removal

Gallbladder problems occur fairly frequently in people with diabetes, so if you're a diabetic and you've recently had your gallbladder removed, you're not alone. While you tried to cope with your diseased gallbladder before your surgery, you probably needed to cut back on fat in your diet to minimize symptoms. After gallbladder removal surgery -- known in medical parlance as cholecystectomy -- your doctor may tell you to gradually return to your previous diet, perhaps with an emphasis on certain nutrient groups. However, because you have diabetes, you'll need to continue to carefully watch what you eat. Fortunately, the diet for gallbladder removal patients and the diet recommended for diabetics contain many of the same elements. Video of the Day Following your gallbladder removal surgery, you may find you have difficulty digesting meals that contain a lot of fat. That's because your gallbladder's primary function was to help you process fats. You may experience diarrhea following meals, especially particularly fatty ones. So, steer clear of fried foods to prevent digestive problems, and skip fatty sauces and gravies, as they contain too much fat. Because you're diabetic, stick with healthier fats in small quantities. For example, choose olive oil instead of butter for stir fries, and consider having fish for dinner instead of meat, because fish contains healthy fats known as omega-3 fatty acids. Limit your fat at each meal to 3 grams or less to avoid digestive problems. You may know that a high-fiber diet can help you manage your diabetes by stabilizing and normalizing your blood sugar levels. In addition, getting plenty of fiber may help your digestive system normalize your bowel movements following gallbladder removal surgery, reducing the incidence of diarrhea and c Continue reading >>

Metformin, The Liver, And Diabetes

Metformin, The Liver, And Diabetes

Most people think diabetes comes from pancreas damage, due to autoimmune problems or insulin resistance. But for many people diagnosed “Type 2,” the big problems are in the liver. What are these problems, and what can we do about them? First, some basic physiology you may already know. The liver is one of the most complicated organs in the body, and possibly the least understood. It plays a huge role in handling sugars and starches, making sure our bodies have enough fuel to function. When there’s a lot of sugar in the system, it stores some of the excess in a storage form of carbohydrate called glycogen. When blood sugar levels get low, as in times of hunger or at night, it converts some of the glycogen to glucose and makes it available for the body to use. Easy to say, but how does the liver know what to do and when to do it? Scientists have found a “molecular switch” called CRTC2 that controls this process. When the CRTC2 switch is on, the liver pours sugar into the system. When there’s enough sugar circulating, CRTC2 should be turned off. The turnoff signal is thought to be insulin. This may be an oversimplification, though. According to Salk Institute researchers quoted on RxPG news, “In many patients with type II diabetes, CRTC2 no longer responds to rising insulin levels, and as a result, the liver acts like a sugar factory on overtime, churning out glucose [day and night], even when blood sugar levels are high.” Because of this, the “average” person with Type 2 diabetes has three times the normal rate of glucose production by the liver, according to a Diabetes Care article. Diabetes Self-Management reader Jim Snell brought the whole “leaky liver” phenomenon to my attention. He has frequently posted here about his own struggles with soarin Continue reading >>

Important Information About The Side Effects Of

Important Information About The Side Effects Of

JANUMET What is the most important information I should know about JANUMET? Serious side effects can happen in people taking JANUMET, including: 1. Lactic Acidosis. Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET, can cause a rare but serious condition called lactic acidosis (a buildup of an acid in the blood) that can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency and must be treated in the hospital. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: you feel cold in your hands or feet you feel dizzy or lightheaded you have a slow or irregular heartbeat you feel very weak or tired you have unusual (not normal) muscle pain you have trouble breathing you feel sleepy or drowsy you have stomach pains, nausea or vomiting Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance for getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye have liver problems drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term "binge" drinking get dehydrated (lose a large amount of body fluids). This can happen if you are sick with a fever, vomiting, or diarrhea. Dehydration can also happen when you sweat a lot with activity or exercise and do not drink enough fluids have surgery have a heart attack, severe infection, or stroke The best way to keep from having a problem with lactic acidosis from metformin is to tell your doctor if you have any of the problems in the list above. Your doctor may decide to stop your JANUMET for a while if you have any of these things. 2. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes