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Can You Take Metformin Extended Release Twice A Day?

Metformin Overview

Metformin Overview

Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. Metformin belongs to a group of drugs called biguanides, which work by helping your body respond better to the insulin it makes naturally, decreasing the amount of sugar your liver makes, and decreasing the amount of sugar your intestines absorb. This medication comes in tablet, extended-release tablet, and liquid forms. It is taken up to 3 times daily, depending on which form you are taking. Swallow extended-release tablets whole. Common side effects of metformin include diarrhea, nausea, and upset stomach. Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Metformin may be found in some form under the following brand names: Serious side effects have been reported including: Lactic Acidosis. In rare cases, metformin can cause a serious side effect called lactic acidosis. This is caused by a buildup of lactic acid in your blood. This build-up can cause serious damage. Lactic acidosis caused by metformin is rare and has occurred mostly in people whose kidneys were not working normally. Lactic acidosis has been reported in about one in 33,000 patients taking metformin over the course of a year. Although rare, if lactic acidosis does occur, it can be fatal in up to half the people who develop it. It is also important for your liver to be working normally when you take metformin. Your liver helps remove lactic acid from your blood. Make sure you tell your doctor before you use metformin if you have kidney or liver problems. You should also stop using metformin and call your doctor right away if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treate Continue reading >>

Glucophage Sr 500mg, 750mg And 1000mg Prolonged Release Tablets

Glucophage Sr 500mg, 750mg And 1000mg Prolonged Release Tablets

Glucophage SR 500mg, 750mg and 1000mg prolonged release tablets This information is intended for use by health professionals Glucophage SR 500 mg prolonged release tablets Glucophage SR 750 mg prolonged release tablets Glucophage SR 1000 mg prolonged release tablets 2. Qualitative and quantitative composition 500 mg: One prolonged release tablet contains 500mg metformin hydrochloride corresponding to 390 mg metformin base. 750 mg: One prolonged release tablet contains 750 mg metformin hydrochloride corresponding to 585 mg metformin base. 1000 mg: One prolonged release tablet contains 1000 mg metformin hydrochloride corresponding to 780 mg metformin base. For the full list of excipients, see section 6.1. 500 mg: White to off-white, round, biconvex tablet, debossed on one side with '500'. 750 mg: White capsule-shaped, biconvex tablet, debossed on one side with '750' and on the other side with 'Merck'. 1000 mg: White to off-white capsule-shaped, biconvex tablet, debossed on one side with '1000' and on the other side with 'MERCK'. Reduction in the risk or delay of the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adult, overweight patients with IGT* and/or IFG*, and/or increased HbA1C who are: - at high risk for developing overt type 2 diabetes mellitus (see section 5.1) and - still progressing towards type 2 diabetes mellitus despite implementation of intensive lifestyle change for 3 to 6 months Treatment with Glucophage SR must be based on a risk score incorporating appropriate measures of glycaemic control and including evidence of high cardiovascular risk (see section 5.1). Lifestyle modifications should be continued when metformin is initiated, unless the patient is unable to do so because of medical reasons. *IGT: Impaired Glucose Tolerance; IFG: Impaired Fasting Glucose Trea Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Editor’s Note: This is the second post in our miniseries about diabetes drugs. Tune in on August 21 for the next installment. Metformin (brand names Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet, Glumetza) is a member of a class of medicines known as biguanides. This type of medicine was first introduced into clinical practice in the 1950’s with a drug called phenformin. Unfortunately, phenformin was found to be associated with lactic acidosis, a serious and often fatal condition, and was removed from the U.S. market in 1977. This situation most likely slowed the approval of metformin, which was not used in the U.S. until 1995. (By comparison, metformin has been used in Europe since the 1960’s.) The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required large safety studies of metformin, the results of which demonstrated that the development of lactic acidosis as a result of metformin therapy is very rare. (A finding that has been confirmed in many other clinical trials to date.) Of note, the FDA officer involved in removing phenformin from the market recently wrote an article highlighting the safety of metformin. Metformin works primarily by decreasing the amount of glucose made by the liver. It does this by activating a protein known as AMP-activated protein kinase, or AMPK. This protein acts much like an “energy sensor,” setting off cellular activities that result in glucose storage, enhanced entry of glucose into cells, and decreased creation of fatty acids and cholesterol. A secondary effect of the enhanced entry of glucose into cells is improved glucose uptake and increased storage of glycogen (a form of glucose) by the muscles. Additionally, the decrease in fatty acid levels brought about by metformin may indirectly improve insulin resistance and beta cell func Continue reading >>

What Time Of Day Do You Take Metformin?

What Time Of Day Do You Take Metformin?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I am on two 500 mg. Metformin twice a day. I'm unsure of when to take them, as I've read so many different things. Some people take them before eating, some after. The thing that most concerns me is what time of day should I be taking them? My bottle just says two twice day. Is it best to take them with breakfast early in the a.m. (I eat at 7:00 a.m.) and then wait until dinner (which varies for me--I don't eat "dinner" at a set time, but it is usually around 4 p.m. or so). When do YOU take Metforming (if that is the drug you are using). Thanks for any advice you can give. I've been taking Metformin earlier in the day (around 3 p.m.) and I eat snacks before bed (low carb), and also oftentimes take p.m. pain meds. I have found that my morning glucose reading is often too high (137-140). I can't sleep if my stomach is growling, so I have to eat something before I can sleep! It actually becomes a fairly personal thing as to when it suits you best to take your Metformin and depends on a few things. Some people experience gastric side effects for the first few weeks of taking Metformin, this can range from cramps, wind to diarrhea - for people who experience this, often the advice is to eat something before take the Metformin - the instruction from the Doctor can be "Take with food", which can be translated as don't take it on an empty stomach. I personally was very lucky and had no issues and so that didn't apply to me (I'm on the same dose as you). I generally don't eat breakfast, but take my Metformin just before leaving the house for work in the morning, or at weekends when I get up. The eveni Continue reading >>

Efficacy, Tolerability, And Safety Of A Novel Once-daily Extended-release Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Efficacy, Tolerability, And Safety Of A Novel Once-daily Extended-release Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of a novel extended-release metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Adults with type 2 diabetes (newly diagnosed, treated with diet and exercise only, or previously treated with oral diabetic medications) were randomly assigned to receive one of three extended-release metformin treatment regimens (1,500 mg/day q.d., 1,500 mg/day twice daily, or 2,000 mg/day q.d.) or immediate-release metformin (1,500 mg/day twice daily) in a double-blind 24-week trial. RESULTS—Significant decreases (P < 0.001) in mean HbA1c (A1C) levels were observed by week 12 in all treatment groups. The mean changes from baseline to end point in the two groups given 1,500 mg extended-release metformin (−0.73 and −0.74%) were not significantly different from the change in the immediate-release metformin group (−0.70%), whereas the 2,000-mg extended-release metformin group showed a greater decrease in A1C levels (−1.06%; mean difference [2,000 mg extended-release metformin − immediate-release metformin]: −0.36 [98.4% CI −0.65 to −0.06]). Rapid decreases in fasting plasma glucose levels were observed by week 1, which continued until week 8, and were maintained for the duration of the study. The overall incidence of adverse events was similar for all treatment groups, but fewer patients in the extended-release metformin groups discontinued treatment due to nausea during the initial dosing period than in the immediate-release metformin group. CONCLUSIONS—Once- or twice-daily extended-release metformin was as safe and effective as twice-daily immediate-release metformin and provided continued glycemic control for up to 24 weeks of treatment. Metformin hydrochloride has been w Continue reading >>

Efficacy Of Once- Or Twice-daily Extended Release Metformin Compared With Thrice-daily Immediate Release Metformin In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Efficacy Of Once- Or Twice-daily Extended Release Metformin Compared With Thrice-daily Immediate Release Metformin In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Abstract BACKGROUND: The extended-release formulation of metformin (MXR) prolongs drug absorption in the upper gastrointestinal tract and permits once-daily dosing in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This newer formulation may enhance patient compliance with oral therapy compared to conventional immediate-release metformin (MIR) in T2DM. OBJECTIVES: To analyse whether a switch from thrice daily MIR to once or twice daily MXR wouldachieve comparable degrees of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). METHODS: We conducted an open study of the efficacy and tolerability of MXR in 40 patients with T2DM who had achieved moderate or good glycemic control with MIR alone or in combination with other antihyperglycemic agents. After a lead in period of 3 months patients were switched over to a specific brand of MIR at baseline (Visit 0). Patients were subsequently followed for 4 more visits. These visits were done monthly, after taking MIR in a dose of 1-2 g/day (Visit 1); MXR as a single dose at dinner but 0.5 g less than baseline dose of MIR (Visit 2); MXR, 1-2 g/day as a single dose at bedtime, with strength same as that of baseline dose of MIR (Visit 3); and MXR, 1-2 g/day in two divided doses keeping dose same as baseline MIR (Visit 4). Glycemic control was assessed by a four-point glucose profile (fasting and three postprandial levels) at each visit. RESULTS: At visit 2, when patients had been on 500 mg lesser dose of MXR for 1 month, glucose profile worsened. However, glycemic control, at visit 3, returned to earlier levels when dose of MXR was increased back to original dose. Overall the MXR formulation was well tolerated with minor gastrointestinal adverse effects, reported by only 3 patients. CONCLUSION: Patients with T2DM who had Continue reading >>

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

Metformin helps control blood sugar and increase your body's sensitivity to insulin. The drug is available only by prescription and sold under several different brand names, including Fortamet, Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage and Glucophage XR. Your dosage will depend on your normal diet and exercise habits -- too much metformin can lead to low blood sugar and hypoglycemia. Always follow your doctor's directions for taking your medication. Video of the Day Metformin works by limiting your liver's production of glucose and stopping your body from absorbing some of the glucose in your bloodstream. Additionally, metformin increases your body's sensitivity to insulin, allowing your pancreas to produce less insulin. Keeping blood sugar levels stable can decrease hunger and food cravings, leading to weight loss. Metformin is not an appetite suppressant, nor does it boost metabolism; to lose weight, you'll still need to pay close attention to your diet and increase your physical activity. Standard vs. Extended Release Options The amount of metformin you'll take depends on why you are using the medication, how often you take the medicine, other medications you might be taking and the time between doses. The National Institutes of Health explains that metformin is available as a tablet or a liquid solution. Tablets come in an extended release dose -- Glucophage XR -- or in a standard release option. Extended release pills are designed to be taken once daily, with your evening meal. Standard tablet and liquid solutions may be taken once or multiple times daily -- with meals. Metformin should be taken with food. Always follow your doctor's orders. It's typical to start with a 500 milligram dose once daily, then increase both the amount of medication and the frequency. If you're using Continue reading >>

One Of The Most Effective Diabetes Drugs

One Of The Most Effective Diabetes Drugs

You may recall that I recently wrote a series on various medicines and how they can affect your diabetes (see "The Ups and Downs of Meds and Diabetes [Part 1]" as well as Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, and Part 5). One kind reader, who happens to be a nurse, asked me to devote a post to metformin with regard to its effects on kidneys and special considerations to keep in mind with this drug. I wrote about metformin back in December 2006 (was it that long ago?) and its link to vitamin B12 deficiency (see “Metformin and Risk For Vitamin B12 Deficiency”). But there are other important facts to know about this very popular diabetes drug. Raise your hand if you take metformin. OK, obviously I can’t see you, but I’ll wager that many of you reading this are on this medication. Metformin is the generic name for Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Fortamet, and Riomet. It also comes combined with other diabetes medications, including glyburide (in Glucovance), glipizide (in Metaglip), rosiglitazone (in Avandamet), pioglitazone (in Actoplus Met), sitagliptin (in Janumet), and repaglinide (in PrandiMet). I’ve read that approximately 35 million prescriptions were written for metformin in 2006, making this one of the top 10 best selling generic drugs. And you may not be aware that the American Diabetes Association, in its 2006 practice guidelines for health-care professionals, recommended metformin over sulfonylureas as the first drug of choice for people with Type 2 diabetes. This really isn’t surprising. Metformin has a long track record for being safe and causing relatively few serious side effects—plus, it also works! Chances are, if you have Type 2 diabetes and need to start on medication, your health-care provider will recommend you take metformin. How It Works Just a Continue reading >>

Metformin Er - Am/pm Dosage?

Metformin Er - Am/pm Dosage?

Am currently taking Metformin HCL ER, 2 - 500mg tabs daily, at about 6pm, with dinner. In the two months since my surgery my fasting blood glucose level has gone down; in May it ranged from 83-109, mostly in the 90's. However, probably because of overeating in the afternoon, I have gained about 10 lbs. So I am wondering if I should split the Met dose between breakfast and dinner, or take it all in the morning, with my other pills (mostly supplements). Perhaps it would be more effective peaking in the afternoon, when I am eating the most, rather than late night/early morning, as it is now. I don't want to risk morning hypos, true or false - but do want to lose that weight, planning to cut down the Met when I reach a certain goal. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Met builds in the body and works on the liver, you can try splitting it that might help. Met is not suppose to cause a hypo right now your readings look very good you posted, best wishes to you it never did that for me. I also take two Metformin ER tablets per day (500 mg) and I take one with breakfast and one at bedtime. It worked out to be the easiest times of day for me to remember. Also, I'm sure you know that the ER tablets should not be broken. Thanks - will try taking one in the evening and one in the morning, and see how that goes... I take my kombiglyze xr 2000mg with my evening meal. TUJUEO metformin xr Humalog soon to be novolog I take the regular metformin. My doctor says it shouldn't matter when I take it. But I find it does. I find I get an immediate effect within a few hours as well as an accumulated effect. I take my metformin 3 x a day, before bed, around 5 am and around 9 am. Those are the times my liver seems more active and the metformin seems to calm it down. 115 pounds, Breast Can Continue reading >>

Wait Times: How Long Until Your Med Begins Working

Wait Times: How Long Until Your Med Begins Working

Photography by Mike Watson Images/Thinkstock There are many type 2 medications, and each drug class works in the body in a different way. Here’s a quick guide to help you understand how long each drug will generally take to work: These short-acting oral medications, taken with meals, block the breakdown of complex sugars into simple sugars in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. “Simple sugars are more easily absorbed and cause the blood sugar to ultimately go up,” Sam Ellis, PharmD, BCPS, CDE, associate professor in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy at the University of Colorado says. These drugs are minimally absorbed into the blood, so a certain blood level concentration is not necessary for them to work. You will see the effect immediately with the first dose. “You take it before a meal, and with that meal you see the effect,” says George Grunberger, MD, FACP, FACE, President of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. While researchers aren’t exactly sure how these oral medications work, it’s likely that the meds block some absorption of glucose in the GI tract. “You’ll see most of the effect in the first week with these drugs,” says Ellis. alogliptin, linagliptin, saxagliptin, sitagliptin These drugs work to block the enzyme responsible for the breakdown of a specific gut hormone that helps the body produce more insulin when blood glucose is high and reduces the amount of glucose produced by the liver. Take a DPP-4 inhibitor (they come in pill form) and it’ll work pretty fast—you’ll see the full effect in about a week. “It’s blocking that enzyme after the first dose a little bit, but by the time you get out to dose five, you’re blocking the majority of that enzyme,” Ellis says. albiglutide, dulaglutide, exenatide, exe Continue reading >>

Metformin ~ Slow Release Or Not?

Metformin ~ Slow Release Or Not?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Have been on Metformin now for just 2 weeks, first week 500 once a day & now twice a day, morning & night. Touch wood not too many adverse effects?! Now, I know it's very early days but i'm finding that i'm still having spells when i'm weak & shaky & dizzy in the afternoon. I'm thinking praps i need a midday dose? I gather that slow release is a reluctant option for docs to prescribe cos it's obviously much more costly BUT aside from that does anyone know of any reason why standard maetformin is preferable to SR? Seeing doc again tomorrow & it would be useful to be informed..... I don't know about the SR met, because I've been on the normal one for 5 years. what I can't understand is why you think the shaky feeling would be better on it. the "Shakes" when caused by hypo, are not improved by Metformin. They are not usually caused by it either. Now is the time to DEMAND enough strips to test when this happens. You shouldn't get real hypos on Metformin and taking more wouldn't prevent it's happening. A glucose Tab might. Was told to lose weight & increase exercise for 3 months. Nothing else. 2 months on I was having horrid dizzy spells & palpitations. She did a blood test which was 11.2 an hour after my breakfast. Took my BP which she said was up 148/90 (ish) & told me it was because my bllod glucose was going up & down & suggested Metformin to stabilise this happening. I HAVE been feeling less woozy since taking it but only for a few hours after the tablet. So i was assuming that i needed a midday one. My doctor does not want me to do any testing yet. She says it leads to obsession & is unnecessary at the moment. I know you lot don't agree with her. I j Continue reading >>

Glucophage

Glucophage

GLUCOPHAGE® (metformin hydrochloride) Tablets GLUCOPHAGE® XR (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets DESCRIPTION GLUCOPHAGE® (metformin hydrochloride) Tablets and GLUCOPHAGE® XR (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets are oral antihyperglycemic drugs used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N,N-dimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other classes of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The structural formula is as shown: Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline compound with a molecular formula of C4H11N5 HCl and a molecular weight of 165.63. Metformin hydrochloride is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pK of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. GLUCOPHAGE tablets contain 500 mg, 850 mg, or 1000 mg of metformin hydrochloride. Each tablet contains the inactive ingredients povidone and magnesium stearate. In addition, the coating for the 500 mg and 850 mg tablets contains hypromellose and the coating for the 1000 mg tablet contains hypromellose and polyethylene glycol. GLUCOPHAGE XR contains 500 mg or 750 mg of metformin hydrochloride as the active ingredient. GLUCOPHAGE XR 500 mg tablets contain the inactive ingredients sodium carboxymethyl cellulose, hypromellose, microcrystalline cellulose, and magnesium stearate. GLUCOPHAGE XR 750 mg tablets contain the inactive ingredients sodium carboxymethyl cellulose, hypromellose, and magnesium stearate. System Components And Performance GLUCOPHAGE XR comprises a dual hydrophilic polymer matrix system. Metformin hydrochloride is combined with a drug release controlling polymer to form an “inne Continue reading >>

Metformin Extendedrelease Versus Immediaterelease: An International, Randomized, Doubleblind, Headtohead Trial In Pharmacotherapynave Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Metformin Extendedrelease Versus Immediaterelease: An International, Randomized, Doubleblind, Headtohead Trial In Pharmacotherapynave Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Metformin extendedrelease versus immediaterelease: An international, randomized, doubleblind, headtohead trial in pharmacotherapynave patients with type 2 diabetes AAA Clinical Research, Brampton, Ontario, Canada Naresh Aggarwal MD, CCFP, FCFP,AAA Clinical Research, 490 Bramalea Rd, Unit 201, Brampton, ON L6T 0G1, Canada. Email: [email protected] AAA Clinical Research, Brampton, Ontario, Canada Naresh Aggarwal MD, CCFP, FCFP,AAA Clinical Research, 490 Bramalea Rd, Unit 201, Brampton, ON L6T 0G1, Canada. Email: [email protected] Please review our Terms and Conditions of Use and check box below to share full-text version of article. I have read and accept the Wiley Online Library Terms and Conditions of Use. Use the link below to share a full-text version of this article with your friends and colleagues. Learn more. This international, randomized, doubleblind trial (NCT01864174) compared the efficacy and safety of metformin extendedrelease (XR) and immediaterelease (IR) in patients with type 2 diabetes. After a 4week placebo leadin, pharmacotherapynave adults with glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) at 7.0% to 9.2% were randomized (1:1) to receive oncedaily metformin XR 2000 mg or twicedaily metformin IR 1000 mg for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in HbA1c after 24 weeks. Secondary endpoints were change in fasting plasma glucose (FPG), mean daily glucose (MDG) and patients (%) with HbA1c <7.0% after 24 weeks. Overall, 539 patients were randomized (metformin XR, N = 268; metformin IR, N = 271). Adjusted mean changes in HbA1c, FPG, MDG and patients (%) with HbA1c <7.0% after 24 weeks were similar for XR and IR: 0.93% vs 0.96%; 21.1 vs 20.6 mg/dL (1.2 vs 1.1 mmol/L); 24.7 vs 27.1 mg/dL (1.4 vs 1.5 mmol/L); and 70.9% vs 72.0%, respectively. Adver Continue reading >>

Slow Release Metformin Advice

Slow Release Metformin Advice

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi, I have just been moved to 2x 750 slow release metformin a day from 2x 850 IR metformin, I was taking one tablet at breakfast and one at teatime. My BG is controlled - my last test was 45. Can anyone advise whether to keep my slow release at these times or is it better to take them both together at tea time. The doctor didn't seem to know either way. That's odd that your doc prescribed you medication but doesn't know how you should take it ? I would still take them morning and evening with food personally. See above. The only advice I was ever given was to take them with food. I can't see anything wrong with what you are doing now. The leaflet should guide you. With SR I think you will find timing isn't very critical and my leaflet says you can split during the day or not. I split my full 2000gm dose as it seems to make sense and that's what my prescription says but the leaflet allows the dose to be taken at one go. Thanks for all your replies. I think splitting the dose makes more sense I just wondered why the leaflet says take in 1 dose.I'll split them and watch my levels. I've just started on slow release Metformin 2 x 500mg twice a day. Ordinary metformin had me running (and I mean running) to the loo, hopefully these will sort that out! I've just started on slow release Metformin 2 x 500mg twice a day. Ordinary metformin had me running (and I mean running) to the loo, hopefully these will sort that out! I've just had mine changed from 2 x 500 ordinary to 1 x 500 modified release. Is MR the same as SR? Hope I don't have any side effects as the original ones were fine for me after the first week. I've just had mine changed from 2 x 500 ordinary Continue reading >>

Metformin Extended Release Tablets

Metformin Extended Release Tablets

Generic Name: metformin hydrochloride Dosage Form: tablet, extended release Metformin Extended Release Tablets Description Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP are an oral antihyperglycemic drug used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N,N-dimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other classes of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The structural formula is as shown: Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline compound with a molecular formula of C4H11N5· HCl and a molecular weight of 165.63. Metformin hydrochloride is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP contain 500 mg of metformin hydrochloride USP as the active ingredient. Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP 500 mg contain the inactive ingredients sodium carboxymethyl cellulose, hypromellose and magnesium stearate. Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP 500 mg meets USP dissolution Test 3. System Components and Performance- Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP comprises a swellable matrix system. In the aqueous gastrointestinal (GI) environment, the dosage form swells remarkably thereby increasing in size and geometry from where drug is released slowly by a process of diffusion through the gel matrix that is essentially independent of pH. The hydrated polymer system is not rigid and is expected to be broken up by normal peristalsis in the GI tract. The biologically inert components of the tablet may occasionally remain intact during GI transit and will be Continue reading >>

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